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L n ' ■ , Government 

VA , Publication*- 




Volume VIII MEMs Number 1 



CANADA 
©OMtf^rOTT BUREAU OF STATISTICS 

GENERSrrSTATISHGS-BRANCH 



cm- i / 




MONTHLY REVIEW OF BUSINESS STATISTICS 



JANUARY, 1933 



Published by Authority of the Honourable H. H. Stevens, M.P. 
Minister of Trade and Commerce 



OTTAWA: F. A. ACLAND 

Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty 

1933 



Price: One Dollar per year. 



MONTHLY REVIEW OF BUSINESS STATISTICS 



SUMMARY OF CONTENTS 



Pa oh 

Chart of Three Representative Factors 4 

General Review 3-7 

Table 1. Weighted Indices of the Physical Vol- 
ume of Business 8 

Table 2. Trend of Business Movements. 

Imports of raw materials. Exports of lumber. 
Production of basic industries. Exports of certain 
commodities. Operations of railways. Canal 
traffic. Strikes and lockouts. Reports of the em- 
ployment offices. Immigration. Bank clearings. 
Failures 9 

Chart of The Economic Ratios of Canada f ... 10 

Table 3. Receipts and Visible Supply of Canadian 
Grain 11 

Table 4. Exports and Cash Price of Canadian 
Grain 11 

Table 5. Consumption of Grain and Production 
by the Milling Industry 12 

Table 6. Receipts, Manufactures and Stocks of 
Sugar 12 

Tabic 7. Tobacco, Cigars and Cigarettes Entered 
for Consumption. 

Tobacco, cut. Tobacco, plug— Cigarettes. Cigar- 
ettes, over-weight. Cigars. Foreign Raw Leaf 
Tobacco 13 

Table 8. Production of Boots and Shoes 13 

Table 9. Cold Storage Holdings, Sales and 
Slaughterings of Live Stock and Retail Food 
Prices 14 

Chart of Significant Canadian Factors 15 

Table 10. Output of Central Electric Stations in 
Canada : 16 

Table 11. Railway Freight Loaded at Stations. . 17 

Table 12. Index Numbers of Employment by 
Industries 18 

Electrical Energy Available for Consumption — 18 

Table 13. Seasonally Adjusted Indexes of Em- 
ployment, Indexes of Retail Sales and Auto- 
mobile Financing 19 

Table 14. Trend of Business in the Five Economic 
Areas. 

Canada, Maritime Provinces, Quebec, Ontario, 
Prairie Provinces, British Columbia— Construction 
Contracts Awarded. Building Permits. Index of 
Employment. Bank Debits. Sales of Insurance. 
Commercial Failures 20 

Table 15. Mineral Production by Months. 

Metals— Gold, Silver, Nickel, Copper, Lead, 
Zinc, Fuels— Coal, Petroleum, Natural Gas, Non- 
Metals— Asbestos, Gypsum, Feldspar, Salt, Struc- 
tural Materials— Cement, Clay Products, Lime. . . 20 



Page 

Table 16. Weekly Factors of Economic Activity in 
Canada. 

Grain Receipts and Prices, Live Stock Sales and 
Prices, Carloadings, Security Prices, Mining Stock 
Prices 21 

Table 17. Bank Debits to Individual Accounts 
in the Clearing House Centres of Canada 22 

Table 18. Indexes of Employment by Cities 

Table 19. Building Permits Issued in Sixty-one 
Cities 

Table 20. Index Numbers of Wholesale Prices .... 

Table 21. Prices of Representative Commodities 
and Wholesale Prices in Other Countries. 

United States, United Kingdom, France, Ger- 
many, Belgium, Netherlands, Norway, Sweden, 
Italy, Finland, India, Japan, Australia, New 
Zealand, Egypt 

Table 22. Total Value cf Imports and Exports, 
by Groups, in Thousands of Dollars 

Table 23. Canada's Domestic Exports by Principal 
Commodities 

Indexes of Cost of Living and Cost per Week of a 
Family Budget 

Table 24. Summary of Canada's Imports by 
Principal Commodities 

Table 25. Banking and Currency 

Chart of Security Prices 

Table 26. Index Numbers of Security Prices. 

(a) 1. Common Stocks— Industrials, Total, Iron 
and Steel, Pulp and Paper, Milling, Oils, Textiles 
and Clothing, Food and Allied Products, Beverages, 
Miscellaneous. Utilities, Total, Transportation, 
Telephone and Telegraph, Power and Traction. 

(b) Common Stocks, continued— Companies ' 
abroad, Total, Industrial, Utilities, Banks, General 
Index Number, Traders' Index, Preferred Stocks, 
Interest Rates, Yields on Bonds, Shares Traded, 
Montreal. Mining Stocks— Gold, Copper, Silver 
and Miscellaneous, Total Index 

Table 27. Tonnage of Vessels Entered and Cleared 
from Canadian Ports 

Table 28. Canadian Public Finance 

Table 29. Significant Statistics of the United 
Kingdom 33 

Table 30. Significant Statistics of the United 
States 

List of Current Publications of the Dominion 
Bureau of Statistics 

General Review (in French) 35-38 



MONTHLY REVIEW OF BUSINESS STATISTICS 

Vol. VIII OTTAWA, JANUARY, 1933 No. 1 

Dominion Statistician: R. H. Coats, B.A., F.S.S. (Hon.), F.B..S.C. 

Chief, Branch of General Statistics: S. A. Cudmore, M.A., F.S.S. 

Assistant on Business Statistics: Sydney B. Smith, M.A. 



THE BUSINESS SITUATION IN CANADA 

While business conditions in Canada reflected depression in 1932, constructive develop- 
ments in the latter part of the year were suggestive of greater resistance to the prevailing trend of 
the last four years. The decline was practically general in the major economic factors during 
the first six months of the year, but a reversal in business psychology was manifested at midyear, 
resulting in a temporary advance. The index of the physical volume of business was 78-3 in 
July compared with 75 • 3 in April, the low point of the first half of the year. Despite the impetus 
of a heavy grain movement resulting from a wheat crop considerably greater than normal, the 
indicated rebound of business operations was counterbalanced by reaction toward the end of 
the year. 

During the first half of 1932, wholesale prices in Canada continued the decline of preceding 
years, the net result being an index of 66-6 in June compared with 69-4 in January. During 
the third quarter, the trend was reversed, the index reflecting a moderate rally. The reaction of 
the last quarter more than offset the gain of the three preceding months and the year ended with 
commodity prices at a new low level for the present movement. Wholesale prices in December 
were down to pre-war levels. 

The rally in common stock prices during the third quarter was one of the spectacular move- 
ments of the year. The low point in post-war history was reached in June, when 
the official index on the base of 1926 was 43-2. The gain in the index in the three 
months was no less than 46 p. c. Part of this gain was offset by decline during the last quarter, 
but the point reached in June remains the minimum for the present depression. 

The most significant development differentiating the last half of 1932 was the rise in govern- 
ment bond prices. After Great Britain was forced off gold in September, 1931, the prices of 
Canadian Government bonds experienced a severe reaction, the lowest point 
being reached in January, 1932. The improvement during the first six months 
of the year was moderate. A rapid gain was shown in the third quarter and the most of the 
betterment was retained until the end of the year. The average yield on four refunding bonds 
of the Dominion Government was computed as 4-78 p.c. in December compared with 5-23 p.c. 
in June and 5-37 p.c. in January. The yield on Ontario Government bonds followed a similar 
trend, being 4-90 p.c. in December compared with 5-48 p.c. in June and 5-74 p.c. in January, 
1932. The decline in the yields on high grade bonds is regarded as a wholesome development 
favouring the greater investment of surplus funds in productive enterprises. From this view- 
point, the yield on government bonds may be regarded as an excellent barometer of credit con- 
ditions in Canada. 

Economic Ratios 

For the purpose of further analysis leading to the appraisal of Canada's present position, 
attention is directed to five ratios of economic importance extending over the post-war period. 
Of these the relationship between the physical volume of business and wholesale prices occupies 
the premier position. The primary post-war prosperity cycle culminating in 1920 was based 
largely on price inflation and was consequently short lived. The price deflation of 
1921 and 1922 was severe, the annual index dropping from 156 in 1920 to 97 in 1922. Subsequent 
fluctuations during the next seven years were of a relatively moderate character, the comparative 
stabilization of the price level serving as a background of encouragement to business expansion. 
The price stability of that period contrasts sharply with the trend of business operations. The 
prosperity phase of the secondary post-war cycle was characterized by relative price stability, 
57904— 1J 



MONTHLY REVIEW OF BUSINESS STATISTICS 




MONTHLY REVIEW OF BUSINESS STATISTICS 5 

although the normal development in line with historical precedent would have been a considerable 
advance in commodity prices. The decided expansion in the volume of productive enterprise 
was the chief element in the prosperity of the period. From 1929 to 1932, the two factors 
show similar downward trends. The index of business operations in 1932 was on a similar level 
to that of 1922, while the average index of wholesale prices was only slightly higher than in 1913. 

The relationship of imports and exports in the post-war period may be considered in three 
sections. During the primary post-war cycle, a large favourable balance of trade was shown 
in 1919, which was converted into a moderately unfavourable balance in the succeeding year. 
During the second section constituting the period of business recovery from 1921 to 1927, exports 
showed gains from year to year, while the expansion in imports was at a considerably slower pace 
with a marked interruption in 1924. Consequently, the surplus of exports over imports amounted 
to a large total during the seven-year period. Exports showed a decline in 1928 and a moderately 
unfavourable balance of trade was shown from 1928 to 1931. Despite the exclusion from our 
"merchandise" exports of a considerable quantity of gold from Canadian mines now shipped to 
and refined at the Royal Canadian Mint rather than exported in crude form to external markets, 
the balance of trade was again favourable in the calendar year 1932, reversing the trade situation 
of the four preceding years. Exports in 1932 amounted to $501,839,000, exceeding imports at 
$452,614,000 by $49,225,000. In the preceding calendar year, the surplus of imports over 
exports was $10,855,000, imports being $628,098,000 and exports $617,243,000. 

Notice deposits held by the chartered banks averaged higher than current loans in each year 
of the post-war period except in 1920. In that year current loans reached a high point and the 
subsequent decline culminated only in 1925. Notice deposits reached a post-war peak in 1928 
and the decline since that year has been relatively moderate. A cyclical peak for current loans 
was reached in 1929 and since that time such accounts have been sharply curtailed, widening the 
gap between notice deposits and current loans. At the end of November, notice 
deposits were $1,378,700,000, showing a surplus of $380,000,000 over current 
loans which amounted to $998,934,000. On November 30, 1931, notice deposits were $1,396,- 
000,000 and current loans $1,102,000,000 leaving a surplus of $293,000,000. 

The cyclical fluctuation of bank deposits is of a more moderate character than that of bank 
debits, the turnover of bank deposits being much greater in periods of prosperity than in depres- 
sion. The ratio of the monthly average of bank debits to bank deposits was 115-2 p.c. 
in 1932 compared with 178-0 in 1929. The present level of bank deposits is sufficient for con- 
siderable business and speculative expansion. In a time of depression, low prices and inactive 
business operations result in a low velocity of bank deposits. Provided the same ratio was 
maintained in 1932 as in 1929, payments by cheque in the 32 clearing centres would have been 
$39,933,000,000 compared with the actual total of $25,844,000,000. 

A comparison of the trend of the prices of government bonds and common stocks leads, for 
the purpose of analysis, to the division of the post-war period into three sections. Bond prices, 
as indicated by the official index, were relatively higher than common stocks in the period from 
1919 to 1926. During the secondary prosperity cycle from 1926 to 1930, common stock prices 
were relatively higher. The ratio has again been reversed in the last two years with the index 
of common stock prices reaching a new low level for the period under review. (See chart on 
page 10.) 

SIGNIFICANT FACTORS 

The decline of productive operations in Canada during 1932 was not nearly so severe as in 
either of the two preceding years. The official index of the physical volume of business indicated 
considerable resistance against depressing influences especially after the first quarter. Despite 
the decline of the last four years, operations are still greater than in the primary post-war depres- 
sion of 1921. The present level is similar to that of mid-year 1922. The lowest point in 
post-war history, reached in March 1921, was 60-6. which compares with about 72-6 in December 
last. 

Gold Production 

Among the industries which are favourably situated during a major depression, gold mining 
probably takes the precedence. The expansion in the production of gold in Canada, which has 
been fairly continuous in the post-war period, was accelerated in the last two years. The new 

57904-2 



6 MONTHLY REVIEW OF BUSINESS STATISTICS 

high level attained in 1932 presents a sharp contrast with conditions in the majority of Canadian 
industries. Gold production from Canadian mines amounted in 1932 to 3,055,000 fine ounces 
worth $63,156,000, exclusive of exchange compensation totalling $6,103,000. The output was 
13-4 p. c. greater than in 1931, 65 p.c. over that of five years ago and 142 p.c. in excess of the 
production of ten years ago. 

The future of the industry is indicated by the annual statements of many of the older pro- 
ducing companies, wherein reference is made to the ample reserves available; in the appreciable 
gold content found in association with the base metal ores at Noranda, International Nickel, 
Flin Flon and Sullivan; in the number of new properties that are being brought into production; 
in the highly promising discoveries that have been reported from time to time, practically all of 
which have been made in the more southerly mineral areas ; and lastly there are those large areas 
as yet only partly explored, but which are believed by geologists to be underlain by rocks suited 
for the deposition of gold. Gold mining has been a prime factor in buttressing the financial struc- 
ture of the Dominion during the period of industrial depression, serving to maintain optimism in 
Canada and to inspire other countries with confidence in the commercial stability of the Dominion. 

Hydro- Electric Power 

While decline was shown in the production of hydro-electric power in the last two years, 
the recession was relatively less than in most of the important industries of Canada. Output 
generated by water and fuel was 15,986,414,000 k.w.h. in 1932 compared with 16,315,676,000 k.w.h. 
in 1931 and 18,093,802,000 k.w.h. in 1930. The output in 1932 was considerably greater than 
in any year previous to 1928. The reduction in the output of total electric energy during 1932 
was almost entirely accounted for by the loss in production for export, the decline being 46 p.c. 
from 1931. 

A turbine installation with a total capacity of 378,923 h.p. was completed and put in opera- 
tion during 1932. The increase was due mainly to the Beauharnois development in Quebec, the 
Chats Falls plant on the Ottawa River and the Corra Linn development on the Kootenay River. 
Large plants under construction in 1932 were the Rapide Blanc development on the St. Maurice 
River and the Canyon development on the lower Abitibi. The program of water power construc- 
tion which had its origin three or four years ago is now approaching completion, no new works 
of magnitude being initiated during 1932. 

Industries producing Consumers' Goods 

As the industries producing consumers' goods are normally the first to recover after a 
depression, attention is now being directed to the records of this group during 1932. While 
present levels of production in the boot and shoe and cotton textile industries are much lower 
than in the prosperous years of the post-war period, developments in the last two years are 
interesting in giving a clue to future cyclical fluctuations. Production of boots and shoes in 1932 
was practically maintained at the level of the preceding years, which was considerably higher 
than in 1930. The imports of raw cotton in 1932 were 97,360,000 pounds compared with 94,- 
910,000 in 1931. 

The Railways 

Carloadings were 2,173,087 in. 1932 compared with 2,575,011 in 1931 and 3,146,247 in 1930. 
This showing was made despite the relatively heavy grain movement in the last four months of 
1932. For the first ten months of 1932, the gross operating revenues of the chief railways were 
$244,754,000 as compared with $295,953,000 in the same period of 1931, or a decline of approxi- 
mately $51,000,000. Operating expenses, however, were even more drastically reduced with 
the result that net operating revenues of last year were rather larger than for the same period of 
1931, amounting to $28,208,000 in 1932 compared with $25,266,000 in 1931. Operating income 
for the same period was $19,400,000 in 1932 compared with $16,500,000 in 193 J. 

THE DECEMBER TREND 

Business operations were at a somewhat lower level in December than in the preceding month, 
the index of the physical volume of business constructed from 45 factors showing a decline 
about three points. Mineral production was one of the groups going contrary to the gener 
trend. Receipts at the Mint and exports of gold were 260,469 ounces compared wit 
248,629 in November. Copper, nickel and zinc were exported in greater volume, while the 



MONTHLY REVIEW OF BUSINESS STATISTICS 7 

production of lead showed a gain in the current period. Silver shipmnents were down and 
imports of bauxite showed sharp reduction. Exports of asbestos of the better grades were con- 
siderably greater than in November. The decline in the index of manufacturing production was 
moderate, the standing being 70 • 2 compared with 72 • 3 in the preceding month. Flour produc- 
tion showed a gain in the latest month for which statistics are available, the output being 1,942,800 
barrels compared with 1,721,600. Gains were also shown in the production of rolled oats and 
corn flour. Sugar refined in the last reported four-week period was 122,457,000 pounds com- 
pared with 115,874,000 in the preceding period. Hog slaughterings amounted to 268,300 head 
in December compared with 249,858, while the decline in the slaughterings of cattle and 
sheep was less than normal for the season. The decline in cheese exports was greater than usual 
for the season, while the exports of canned salmon were in much larger volume. The index for 
the production of foodstuffs was 94 • 4 in December compared with 86 • 7 in November. 

The release of leaf tobacco, cigars and cigarettes showed declines much larger than normal 
for the season, the withdrawal of cigarettes being 304,614,000 compared with 388,774,000 in 
November. The reduction in the excise tax rate on cigarettes from $6 per thousand to $4 
going into effect on October 13, doubtless led to the heavy release during the following month. 

The decline in the manufacture of pnuematic casings was considerably more than normal 
for the season. Imports of crude rubber amounted to 2,109,000 pounds compared with 3,568,000 
in the preceding month. Production of leather boots and shoes in the last reported month were 
1,017,053 pairs compared with 1,301,000. 

Imports of raw cotton at 13,819,000 pounds compared with 15,376,000 in November, 
showed a decline contrary to seasonal tendencies. Gains after seasonal adjustment were shown 
in the imports of cotton yarn and in raw wool and wool yarn. The textile production index was 
96 • 3 compared with 104 • 1 in November. 

Newsprint production reached the low level of 138,682 tons compared with 161,334 in 
November, a part of the decline being of a seasonal nature. The export of planks and boards 
showed a gain after seasonal adjustment, while wood pulp and shingles were exported in lesser 
volume. The wood and paper production index was 60-0 compared with 65 -8 in November. 

The output of automobiles showed moderate gain after seasonal adjustment over the low 
level of the preceding month. Production of steel ingots was 30,755 tons compared with 37,088,, 
while the pig iron output was 27,031 tons compared with 14,147. Imports of crude petroleum 
were 32,808,000 gallons compared with 51,706,000 in November, a marked decline being shown 
even after seasonal adjustment. 

The new business obtained by the construction industry was at a low level in December. 
Contract awards were $4,190,100 compared with $10,170,000 in November while building permits 
in 61 cities were $1,480,700 compared with $2,505,000. The decline in each case was much greater 
than normal for the season. 

The index for electric power production in December was 131-3 compared with 134-4 in 
November, adjustment being made for the number of days in the month and for seasonal tenden- 
cies. The output of the larger central electric stations amounted to 1,433,159,000 k.w.h., 
representing a slight increase over December, 1931, but a decline of 1-02 p.c. from November 
last. 

Carloadings numbered 152,562 in December compared with 192,575 in November, a decline 
of nearly 3 p.c. after seasonal adjustment. Imports showed marked decline, while a moderate 
gain, after seasonal adjustment, was shown in exports. 

Conditions in the United Kingdom 

Preliminary figures of British trade in 1932 show total imports at £703,133,000 compared 
with £862,175,000 in 1931, while British exports were £365,138,000 compared with £389,164,000, 
and re-exports £50,914,000 against £64,035,000. The excess of imports over exports of mer- 
chandise was £287,081,000 in 1932 as against £408,976,000 in 1931, a reduction of £121,895,000. 

Wholesale prices in 1932 averaged 85-1 p.c. of the 1930 base as compared with 87-2 p.c, 
the average for 1931. The December figure was 84-5 as against 88-6 in December, 1931. 
In spite of the departure from the gold standard, the 1932 average is slightly lower than the 
1931 average, which included nine months when the United Kingdom was on the gold standard. 

Dominion Bureau of Statistics, Ottawa, January 21, 1933. 

57904— 2* 



8 



MONTHLY REVIEW OF BUSINESS STATISTICS 



Table 1. Weighted Indexes of the Physical Volume of Business and Agricultural Factors in 
< Canada, Based on the Monthly average for 1926 and Corrected where Necessary for Seasonal 
: " Variation. 



1931 
Dec. 



1932 



Jan. Feb. Mar. April May June July Aug. Sept. Oct. Nov. Dec 



Physical Volume of Business. 

INDUSTRIAL PRODUC- 
TION 



Mineral Production 

Copper exports 

Nickel exports 

Lead production 

Zinc exports 

Gold shipments 

Silver shipments 

Asbestos exports 

Bauxite imports 

Coal production 

Manufacturing 

Foodstuffs 

Flour production 

Oatmeal production 

Sugar manufactured 

Cheese exports , 

Salmon exports 

Tobacco 

Cigars 

Cigarettes , 

Rubber imports 

Boots and shoes production 
Textiles , 

Raw cotton imports 

Cotton yarn imports 

Wool, raw and yarn 

Forestry 

Newsprint 

Wood pulp exports 

Planks and boards exports 

Shingles exported 

Iron and steel 

Steel production 

Pig iron production 

Iron and steel imports. . . 

Automobile production. . 

Coke production 

Crude petroleum imports . . 

Construction 

Contracts awarded 

Building permits 

Cost of construction 

Electric Power 



: DISTRIBUTION 

Trade employment. 

Carloadings 

Imports 

Exports 



Agricultural Factors— 
AGRICULTURAL MARKET- 

INGS 

Grain Marketings 

Wheat 

Oats 

Barley 

Flax 

Rye 

Live Stock Marketings 

Cattle 

Calves 

Hogs 

Sheep 



ANIMAL PRODUCTS- 
INSPECTED Slaughterings— 
Cattle 



Hogs 

Cold Storage Holdings. 



Butter. . 
Cheese., 
Beef.... 
Pork.... 
Mutton. 
Poultry. 
Lard.... 
Veal.... 



83-6 



59-8 
55-1 
57-9 
73-9 
19-6 
39-4 
23 
80 
60-3 
111-8 
109-0 
109-6 



80-7 
130-7 

97-1 
113-3 
163-6 
158 

50-4 

54 

111-3 
172-6 

91-7 

81 9 

84-2 



83-8 



99-0 

95 

68-4 

93 

172-6 
136-2 
105 

46-3 
100-6 

75-0 

71 

66 

51 

71 

52 

23 

84' 
124 

85 
139 
103' 



46-4 
42-9 
77-4 
46-5 
77 

110-8 
50-3 
44-4 
58-7 
29-3 
40-4 
181 
39-2 
26-0 
•0 
•4 

■4 
3 
3 



178 



51 



133-6 

94-3 
1191 
69-1 
67-4 
63-6 



56-4 
52-1 
54-3 
91-1 
19-8 
22-0 
15-3 
75-4 
59-2 

105-0 
94-5 

115-8 



101-4 
184-8 
102-8 
133-6 
231-9 
1761 
51-5 
56-6 
1151 
177-1 
215-4 
87-7 
77-7 



85-4 



81-3 
104-2 

86-9 
125-0 

90- 
116- 
150- 

83- 

27- 

93- 

90-0 

74 

70-6 

57 

78-4 

35-5 

31-2 
120 
128 

86-5 
145 
107-5 

96-8 

61-3 

63-1 

90-5 

41-3 

78-1 
108-4 

54 

47 

51 

34 

45 

18 

44 

31 

93-5 
152-1 



76-6 
93-1 
35-5 
94-7 

134-4 

96-9 
119-5 
75-8 
70-7 
63-9 



77-4 

75-1 

81-8 

66-7 

20-5 

161 

350 

87-7 

69-0 

120-8 

106-4 

162-0 



111-7 

213-1 

109-9 

157-6 

326-3 

180-9 

58-4 

68-2 

110-fi 

166-3 

430-3 

92 5 

76-8 



81-8 

76- 

89- 

56-7 

72 

83 

129-0 
136-5 

73 

26 

93-0 

77 

76 

78-2 

65-0 

102-1 
58-1 
46-1 

124-7 

116-3 
83 

128-7 

100-7 
94-3 
82-3 
76 

121-0 
97-1 
74-4 

104-6 
52-7 
42-0 
60-5 
42-6 
59-5 
27-5 
46-7 
39-9 
92-8 

146-2 

48-1 
55-8 
28-6 
94-6 

136-5 

95-4 
117-5 
73-0 
81-5 
53-5 



103-5 
105-9 
115-4 
90-3 
38-8 
6-1 
51-0 
92-6 
73-0 
94-6 
113-6 
195-0 



107-5 

230-5 

106-1 

150-2 

329-3 

157-8 

54-8 

72-1 

110-3 

171-4 

384-5 

69-4 

73-8 



75-3 



105 

60 

92-2 

88-2 
157 
213 

73 

25 

85-6 

64-6 

66-5 

68-3 

54-0 

99 

45 

39-3 

74-2 

101-1 
88-9 

106-0 
97-1 
90 
61-3 
66-5 
83-0 
25-1 
74-1 

111-6 
49-0 
34-5 
56-0 
33-2 
52 
27-5 
36-0 
29-0 
89-1 

129-0 

25-0 
25-5 
23-7 
94-5 

139-0 

95-0 
117-3 
77-2 
61-6 
61-9 



102-3 
105-7 
113-5 
67-2 
47-4 
23-3 
138-8 
87-2 
61-4 
79-6 
120-8 
188-8 



91-2 
237-4 
108-2 
144-1 
313-5 
143-7 

64-9 

73-3 
103-1 
174-9 
343-1 

71-5 
121-2 



79-9 



68-2 



4 

77-4 
77-9 
68-1 
50-5 
61-2 
44-7 
65-6 

102-2 
70-4 

113 
79-9 
96-5 

120 

129 
96-5 
83-3 
71-4 

107 
46 
33-3 
40-5 
34-1 
40-3 
19-4 
38-1 
34-4 
78-6 

230-1 

28-4 
28-7 
27-5 
94-0 

131-2 

94-5 
117-8 
71-2 
72-9 
58-4 



84-4 
82-8 
89-9 
23 
36-4 
28-6 
106-3 
91-5 
67-8 
78-4 
125 1 
172-3 



87-1 
175-8 
121-7 
120-9 
134-0 
178-0 
54-4 
77-1 
101-9 
210-6 
297-8 
73-1 
94-3 



81-4 

76-9 

92- 
67- 
36- 
92- 
51-6 
211-3 
82 
17 

23-5 
61- 

82-1 

94-0 

85 

62 

70 

55 
223 
120 

78 
134 
169 

93 

53 

50 

79 

63 

74-5 
102 

35-0 

51-8 

50 

32 

25-6 

12-7 

31 

36-7 

75-3 
176-8 

24-9 
25-1 
24-5 
93-4 

130-5 

93-7 
117-4 
70-3 
69-7 
59-3 



221-4 

250 

279-9 
29-2 
48-2 
77-4 

218-4 
89-4 
66-8 
92-8 

116-5 

186-4 



91-9 
233-4 
128-8 
116-9 
113-0 
167-8 

62-0 

81-2 
107-7 
205-4 
245-9 

74-2 
104-2 



78-3 

74-2 

83 

103-2 
32-4 
89-3 
74-3 

163-0 
74-5 
20 
19-3 
54-5 

76-9 
93-3 
96-6 
46-6 
84-0 
68-9 

155-4 
96 
72 

105-5 
89 
84-3 
42-4 
41 

87-5 
28 
55 
89-5 
39-7 
17-6 
37-2 
41 

45-7 
11-7 
26-5 
47-0 
83 

192 

36 
37-4 
27-6 
92-7 

129-0 

89-6 
115-9 
60-5 
63-2 
62- 



135-9 
147-9 
158-5 
112-5 
66-5 
32-7 
170-7 
821 
64-9 
87-1 
105-5 
131-3 



85-7 
178-5 
122-8 
112-2 
103-6 
143-1 

73-5 

82-4 
103-8 
292-9 
199-9 

80-3 
100-0 



78-1 

73-6 

84-8 
7 

160 
98-2 
64-0 
186-5 
73-9 
24-3 
16-4 
56' 

75-5 

97-6 

103-7 
70 • 
93-2 
77-0 
99-4 

102-7 
71-4 

114-3 
61 

93-0 
73-2 
73-3 
98-2 
63-3 
59 
91-4 
38-3 
25-0 
46-2 
27-3 
43-2 
9-3 
27-9 
26-4 
72-7 

172-7 

35-2 
35-6 
25-0 
92-7 

137-1 

90-4 
115-3 
64-3 
63-8 
63-0 



196-6 
222-6 
242-8 
53-1 
121-0 
66-2 
177-8 
79-9 
59-4 
83-9 
111 8 
112-2 



86-7 
143-6 
119-4 
106-4 

98-6 
114-8 

62-7 

94-5 
114-5 
337-6 
170-9 

64-4 



77-1 



71-9 

89-5 
17-2 
26-3 
88-7 
90-8 
185-0 
88-9 
30-8 
67 
68-5 

74-3 

94 

85 

60 

98 

54-1 

35 
102 

69-0 
114-8 
201 

95-0 

67-4 

66-0 
116-8 

60-1 

60-5 

99-2 

33-2 

18-0 

53 

20-4 

41-0 
9-9 

50-9 

15 

82 
136-4 

29-8 
34-2 
18-9 
93-1 

128-0 

91-3 
114-3 
68-1 
64-7 
64-6 



189-0 

213-9 

239-1 

140-9 

34-2 

12-1 

21-3 

77-1 

55-9 

92-8 

110-4 

94-2 



79-3 
115-4 
100-5 
104-9 
103-7 
112-8 

59-3 

92-5 
1151 
351-9 
123-0 

62-9 
111-4 



75-3 



70-4 

99-3 

38-5 
401 
84-2 

135 

185-1 

101 
41-6 
92- 
75 5 

70-6 

88-9 

78-0 

55-1 
131 

56-0 

34 

78-7 

68 

82 

74-0 

83-3 

71 

68-3 
141-2 

63 

64-7 

97-3 

50-2 

25-7 

61 

22 

27 

10 

54 

21 

81-3 
140-0 

29-2 

30-9 

24-8 

93 



127- 

88- 
113- 



67-5 
66-4 



87-4 
97-0 
70 

9 
11 
13 

67 
47 



95- 



66-4 
107-4 
89-9 
96-7 
108-4 
1191 
58-4 
82-9 
102-7 
207-9 
73-9 
36-9 
102-1 



MONTHLY REVIEW OF BUSINESS STATISTICS 
Table 2. Trend of Business Movements 



Items 



1931 



Dec. 



1932 



Jan. Feb. Mar. April May June July Aug. Sept. Oct. Nov. Dec 






Trend of Business Movements— 

Rubber, Crude Imports. 000 lbs. 

Cotton, Raw Imports 000 lbs. 

Wool, Raw Imports 000 lbs. 

Planks and Boards 

Exports Mil. bd. ft. 

Timber Scaled in B.C. Mil. bd. ft. 
Newsprint Production. .000 tons 

Shipments 000 tons 

Stocks 000 tons 

Pig Iron Production. .000 1. tons 
Ferro-alloys Production. . .tons 
Steel Ingots and 

Castings 000 1. tons 

Passenger Automobile Pro- 
duction No. 

Truck Production No. 

Total Cars and Trucks No. 

Exports— Auto Complete or 

Chassis No. 

Exports— Automobiles and 

Parts $000 

Petroleum, Crude Imports 

000,000 gal. 
Condensed Milk Output 000 lbs. 
Evaporated Milk Output 000 lbs. 

Fish Exports 000 lbs. 

Fish Exports $000 

Canned Salmon Exports 

000 cases 
Railways — 
Canadian National— 

(exclusive of eastern lines) 

Operating Revenues $000 

Operating Expenses $000 

Operating Income $000 

Freight carried one mile 

000,000 tons 
Passengers carried one mile 
000,000 pass. 
Canadian Pacific- 
Operating Revenues $000 

Operating Expenses $000 

Operating Income $000 

Freight carried one 

mile 000,000 tons 

Passengers carried 

one mile 000,000 pass. 

All Railways — 

Operating Revenues $000 

Operating Expenses $000 

Operating Income $000 

Freijrht carried 

one mile 000,000 tons 

Passengers carried 

one mile 000,000 pass. 

Carloadings 000 cars 

Canal Cargo Traffic — 

Sault Pte. Marie 000 s. tons 

Welland 000 s. tons 

St. Lawrence 000 s. tons 

Coal Available 000 s. tons 

Coke Production 000 tons 

Strikes and Lockouts — 

Disputes in existence No. 

Number of employees No. 

Time loss in working days 

Percevtagr of unemploy- 
ment in Trade Unions. .P.C. 
Employment Office Reports — 
....No. 
....No. 
....No. 
....No. 
....No. 
....No. 
....No. 

No. 

$000,000 

No. 

$000 



Applications. 

Vacancies 

Placements 

Immigration— Total 

From U. Kingdom 

From U. States 

From other Countries. 

Returned Canadians... 

Bank Clearings 

Failures 

Liabilities.: 



5,493 

12,224 

429 

56-65 
100-4 
165-17 
165-02 

54-21 

13 

1,814 

20-97 

2,024 
408 

2,437 

244 

146 

61-84 

781 

1,519 

64,713 

2,C 

64- 



11,542 

11,342 

287 

833 

48 

11,275 
7,512 
3,677 

'742 

61 

27,731 
27,769 

3,; 

1,878 

140 
185-02 

292 

104 

32 

2,177 

147 

14 
1,268 
14,927 

21-1 

53,885 

36,867 

35,747 

1,288 

147 

802 

339 

1,453 

1,350 

196 

2,957 



3,911 

6,528 

634 

53-85 
85-7 
171-32 
171-84 
53-68 
10-31 
1,823 

25-06 

3,112 

619 

3,731 

548 

248 

72-73 

736 

1,854 

39,921 

1,896 

87-40 



1,024 
1,584 
747 1 

673 



9,116 

8,250 

617 

640 

49 

22,120 

21,781 

486i 

1,605 

113 
165-83 



3,859 

7,074 

513 

60-45 
80-1 
158-54 
150-95 
61-19 
10-51 
1,431 

28-42 

4,494 
983 

5,477 



214 

48-58 

853 

2,200 

28,287 

1,751 

105-11 



1,072 
1,774 
879i 

702 



8,848 

8,461 

229 

679 

47 

22,294 

22,196 

821i 

1,659 

107 
174-18 



5,797 
10,212 
1,829 

77-55 
110-2 
166-76 
163-81 
63-55 
17-99 
1,295 

43-57 

6,617 
1,701 
8,318 

567 

257 

67-64 
1,045 
3,713 
27,693 
1,568 

124-58 



10,213 

9,813 

256 



42 

10,273 
8,742 
1,171 

736 

58 

25,027 

22,550 

1,612 

1,814 

125 
186-01 



3,585 

6,230 

347 

42-52 
165-5 
176-66 
186-44 
53-90 
16-90 
2,185 

36-03 

5,660 
1,150 
6,810 

321 

219 

38-57 
1,102 
4,872 
10,575 
691 

32-51 



,991 
,984 

848 



1,748 
146 

11 

1,044 
10,729 

22-0 

57,755 

31.538 

30,721 

1,067 

142 

725 

200 

957 

1,056 

238 

4,061 



1,670 
144 

17 
3,611 
14,679 

20-6 



1,708 
156 

11 

1,501 

26,410 

20-4 



,558 
,426 
,633 
,039 
101) 
684 
246 
862 
,015 
221 
,651 



803 



9,511 

8,237 

918 

663 

50 

23,851 

21,052 

1,932 

1,653 

113 
180-18 

369 
465 
279 
1,264 
143 

11 

1,413 

34,556 

23-0 

57,580 

34,961 

33,744 

2,059 

386 

1,274 

399 

1,538 

1,073 

190 

3,171 



3,171 
12,463 
1,096 

62-95 
184-3 
175-89 
172-95 
57-01 
13-34 
1,132 

29-24 

7,269 

952 

8,221 

333 

264 

109-52 
913 

6,271 
15,313 

1,214 

34-30 



9,907 

9,128 

596 

816 



9,517 

8,425 

737 

673 

50 

23,400 

21,245 

1,191 

1,632 

110 
182-73 

1,568 
1,037 

884 
1,694 

129 

13 

1,521 

31,905 

22-1 



6,349 

4,486 

816 

110-69 
178-5 
161-37 
164-31 
50-03 



18-12 



7,112 

768 

349 

113-95 
979 

6,947 
17,228 

1,933 

86-89 



10, < 
9,420 
1,138 



891 



10,497 
8,558 
1,579 

933 

63 

24,813 
21,654 
2,328 

2,257 

129 
185-15 

1,1 
1,065 

905 
1,694 

119 

17 
3,011 
38,147 



3,425 

3,590 

344 

37-85 
129-0 
142-49 
145-43 
47-02 
7-31 
892 

27-51 

6,773 

699 

7,472 

740 

1,089 

104-21 
1,495 
5,307 

16,123 
1,831 

69-33 



10,032 

9,144 

703 

717 

52 

9,685 



670 

71 

22,970 

21,053 

1,027 

1,790 

147 
157-37 

2,638 
1,030 

822 
1,679 

127 

26 
6,121 
50,397 

218 



2,173 

5,995 

670 

53-61 
121-1 

157-92 

154-88 

50-03 

5-99 

871 

26-71 

3,166 

901 

4,067 

1,523 

752 

89-78 
1,666 
5,173 
23,167 
1,859 

66-20 



9,746 

9,420 

137 

708 

52 

10,172 

9,119 

697 

690 

65 

23,099 

21,922 

268 



6,204 

4,553 

535 

35-46 
97-2 
150-69 
152-62 
48-06 
5-71 
732 

23-14 

1,741 

601 

2,342 

1,654 

802 

76-91 
1,419 
3,959 
23,813 
1,390 

48-13 



12,498 
9,657 
2,681 

1,429 

44 

13,256 
9,271 
3,723 

1,416 

55 

23,9'8 
22,254 
5,949 



1,813 3,043 



138 122 
175-62 l 215-65 



3,095 
1,162 

938 
1,894 

121 

16 

4,972 
62,492 

21-4 



,815 

,397 
,355 
,944 

270 
,338 

336 
,611 
, 058 



2,825 



3,807 
1,292 
1,061 
2,092 
127 

16 
4.251 
10,995 

20-4 

53,437 
32,111 

29,944 
1,871 

357 
1,279 

235 
1,378 
1,087 

192 
3,926 



2,704 

7,029 

857 

55-26 
110-1 
157-51 
157-57 

48-41 
6-73 

1,599 

17-10 

2,361 

562 

2,923 

2,416 

1,515 

83-45 
1,351 

2,990 

27,166 

1,477 

57-72 



12,299 
9,534 
2,537 

1,190 

37 

12,290 
8,005 
3,924 

1,193 

42 

28,190 

20,839 

6,385 

2,607 

96 
211-53 

3,924 
1,252 
1,014 
2,543 
131 

15 

2,225 
14,470 

22-0 

23,222 

56,877 

22,205 

1,723 

300 
1,145 

278 
1,236 
1,176 

199 
3,439 



3,568 
15,376 
1,070 

46-37 
99-8 
161-33 
164-33 

45-46 
14-15 
1,544 

37-09 

1,669 

535 

2,204 

1,438 

906 

51-71 
134-8 
261-9 
38,583 
1,304 

42-39 



165 



2,109 
13,819 

1,283; 

37-54 j 

■ l 

138-6& 

140-77: 

42-34} 

27-03r 

1.090E 

30-76; 

1.59F 

57a 

2,13$ 

1,090; 

47$ 

32-8i 

1,38$ 

2,872 

27,189 

1,58| 

69-53 



731 



192-58 



2,877 
1,087 

751 
2,738 

143 

12 
1,130 
3,653 



65,165 
28,683 



152-5$ 



215 
147 

5| 

2,02? 

> 



12 

2,375 
10,378 



49.73J 
30,88* 



27,383 29,1 



1,130 

229 

4,343 



Deficit. 



10 



MONTHLY REVIEW OF BUSINESS STATISTICS 



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MONTHLY REVIEW OF BUSINESS STATISTICS 
Table 3. Receipts and Visible Supply of Canadian Grain 



11 





Receipts at Country Elevators and Platform Loadings 


Visible Supply of Canad 


ian Grain 




and 


\\ heat 


| Oats 


Barley 


Flax 


Rye 


Wheat 


Oats 


Barley 


Flax 


Rye 


Month 


Thousand Bushels 


1930 


4,360 
2,989 
21.248 
105,065 
53,800 
52,445 
17,320 

9,256 

9,843 

9,589 

8,418 

6,145 

8,205 

5,437 

11,862 

47,443 

74,086 

43,056 

19.613 

10,851 

12,245 

12,746 

5.982 

8,197 

15,050 

3.780 

17,633 

120 538 

79,564 

36,457 

18,486 


523 
473 
695 
5,080 
3,967 
3,992 
2,055 

1.681 
2,304 
3,733 
2,097 
1,334 
2,049 
1,970 
2,784 
2,893 
5,270 
6,495 
3,350 

1,909 
4,013 
4,788 
1.834 
2,353 
2,094 
1.091 
1,184 
3.441 
4.08? 
3.031 
1,612 


296 
168 
1,167 
7.735 
2,440 
1,123 
639 

516 

404 

614 

688 

803 

1,412 

892 

1,047 

4,569 

1,023 

1,586 

1,380 

801 

943 

1,194 

543 

454 

514 

402 

929 

2,599 

1,125 

1,338 

1,219 


24 

15 

24 

1,185 

1,223 

1,271 

182 

65 

48 
74 
60 
42 
79 
60 
49 
167 
900 
399 
99 

26 

36 

68 

70 

24 

44 

48 

53 

282 

693 

179 

88 


29 

52 

1,145 

3,223 

1,291 

839 

233 

153 

97 

362 

266 

287 
418 
247 
252 
349 
315 
522 
209 

128 

130 

245 

153 

67 

57 

57 

448 

540 

270 

131 

98 


116,693 
102,528 
96,448 
152,211 
188,673 
207,386 
217,643 

202,283 
190.202 
180,540 
162,041 
132.593 
115,672 
110,731 
101,733 
126,462 
163,133 
185,811 
192,305 

195,510 
186,120 
183,956 
164.562 
149.251 
138.572 
121.474 
113,036 
198 240 
239,435 
237,194 
237,391 


8,844 
6.834 
5,995 
9,129 
11,206 
13,847 
15,022 

14,207 

13,802 

14,887 

13,242 

10,840 

9.624 

8,886 

8,847 

9,568 

10,864 

13,609 

15,614 

4,626 
14,279 
14,801 
11 055 
6,443 
5,659 
6.204 
5.857 
7.273 
8.316 
9,115 
9,233 


22,442 
19,869 
21,335 
27,892 
31,879 
31,608 
31,339 

30,436 
29,527 
27,551 
24,081 
15,447 
11,944 
10,260 
8,471 
11,338 
11,274 
10,282 
11,494 

11,402 
11,183 
11,100 
9 220 
6,706 
4,401 
3,627 
3.056 
5.813 
5,874 
6,024 
6,772 


471 
434 
449 
1,003 
1,904 
2,405 
2,074 

2,080 

2,104 

2,059 

1,858 

1,254 

1,127 

742 

758 

883 

1,588 

1,549 

11,473 

1,396 
1,363 
1,383 
1.267 
1,424 
1,347 
1,283 
1,208 
1,400 
1,497 
1,582 
1,436 


8,158 


July 


8,566 


August 

September. . . 

October 

November. . . 
December. . . . 

1931 

January 

February. . . . 

March 

April 

May 


8,124 
9,446 
12,225 
12,924 
13,158 

13.458 
13,391 
13,275 
13,448 
12,970 




12,549 


July 


12,600 


August 

September . . 

October 

November... 
December. . . 

1932 

January 

February.... 

March 

April 


12,163 
12,358 
12,309 
13,024 
12,572 

12,355 
12,864 
12.323 
11.122 
10,242 




7 563 


Julv 


5,541 


August 

September.. . 

October 

November.. . 
December. . . 


5,129 
5 359 
5,256 

4.77G 
4,990 



Table 4. Exports and Cash Price of Canadian Grain 



Exports of Orain 



Wheat 



Oats 



Barley 



Flax 



Rye 



Bushels 



18.889.550 
19.868.298 
17.639.228 
27.817.053 
29.784.275 
31. 217. 694 
22.230.397 



9.608.852 
10.296.603 
12.995.567 

4.680.769 
29.521.699 
20.783.219 
12.004.817 
11,909,108 
14.335.637 
18.925.303 
27.452.063 
22,355,975 



9,472.346 
9.898.363 
9.920.634 
7.513 289 
15.543.013 
15.857.427 
19.620,224 
18.289,832 
26,874.237 
40,192,415 
27,301,976 
27.735.999 



100.319 
568.678 
158.564 
220.519 
345.661 
381,088 
666,166 



260.342 

127.170 

308.087 

158.382 

1,646,844 

2,291.951 

1,257,248 

753,105 

694,900 

1.082.074 

1.364,700 

1,232,261 



1.184,647 
1.139.568 
1.035.612 
1.748.438 
1.622.815 
1.239.599 
513,384 
800,904 
1,050.476 
2,1*9,232 
1,520,634 
1.433,865 



59.139 

8,749 

1,250 

146.107 

524.849 

1.129.144 

734,683 



244,953 

120.034 

458.125 

755.247 

6.281.068 

6,199.012 

2,655.725 

3.2S7.465 

757.930 

220.752 

1.129,460 

2.205,976 



231,707 

323,221 

346.107 

613.805 

1,711,716 

1,021.578 

1.688.500 

1,547,340 

769.088 

710,213 

748,801 

272.667 



61,240 



172,338 
102,496 
421,428 
502,899 



150 

2,700 

168 



483.290 
49,049 

263,500 
61,500 



184,263 



1,200 
3,672 



362,578 



21.959 



24.812 
11.305 

425.398 
24.2'>6 

623.614 



20.000 
49.340 
10.642 



109.036 
669,380 
122.094 
145.273 
483.039 
71,978 
742,391 



218,504 

302.33' 

245.800 

299 906 

1,691.542 

1,115.445 

2.480.942 

1.194,386 

425,911 

403,802 

504,71^ 

17,143 



Average Cash Price 
(Bawis in store Fort William and Port Arthur* 



Wheat 
No.l 
Nor. 


Oats 
No. 2 
C.W. 


Barley 
No. 3 
C.W. 


Flax 
No. 1 
N W.C. 


Rye 
No. 1 
C.W. 



Dollars per Bushel 



1032 
•951 
•925 
•781 
•725 
•643 
•553 



476 


•393 


2-116 


438 


•391 


1-788 


402 


•390 


1-623 


331 


•316 


1-435 


328 


•282 


1-292 


282 


•233 


1-052 


267 


•25 


•978 


261 


•221 


•95 


276 


•221 


•968 


277 


•251 


1-033 


281 


•282 


1-04 


291 


•310 


1-061 


296 


•328 


1-07 


293 


•322 


1-182 


282 


•317 


1-037 


273 


• 306 


•973 


312 


•331 


•945 


336 


•425 


1-056 


300 


•383 


•99 


293 


•377 


•985 


295 


•383 


1-015 


300 


•398 


1-016 


323 


•410 


•985 


355 


•402 


•837 


338 


•377 


•717 


351 


•365 


•682 


300 


•344 


•715 


261 


•288 


•785 


235 


•257 


•708 


240 


•302 


• 696 


210 


•277 


•701 



■537 
•523 
•551 
•425 
■373 
•306 
•30 

•271 
•286 
•312 
•316 
•341 
•355 
•327 

• 293 

• 325 
•370 

• 487 
•427 



•426 
•441 
•478 
•457 
-412 
-337 
-331 
•334 
•318 
•292 
-295 
•297 



12 MONTHLY REVIEW OF BUSINESS STATISTICS 

Tablp 5. Consumption of Grain anH Production by the Milling Industry 





Mill grind ings 


Mill production 














Wheat flour 










and 
month 


Wheat 


Oats 


Corn 


Barley 


Mixed 
grain 




Oatmeal 


Rolled 
oats 


Corn 

flour and 

meal 


Wheat 

flour 

exported 


Percent- 
age of 


Quan- 
tity 














operation 










1930 
August 


Bushels 


Bushels 


Bushels 


Bushels 


Bushels 




Barrels 


Pounds 


Pounds 


Pounds 


Barrels 


6.930,364 


817,134 


235.271 


83.091 


632,982 


53 3 


1,547.936 


922.208 


10,109,769 


2,195.274 


627,233 




7.254.614 


1.054,097 


151.357 


90.074 


1,059,204 


57-2 


1.624,238 


1.017,130 


13,825.936 


1.755.038 


734,349 


October 


8.348,434 


1.173.911 


183.736 


131,307 


1.432.239 


620 


1,868,575 


1,160,492 


13,588.271 


1.948,686 


813,691 


November 


7.788.827 


1.085,491 


176.074 


128.156 


1.872.362 


62- 1 


1,739.375 


1,278.662 


13,326.255 


1.499.621 


792,271 


December 


5.225,805 


1,125.885 


148.866 


136,065 


1,886.930 


38-7 


1.170.025 


3.636,850 


10,723,499 


1.070,225 


601,894 


1931 

Januarv 


4.833.535 


997.080 


160,976 


125.357 


1.915.710 


36-6 


1.086.272 


2.449,163 


10,870,397 


1,155.518 


392,256 


February 


4 607 154 


940.355 


170.167 


129.777 


1 657.462 


37-3 


1.035.383 


1 461.180 


10.434.204 


1894.492 


414,773 




5.158,112 


843.761 
822.047 
785 196 


141.271 
176 096 
157.539 


134.297 
116.171 

84.809 


1.660.573 
1 565.891 
1 189.023 


38-9 
38-3 
411 


1.168.408 
1.058.311 
1.183 280 


1,568.252 
2 925 422 
2 865.362 


8,674,493 
6,945.416 
7 659.185 


1.158,556 
2.612 040 
2 130.887 


560,553 




4 718.805 

5 304.076 


326.117 


May 


481,265 


June 


5.033,072 


769.942 


1G7.195 


73.578 


9^2.0*1 


43-7 


1.121.115 


1.569,155 


9.528,397 


2,072.918 


490,294 


July . . ... 


5.932,146 


937.695 


175.921 


81,527 


938,413 


47-1 


1.319,008 


690.259 


12.272,542 


2.612,240 


466,967 


August 


5.992,090 


836.410 


149 814 


107.612 


1,029.935 


47-8 


1.333.287 


408,475 


9,530.679 


2,277,749 


522,178 


Beptem her . . . 


8.772,319 


1,166,178 


170.265 


126.363 


1.272,527 


56-7 


1.515.613 


1,439.602 


14.520,597 


2,039.254 


556,565 


October 


7,565.330 


1,506,473 


172.015 


1?6.71o 


1,705.240 


60-5 


1.693.925 


2.509,165 


17,498,451 


2.288,754 


558,459 


November. . . . 


^,101,645 


1,761,877 


209.089 


129.541 


1,791.642 


70-0 


1.012,457 


3.520.322 


20,901,593 


2,588,950 


476,487 


December 


5.275.097 


1,151.246 


158.509 


106,230 


2.123,600 


40-9 


1.175.152 


3.659.093 


11,513,316 


1,714.434 


451,310 


1932 
Januarv 


3,798,168 


902.969 


145. 73« 


89.204 


1,788,297 


31-3 


851.192 


1.799.72« 


9,534,327 


1,802,005 


331,806 


February 


3.751.268 


7*9.941 


153.989 


68,471 


1.701.8^0 


31-3 


842. 123 


1.788.903 


8.218.910 


2.3' , 9,16o 


357,513 


March 


4 685 646 


882.368 


175 321 


85 035 


1 818 416 


37-2 


1.053 770 


1 653,557 


9.454.423 


2 233.622 


414.779 


April 


4.446.506 


666.203 


178.754 


73.738 


1.416,128 


35-9 


993.385 


1,551.310 


6.594.244 


2.591.116 


255,390 


May 


4. 643. 15«> 


616.418 


129.879 


53.386 


1.045.021 


38-6 


1,040.693 


888. 497 


6.315.048 


l,9 n 8,770 


461.867 


June 


5.173,525 


650.403 


135.783 


44.464 


873.889 


43-0 


1,151.286 


880,560 


8,027,410 


2,099,028 


570.861 


July 


5 379.486 


695,557 


183.623 


40,894 


716.067 


41 3 


1.201,965 


402,937 


8.940,843 


2.628.909 


446,379 


August 


5 716.002 


939 418 


187 020 


74.088 


895 616 


42-7 


1 272 009 


658 480 


12 301.642 


2 738 376 


330,382 


September 


6.151.877 


1,081.749 


147.992 


72.056 


1.174,201 


50-9 


1,384.500 


777,966 


14,124.180 


2.226.154 


385,113 


October 


7,670,615 


1.346,592 


129.236 


77,779 


1.447,920 


62-4 


1.721,598 


1,387.585 


16.683/29 


1,776,832 


528,794 


November. . . . 


8,638,600 1,453.153 


209.499 


102,769 1,941,348 


70-5 1.942,044 1,193.036 17,871,610 2,466,753 


576,864 



Table 6. Receipts, Manufactures and Stocks of Sugar in Thousand Pounds 



Year and 
4-week period 



1930 

August 9. 

September 6. 
October 4. 

November 1. 
November 29 
December 31. 

1931 

January 31. 
February 28 
March 28. 

April 25. 

May 23 

June 20. 

July 18 

August 15. 

September 12. 
October 10. 
November 7. 
December 5. 
December 31. 

1932 

January 30. 

February 27. 

March 26 

April 23 

May 21. 

June 18. 

July 16. 

August 13 

September 10. 

October 8. 

November 5. 

December 3 



Raw Sugar 



Stock 
on hand 
at be- 
ginning 
of period 



93.595 
82,707 
93,369 
53.544 
60,779 
104.507 



108.269 
115.726 
91.476 
71.255 
74.881 
117,363 
123,541 
110,325 
76.658 
96.140 
66,512 
Ol.OS^ 
96,785 



98.423 

102.650 

83.834 

67.702 

60,295 

122/05 

122,425 

110.656 

38 489 

77,116 

60.036 

106.861 



Re- 
ceipts 



104.466 
90.592 
59.575 
75 781 

115.341 
49.803 



34.506 
18 68" 
34.275 
49.907 

123 518 
79.112 
77.162 
66.006 

107.72? 
54.318 

110.354 
90,828 
50.737 



32,199 

8.639 

36.780 

27 237 

126.477 
75.2°4 
85,435 
35.11? 

120 743 
75.160 

123,367 
80,943 



Melt- 
ings 
and 
ship- 
ments 



107.604 
87.681 
99.399 
68.547 
71.613 
46.040 



27.050 
42 930 
54.497 
46282 
81 036 
72.933 
90, 37° 
99.674 
88.23" 
8'. 055 
85.833 
85,076 
49.099 



27.973 
27.454 
52.912 
34 644 
64.5-7 
75.005 
97.2^4 
107.288 
82 HO 
92 230 
76^543 
70,707 



Refined Sugar 



Stock 
on hand 
at be- 
ginning 
of period 



78.402 
87.835 
86. 137 
89.321 
102.122 
131.418 



136.260 
111.178 

98.886 
96.086 
71 354 
79.818 
77.289 
74.075 
76.046 
02.326 
88.407 
130.392 
162.469 



174.905 
155.110 
131.044 
129 590 
109.901 
111.503 
123.942 
108.248 
124 079 
174,985 
174,985 
155,411 



Manu- 
factured 
granu- 
lated 



90.529 
80,516 
86.561 
91.957 
97,293 
57,875 



23,643 
35 380 
47,504 
37.025 
66. 180 
63,254 
78,414 
84.879 
82.700 
86,397 
109,523 
110,785 
51,744 



24,211 
22.640 
44.332 
30 275 
53.212 
63.996 
84,990 
91,620 
73.687 
97,775 
108,298 
109,777 



Manu- 
factured 
yellow 

and 
brown 



9,258 
6.914 
9.878 
7.731 
11.265 
9.202 



3.540 
5.029 
8.085 
5 331 
10 476 
6.106 
6.881 
6.993 
6.706 
9.700 
12.267 
13.635 
9.860 



3.6 C 
3.041 
7.544 
5 605 
5.540 
9.725 
7.503 

10.080 
8 23o 
8.238 
7,576 

12.679 



Total 
manu- 
factured 



99.787 
87.430 
96.439 
99.688 
108.558 
67.077 



27.184 
40 408 
55 589 
42.356 
76 655 
69.360 
05.295 
91.871 
89,406 
96.105 
121.701 
124,420 
61.613 



27.891 
25.681 
51 876 
35.879 
58.751 
73.722 
92.583 
101,700 
81.917 
106,613 
115,874 
122.457 



Total 
domes- 
tic 
shio- 
ments 



88.719 
86,739 
90.865 
84.386 
77.119 
52,812 



51,595 
52,161 
57.641 
66.091 
66.933 
70,882 
87.306 
88,342 
82,097 
87,601 
77.662 
90,849 
48,712 



47,2 '0 
49.221 

52.838 
55 229 
56.256 
60,354 

107.377 
84,478 
79 741 

101,052 
84.813 
87,675 



Ship- 
ments 
granu 
lated 



84.171 
81,696 
83,912 
77,202 
67,650 
46,364 



46,867 
46 216 
51.188 
60,250 
60.766 
65.395 
81,810 
84.192 
75.001 
80.321 
69,411 
76,969 
42.927 



42.439 
43.691 
47,136 
47 723 
51.129 
55.403 
100.986 
79.862 
74 845 
95,456 
76.537 
77,105 



Ship- 
ments 
yellow 

and 
brown 



6.182 
7,432 
9.342 
9,685 
11,61? 
7,494 



5,399 
6.485 
7,200 
6.839 
7 4"5 
6.494 
6,690 
5.708 
8,12.- 
9,783 
10,395 
15.374 
6.170 



.291 
,007 
,262 
.451 
9.521 
11,848 



Total 
ship- 
ments 



90.353 
89.120 
93.254 
86.887 
79,262 
53.858 



52.265 
52 700 
58,388 
67. 088 
68 191 
71 889 
88.510 
89.900 
83,12f 
90,104 
79.806 
92.342 
49.097 



47,766 
49.747 
53.330 
55 569 
57.149 
61.->83 

108.277 
85,869 
82.107 

104/08 
86,058 
89,033 



MONTHLY REVIEW OF BUSINESS STATISTICS 



13 



Table 7. Tobacco, Cigars and Cigarettes Entered for Consumption. 



Year and Month 



1930 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September 

October 

November 

December 

1931 

January 

February 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September 

October 

November 

December 

1932 

January 

February 

March 

April , 

May 

June 

July 

August. 

September 

October 

November 

December 



Tobacco, 
cut 



Pound 

1,463,701 
1,361.430 
1,386,779 
1,322,441 
1,406,258 
1.381,943 
1,224,840 
1,312,936 



1,057,507 
1,163.399 
1.372.596 
1,250.655 
1,487,028 
1.480 478 
1.468.877 
1,449.103 
1,457.618 
1,452,865 
1,451,340 
1,366,' 



1.144.298 
1,272,469 
1,414.941 
1,659.842 
1.436,417 
1,493.496 
1.488,431 
1,559,663 
1,662,365 
1,551,042 
1,427,688 
1,209.81° 



Tobacco, 
plug 



Pound 

562.472 
577.722 
583,668 
552,148 
476.020 
452,670 
455,503 
471,292 



366,785 
430,463 
459 155 
439.364 
514.005 
503 867 
453 989 
469.793 
417,050 
439,268 
410,253 
426,968 



382.000 
343,887 
389.797 
425 577 
421.248 
425. 899 
391.668 
419,483 
368,601 
379,960 
358,572 
340.791 



Cigarettes 



Number 

651,235.720 
434.9*8 266 
529.519.070 
477.205.140 
483,960.240 
438.497.550 
401.175.589 
326,147,670 



319,555.340 
327,255,230 
349.681,715 
382,303.130 
382,951,155 
430.179 170 
474,415,620 
425,138,580 
371,311,090 
344,956.140 
355,716,768 
369,235,870 



278.416.630 
281.496.910 
304,243,772 
269 309 750 
312,790.432 
376.779.975 
338,874.828 
329,466,3*4 
313,709,922 
214,301.678 
388,655.140 
301613.955 



Cigarettes, 
over- 
weight 



Number 

141,660 
97,100 
71,000 
51,800 

167,700 
17,900 
38,200 

144,300 



78.300 

68.500 

117,800 

500 

31,820 
164.250 
227,450 
200,400 

76,600 
135,450 
115,200 
148,210 



57,200 
56.700 
50,150 
49.050 
37,350 
66,300 
40,300 
43,700 
39,400 
57.100 
148,400 
39.260 



Cigars 



Number 

17,687,316 
16,654.019 
16.947,724 
17,944.831 
19,333,469 
22,515,6*6 
17,418,328 
11,408,452 



7,259,572 
7,650,784 
9.984 215 
11,116,740 
14.734,327 
14.380.513 
14,091,692 
12,860,616 
15,270,873 
17,316,957 
15,753,873 
11,329,243 



7.595,920 

8,154.663 

9,657.775 

10 20 s ? 636 

10,552,455 

12,754.263 

11,492,868 

12,298,501 

12,799,348 

14,424,229 

14,071.178 

9 014.869 



Foreign 
raw leaf 
tobacco 



Pound 

1,763,088 
1,110,358 
1,416.720 
1.482,179 
1.514.2*3 
1,505,683 
1,139,124 
1.064.933 



1,288.600 
1.072.285 
1.115 135 
1.284.691 
1,434.154 
1.382 348 
1.328.631 
1.283,479 
1,076.864 
1,177.265 
1,144,401 
994,476 



1,063,412 

8S9.417 

942.999 

1.120 066 

1,108.312 

1,320.001 

1,149.197 

1.083,602 

1,042,140 

938.889 

1,027,873 

744.579 



Table 8. — Production of Boots and Shoes. 



1950 

May, 

June 

July 

August 

September.. 

October 

November.. 
December... 

1931 

January 

February.... 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September. . 

October 

November.. 
December. . 

1932 

January 

February... 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September . . 

October 

November. . 



Boots and shoes with leather or fabric uppers 



Welts 



263,044 
255.538 
335.729 
306.544 
310.184 
290.812 
204.928 
193,340 

231,498 
278,200 
326.112 
332,306 
293,408 
252,037 
281.175 
274,644 
275,156 
235.904 
181,474 
171.294 

212,534 
272,581 
281,244 
243,435 
241.653 
235.079 
247,387 
273,591 
267,515 
213,345 
196 «01 



McKays 

and 

all 

imitation 

welts 



686,721 
618,747 
548,897 
722,749 
740.557 
663,654 
422,543 
406,884 

426,112 
600,694 
880,851 
810,653 
892,177 
782,256 
683.700 
816.379 
824.817 
723,0^9 
494.143 
433,536 

532,297 
774,827 
907.035 
781,111 
821,112 
746,474 
610,921 
828,070 
807,126 
679,722 
450 4 '8 



Nailed 
pegged, 

screw 
or wire 
fastened 



112,551 
107,369 
115,584 
144,308 
160,270 
161.697 
113,951 
113,786 

111,106 

123,809 
152,328 
134,025 
146.830 
119,495 
121,877 
164,848 
195,496 
182,54? 
150.854 
132,822 

123.365 

158,460 
150 132 
120,920 
125.907 
118,518 
129.505 
180,350 
185,458 
189,725 
166 0"4 



Sticb- 
downs 



232,817 
220.562 
168.963 
129,710 
125,639 
123,372 
114,824 
128,353 

126,310 
138,121 
177,142 
207,343 
233.114 
234,244 
174.632 
148,542 
124,722 
139,528 
138,910 
148,777 

132,897 
171,322 

212.237 
216,884 
264.754 
243,324 
169,801 
148,365 
136,672 
151.968 
1 35 217 



Total 



1.370,781 
1.250,886 
1,232,993 
1,368,683 
1,406,149 
1,305.315 
900,345 
877,041 



921,878 
,184,316 
,596.409 
.546.111 
.622,637 
,442,330 
,316,349 
,467,600 
,482,835 
,337,126 
,013,879 

919,847 

029.556 
414.816 
607.280 
413.214 

507.574 
400,508 
202,968 
484.042 
470.476 
301,011 
017 153 



Total footwear 



Mens' 



401,356 
393,345 
439,235 
465,095 
483.554 
494.271 
350,806 
339,476 

296,301 
368.102 
472,669 
443.797 
445.979 
403.207 
421,682 
434,443 
454,133 
431,115 
363,011 
348,868 

300.352 

420.882 
411,320 
370,801 
422,104 
436.647 
409,588 
469.002 
471,961 
449,281 
'03.661 



Boys* 

and 

youths' 



80,487 
68.316 
63,899 
81,408 
100.482 
97,210 
77,582 
85,163 

72,959 

68,363 

97,515 

92.829 

85.643 

79.458 

74,836 

85,615 

104.041 

119.592 

107,503 

104,437 

79,681 
91,177 
87,098 
68,822 
75,047 
65,144 
54,778 
91,741 
109.625 
108.139 
110 661 



Women's 



694,418 
626,824 
634, 137 
719,083 
754,204 
670,404 
430, 139 
384,526 

386,168 
554,616 
790,849 
756.981 
817,519 
766,049 
674,325 
804,318 
839,989 
711,900 
513.384 
418.306 

491,281 
731.280 
807.022 
742,845 

803,803 
746,658 
665,684 
863,149 
858,238 
748,048 
5«8.!>63 



Misses' 

and 
childrens 



222.638 
201.050 
171,396 
182,347 
176,812 
183.681 
175,803 
159,008 

144,793 
188,776 
244,120 
252,635 
260,635 
210,498 
187,098 
196,594 
184,536 
197,983 
178,872 
174,731 

163,531 
214,295 
264 903 
232,427 
248,460 
214,127 
160,666 
183.565 
187,436 
202.130 
187.757 



Babies 

and 
infants' 



126,639 
108,909 
108.205 
94.753 
100.807 
106.846 
90.468 
96,019 



84.703 

97,108 
124,777,., 
123,675 1. 



Total 



1.524,938 
1,398.444 
1,414.872 
1.542,686 
1,615,859 
1.552 392 
1,124.798 
1.064.192 



131,016 
117.239 
98,881 
106,036 
89.738 
93,554 
91.926 
87,192 

77,337 
100.779 
119.865 
108,597 
106,674 
96.616 
88.768 
100,902 
95,942 
91,592 
90 992 



984,924 
278,965 
729.930 
669. 917 
740.792 
576,449 
456.822 
627,006 
672,437 
554,144 
254,696 
133,534 

112,192 
558,413 
720,208 
523,492 
656.088 
,559,192 
,379.484 
,708,359 
,723,202 
.599,190 
.361 334 



57904—3 



14 



MONTHLY REVIEW OF BUSINESS STATISTICS 



Table 9. — Sales and Slaughterings < 


Df Live Stock 


, Retail Food Prices, and Cold Storage Holdings. 


Classification 


1931 


1932 


Dec. 


Jan. 


Feb. 


Mar. 


April 


May 


June 


July 


Aug. 


Sept. 


Oct. 


Nov. 


Dec. 


Sales on Stock Yds: 




























(Current month 




























■prelim.) 

Cattle 


48.811 
18.005 
125,677 
34,213 


42.573 
14,653 
127,558 
22,351 


36,234 

17,606 

111,246 

13,443 


43,992 
29.112 
117,198 
15,157 


38,244 

35,424 

112,178 

11,388 


44,226 
38.482 
119.341 
11,867 


38,833 
30.026 
104,127 
30,434 


44,941 
25,35f 
81,55/ 
38,45/ 


64,884 
26.638 
83.187 
60,488 


56,647 
24,305 
62,737 
60,044 


58,195 
25,299 
76,081 
103,224 


66,598 


45.127 




26,072 13,117 




126,986 1 
75,412 


08,160 




23,780 


Inspected Slaugh- 




terings: 

Cattle 


48.645 

17.150 

4.055 

50.484 

247,250 


47.875 
17,305 
10.171 
38.101 
263,785 


39.379 
22.679 
5,258 
29,454 
239,921 


44,505 
43.253 
2.801 
34,304 
232,875 


43.302 

46.612 

28.448 

1.426 

229,124 


44.156 
51,240 
16,685 
6.519 
254,836 


41,818 
43.171 
12,726 

37,472 
247,722 


41.22J 
32 255 
11 36? 
52 64( 
191,57' 


47,184 
31.598 
11,983 
73,856 
189,253 


52,174 
29,450 
11,286 
89,869 
166,352 


50,408 
27,2'8 
8,216 
137,368 
189,222 


56,03« 
23,722 
8,982 
109,900 
249,858! 


45,075 




14,919 




5,369 




44,019 




!68,300 


Av. Retail Prices, in 




cents, of Food in 




























Canada: 






























13-2 


13-3 


13-4 


13-7 


13-4 


13-3 


13-3 


IS- 


13-1 


12-7 


12-4 


11-9 


10-9 




15-8 


15-3 


15-7 


15-7 


14-6 


13-6 


13-5 


IS- 


13-2 


13-1 


13-2 


12-7 


12-2 




21-9 


22-2 


22-2 


22-5 


22-2 


22-9 


22-7 


21 f 


21-4 


20-4 


19-3 


17-9 


16-6 


Pork fresh .... " 


16-6 


160 


15-8 


15-6 


15-3 


15-2 


15-0 


15-( 


) 15-6 


15-9 


15-7 


14-5 


12-9 
































22-3 


20-8 


19-3 


18-4 


17-8 


17-2 


16-8 


16-1 


17-6 


18-8 


19-6 


19-2 


18-6 




13-0 


12-8 


12-5 


11-8 


11-5 


11-5 11-3 


li-: 


11-4 


12-1 


12-6 


13-3 


12-9 




49-5 


41-8 


29-7 


32-8 


24-8 


19-5 


19-2 


21 -J 


24-1 


25-6 


30-3 


38-6 


45-2 


Milk qt 


10-8 


10-7 


10-4 


10-2 


10-1 


10-0 


9-8 


9-( 


) 9-6 


9-6 


9-5 


9-6 


9-8 
































27-2 


27-5 


25-9 


24-1 


31-2 


24-5 


22-6 


2M 


) 22-1 


25-0 


26-9 


26-4 


25-9 




22-5 


21-1 


21-4 


21-3 


21-2 


21-0 


20-7 


20- 


20-2 


19-8 


20-0 


19-9 


19-8 




6-2 


6-3 


6-3 


6-3 


6-2 


6-2 


6-2 


5-' 


5-6 


5-6 


5-6 


5-6 


5-8 


Flour " 


3-0 


3-1 


3-0 


3-0 


3-0 


3-0 


3-C 


2-' 


2-9 


2-9 


2-9 


2-8 


2-7 




4-7 


4-7 


4-7 


4-7 


4-7 


4-7 


4-7 


4-1 


4-8 


4-8 


4-8 


4-7 


4-6 




8-8 


8-7 


8-7 


8-7 


8-5 


8-6 


8-5 


8-i 


5 8-5 


8-5 


8-4 


8-3 


8-2 




4-9 

17-6 


4-8 
16-6 


4-6 
16-3 


4-4 
16-4 


4-3 
15-8 


4-3 
15-9 


4-3 
15-5 


4-: 

15-' 


I 4-2 

r 15.9 


4-3 
16-1 


4-3 
15-7 


4-2 
15-8 


4-0 


Apples e vapor- 


15-5 


Prunes " 


11-8 


11-7 


11-4 


11-4 


11-0 


10-8 


11-0 


10-< 


) 11-0 


11-2 


10-8 


10-7 


10-6 
































6-2 


6-1 


6-1 


6-1 


6-0 


60 


5-S 


5-< 


l 5-8 


5-9 


5-8 


5-8 


5-8 


Tea " 


52-4 


51-4 


51-3 


50-6 


50-3 


45-2 


45-5 


45-( 


) 44-6 


45-2 


44-5 


43-« 


43-7 


Coffee " 


45-0 


44-6 


44-3 


43-5 


43-7 


42-6 


42-4 


42- 


41-6 


42-4 


41-3 


41-2 


41-0 


Potatoes peck 


16-1 


15-8 


16-1 


15-8 


15-3 


15-2 


14-7 


14. < 


> 26-4 


18-4 


17-3 


17-3 


18-1 


Cold Storage 




1932 


1933 


Holdings 


Jan. 


Feb. 


Mar. 


April 


May 


June 


July 


Aug. 


Sept. 


Oct. 


Nov. 


Dec. 


Jan. 


Cold Storage Holdings a 


s at 




























First of Month: 






























(000 lbs. or doz.) 






























Butter— 


































23,937 

216 

24,153 

11,664 

2,862 

510 

4,160 

14,892 
2,659 
439 
6.705 
5.580 

30,275 
2,482 

6,167 

3,502 

185 

169 

10,023 


18,665 

197 

18,862 

10,208 

1,536 

602 

3,725 

16,148 
4,333 
539 
7,638 
7.387 

36,045 
3,233 

5,688 

4,537 

411 

96 

10,732 


10,212 

144 

10,356 

7,936 

282 

251 

3,252 

20.210 
3,371 

573 

7,859 

8.423 

40,436 

2,738 

5.019 

4,033 

314 

235 

9,600 


4,431 

4,49( 
7,66 

24( 

422 

3,29* 

21,861 

3,822 
37* 
5,97 
8,214 
40,251 
2,84* 

3,931 

4,41< 

351 

21( 

8.91' 


t 2,816 

32 

5 2,848 

5,934 

> 3,416 

534 

3,458 

! 22,455 

! 2,840 

i 702 

57.695 

7,784 

41,476 

3,286 

3.416 

4.299 

[ 233 

) 198 

[ 8,146 


4.292 

93 

4,385 

7,535 

8,870 

584 

4,312 

21.593 
3.080 
1.048 
5.991 
10,580 
42.293 
3.743 

2,975 

3.992 

458 

175 

7,600 


16,472 

334 

16.806 

16.022 

10,879 

829 

5.081 

18,458 
3,122 
982 
5,848 
8,999 

37,409! 
4,257 

2,329 

3,583 

327 

162 

6,401 


25,283 

259 
25,542 
19,355 

11,211 

820 

5,158 

3,862 
2,695 
394 
6,422 
1,180 
$4,553 
3,566 

2,668 

4.094 

302 

224 

7,288 


30,943 

338 

31,281 

22,119 

11,896 

995 

5,023 

10,255 
3,118 
710 
6.083 
9,788 

29,954 
2,707 

2,792 

4,596 

287 

177 

7,852 


33,318 

257 

33,575 

21,764 

11,056 
1,205 
4,848 

6,466 
2,463 
369 
5,051 
8.053 
22,4 A 2 
1.183 

2,813 

4,989 

239 

72 

8,113 


31,181 

136 

31,316 

20,423 

8,229 

519 

4.506 

5,236 
2,573 
267 
4,451 
9,624 
22,152 
1,913 

3.294 

5,002 

110 

88 

8,493 


26,361 

109 

26,470 

13,229 

4,123 

271 
3,988 

6,649 
3.830 
409 
4,912 
7.7*7 
23.567 
1.539 

4,642 

4,850 

79 

93 

9,665 


20,328 




69 


Totals 


20,397 


Cheese 


12,944 


Egos— 
Cold Storage 


1,254 


Fresh 


273 


Frozen 


3,773 


Pork — 


11,765 


Fresh not frozen 
Cured dry salted 
Cured sweet pick 
In process of cure 
Totals 






4,281 







461 


led.... 




6,219 






6,827 






29,552 


Lard 


2,327 


Beef— 
Fresh frozen 


5,113 


Fresh not frozen 
Cured 






3,421 






222 


In process of cure 
Totals 






184 






8,940 


Veal— 
Fresh frozen 


1,089 

236 

1,325 


666 
277 
943 


453 
241 
694 


36' 

63< 
l,00f 


1 484 
) 447 
i 930 


648 

508 

1,156 


716 

453 

1,169 


802 

414 

1,215 


893 

323 

1,216 


889 

471 

1,360 


958 

416 

1,374 


894 

359 

1,253 


702 


Fresh not frozen 
Totals 






180 






882 


Mutton and Lamb — 






Frozen 




8,471 

199 

8,670 


7,017 

385 

7,402 


6.048 

182 

6.230 


4,84 

171 

5,02' 


5 3,946 
5 161 
I 4,107 


2,172 

140 

2,312 


1,506 

214 

1,747 


1,001 

277 
1 277 


872 

366 

1.239 


1,020 

449 

1,469 


3,070 

383 

3,453 


4,856 

439 

5,295 


5,043 


Not,frozen 


274 


Totals 


5,291 


Poultry 


13,646 


13,216 


11,668 


9,45! 


! 7,701 


6,368 


5,257 


4,414 


3,374 


2,404 


2,057 


3,549 


8,341 


Fish— 
Fresh frozen 


15,473 


13,042 


10,724 


9,24 


r 8,569 


9,288 


10,173 


14 086 


16,734 


19,512 


21,706 


19,953 


17,121 


Fresh not frozen. 
Smoked, etc 










84 
6,795 


6, 
4,97- 


> 48 
1 4,544 


151 
3,830 


51 
5,218 


56 
5,522 


83 
6,228 


46 
6,825 


52 
7,177 


89 
7,173 


40 






7,964 


8,510 


6,734 


Fresh frozen during prec 


eding 




























month 






,384 


1, 


504 


l.t 


42 


1.11 


3 1,014 


1,624 


2,451 


6,073 


3 


,986 


3, 


912 


4,107 


2 740 


1,680 



MONTHLY REVIEW OF BUSINESS STATISTICS 



15 



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57904-3^ 



16 



MONTHLY REVIEW OF BUSINESS STATISTICS 



Table 10. Output of Central Electric Stations in Canada. (A) Monthly Output. 
(Thousands of Kilowatt Hours i 





Totals for Canada 


Generated by Water- F J ower 


General e«l ■> Fue 




Month 








Mari- 






Prairie 


British 


Prainp 


Othi»i 


1 otal 




Water 


Fuel 


Total 


time 
Pro- 
vinces 


Quebeo 


Ontario 


Pro- 


Colum- 


Pro- 


Pro- 


Imports 














vinces 


bia 


vinces 


vince*- 






1,565,856 


35,870 


1,601.726 


16,989 


797,314 


548, 906 


111.318 


91,329 


18,138 


17.732 


124,029 


December... 


1.496.901 


38.431 


1.535.332 


17.616 


746,934 


532.318 


117.079 


82.954 


19.953 


18.47* 


10°. 004 


1930- January 


1.613.719 


41,092 


1,554.811 


29.448 


745.711 


549.119 


104.698 


84.743 


23.063 


18.029 


ir.625 




1.371,215 


26,880 


1.398.095 


28,705 


686.957 


489.210 


82.397 


83.946 


18.702 


8.178 


117.176 




1.491.040 


24.425 


1.515.465 


34.469 


741.411 


628.404 


89 826 


96 930 


18.22? 


6.203 


•26.894 


April 

May 


1.480.953 


21.385 


1 502.338 


42.968 


744,861 


509.615 


92 601 


90.908 


16.437 


4.948 


117.504 


1,523.521 


21.106 


1,544.627 


44.139 


761.327 


624.679 


100.116 


93.260 


16.466 


4.640 


129.138 


June 


1,414.236 


20.375 


1.434.611 


42,632 


709.245 


485,791 


87.683 


88.°85 


15.801 


4,57* 


W.016 


Julv 


1.404.009 


21,681 


1.425,690 


40, 667 


722,335 


460.611 


89. 169 


91. '27 


16.522 


5. 159 


1*1.817 


August 


1,391.054 


20,806 


1.411.860 


41,788 


710.842 


457 424 


84.925 


96.075 


14,898 


5.908 


142,571 


September. . 


1.419.051 


23,910 


1.442.961 


38.662 


704.123 


185.151 


92.060 


99.055 


14.882 


9.028 


153.657 


October 


1,549.846 


24,714 


1.574.560 


39.180 


781,996 


521.991 


95.005 


111,374 


18.87* 


7.840 


161.323 


November 


1.488.175 


27,228 


1,515.403 


41,264 


764.490 


480.131 


92.292 


109.998 


19,506 


7.722 


141.587 


December . 


1.513.152 


29,156 


1,542.308 


44.295 


764,612 


480.442 


111.443 


112,360 


19.748 


9.408 


149.295 


1931-January 


1.456,326 


32,395 


1,488,721 


44,394 


735,385 


469,438 


104,099 


103.010 


20,187 


12.208 


162,443 


February.... 


1.311.136 


27.851 


1.338.987 


31.097 


674.560 


422.213 


88.481 


94.785 


17.298 


10.553 


145,461 




1,391.982 


25.576 


1.417.558 


34.338 


703,708 


451,912 


95.991 


106.033 


15.992 


9.584 


127 940 


April 


1.388.034 


23,056 


1.411,090 


52.154 


717.900 


415,482 


101.539 


100.959 


13.360 


9,6f6 


97. 677 


May 


1.342 940 


22.846 


1,365.786 


53,433 


693,853 


394,243 


102.640 


98.771 


12.781 


10.065 


86.824 


Juno 


1.267,869 


21 , 959 


1.289.828 


52.675 


638,719 


379,568 


101.337 


95,570 


12.139 


9.820 


88.602 


Julv 


1,230.622 


20,700 


1,251.322 


50.712 


620. 634 


369,294 


100.480 


89,502 


12.297 


8.403 


95.085 


August 


1.234,266 


21,883 


1,256,149 


44,924 


644.446 


352.877 


98.119 


93,900 


12.905 


8.978 


99,780 


September. . 


1.263,412 


25,001 


1,288,413 


46,251 


662,400 


355,122 


102.835 


96.804 


13.436 


11.565 


93.288 


October 


1,400,704 


27,638 


1,428,342 


55,743 


736,381 


384.065 


123.087 


101,428 


15,332 


12,306 


95.423 


November.. 


1.385.378 


29.642 


1,415,020 


56.725 


731,014 


373,084 


125,867 


98,688 


18.819 


10.823 


73,357 


December . . 


1,397,876 


34,306 


1.432,182 


55,214 


722,508 


385,407 


130.407 


104.340 


20,908 


13.398 


69,362 


1932- January 


1,382.794 


31,124 


1,413,918 


48,584 


721,827 


374,534 


129,050 


107.899 


20,382 


10,742 


61,767 


February 


1,297,892 


27,241 


1,325,133 


46.098 


682.589 


355,865 


115.39« 


97.041 


18,125 


0,116 


52,422 


March 


1,363,912 


24,784 


1,388.696 


44 292 


713,227 


394,206 


110 943 


101 244 


15 410 


9,374 


55 414 


April 


1,306,751 


22,736 


1,329,487 


50,445 


700,575 


363,099 


99.544 


93.088 


12,413 


10,323 


54.982 


May 


1.249.226 


21,789 


1,271,015 


53.897 


661.740 


344.635 


95.863 


93.091 


12.294 


9.495 


51.354 


June 


1,176.673 


21,559 


1,198,232 


47.894 


633.614 


325,476 


83.542 


86, 147 


11,996 


9,563 


64.864 


July 


1.133,555 


22,026 


1,155,581 


38,583 


606.872 


317,815 


81,519 


88.766 


11,986 


10,040 


59 015 


August 


1,206.682 


23,538 


1,230,220 


44,786 


663.911 


326. 0°1 


82,120 


89.835 


13,530 


10,008 


69.192 


September. . 


1,254.644 


24,496 


1,279.140 


48.069 


687.536 


337 472 


90.0"2 


91,485 


13.976 


10,520 


71 500 


October..... 


1,362,754 


27,474 


1,390,228 


50,989 


763,577 


348. K30 


1^4,780 


94,«78 


16.072 


11,402 


5^,737 


November. . 


1,416.774 


31,153 


1,447,927 


53,110 


823,035 


333,265 


111.404 


95,960 


18,303 


12.76C 


35.023 


December . . 


1,400,761 


32,398 


1,433,159 


52,587 


801,907 


326,173 


116,933 


103,161 


19,679 


12,719 


41,609 



(B) Average Daily Output. 



1929- November. 
December. 

1930-January.... 

February... 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

Aueust 

September. 

October 

November. 
December.. 

1931 -January. ... 
February... 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September. 
October — 
November. 
December . 

1932-January 

February. . . 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September. 

October 

November. 
December . 



52.195 


1,195 


53,390 


586 


28,577 


18,296 


,3 711 


3,045 


604 


591 


48,288 


1,239 


49.527 


568 


24.095 


17,172 


3.777 


2.67« 


643 


59« 


48,829 


1,326 


50,155 


950 


24.055 


17,713 


3.377 


2,734 


744 


582 


48,972 


960 


49.932 


1,025 


24,531 


17.472 


2,913 


2,908 


668 


292 


48.098 


788 


43.886 


1,112 


23.916 


17 045 


2.898 


3,127 


588 


200 


49.365 


713 


50.078 


1.432 


24.829 


16.987 


3.087 


3.030 


548 


165 


49.146 


681 


49.827 


1,424 


24.559 


16,925 


3,230 


3.008 


631 


150 


47.141 


679 


47.820 


1.422 


23,642 


16.193 


2, 9^2 


2,962 


527 


152 


45.291 


699 


45,990 


1,312 


23.301 


14.858 


2,877 


2,943 


533 


166 


44.873 


671 


45.544 


1,348 


22,9.30 


14,756 


2,740 


3,099 


481 


190 


47.301 


797 


48.098 


1,288 


23.470 


16.172 


3,069 


3,302 


496 


301 


49.995 


797 


50,792 


1,273 


25.226 


16,838 


3,065 


3,593 


644 


253 


49,606 


908 


50,514 


1,375 


25,483 


16,004 


3,077 


3,667 


650 


258 


48,811 


940 


49,751 


1,429 


24,665 


15,498 


3,595 


3,624 


637 


v 303 


46.978 


1,045 


48,023 


1,432 


23,722 


15.143 


3,358 


3,323 


651 


394 


46,826 


995 


47,821 


1,111 


24,091 


15,079 


3,160 


3,385 


618 


377 


44,903 


825 


45,728 


1.108 


22.700 


14.578 


3,096 


3.421 


516 


300 


46.268 


768 


47,036 


1,738 


23,930 


13,849 


3,385 


3,366 


445 


323 


43,320 


737 


44.057 


1,723 


22,382 


12,718 


3,311 


3,186 


412 


325 


42,262 


732 


42,994 


1,756 


21,291 


12.652 


3,378 


3,185 


405 


327 


39,698 


667 


40.365 


1,636 


20,020 


11,913 


3,242 


2,887 


396 


271 


39,815 


706 


40,521 


1,449 


20,789 


11.383 


3.165 


3,029 


416 


290 


42,114 


833 


42,947 


1,542 


22,080 


11,837 


3.42a 


3,227 


448 


385 


45,184 


891 


45,980 


1,798 


23,754 


12,380 


3,971 


3.272 


494 


397 


46,170 


988 


47,167 


1,801 


24,367 


12,436 


4,195 


3,290 


627 


361 


45.093 


1.106 


46.199 


1,781 


23,307 


12,436 


4,207 


3,366 


674 


432 


44,606 


1,004 


45,610 


1,567 


23,285 


12,081 


4,102 


3,481 


657 


347 


55,754 


939 


56,693 


1,621 


23,537 


12,271 


3,079 


3,346 


625 


314 


43,997 


799 


44,796 


1,429 


23.007 


12.716 


3.579 


3.266 


497 


302 


43,558 


758 


44,316 


1,681 


23,353 


12,103 


3,318 


3,103 


414 


344 


40,298 


704 


41,002 


1,739 


21.336 


11.117 


3,002 


3,003 


396 


306 


39,222 


719 


39,941 


1,507 


21.120 


10.849 


2.785 


2,872 


400 


319 


36,566 


711 


37,277 


I.214 


19.577 


10.252 


2,630 


2.863 


387 


324 


38,025 


759 


39,684 


1.445 


21,416 


10.517 


2.649 


2,898 


436 


323 


41 821 


817 


42,638 


1,602 


22 018 


11.249 


3,003 


3.049 


466 


351 


43,060 


886 


44,846 


1,642 


24,632 


11,243 


3,380 


3,060 


518 


368 


47,226 


1,038 


48,264 


1,770 


27,435 


11,109 


3,713 


3,199 


613 


425 


45,186 


1,045 


46,231 


1,696 


25,868 


10,522 


3,772 


3.328 


635 


410 



MONTHLY REVIEW OF BUSINESS STATISTICS 



17 



Table 11 — Railway Revenue Freight Loaded at Stations in Canada in Tons. 



Commodities 



Railway Freight Loaded— 

Agrici ltural Products — 

Wheat 

Corn 

Oats 

Barley 

Rye 

Flaxseed 

Other grain 

Flour 

Other mill products 

Hay and straw 

Cot' on ' 

Apples (fresh) '. 

Other fruit (fresh) 

Potatoes 

Other fresh vegetables 

Other agricultural products. . . 
Animal Products — 

Horses . 

Cattle and calves 

Sheep 

Hogs 

Dressed meats (fresh) 

Dressed meats (cured, salted, 
canned) 

Other packing house products 
(edible) 

Poultry 

Eggs 

Butter and cheese 

Wool ' 

Hides and leather 

Other animal products (non- 
edible) 

Mine Products — 

Anthracite coal 

Bituminous coal 

Lignite coal 

Coke 

Iron ores 

Other ores and concentrates. .. 

Base bullion and matte 

Clay, gravel, sand, stone 
(crushed) 

Slate — Dimensions or block 
stone 

Crude petroleum 

Asphalt 

Salt 

Other mine products 

Forest Products — 

Logs, posts, poles, cord wood. . 

Ties 

Pulpwood 

Lumber— Timber— Box shooks 
—Staves heading 

Other forest products 

Manufactures and Miscellan- 
eous— 

Refined Petroleum and its pro- 
ducts 

Sugar 

Iron, pig and bloom 

Rails and fastenings . 

Bar and sheet iron — Structural 
iron and iron pipe 

Castings, machinery & boilers 

Cement 

Brick and artificial stone 

Limp and plaster 

Sewer pipe and drain tile 

Agricultural implements and 
vehicles other than autos 

Automobiles and auto trucks. . 

Household goods 

Furniture 

Liquor beverages 

Fertilizers, all kinds 

Paper printed matter, books. 

Wood-pulp 

Fish (fresh, frozen cured, etc.) 

Canned goods (all canned food 
products) 

Other manufactures and mis- 
cellaneous 

Merchandise 



1931 



Oct 



1,548,002 
1, 

77,848 

30,929 

4,135 

8,369 

9,721 

134,139 

109,377 

37,838 

192 

70,199 

7,551 

41,192 

24,309 

111,800 

7,812 
51,181 
14,489 
19,710 

9,502 

2,058 

55377 
262 
876 
6,187 
1,084 
4,294 

4,( 

2.203 

620,851 

303,025 

76,462 

621 

77,452 

4,213 

480,293 

12.006 
1,676 
21,038 
13.897 
70,083 

161.315 

2.947 

127,147 

215,006 
17,104 



175,354 
13,753 
17,564 
5,082 

35, ,817 
11.017 

132.792 

23.759 

20.865 

6,366 

4.009 

2,732 

7.800 

2.753 

13,947 

15.307 

135.952 

55.617 

5,771 

9.896 

224,542 

163.718 



Jan. 



409,261 

4. 

61.375 

25.544 

6.657 

1.429 

3.170 

73.978 

67.304 

41.876 

424 

20.644 

729 

17.320 

11.262 

19,540 

2, 
26.457 

1.959 
23,662 

8,829 

1,526 



474 
867 

2.194 
' 308 

3.725 

2.1 

976 

435.626 

345,671 

69,338 

95 

69,845 

24.072 

69.632 

8.118 

1,934 

2.230 

10.948 

54,056 

140.082 

865 

139.123 

150, 791 
10,693 



84.837 

11 548 

6 863 

1,553 

23.815 

6. 
35.783 

8.532 
13, 

4.644 

1.623 
6.289 
1.542 
2.632 
9.: 
12.235 
153 039 
37.839 
6.802 

9.762 

156.708 
117.297 



1932 



Feb. Mar. Apr. May June July Aug. Sept 



2,749 
19,055 

1,334 
20.975 

6,841 

2,549 

4,550 
327 
610 

2,838 
347 

2,785 

2,933 

346 

407.264 

357.941 

77.555 

66 

60,641 

24,242 

73,921 

8,445 

1.765 

1.769 

12.343 

57.983 

196.522 

3.512 

205,311 

155,516 
11,692 



79.650 

13.625 

8,130 

1,320 

23,377 
6.208 

27,117 
7,870 

14,726 
3,478 

1,930 
8,739 
1,954 
1,819 
9.482 

18 313 
137.793 

46.835 
8.298 

13,942 

200.843 
J 25. 345 



25.970 
1,464 

21.941 
7,603 

2,582 

4,473 
351 
736 

2,491 
376 

2,812 

3,062 

921 

429,537 

233.985 

71.469 

292 

69.138 

26,883 

96,740 



2.409 

1,443 

14,573 

58,322 

238.218 

5,291 

231.621 

186,279 
14,910 



100,973 

20.430 

9,493 

9.822 

24.762 
6.359 

31.244 
7.595 



574 
548 
,19 
215 

778 



8.064 
27.905 

1,342 
18,981 

6,322 

3,148 

4,089 
265 

2,159 

2,213 
280 

2,588 

2,661 

317 
357,117 
97,088 
46,589 
825 
64,5 C 6 
29.300 

174,647 

8,582 

2,332 

2,748 

15,325 

50,512 

189,524 

3 , 60 ; 

130,010 

181,851 
12,116 



126,604 
15,468 
6,69^ 
8,852 

22,259 
7,630 

50,260 
9.655 



19.214 18,208 
4,026 3,796 



3.644 
13.607 

3,850 

1.845 
12.350 
37 108 
141.924 
44.400 

4.640 

15,916 

186.096 
154.735 



4,196 
11,304 

7,167 

1.8)4 

11.154 

75.682 

121.966 

42.477 

2,514 

10,905 

166,607 
169.161 



2,688 

24,479 

596 

19,908 

6,588 

4,335 

4,366 
148 

3.280 

3,670 
331 

2,028 

2,630 

860 
429,206 
51,665 
19,168 
1,010 
51,428 
23,193 

252,232 

11,618 
1,879 
8,126 
15,326 
62,587 

127,518 

5,154 

93,734 

187,905 
11,047 



174,806 
11,097 
4,835 
2,055 

26,511 
6.573 
60. 179 
11,181 
18,267 



2,567 
10.835 
5,114 
1,409 
10.887 



1,170,526 

7.922 

41.235 

21,337 

12,947 

5,548 

1,718 

103,031 

84.255 

12,353 

187 

183 

1.429 

16.127 

2,193 

9,276 

2.871 
25,889 

1,480 
20,934 

5,700 



5,139 
42 
1,765 
7,153 
460 
2,332 

2,613 

946 

429,465 

33,191 

19,111 

942 
45,778 
25,924 

292.715 

10,342 
708 
18,936 
15,615 
68,111 

98,556 

6,120 

58,434 

199,350 
22,644 



157.460 
15 712 
3.713 
2,924 

25,117 
5.372 

60.099 

11 

16.260 
2,254 

3,345 
10.697 
4,109 
1.194 
10 580 



88, 803 | 20 485 

133,5011115,217 

40,254 35.061 

2,363 2.657 



8.177 



168,976 
149. 07« 



8,836 



138 492 



588,611 

6,229 

73,725 

30, 709 

10,826 

7,163 

2,963 

105,914 

83,363 

7,353 

479 

257 

3,554 

5,233 

3,8~,i 



3,017 
31,219 

1,902 
14,944 

5, 

3,643 

5,873 
159 
1,241 
8,347 
1,937 
2,054 

2,093 

1,558 
109,383 
33,841 
22,265 
848 
45,649 
23,909 

177,172 

5,802 
733 
17,396 
14,577 
72,116 

69,996 
3,159 
63,977 

135,208 
15,993 



177,601 

23,058 

4,514 

9,156 

20,059 
5,601 
57,693 
11,739 
16,^88 
1,936 

4,934 
8,941 
3,592 
1,620 

10,913 

9, V 9 

106,001 

33,399 
2,872 



,054 



187,213 
121,859 



811,770 

2,144 

21,543 

25,896 

10, 456 

2,780 

2,819 

103,0 8 

79,984 

9, 99 

626 

4,521 

7,513 

1,417 

8,959 

8,575 

2,471 
34,139 

2,610 
13,106 

7,048 



4,747 
167 

1,328 

6,415 
485 

2,031 

2,416 

1, 

414,123 
83,943 
23,853 
1,032 
21,354 
23,185 

292,224 

9,050 

1,106 

16,311 

13,481 

55,81,' 

70,067 

2. 

47,763 

125,939 
13,093 



208,541 
17,138 
6,905 
1,376 

17,789 
5,659 

57,194 
9,393 

15.639 
3,277 

7,214 

5,242 

2,6>3 

1,374 

11,435 

13,373 

102,453 

37,939 

3,559 

9,877 

160,890 
133,121 



2,318,995 

1,686 

43,973 

64,765 

9,814 

1,495 

2,121 

10[), 753 

76,81*3 

10,808 

488 

34,47, 

17,704 

9,405 

20.0U2 

40,362 

1,973 
41,505 

4,170 
12,325 

6,459 

2,943 

5,133 

191 
772 

4,895 
743 

2,612 

2,997 

2,725 
443,921 
199,236 
35,818 
542 
25,848 
28,949 

215,154 

6,587 

1,752 

12,221 

12,729 

66,725 

110,374 

1,537 

63,795 

128,157 
11,378 



185,461 

19,816 

4,193 

926 

20,232 
5,630 
53,426 
12,466 
14,281 
1,694 

3,639 

3,047 

2,644 

1,611 

10,132 

18,216 

102.204 

37,895 

3,712 

10,462 

144,933 
130,766 



Oct. 



,670,293 

3,041 

59,399 

32,749 

10,955 

7,037 

7,047 

144,778 

91,206 

15,999 

455 

67,081 

9,193 

30,366 

18,830 

107,973 

2,369 
38,232 
11,203 
14,516 

7,496 

2,373 

4,526 
242 
505 

4,332 
439 

2,782 

3,064 

4,505 

426,425 

430,350 

57,711 

360 

31,238 

28,123 

209,773 



1,630 
9,187 
13,977 
77.499 

182,086 

702 

71,378 

136,595 
14,113. 



147,274 
17,707 
8,839 
1,084 

13,098 
4,401 

40,414 
8,603 

15,421 
1..922 

1,752 
3,634 
4,842 
2,031 
10,591 
18,744 
112,913 
47,546 
5,654 

12,708 

154,431 
128,511 



18 



MONTHLY REVIEW OF BUSINESS STATISTICS 



Table 12. Indexes of Employment by Industries 


, Year 1926 = 100 






Industries— First of Month 


1932 


1933 


Jan. 


Feb. 


Mar. 


April 


May 


June 


July 


Aug. 


Sept. 


Oct. 


Nov. 


Dec. 


Jan. 


Indexes of Employment Un- 
adjusted- 
All Industries 


91-6 
83-9 
95 1 

78-1 
78-7 
55-6 
411 
85-2 
77-2 
58-0 
94-7 
89-9 
76-1 
91-7 

107-7 
82-2 
90-3 
97-4 

103-3 

81-4 

74-4 
119-3 
115-5 
123-7 

99-5 
110-6 

77-1 
118-4 
126-4 

70-7 

59-2 

86-9 
25-0 
75-6 
56-9 

60-9 
61-8 

82-4 

71-8 

74-3 
93-6 
117-3 

98-4 
68-7 

105-1 
99-1 

134-8 

76-5 
98-1 
98-7 
98-0 
85-6 
112-4 
82-5 
68-0 
104-8 
64-3 
197-1 
63-7 
114-4 
107-7 
128-2 
120-6 
125-7 
135-4 
103-9 


89-7 
85-9 
921 
76 9 
86 2 
57-8 
41-8 
910 
80-4 
59-7 
91-1 
88-8 
73 4 
93-4 
107-9 
90 9 
96 3 
103-8 
106-1 

88-8 

80-6 
119-2 
120-9 
115-5 

97-9 
110 3 

76-7 
115-7 
124-9 

73-4 

67-4 

81-8 
29-7 
77-9 
70-3 

68-0 

68-9 

84-9 

77-0 

75-3 
93-7 

115-0 
1Q4-0 

68-5 
102-4 

97-8 
133-9 

65-4 

97-3 
97-5 
97-3 
83-4 
110-9 
79-7 
67-8 
90-4 
59-1 
1600 
60-2 
112-1 
105-4 
128-4 
117-3 
117 2 
123-7 
102-5 


88-7 

87-0 

91-6 

79-8 

89-5 

58-2 

42-2 

84-9 

86-1 

48-7 

93-2 

87-2 

71-4 

95-6 

105-2 

911 

100-2 

108-6 

109-6 

92-6 

83-2 
120-9 
1211 
120-0 
113-5 
109-6 

760 
1160 
123-1 

74-9 

67-0 

81-8 
32-4 
80-7 
74-8 

65-8 
73-2 

83-2 

74-2 

76-8 

95-9 
116-2 
100-4 

60-6 
101-1 

94-4 
134-0 

69-7 
95-2 
95-R 
95-1 
81-9 
110-0 
77-8 
69-0 
83-3 
55-0 
138-6 
62-5 
114-7 
110-2 
130-2 
117-4 
113-6 
119-6 
100-0 


87-5 
87-3 
92-7 
76-9 
91-6 
58-8 
43-0 
81-2 
89-7 
40-1 
93-2 
88-6 
74-4 
94-7 
105-6 
89-7 
101-0 
109-2 
110-9 

93-5 

83-2 
116-8 
115-2 
118-6 

93-1 
112-7 

75-8 
115-6 
119-9 

75-6 

71-3 

82-9 
291 
81-7 
75-6 

67-9 
76-4 

77-2 

73-6 

77-6 

92-8 
116-3 
102 3 

311 
101-0 

93-8 
135-1 

70-3 
93-9 
94-4 
93-8 
81-9 
110-9 
77-6 
67-5 
79-9 
51-7 
134-9 
59-4 
113-9 
107-7 
127-9 
119-4 
114-3 
120-2 
100-8 


87-5 
85-8 
97 1 
75 9 
91 4 
601 
45-5 
77 1 
91-6 
33-7 
93-4 
87-3 
72-4 
96-2 
104 2 
85-9 
100-7 
108-5 
111-2 

93-0 

83-9 
120 6 
120-3 
120-3 

91 5 
113-6 

77-0 
114 1 
116-5 

70-5 

65-2 

81-7 
27-3 
73-7 
81-7 

65-9 
73-2 

71-2 

74-9 

760 

83 2 
119 4 
102 8 

32-5 
97-9 
89 4 
131-1 

731 
941 
96 6 
93 5 

84 3 
112 3 

77-7 
820 
83-2 
58 5 
130-7 
65 8 
/14 7 
107 4 
130 3 
1?1 4 
116-2 
123 
1010 


89-1 
860 

F6-3 
86-0 
91-5 
64-2 
51 3 
77-4 
93 3 
31 3 
96-9 
88-3 
72 8 
991 

105-3 
86-4 
98-9 

107-0 

108-6 

91-9 

81-0 
112-4 
1071 
119-7 

78-8 
114-1 

83 1 
117-4 
109-9 

69-4 

58-8 

78-6 

27-4 
73-8 
86-3 

65.4 
76-5 

680 

74-3 

75-3 
78-4 

123-3 
97-5 
37-9 
96-8 
86-5 

133-0 

74-4 
941 
980 
93 1 
85 5 
113 1 
77-1 

91 4 

92 9 
P2-9 

147 7 
740 
116 8 
111 1 
129 4 
121-9 
116 1 
122-1 
102-4 


88-7 
85-4 

114-7 
84-6 
86-5 
64-8 
54-7 
71 2 
91-0 
29-4 

100-5 
87-9 
73-7 
96-7 

104-0 
86-2 
96-2 

103-6 

107-7 

891 

77-6 
112-0 
106-7 
118-5 

82-7 
109-9 

78-2 
117-4 
109-0 

68-2 

61-7 

77-6 
281 
72-7 
87-8 

62-4 
72-6 

63-8 

69-9 

72-5 
78-2 

123-6 
99-« 
34-2 
95-0 
83-2 

132-2 

76-1 
93-1 

95-3 
, 92-7 
85-9 
1140 
77-7 
90-4 
93-3 
59-1 
149-7 
77 3 
119-9 
118-2 
130-7 
119-5 
115-4 
121-8 
100-8 


86-3 
82 6 
113 3 
82-0 
88-8 
59 8 
51 8 
62-4 

82 2 
34-9 

103-6 
86-6 
73-1 
940 

102-2 
80-7 
91 8 

101-2 

103-5 

81-8 

75-2 
110-4 
106-3 
115-2 

67 1 
105-9 

71-2 
116-9 
105-7 

64-3 

54-2 

72-5 
23-4 
69-1 
72-5 

69-8 
64-3 

61-6 

710 

67-7 
78-3 
120-6 
97-2 
29 1 
94 8 

83 5 
132-3 

73-9 
93 5 

98-2 
92-4 
85-3 
114-0 
76-8 
90-0 
90- 
571 
14^-9 
72 3 
117-0 
114-4 
126-9 
118-2 
113-8 
118-9 
102-0 


86-0 
83-1 

112-7 
79-6 
91-4 
59-4 
50-4 
67-3 
810 
50-1 

109-2 
88-5 
76-1 
98-3 

101-7 
80-7 
93-9 

102-6 

104-7 

87-4 

70-9 
112-6 
106-3 
121-1 

84-6 
106-9 

69-9 
117-6 
101-3 

621 

60-8 

71-4 
22-4 
64-8 
57-3 

66-4 

78-5 

53-9 

61-5 

65-4 
80-6 

122-2 
96-4 
26-0 
96-5 
87-6 

130-0 

72-6 
92-9 
96-0 
92-2 
86-5 
118-4 
77-3 
90-2 
84-4 
52-8 
133-4 
73-3 
119-4 
120-1 
128-9 
116-0 
1131 
117-3 
103-1 


86-7 
84-1 

109-7 
88-6 
90-6 
58-1 
46-6 
72-9 
82-2 
48-5 

121-0 
87-3 
73-4 
99-7 

101-7 
81-0 
98-6 

105-0 

110-0 

92-1 

80-9 
115-2 
109-8 
122-7 

95-9 
107-5 

70-2 
113-9 
105-2 

61-1 

59-8 

68-9 
21-4 
62-4 
46-0 

61-8 
81-7 

54-8 

64-9 

67-4 
81-7 

121-4 
991 
28-4 
98-2 
89-2 

131-9 

74-0 
91-2 
91-8 

91-0 
87-2 
120-7 
77-7 
90-7 
84-3 
49-1 
137-3 
73-4 
109-8 
104-5 
128-6 
113-0 
114-5 
1190 
103-8 


84-7 
81-7 

98-2 
87-0 
89-3 
54-7 
40-9 
75-8 
80-4 
480 
111-7 
88-0 
73-8 
101,4 
102-3 
82-0 
99-2 
106-2 
115-2 

91-8 

75-9 
109-6 
103 -0 
118-9 
117-7 
108-1 

61-1 
111 6 
108-0 

57-6 

61-2 

62 4 
21-9 

55 3 

47-5 

64-3 
82-4 

52-6 

66-5 

67-9 

82-9 
119-0 
1010 

37-9 
101-2 

93-9 
134-9 

70-7 
89-6 
89-5 
89 6 
84-5 
1191 
74-5 
87-8 
77-9 
42-4 
134-9 
63-6 
106-5 
98-7 
126-5 
113-2 
115-4 
121-2 
102-5 


83-2 
80-3 
950 
810 
86-7 
50-6 
36-2 
73 9 
76-2 
43 9 

102 9 
'86 1 
70-2 
99-3 

102-9 
861 
96 3 

105-4 

1151 

850 

73-5 
121-7 
125 4 
115-6 
105-2 
106-9 

53-9 
110-6 
101-5 

60-5 

63-7 

67-7 
24-2 
62-1 
50-9 

54-5 
72-0 

46-2 

62-8 

65-3 
79-8 
118-2 

98-4 
56-2 
99-9 
93-4 
134-0 

65 3 
89 3 
84-6 
90-5 
83-9 
116-6 
72-9 
94 2 
67-6 
37-4 
115-4 
56-3 
103-7 
94-8 
125 3 
111 8 
117-8 
124-8 
101-3 


78-5 




74-4 


Animal products — edible 


92 

77-8 


Leather and products 

Lumber and products 

Rough and dressed lumber. 

Furniture 

Other lumber products 


77-6 
43-2 
30-0 
641 
67-0 
22-9 


Plant products — edible 

Pulp and paper products 


88-4 
82-2 
67-1 




89-4 


Printing and publishing 


100-5 
75-6 




88-1 


Thread, yarn and cloth 

Hosiery and knit goods 

Garments and personal fur- 


100-6 
103-0 

75-3 


Other textile products 

Plant products (n.e.s.) 


P5-9 
120-6 
124-8 


Distilled and malt liquors.. 
Wood distillates and extracts . 
Chemicals and allied products 
Clay, glass and stone products 


113-0 
108-9 
101-8 
50-1 
108-3 




96-4 


Iron and steel products 

Crude, rolled and forged 


56-3 
47-6 


Machinery (other than ve- 
hicles) 

Agricultural implements — 


63-1 
22-9 
64-2 


Automobiles and parts.... 
Steel shipbuilding and re- 


57-9 
53-2 


Heating appliances 

Iron and steel fabrication 


54-3 
43-4 


Foundry and machine shop 


57-0 


Other iron and steel pro- 


53-2 


Non-ferrous metal products.. . 


74-7 
115-4 




93-5 




74-5 




96-9 


Coal... 


91-6 
129-8 


Non-metallic minerals (ex- 


59-3 




87-5 




83-9 




88-4 




78-3 


Street railways and cartage.. . 


114-2 
71-6 


Shipping and stevedoring. 

Construction and Maintenance. 


64-7 
32-4 
29-7 




97-1 


Railwav 


53-7 




102-2 


Hotels and restaurants 

Professional 

Personal (chiefly laundries)... 
Trade 


95-2 
116-6 

109-2 
119-6 


Retail 


12^-4 


Whol?*»)e 


98-9 



Electrical Energy Available for Consumption, Million K.W.H. 1 


Economic 


1931 


1932 


Area 


Dec. 


Jan. 


Feb. 


Mar. 


April 


May 


June 


July 


Aug. 


Sept. 


Oct. 


Nov. 


Dec. 


Maritime Provinces. 

Quebec 

Ontario 

British Columbia... 


53-6 
582-1 
45<J-5 
104-5 


57-7 
576 -9 
459-0 
107-1 


55-0 
546-3 
440-9 

96-5 


52-2 
584-6 
468-8 
10)-5 


59-7 
576-7 
433-1 

92-7 


62 2 
522-6 
433-6 

92-8 


56-3 
492-9 
40? -4 

85-1 


47-4 
467-7 
399-1 

87-9 


53-5 

509-9 

412-5 

89-1 


57-3 
527-2 
427-6 

90-5 


610 
601-2 
462-5 

94-0 


64-5 
654-6 
468-0 

95 


63-9 
032-0 
455-8 
102-1 



Production plus provincial imports less provincial exports 



MONTHLY REVIEW OF BUSINESS STATISTICS 



19 



Table 13. Indexes of Employment with Seasonal Adjustment, Indexes of Retail Sales 

Automobile Financing. 



Classification 



Seasonally Adjusted Indexes of 
Employment— All Industries. 

Manufacturing 

Leather and products 

Rough and dressed lumber 

Furniture 

Musical Instruments 

Pulp and paper 

Paper products 

Printing and publishing 

Rubber products 

Textile products 

Thread, yarn and cloth 

Hosiery and knit goods 

Clay, glass and stone products. . 

Electric current 

Electric apparatus 

Iron and steel products 

Crude, rolled and forged pro- 
ducts 

Machinery other than vehicles. . 

Agricultural implements 

Automobiles and parts 

Logging 

Mining 

Metallic ores 

Non metallic minerals except 
coal 

Telephones 

Transportation 

Street railways and cartage ... 

Steam railways 

Shipping and stevedoring 

Construction and Maintenance. 

Building 

Highway 

Railway 

Hotels and Restaurants 

Trade 

Retail 

Wholesale 

Economic areas and cities — 

Maritime Provinces 

Quebec 

Ontario 

Prairie Provinces 

British Columbia 

Montreal 

Quebec 

Toronto 

Ottawa 

Hamilton 

Windsor 

Winnipeg 

Vancouver 



Indexes of Retail Sales, January. 

1929 = 100— 

Boots and shoes (6) 

Candy (6) 

Clothing (9) 

Drugs (7) 

Dyers and cleaners (4) 

Furniture (4) 

General and departmental, 25 

stores and 4 chains 

Groceries and meats (23) 

Hardware (5) 

Music and radio (4) 

Restaurants (11) 

General index 

Automobile Financing— 

Total new and used cars— 

Number 

Percentage change, 1932 to 1931. 
Financing in dollars $000 . . 
Percentage change, 1932 to 1931. 









1932 








1933 


Jan. 


[Feb. 


| Mar. 


1 April 1 May 1 June 1 July 1 Aug. 


| Sept 


Oct. |Nov. 


|Dec. 


Jan. 


First of Month 





98-2 

91-4 
80-6 
59-2 
93-6 
57-8 
80-7 
98 2 

105 5 
88-8 
94-8 
97-5 

109 5 
86-7 

123-2 

126-8 
771 

64-6 
91-3 

26-3 
81 3 
490 
102-9 
138-5 

85-7 
990 
88-6 
1161 
830 
86-5 
1480 
80-2 
326-9 
86-8 
118- 1 
1191 
124-2 
104-6 



115-5 
94-2 

100-3 
96-8 
89-6 

941 

103-2 
1010 
116-3 
94-2 
111-8 
91 1 
951 



91 

89 

84-7 
57-5 
90 
60-7 
76-7 
94-5 
106-2 
88-7 
95-5 
103-5 
105-8 
871 
122-4 
125-2 
74 9 

71 4 

82-0 
291 
73 3 

45 9 
101 1 
137-4 

75-5 
100- 1 

88 3 
115-2 

820 

90-3 
133-9 

771 
387-4 

83-6 
106-7 
119-5 
124-9 
104-6 



104-9 
91-6 
96-3 
96-7 
84-7 

95 

106-8 
102 1 
114-4 
94-7 
79 9 
93-4 
96-7 



1931 



Nov. 



93-3 

72-5 
102-7 

90-8 
109-4 

92-7 



117-4 
94-5 

100-6 
80-5 
69-5 

103 1 



5,162 
-24 1 

2,146 
-29-5 



Dec. 



125-5 
146-0 
132- 1 
103-9 
78-7 



195-9 
96-6 

142- 1 
82 
78-5 

141-7 



4,901 
—28-5 

1,827 
—38-9 



1 92-7 



96-9 
911 
94-6 
95-1 
84-1 

96-7 
110-9 
102-2 
106-0 
93-8 
74-7 
92-8 



921 
90-6 
95 1 
95 2 
84-6 



100-2 

109 9 
89 
94 1 
91-3 

89 7 



89 6 

85 1 

92 3 
47 6 
75 5 
34 6 
72 8 
95 9 

104-8 
84 2 

98 4 
107 5 
110" 

77-7 
117-7 
117-0 

68 7 

61 5 
79 8 
26 
66 1 
42 9 
10) -5 
133 8 

74-7 

93 9 

87 5 
114 4 
81 1 
89-5 

99 9 
660 

269 4 
70 3 
117-6 
117 ° 
124 8 
1^2-8 



89-6 
8^ 9 

91 1 

92 8 
82-9 

92-3 
107-4 

97 9 
103-1 

86 6 
80 3 
89 2 

87 3 



85-3 
80-1 
84-6 
84-6 
76 1 

82-1 
97-2 
91-8 
91-5 
78-9 
78-0 
85-1 
84-2 



83-7 
81-4 
82-5 
87-0 
77-4 

82-7 
101-4 
90-0 
92-6 
75 8 
69 3 
82-5 
84-8 



83 4 

81-8 
90-1 
38-9 
72-2 
46-4 
71-7 
96-9 
102-6 
83-2 
98-3 
105-1 
109-7 
66-6 
109-4 
103-6 
61-7 

60-1 
68-4 
23-9 
47-8 
33-6 
96-6 
128-6 

67-1 
89-5 
82-8 

1151 
74-8 
78-5 
66-2 
40-1 
87 
64 
07 

114 

120 

100 



83-9 
94-2 
90-8 
88-2 
75-9 
50-3 
82-2 
85 1 



82 

80-9 
87-9 
39-7 
74-0 
43-7 
73-2 
98-6 
102-2 

83 -r, 
97-4 

105-1 
111-3 

58-5 
108-7 
104-7 

58-2 

62-1 
62-8 
22-7 
52-5 
32-8 
98- 
131-2 

66-4 
89-3 
80-2 
114-4 
71-6 
761 
66-1 
36-1 
100-7 
60-6 
102-9 
113-7 
120-2 
99-6 



87-0 
79-6 
80-3 
86-0 
75-2 

81-1 

92-7 
89-7 
91-9 
76-1 
66-0 
81-0 
86-2 



82-4 
81-4 
84-5 

43-6 

71 

39-9 

71-6 

95 
102 

85 

95 
103 
110-3 

53-2 
110-7 

98-4 

60-6 

64 

68-2 
24 
60-3 
38 
97 
132-7 

64-6 
90-2 
80-8 

1151 
71-2 
83-2 
69-9 
36-0 

120-9 
66- 

102- 

111-6 

115-2 
99-2 



86-1 
81 3 

82-6 
83-3 
74-2 

82-5 

93-4 

87-8 

94 

75-3 

65-5 

78-5 

84-5 



1932 



Jan. 



79-5 
90-6 



420 
66-7 
78-7 



4,052 
— 19 6 

1,445 
-34-2 



Feb. 



48 1 
69 8 
52-1 
87 4 
75-4 
64-5 

78-7 
83-8 
54-1 
34-9 
650 
75-3 



4,170 
-22-3 

1.529 
-35-2 



Mar. 



62-5 
103-0 
85 8 
90 8 
88-3 
49 5 

89-3 
89-5 
65-6 
31 9 
67 3 
85-7 



4.950 
-38 2 

2,025 
-430 



April 



87-3 
72 3 
98-4 

87-4 
127-8 
53-6 

103 1 

92-4 
93-9 
28 6 
680 
94-5 



7,345 
-49-5 

3,000 
-52-5 



May 



75-3 
91-7 
79-3 
119-6 
52-9 

103-9 
85-7 

120- 1 
26-6 
64-5 
91-8 



9.615 



J, 788 
-40-1 



June 



107-5 
63-7 

110-8 
84-4 

119-2 
43 7 

102-3 
83-4 
109-5 

20-9 
62-6 
92-6 



9,151 

-20-7 
3,472 
-29-4 



July 



83-1 
70-9 
68-7 
79-0 
93-2 
32-7 

88-0 
86-7 
89-2 
15-9 
63-9 
82-0 



6,632 
-35-8 

2,475 
-41-0 



Aug. 



57-3 
69-2 
51-6 
79 3 

92-2 
44-9 

81 6 
76-0 
94-0 
221 
65-6 
74-1 



6,065 
—10 9 

2,185 

-24-8 



Sept 



71-6 

62-7 
80-7 
76-8 
123-5 
54-9 

94-0 
80-6 
104-5 
38 8 
64-7 
84-2 



5,018 
-15-8 
1,897 
-27-4 



Oct. 



76-5 
68-3 
87-2 
81-2 
108-8 
58-4 

109-9 
88-2 

102-7 
39-0 
61-5 
94-0 



4,361 
-32-2 
1,583 
-40-5 



84 i 

810 

79-5 
43-2 
70-4 
22-8 
71-2 
95-7 
98-4 
81-6 
92-4 
10-J -7 
109-3 
56-4 
112-7 
96-7 
61-4 

51-9 
66-3 
24-1 
82-7 
53-1 
75-3 
133-4 



86« 

89' 

81 
117 

72 

82- 

45 

37- 
161 • 

73 
104 
113 
117-8 

99-6 



83-2 

84-9 
84-3 
88-1 

77-4 

82-9 
94-8 
87-6 
91-7 
73-0 
85-5 
79-6 
86-1 



Nov. 



78-3 
57-0 
85-2 
79-3 
92-2 
59-4 

97-7 
80-4 
79-4 
40-7 
55-8 
85-7 



4,286 
-17-0 

1,334 
-37-8 



20 



MONTHLY REVIEW OF BUSINESS STATISTICS 
Table 14. Trend of Business in the Five Economic Areas 1 



Areas and Items 



Business in Five Economic 
Areas— 

Canada— 

Contracts awarded $000 

Building Permits $000 

Employment. Average 1928—100 

Bank Debits $000,000 

Sales of Insurance $000 

Commercial Failures... Number 

Maritime Provinces— 

Contracts Awarded $000 

Building Permits $000 

Employment.Average 1928-100 

Bank Debits $000,000 

Sales of Insurance $000 

Commercial Failures... Number 

Quebec — 

Contracts Awarded $000 

Building Permits $000 

Emolovment.Average 1926-100 

Bank Debits $000,000 

Sales of Insurance $000 

Commercial Failures... Number 

Ontario — 

Contracts Awarded $000 

Building Permits $000 

Employment.Average 1926-100 

Bank Debits $000,000 

Sales of Insurance $000 

Commercial Failures... Number 

Prairie Provinces— 

Contracts Awarded $000 

Building Permits $000 

Employment.Average 1926—100 

Bank Debits $000,000 

Sales of Insurance $000 

Commercial Failures... Number 

British Columbia— 

Contracts Awarded $000 

Building Permits $000 

Employment.Average 1926-100 

Bank Debits $000,000 

Sales of Insurance $000 

Commercial Failures... Number 



1931 



Dec 



11.25 
7.895 
PI 

2,639 

46,951 

196 

623 
77 
111 
57 

3.363 
16 

3,970 

3,08 

86-: 

77 

14,044 

72 

4,223 

3,867 

93-8 

1,194 

18,999 

68 

1,345 

583 

92-? 

458 

7,376 

43 

1,096 

281 

80-6 

154-9 

3,169 



1932 



12.738 
2 

S9-7 

2,071 

37.082 

238 

416 
85 
99 

48-4 

2.207 

15 

2,«2n 

930 

85-9 

666 

11,167 



6.347 

1,053 

92 7 

8 

16.537 

91 

1.906 

317 

91 3 

. 359 

5,203 

35 

1,249 

376 

77-5 

134-7 

1,968 

15 



14,803 

2,579 

88 7 

1,990 

37, c 5: 

221 

3.023 

V0 

931 

39-6 

2,275 

12 

7,C 

797 

86-5 

576 

12,157 

92 

3,956 

1,174 

91-8 

922 

16,390 

79 

243 
281 
88-2 
329 
4,92.9 
30 

501 
247 

78-7 

123-3 

2,112 

8 



10.767 

3,324 

87-5 

2.024 

37,206 



312 

72 

88-3 

41-2 

2,395 

13 

3,297 

950 

85-0 

638 

11,354 

78 

4,579 

1,698 

91-1 

861 

16,035 



2,006 
345 
86-1 

353 

5,031 

40 

572 

259 

80-9 

130-4 

2,391 

9 



10.113 

4.237 

87 5 

2 074 

33,425 

190 

585 

473 

87 8 

42 5 

1,781 

13 

2.948 
830 

86 
596 

9,845 
75 

4,018 
1 820 

89 5 

925 

14,851 

79 

1,724 
825 

87 6 
379 

4,702 
17 



82-7 
131 1 
2,246 



14,186 

5,290 

89 1 

2.175 

30, 779 

204 



147 
96-4 

49-2 

1,939 

14 

7,390 

1,467 

87-8 

676 

8,913 

80 

4,168 

1,511 

89-9 

967 

13.660 

79 

1,417 

1,904 

89-3 

358 

4,289 

20 

874 

262 

83 7 

124-9 

1,978 
11 



June 


July 


Aug. 


Sept. 


Oct. 


Nov 


12,155 


12,540 


12,689 


9,647 


8,876 


10,170 


4 388 


4,227 


3,331 


2,204 


3/56 


2,505 


88-7 86-3 


86-0 


86-7 


84-7 


83 2 


2.213 


2,176 


2,116 


2.098 


2,367 


2.466 


40.744 


34.226 


28, 124 


25,023 


29,657 


33,739 


176 


175 


188 


192 


199 


229 


1.333 


630 


961 


344 


508 


348 


131 


207 


11« 


71 


139 


134 


96-4 


90-1 


87-8 


84-9 


86-8 


83-8 


43-6 


46-2 


41-8 


43-3 


43-2 


40 6 


2,242 


2,381 


1,797 


1,532 


1,749 


2,068 


18 


8 


9 


9 


15 


15 


4,16 c 


3,444 


6,858 


3,475 


4,859 


4,938 


1,535 


2,120 


1,145 


455 


1.289 


609 


86-6 


84-4 


85-3 


85-8 


83-6 


82 9 


693 


647 


641 


623 


692 


710 


13,116 


9,924 


8.533 


7,757 


8,92' 


9,895 


61 


72 


86 


89 


80 


89 


4,321 


6,793 


3,360 


4,691 


2,722 


2,861 


2,064 


1,115 


977 


901 


1,154 


1,522 


89-2 


86-9 


85 1 


86-1 


84-2 


84-1 


944 


975 


895 


917 


927 


1,158 


17,258 


14,587 


11,608 


10,433 


12,498 


14.461 


70 


65 


72 


64 


73 


SO 


1,852 


1,023 


830 


644 


628 


828 


470 


480 


367 


337 


222 


104 


90-5 


90-1 


91-6 


94-6 


91-6 


86-7 


397 


388 


406 


402 


£80 


435 


5,750 


5,323 


4,370 


3.633 


4,680 


5,291 


17 


21 


15 


21 


26 


35 


474 


651 


679 


493 


159 


1,196 


188 


304 


724 


439 


253 


136 


83-7 81-4 


82-8 


82-1 


77-8 


73 8 


124-1 


118-3 


131-8 


112-1 


124-6 


122-2 


2,378 


2,011 


1,816 


1.668 


1,802 


2,024 


10 


9 


6 


9 


5 


10 



4,190 

1,481 

78-5 

2,085 

33,249 



542 

72 

801 

39-4 

2,042 



1,248 

261 

77-8 

606 

9,793 



1,476 

939 

78-8 

904 

14,290 



48 

137 

84-4 

410 

5,083 



875 

72 

69-7 

125-3 

2,041 



'Employment indexes apply to first of following month. 







Table 15. 


Mineral Production by Months 












Minerals 


1931 


1932 


Nov. 


Dec. 


Jan. 


Feb. 


Mar. 


Apr. 


May 


June 


July 


Aug. 


Sept. 


Oct 


Nov. 


Mineral Production 




























Metals— 
Gold 


000 oz. 

000 oz. 
tons 
tons 
tons 
tons 


234-0 
1.548 
1.693 

11,821 
8,729 
7,921 


240-6 

1 525 

1 765 

11.545 

10,686 
7,289 


233-? 
1,773 
1,594 
9/38 
10, 734 
7,555 


225-9 
1,601 
1,787 
11,214 
10,077 
7,112 


255-7 
1.460 
1.877 
11 831 
10.666 
7,583 


246-4 
1.645 
1.692 
11,039 
10.812 
7,325 


268-5 
1.418 
1,736 
10,678 
10,075 
7,624 


270-5 
1,311 
1.581 
10.335 
11,228 
7,333 


247-9 
1,825 
1,480 
9.045 
10,027 
7,603 


262-6 
1,447 
420 
8.802 
10,899 
6,866 


260-5 
1,172 
339 
9,406 
9,947 
6,651 


253-1 
1,511 
1,071 
11,293 
9,930 
6,852 


252-5 


Nickel 

Copper 

Lead 


614 
8,858 
13,180 


Zinc 


6,653 


Fuels— 

Coal 

Petroleum 

Natural Gas 


000 tons 

000 bbls. 

000 M cu. ft 


1,253 
99-0 
2,540 


1,203 
106 2 
2,899 


1,188 

96-9 

3,220 


1,230 

90-8 

3,044 


1,049 

97 5 

3.010 


739 

95-6 

2,354 


697 
95-2 
1,760 


752 
89-5 
1,131 


653 

86-9 

982 


720 
85-2 
912 


929 
79-8 
1,158 


1,229 
78-8 
1,712 


1.263 
77-1 

2,182 


Non-metals— 

Asbestos 

Gypsum 

Feldspar 

Salt 


tons 

000 tons 

tons 

tons 


14,068 
50-13 
1,207 

14,354 


10,523 

53-20 

591 

13,641 


10,190 
6 41 

700 
9,723 


7,706 

6-10 

945 

10,332 


8.937 

5 86 

1 160 

13,093 


8,830 

15-55 

415 

15,326 


9,942 

32-24 

423 

15,406 


7,977 

70-71 

479 

15,409 


7,164 

80-14 

635 

13,869 


9.918 

69-46 

360 

14,331 


11.001 

52 53 

375 

15,218 


13.232 

52-34 

482 

16,683 


11,616 

27-60 

433 

18,640 


Structural Materials— 

Cement 000 bbls. 

Clay products. ... $ 000 
Lime tons 


793 

660 

29,628 


371 

526 
23,972 


271 

335 
23.685 


236 

296 

23,632 


276 

311 

29.108 


427 

362 

26,744 


531 

404 
30,014 


567 

428 

27,290 


457 

375 

27,185 


510 

386 

27,733 


509 

356 

28,550 


411 

323 
34,822 


193 



MONTHLY REVIEW OF BUSINESS STATISTICS 
Table 16. Weekly Indicators of Economic Activity in Canada, 1932-3 



21 



Items 



Statistics of Grain Trade— 

Receipts Country Elevators— 

Wheat 000 bushels 

Oats 000 bushels 

Barley 000 bushels 

Flax 000 bushels 

Rye 000 bushels 

Visible Supply— 

Wheat 000,000 bushels 

Oats 000 bushels 

Barley 000 bushels 

Flax 000 bushels 

Rye 000 bushels 

Aver. Cash Price Ft. William and Pt. 

k Arthur— 
Wheat No. 1 Nor $ per bush . 
Oats No. 2C.W 

Barley No. 3 C.W 

Flax No. 1 N.W.C 

Rye No. 1 C.W 

Sales and Prices of Live Stock— 
Sales on Stock Yards— 

Cattle No 

Calves " 

Hogs J 

Sheep " 

Prices at Toronto — 

Steers, 1,000-1,200 lbs per cwt. $ 

Calves, good veal " $ 

Hogs, thick smooth " $ 

Lambs, good handy weight " $ 

Carloadings, Totals- 
Grain and grain products 

Live Stock 

Coal 

Coke 

Lumber 

Pulpwood 

Pulp and paper 

Other forest products 

Ore 

Mdse L.C.L 

Miscellaneous 

Total cars loaded 

Total cars received from connections 

Indexes of Carloadings, 1926=100 — 

Grain and grain products 

Live Stock 

Coal 

Coke 

t Lumber 
Pulpwood 
Pulp and paper 
Other forest products 
Ore 
Merchandise 
Miscellaneous 
Total for Canada 
Eastern Division 
Western Division 

Indexes of Common Stock Prices— 
Industrials — 

Total (96) 

Iron and steel(19) 

Pulp and paper (9) 

Milling (5) .' 

Oils (4) 

Textiles and clothing (9) 

Food and allied products (21) 

Beverages (8) 

Miscellaneous (21) 

Utilities— 

Total (18) 

Transportation (2) 

Telephone and telegraph (2) 

Power and traction (14) 

Companies Abroad — 

Total (8) 

Industrial (1) 

Utility (7) 

Grand total (122) 



November 



Mining Stocks — 

Gold (11) 

Copper (4) 

Silver and miscellaneous (5), 
Total Index (20) 



9,996 

537 

113 

82 

30 

242 

8,524 

5,225 

1,554 

5,067 



•459 
•231 

•286 
•676 
•275 



13,936 
5.757 
21,786 
16,339 

3-47 
6-92 
4-00 
4-64 

8,937 

1,623 

7,934 

630 

927 

700 

1,307 

1,602 

570 

13,319 

7.987 

45,536 

18,286 



48-72 
89 05 
3312 
25-18 
51-21 
55-40 
50-86 
29-22 
75-65 
46-45 
57-56 
58-92 
55-84 



55-6 
47-2 
2-2 
44-5 
89-1 
31 8 
79-2 
43-7 
63-9 

41-7 
31-4 

65-1 
48-3 

41-4 
56-9 
28-5 
48-0 



54-6 
69-3 
23-1 
56^7 



4S 



242-9 
8,364 
5,225 
1,693 
4,892 



•480 
■241 
•308 
•715 
•303 



10,865 
5,214 
19,233 
15.887 



5-£2 
3-f2 
4-75 

10,207 

1,516 

6,828 

583 

922 

556 

1,232 

1,690 

706 

12,228 

7,808 

44,276 

17,345 

57 10 

46-96 
83 81 
115-45 
29 14 
47 24 
49 98 

62 59 
38 58 
82 29 
54-69 

63 25 
65-03 
61-11 



57-8 
48-7 
21 
43-5 
89-9 
32-5 
80 7 
45-8 
69-5 

43 5 
34-3 
65-0 
49-1 

42-5 
56 9 
30-6 
49-8 



55-7 
74-9 
23 9 
58-8 



8,871 
845 
335 
35 
40 

237 

8,2 

5,407 

1,435 

4, 



•477 
•251 
•311 

•71', 
•303 



12,175 
5,354 
27,193 
15,372 

3-50 

5-08 
3-70 
4-74 

9,446 

1,654 

7,483 

860 

869 

760 

1,379 

1,720 

725 

12,862 

8,192 

45,950 

17,594 

48-68 
50 61 
83 63 
184 55 
27-47 
61-84 
57-29 
57-68 
36 67 
74-13 
50 18 
59-27 
61-89 
55-99 



58 

49-5 
2 
42-8 
91 8 
330 
78-9 
45 2 
71 6 

43-6 
33-6 
65-0 
50-2 

45 5 
63 2 

30-7 
50.8 



56-4 
77 3 
23-5 

59-8 



20 



7,053 
778 
466 
42 
25 

238-2 

8,653 

5,568 

1, 

4,927 



•473 

•238 



14,979 
4 

28,033 
15,216 

3-60 
511 
4 00 
4-75 



48-29 
53-74 
66-36 
165 19 
28-13 
76-43 
50-02 
72 20 
37 95 
74-15 
55 65 
59-24 
63-02 
54-42 



56 
45-8 

1 
43 
89 
33 
77 

41 5 
67-8 

41 
32 
63 7 
47-1 

45 
63 

30 4 
491 



58-9 
76-9 
24 
•61 



,548 



19 



237-2 
9,115 
6,024 
1,582 
4,770 



•457 
•225 



14,633 
4, 
3D, 951 
12,598 

3-97 
5-75 
413 
4-74 



Dec. 



54-7 
43-6 
1-8 
40-5 
88-7 
31-9 
77-0 
37-8 
65-3 

40-7 
32-0 
60-7 



44-3 
62-1 
29-5 
47-7 



61-4 
77-1 
23 1 
63-5 



10 



6,212 

550 

421 

28 

31 

235-8 
9,359 
6,233 
1,501 
4,865 



•443 
•217 
•286 
•693 



11,612 
3,371 

26,91 
6,509 

3-52 

5-74 
405 
4-75 



.395 
,315 

.904 
819 
697 
588 
407 
846 
604 
182 
187 
004 
547 

56 
74 
92 
52 
18 
78 
44 



39 5 

860 
32-7 
76-3 
37-4 
64-9 

40-0 
31 1 

60-5 
45-7 

43-9 
61-5 

29-2 



62-6 
75-0 



64-0 



17 24 



3,618 

347 

249 

16 

14 



9,537 
6,515 
1,473 
4,911 



•420 
•204 
•281 
•691 
•299 



9,079 

3,423 

28,920 

6, 

3-53 
6-22 
3-79 
5-34 



53-3 
41-2 
1-8 
40-1 
85-0 
32-3 
770 
37-2 
64-6 

40-4 
31-5 
62-0 
45-8 

44-5 
62-5 
29-4 
47-0 



63-1 
721 
22-0 
63-7 



3,128 

287 

235 

21 

21 

236-1 
9,322 
6,630 
1,421 

4,979 



■409 
•201 
•267 
•702 
•290 



5,114 
2,759 
26.294 
5,137 



3-76 
5 
3-95 
5-41 

3,853 

951 

4,968 

1,062 
538 
643 
1,150 
1,763 
701 
147 
987 
703 
339 



52-6 
41-5 
1-7 
401 
83-9 
31-1 
75-1 
360 
64-0 

41-0 
33-1 
61-2 
45-4 



44 



30-4 
47-0 



61-9 
68-4 
210 
61-9 



1,897 

178 

161 

14 

17 

237 

9,233 

6,772 

1,436 

4,990 



-217 
■206 
•720 

281} 



5,234 
1,746 
16,553 
1,692 

3-93 
6-65 
4-00 
5 00 



,321 

725 
,097 
,388 
,071 
,271 



52-0 
41-5 
1-4 
38-2 
83-1 
31-1 
76-0 
35-2 
63-4 

40-5 
32-6 
60-2 
451 

43-6 
59-7 
301 
46-4 



631 
68-0 
220 

62-7 



January 



2,365 

183 

136 

20 

14 

236- 
9,205 
6,755 
1,451 

5,002 



6,003 
2,514 
10,813 
4,185 

3-45 
6-24 
3-75 
5-79 

2,854 

1,080 

4,208 

696 

383 

1, 
1, 

649 
8,749 
5,006 
26.782 
14,995 

38 
66-75 
71-39 
172-28 
19-7 
28-34 
61-80 
69-71 
50-39 
74-49 
60-34 
60-10 
60-77 
59-00 



53-5 
44-4 
1-4 
380 
85-8 
30-6 
75-8 
35-1 
65-4 

41-4 
33-4 
61-2 
46-1 

44-7 
61-7 
30-5 

47-6 



65-4 
72-3 
24-6 
65-5 



231-2 
9,090 
6,740 
1,458 
5,009 



•445 
•223 
•277 
•778 
•315 



12,619 
3,783 

27,532 
6,425 



6-04 

3-80 

6-02 

««« 

4,730 

1,201 

5,082 

875 

418 

710 

1,456 

1,341 

602 

10,731 

5,480 

32,626 

17,070 

50-23 
50-53 
70-49 
184-60 
17-50 
22-98 
59-33 
51-42 
43-85 
77-63 
56-45 
59-73 
59-83 
59-66 



54-7 
45-5 
1-3 
38-6 
89-4 
29-9 
75-9 
35-0 
66-2 

41-6 
33-4 
62-0 
46-4 

44-5 
61-7 
30-2 
48-1 



65-4 
73-5 
25-8 
65-8 



22 



MONTHLY REVIEW OF BUSINESS STATISTICS 



Table 17. Bank Debits to Individual Accounts in th^ Clearng Hou<e Centres of Cam da in 
Millions of Dollars, with Annual Totals for Leading Cities and Economic Areas 



Year 


Canada 


Halifax 


Saint 
John 


Montreal 


Toronto 


Winnipeg 


Vancou- 
ver 


Maritime 
Provinces 


Quebec 


Ontario 


Prairie 
Provinces 


British 
Columbia 


1924 


27,157 


249 


262 


7,502 


7.659 


3,793 


1,410 


585 


8,133 


11,209 


5,505 


1,725 


1925 


28.126 


292 


208 


7.766 


7.588 


4,183 


1,475 


572 


8,475 


11.236 


6.000 


1.842 


1926 


30.358 


310 


215 


9,133 


8.210 


3,877 


1.553 


605 


9,909 


11.998 


5,886 


1,960 


1927 


36.094 


325 


219 


11.780 


10.537 


4.005 


1,596 


628 


12.744 


14.642 


6,127 


2,053 


1928 


43,477 


405 


249 


13.962 


12.673 


5,188 


1.982 


745 


14.913 


17.312 


8.005 


2.499 


1929 


46.670 


425 


273 


15.558 


13.714 


4.789 


2,366 


798 


10.488 


18.543 


7.923 


2,923 


1930 


37.491 


362 


246 


12.271 


10.655 


3,712 


1.813 


708 


13.137 


15,044 


6,279 


2.322 


1931 


31.576 


330 


235 


9,757 


9,512 


3,2sn 


1,416 


653 


10,550 


13,377 


5,201 


1.806 


1932 


25,844 


258 


214 


7,136 


8,066 


3,138 


1,190 


519 


7,766 


11,259 


4.797 


1,503 



Clearine House 
Centres 


1931 


1932 


Dec. 


Jan. 


Feb. 


Mar. 


April 


May 


June 


July 


Aug. 


Sept 


Oct. 


Nov. 


Dec. 


Bank Debits 

Maritime Provinces 
Halifax 


$ 

29-7 

7-7 

20-0 


t 

22-2 

7-5 
18-7 


1 

17-7 
6-3 
15-6 


S 

19 7 

5-7 
15-9 


S 

211 

6 3 

15 2 


$ 

26-3 
60 
16 9 


$ 

21-4 
6-4 
15-7 


S 

24-1 
6-2 
15-9 


t 

20-3 
5-6 
15 9 


22-6 
5-6 
15-1 


1 

21-7 
5-7 
15-8 


1 

21-1 
6-0 
135 


$ 

19-9 
6-2 


Saint John 


13-3 


Totals 


57-4 


48-4 


39-6 


41-2 


42 5 


49-2 


43-6 


46-2 


41-8 


43-3 


43-2 


40-6 


39-4 






Quebec — 


705-3 
61-9 
6-8 


617-6 

42-4 

5-9 


530-7 

39-5 

6-1 


587-9 
45-0 
5-4 


548-9 

41 

6 


6120 

58 2 

60 


639-7 

47-4 

6-3 


587-6 
54-3 
5-5 


592-6 
431 

5-8 


576-6 

40-9 

5-8 


631-1 

55-4 

5-7 


654-1 

49-9 

5-7 


556-8 




43-5 


Sherbrooke 


5-8 


Totals 


774-1 


• 666-0 


576-2 


638 3 


595 9 


676-2 


693-4 


647-4 


641-4 


623-3 


692-2 


709-7 


606-1 






Ontario — 


9-7 
8-6 
6-8 

53-2 
5-5 

11-9 

35-3 

269-3 

7-0 

8-0 

4-7 

749-2 

24-8 


7-1 
5-6 
3-9 

44-9 
4-7 
91 

27-0 

122 -n 

5-6 

5-6 

3-5 

606-8 

171 


6-3 
5-1 
4-3 

43-2 
3-6 
7-5 

24-9 

127-4 

4-6 

7-7 

3-1 

666-0 

17-6 


6-5 
51 

3 4 
45 9 

3-9 

7-3 

25-7 

122 6 

4 6 
6-4 
3-5 

607-8 
18 6 


7-4 

5-6 

4-4 

46-8 

4 5 

8 2 

25 6 

141 2 

4-7 

6 9 

3 7 

646 2 

20 3 


6-9 
60 
4-6 

48 1 
4-8 
7-9 

28-0 

174-6 

4-4 

8-5 

3-4 

650 8 

18 9 


7-7 

5-2 

51 

45-4 

5-0 

8-8 

321 

159-0 

4-7 

8-8 

4-3 

639 7 

18 5 


8-5 
4-3 
5-4 

40-1 
5-4 
8-1 

28-8 

132-6 

4-8 

8-8 

31 

708-8 

17-0 


6-2 

4-8 

4-6 

43-2 

4-2 

6-9 

23-3 

124-4 

3-9 

6-8 

2-9 

644-6 

18-4 


6-6 
110 

4-4 
45-4 

5-3 

7-6 
22-7 
83-8 

4-4 
11-8 

3-2 

692-7 

18 1 


7-5 
4-4 
4-2 

41-5 
4-8 
8-2 

26-3 

89-5 

40 

9-2 

3-2 

707-2 

17-3 


6-9 
6-8 
5-6 

43-4 
4-3 
8-6 

24-9 

203-1 

4-3 

6-6 

3-3 

823-4 

17-3 


7-7 




7-7 


Fort William 


5-4 
39-0 




4-7 




8-0 




26-6 




99-2 


Peterborough 


5-4 
8-1 




3-1 




672-1 




16-7 






Totals 


1.194-0 


862-9 


921-5 


861-3 


925 3 


966-9 


944-2 


975-9 


894-2 


917-0 


927-4 


1,158-5 


903-8 






Prairie Provinces- 


3-9 

55-8 

52-9 

3-9 

2-4 

6-9 

3-0 

45-0 

12-7 

271-1 


2-6 
42-6 
44-9 
2-9 
1-7 
5-5 

1.8 

33-3 

9-9 

213-8 


2-4 

40-7 

29-5 

2-6 

1-6 

4-4 

1-7 

27-5 

8-1 

210-8 


2-8 

40-2 

41 

2-4 

1-7 

4-6 

17 

44 1 

9-0 

205-2 


2-5 

40-5 

35 7 

2 9 

17 

4 4 

2 

45 3 

9 9 

234 I 


3-0 

42-0 

31 2 

2 9 

1-5 

50 

1-8 

39 3 

9 8 

221-4 


2-8 

48-9 

32-3 

3-1 

1-6 

5-2 

1-8 

34-2 

9-3 

258-3 


2-7 

34-6 

28-9 

3-0 

1-7 

5-6 

1-7 

35-9 

8-8 

264-7 


2-7 

37-3 

30-6 

3-3 

1-5 

4-4 

1-6 

36-7 

9-7 

278-8 


3-1 

43-4 

28-2 

3-6 

1-7 

51 

1-6 

41-0 

100 

264-6 


3-5 

51-0 

34-0 

3-7 

2-4 

6-1 

1-8 

61-6 

11-5 

404-2 


2-8 

48-6 

26-8 

3-5 

2-0 

5-2 

1-8 

34-1 

9-8 

300-8 


2-6 


Caleary 

Edmonton 

Lethbridge 

MediHne Hat 

Moose Jaw 

Prince Albert 

Reeina 


43-9 
30-4 
3-3 
1-8 
5-3 
1-9 
29-8 


Saskatoon 


9-2 




281-7 






Totals 


457-7 


359- o 


329-4 


352-8 


379- 1 


357-9 


397-5 

4-2 
96 1 
23 8 


387-8 


406-5 


402-2 


579-7 


435-3 


410-0 






British Columbia— 
New Westminster 

Vancouver 

Victoria 


5-3 

120-8 
28-8 


4-7 
104-6 
254 


4-0 
101-6 

17-7 


4-2 

100-6 
25-6 


4-6 
105-6 
21-C 


4-4 
97-9 
22-5 


4-6 
91-7 

22-0 


4-2 
105-1 
22-5 


4-2 
89-1 
18-9 


4-2 

102-1 

18-4 


3-6 
97-9 
20-6 


4-1 
98-1 
23-0 






Totals 


154-9 


134-7 


123-3 


130-4 


131-1 


124 9 


124 1 


118-3 


131-8 


112 1 


124 6 


122-2 


125-3 






Totals Canada. 


2,638-1 


2.071-n 


1,990-0 


2,024-0 


2.073 9 


2,175-2 


2.202-8 


2.175-6 


2,115-7 


2,097- 


2,367 2 


2,466-3 


2,084-6 
'"1 






Table 18. Indexes of Employment by Cities, 1926=100 





1931 


1932 


1933 


1st of Month 
















Oct. 


Nov. 


Dec. 


Jan. 


Feb. 


Mar. 


Apr. 


May 


June 


July 


Aug 


Sept. 


Oct. 


Nov. 


Dec. 


Jan. 


Employ- 






























ment- 


































Montreal 


97-3 


95-4 


96-7 


88-0 


87-4 


89-8 


91-2 


91 1 


91-7 


88-6 


85-5 


86-3 


88-0 


84-8 


85-1 


77-5 


Quebec 


124-2 


120-0 


108-7 


100-8 


100-9 


101-9 


102-0 


104 


105-6 


104-8 


101-0 


105-8 


100-2 


98-5 


95-9 


92-6 


Toronto 


107-3 


105-6 


104-8 


99-6 


97-8 


97-8 


97-8 


97-5 


96-8 


94-6 


92-3 


91-6 


93-5 


92-5 


91-2 


86-4 


Ottawa 


124-5 


118-6 


112-7 


108-9 


104-5 


96-6 


101-7 


102-5 


100-9 


99-3 


97-6 


98-0 


94-4 


94-1 


92-6 


85-8 


Hamilton 


96-1 


96-3 


94-n 


91-3 


90-2 


90-4 


87-4 


86 9 


84-9 


84-4 


80-6 


77-1 


77-6 


77-8 


76-6 


70-7 


Windsor 


80-9 


67-7 


72-3 


83-5 


81-4 


80-4 


89-8 


88 3 


910 


89-6 


80-0 


71-8 


58-7 


62-5 


63-7 


63-9 


Winnipeg 


96-4 


93-5 


93-2 


92-5 


89-6 


88 5 


86-8 


86 1 


85-2 


87-0 


86-0 


85-1 


85-6 


84-3 


P2-2 


80-6 


Vancouver. . 


9Q-7 


101-5 


98-3 


91-1 


90-1 


87-8 


87-8 


87-6 


89-4 


88-7 


87-9 


89-0 


88-5 


87-9 


85-8 


82-5 



MONTHLY REVIEW OF BUSINESS STATISTICS 



23 



Table 19. Building Permits Issued by Sixty-* 


3ne Cities in 


Canada in Thousands of Dollars 




1931 


1932 


City 


Dec. 


Jan. 


Feb. 


Mar. 


April 


May 


June 


July 


Aug. 


Sept. 


Oct. 


Nov. 


Dec. 


Building Permits— 

Nova Scotia 


70 


77 


66 


56 


213 


106 


92 


120 


67 


51 


102 


109 


49 




70 


65 


66 


51 

1 
5 


108 
26 
79 


95 
2 

9 


89 
1 

3 


105 

1 

14 


67 


40 


92 
2 
8 


108 


49 










13 






10 














New Brunswick... 


7 


8 


14 


16 


260 


40 


39 


88 


51 


20 


36 


25 


23 










2 
2 
13 


3 

32 
225 


4 

12 
24 


3 

6 

31 


5 

58 
24 


1 
23 
27 


20 


2 
5 

29 












12 
2 


6 
19 




Saint John 


7 


8 


22 


Quebec 


3,087 


930 


797 


950 


830 


1,467 


1,535 


2,120 


1,145 


455 


1.289 


609 


261 


Montreal and Mai- 
sonneuve 


2,983 
83 

9 
9 
2 


865 
35 

'"i7 
12 


728 

34 

5 

26 

4 


839 
72 

14 

24 

1 


661 
70 
7 
18 
32 
42 


1,311 

115 

2 

20 

13 

5 


1,420 
52 

4 
28 

8 
22 


1,814 

240 


973 
99 


338 

61 

2 

11 

1 
43 


1,149 
68 

12 

1 
59 


248 

320 

4 

4 

33 


216 

is 


Shawinigan 

Sherbrooke 

Three Rivers 

Westmount 




46 
8 
12 


32 

8 

33 


2 

1 

30 




3,867 




1,174 


1,698 


1,820 


1,511 


2,064 


1,115 


977 


900 


1.174 


1,522 


939 






Belleville 




3 

46 
2 
9 
1 
4 

80 
13 
15 

2 

83 
4 

1 
4 

22 
2 

2 

541 

132 

ii 


'"'23 
2 
2 
2 
6 
105 
3 
31 

5 

140 


2 
20 

7 

11 
19 
25 
114 
13 

5 
79 

350 


17 
35 

9 
41 
13 
11 
98 
89 
138 
87 
36 

9 
145 

5 
11 
18 

4 

12 
14 

5 

9 
817 

157 
21 
11 


19 

8 

9 

63 

12 

17 

111 

108 

19 

63 

10 

6 

131 

2 

16 

156 

7 

14 

4 

15 

13 

514 

171 

4 
3 


14 

7 

10 
23 
10 
38 

149 
28 
37 
49 

106 
6 

260 

" 17 
12 
7 

18 

1 

8 

34 

376 

126 

8 

699 

2 


6 

13 

2 

28 

8 

8 

187 

8 

2 

35 

2 

1 

115 

6 

8 

30 

4 

50 

2 

4 

13 

394 

115 
3 

66 


i 

2 
12 

14 

13 

72 

30 

25 

27 

1 

1 

75 

1 

100 

5 

6 

22 

4 

29 
381 

119 
9 
13 

1 


8 
9 
6 

76 
3 

14 
105 

22 

13 

35 
2 
5 

68 
1 
1 

14 
3 
9 

14 
5 

11 
317 

129 
1 
8 
8 


29 

5 

6 

8 

3 

15 

348 

19 

33 

31 

2 

4 

90 
3 
8 

12 
12 
8 
1 
3 
9 
383 

111 
11 
6 


2 

22 

3 

10 
45 

7 

37 

39 

2 

7 

38 

1 

6 

25 

2 

18 

4 

5 

1 

1,197 

46 
1 
2 


3 




56 
10 
27 
10 
557 
19 
22 
50 
16 

97 
5 


2 




3 


Fort William 

Gait 






2 




12 




8 




8 




22 


Niagara Falls 






48 








11 

42 

3 
2 

8 
605 

97 

2 

14 

33 


12 
3 

1 
5 

"'8 

12 

589 

386 
6 
13 

1 


1 


Port Arthur 

Stratford 

St. Catharines 

St Thomas .... 


3 

8 

23 


3 

2 
2 




15 

10 

2,630 

165 
6 

67 
4 


1 


Sault Ste. Marie.. 

Toronto 

York and East 

Townships 

Welland 


2 
805 

9 
2 




2 






















5 

4 

7 


6 
3 


i 

3 
11 








1 

1 
11 










3 
3 


3 


1 
17 


1 
4 


4 
12 


i 

10 






Woodstock 


11 


3 


2 


Manitoba 


466 


106 


64 


41 


199 


1,108 


135 


202 


171 


132 


79 


30 


115 




226 
164 

77 


i 

105 


63 


1 

5 
36 


5 

54 
139 


7 

28 

1,073 


2 

4 
128 


6 

3 

192 


1 

10 

161 


7 

6 

118 


1 

6 

72 


30 


2 


St Boniface 


100 
13 






Saskatchewan 


28 


34 


37 


218 


195 


365 


87 


88 


37 


52 


25 


23 


2 










112 
95 
12 


160 
18 
17 


9 

26 
330 


3 

22 
62 


71 

7 
10 


19 

17 


1 
18 
33 


9 

15 


12 

11 


1 




26 
2 


30 

4 


20 
IS 


1 


Saskatoon 


1 




89 


177 


179 


85 


431 


431 


249 


191 


159 


154 


118 


51 


20 








58 
5 
4 

23 


44 
23 
110 


142 
30 

7 


50 

31 

2 

2 


250 

160 

13 

8 


74 

347 

9 

1 


74 

171 

2 

1 


68 

112 

9 

1 


55 

76 

22 

5 


71 

74 

8 

1 


61 

48 

8 

1 


16 
13 

21 


13 


Edmonton 

Lethbridge 


6 

1 










British Columbia.. 


281 


376 


247 


259 


287 


262 


188 


304 


724 


439 


253 


136 


72 




2 

24 
11 

1 
216 

3 
23 


1 
4 
8 
3 
339 
4 
18 


1 
5 

17 
10 
194 
3 
17 


8 

13 
13 

187 
11 
26 


4 

1 
8 

'212 
6 

56 


11 

15 

4 

203 

2 

26 


8 
4 

10 

5 

127 

1 

34 


1 

3 

17 

10 

233 

5 

35 


3 
4 

16 

2 

634 

37 

29 


9 

5 
14 

2 
384 

4 
21 


8 
19 

9 

2 
176 

4 
35 


2 
3 
9 

"112 

*"l0 


1 






New Westminster. 

Prince Rupert 

Vancouver 

North Vancouver. 


3 

2 
54 

1 
12 






Total 61 cities... 


7.895 


2,762 


2,579 


3,324 


4,236 


5,290 


4,388 


4,227 


3,331 


2,203 


3,056 


2,505 


1,481 



24 



MONTHLY REVIEW OF BUSINESS STATISTICS 

Table 20. Index Numbers of Wholesale Prices: 1926 = 100 



Classification 


1931 


1932 


Dec. 


Jan. 


Feb. 


Mar. 


April 


May 


June 


July 


Aug 


Sept. 


Oct. 


Nov. 


Dec. 


Totals. 


70 C 

56-4 
66-4 
71-8 
78-C 
87-3 
66-3 
87-5 
85-1 

74-0 
65-4 
67-3 
91-1 
64-7 

79 
61-6 

60-2 
72-9 
43-7 
68-6 
57-1 
69-8 
64-8 
67-0 
43-4 
71-2 
53-8 
69-5 
72-4 
71-6 
75-6 
800 
77-9 
811 
85 1 
83-3 

87-8 
42-5 
58-8 
48-8 
77-1 
50-3 
71-6 
61-5 
48-5 
87-8 

93-7 
66-5 
57-1 
67-1 
76-2 
43-5 
78-5 
80-0 
44-7 
64-9 

37-6 
67-6 
77-2 
71-2 
85-7 
86-9 
92-9 
43-5 
102-4 
62-8 

52-8 
97-5 
58-7 
46-1 

100-4 
95-5 

100-8 
72-9 
91-8 

103-4 

71-2 
72-0 


69-4 

55-7 
63-e 
71-1 
74-8 

87-1 
66-S 

87-3 
84-4 

73-3 
63-6 
66-5 
91-1 
63-8 

79-5 
60-3 

58-6 
71-8 
42-5 
68-6 
56-6 
66-7 
63-1 
64-7 
42-0 
68-8 
520 
65-5 
73-0 
71-0 
74-3 
75-3 
74-8 
80-6 
85-1 
83-1 

79-1 
41-2 
58-7 
49-9 
77-1 
50-3 
71-0 
58-6 
48-5 
87-1 

93-7 

66-7 
58-8 
65-0 
67-2 
44-6 
78-5 
80-0 
40-5 
64-9 

35-1 
67-6 
72 2 
71-4 
81-5 
86-9 
92-5 
43-5 
99-4 
65-1 

52-7 
97-5 
56-5 
461 

100-4 
95-3 

100-8 
72-9 
91-8 

103-5 

71-2 

71-0 


69-2 

56-4 
62-4 
71-6 

74-8 
87-0 
631 
87-2 
84-2 

731 
63-1 
66-4 
91-1 
63-7 

79-4 
60-2 

58-5 
71-2 
43-3 
68-5 
56-9 
65-3 
61-1 
62-9 
43-7 
66-2 
52-1 
67-6 
71-3 
70-3 
74-4 
75-3 
74-9 
79-8 
84-8 
82-6 

80-9 
43-1 
59-1 
48-8 
77-0 
50-3 
70-3 
56-0 
41-6 
87-1 

93-7 
65-9 
55-7 
59-3 
72-7 
44-6 
78-5 
80-0 
36-8 
64-9 

35-1 

66-6 
72-2 
72-3 
78-7 
86-9 
92-2 
43-5 
96-8 
56-2 

51-3 
97-5 
56-0 
44-6 

100-4 
95-3 

100-8 
72-7 
91-8 

103-5 

71-2 
72-0 


69 1 

56-7 
63-5 
71-5 
74-4 
86-3 
60-3 
86-2 
83-3 

72-9 
63-8 
65-9 
90-8 
63-1 

79-1 
59-6 

57-5 
71-9 
42-7 
69-1 
56-9 
64-3 
63-4 
63-8 
43-7 
65-2 
51-7 
70-1 
71-5 
71-1 
73-5 
75-3 
74-5 
77-7 
84-3 
81-3 

82-5 
43-4 
60-2 
51-0 
75-4 
50-3 
71-1 
56-0 
41-6 
84-2 

93-7 
65-7 
55-6 
64-0 
67-0 
44-0 
78-5 
800 
30-8 
64-9 

35-1 
66-6 
72-2 
71-8 
77-5 
86-9 
91-0 
43-5 
94-6 
52-1 

47-8 
97 5 
53-7 
43-3 

100-4 
92-7 

100-8 
72-7 
91-8 

103-8 

71-2 
72-0 


68 4 

57-1 
60-2 
71-1 
74-0 
86-5 
58-5 
86-0 
83-3 

71-8 
62-1 
65-6 
90-7 
62-8 

78-9 
59-2 

56-5 
71-6 
42-8 
69-1 
570 
61-0 
62-0 
61-6 
44-5 
62-1 
51-1 
58-3 
69-2 
66-2 
72-8 
75-2 
74-1 
77-2 
84-4 
81-2 

83-2 
44-0 
60-8 
51-9 
73-8 
50-3 
66-3 
50-6 
37-7 
82-8 

90-2 
64-7 
54-0 
62-6 
47-9 
39-5 
78-5 
80-0 
26-0 
64-9 

32-9 
67-7 
72-2 
71-3 
76-2 
86-9 
91-1 
450 
94-2 
50-6 

44-9 
97-5 
50-8 
41-2 

100-8 
91-7 

100-8 
72-7 
91-8 

105-9 

71-2 
71-4 


67 7 

56-7 
58-1 
70-3 
73-4 
86-5 
57-2 
85-9 
83-2 

71-5 
60-6 
64-7 
88-2 
62-1 

78-0 
58-6 

55-4 
70-8 
42-7 
68-3 
56 5 
58-2 
59-4 
58-9 
44-6 
58-7 
49-9 
59-0 
69-8 
66-9 
71-5 
75-2 
73-5 
75-9 
85-3 
811 

83-4 
441 
59-7 
52-5 
72-2 
50-3 
66-9 
50-6 
27-5 
80-2 

90-2 
64-9 
54-4 
56-7 
44 9 
37-2 
78 6 
80-0 
24-2 
64-9 

30-4 
67-7 
72-2 
69 6 
75-8 
86 9 
91-2 
45-0 
95-7 
481 

41-5 
97-5 
50-8 
40-4 

100 8 
88 8 

100-8 
760 
91-8 

105-9 

71-2 

70-5 


66 6 

54-3 
57-6 
69-3 
72-1 
86-6 
56-6 
860 
82-6 

71-0 
59-7 
63-2 
881 
60-4 

76-9 
56-7 

53-9 
69-9 
39-8 
66-8 
54 3 
68 7 
58-3 
58-5 
40-6 
59-3 
47-6 
550 
68 1 
64-6 
68-7 
75 1 
72-1 
75-8 
85-3 
811 

82-6 
39-5 
55-8 
52-5 
72-2 
50-3 
64-5 
50 6 
26-4 
77-5 

90-2 
66-7 
53-8 
55-4 
49 7 
34-9 
78-6 
80-0 
24-2 
64-9 

27-4 
67-7 
72-2 
68 
70-3 
86-9 
91 3 
45-0 
97-6 
47-3 

39-4 

97-5 
511 
39-5 

100 8 
88-7 

100-8 
76-1 
91 8 

105-9 

71-2 

72-0 


66 C 

55-2 
57-9 
69-0 
69-7 
86 4 
56-1 
85-7 
82-7 

71-5 
60-9 
62-8 
88-1 
60-0 

75-9 
56-5 

54-3 

70-0 
41-8 
66-7 
55-2 
57-8 
59-0 
58-5 
41-8 
58-3 
48-0 
50-7 
68-6 
63 8 
66-9 
75-1 
71-3 
75-6 
85-0 
80-8 

85-0 
39-2 
54-8 
52-5 
73-8 
50-3 
63-8 
46-9 
29-0 
73-7 

90-2 
66-9 
55-7 
54-7 
510 
38-3 
77-2 
80-0 
241 
64-9 

28-2 
68-2 
72-2 
66-2 
68-6 
86-9 
91-0 
45-0 
97-2 
47-2 

38-6 
97-5 
49-5 
38-1 
99-8 
88 7 

100-8 
75-5 
91-8 

105-9 

71-2 
72-0 


66-8 

55-1 

58-9 
69-3 
69-5 
86-1 
57-3 
85-9 
82-9 

71-6 
61-1 
63-2 
88-1 
60-4 

75-7 
57-0 

54-7 
70-6 
42-2 
66-9 
55-5 
58-0 
61-2 
59-8 
41-7 
59-3 
48-3 
49-5 
66-5 
61-9 
66-6 
75-1 
71-1 
76-4 
85-1 
81-2 

83-1 
39-9 
55-6 
52-5 
73-7 
50-3 
61-9 
46-9 
38-9 
73-0 

90-2 
65-5 
55-6 
56-5 
54-9 
48-6 
79-1 
80-0 
30-6 
63-7 

31-0 
68-2 
72-2 
65-8 
68-3 
86-9 
90-8 
41-9 
96-8 
48-3 

40-3 
97-5 
51-6 

40-4 
99-8 
89-4 

100-8 
75-5 
91-8 

105-9 

71-2 
72-4 


66-9 

53-5 
60-8 
70-0 
69-9 
85-9 
58-9 
86-1 
82-8 

72-1 
61-8 
62-5 
88-1 
59-6 

76-5 
55-9 

53-9 
71-0 
39-7 
66-6 
54-2 
59-3 
63-4 
61-6 
38-9 
60-2 
46-9 
50-8 
65-2 
61-3 
67-4 
75-1 
71-5 
76-4 
85-1 
81-2 

82-9 
36-9 
53-5 
52-5 
73-7 
50-3 
61-3 
49-7 
48-8 
73-7 

88-8 
60-3 
54-7 
60-6 
65-0 
48-6 
80-5 
80-0 
31-2 
63-7 

31-6 

68-8 
72-2 
67-5 
67-1 
86-9 
90-5 
41-5 
93-9 
52-1 

43-5 
97-5 
48-2 
43-1 

100-6 
90-1 

100-8 
75-4 
91-8 

105-9 

71-2 
72-0 


65-0 

52-2 
59-3 
691 
64-5 
85-8 
57-7 
85-9 
83-4 

71-4 

60-7 
60-3 
86-8 
57-4 

771 
53 

52-6 

69-2 
37-9 
65-9 
530 
57-5 
62-8 
60-5 
36-8 
58-4 
44 9 
56-2 
62-4 
60-7 
67-5 
651 
66-2 
75-8 
85 
80-9 

81-6 
34-4 

51 7 

52 5 
73 5 
50-3 
60-8 
49-7 
43-5 
73-7 

88-8 
52-7 
50-6 
60-2 
66-7 
41 2 
80-5 
80-0 
30-0 
63-7 

31-6 

67-7 
60-4 
68-4 
65-4 
86-9 
90-0 
43-7 
92-8 
50-6 

40-9 
97-5 

481 
41-6 

100-6 
89-8 

100-8 
75-4 
91-5 

105-9 

71-2 
72-3 


64 8 

52 2 

57-5 
68-6 
64-6 
86-0 
58-2 
85-7 
83-9 

71-0 
60-1 

59-9 
86-0 
57-0 

77-1 
52-5 

52-3 
68-7 
37-7 
66-1 
53-0 
56-3 
60-5 
58-7 
36-6 
56-9 
44-2 
54-2 
62-4 
60-2 
67-6 

65 1 
66-3 
76 3 
84-7 
80 9 

80-8 
33-9 
51-9 
52-5 
73-5 
50-3 
60-2 
49-7 
33-4 
73-1 

88-8 
47 7 
480 
58 7 
69-5 
40-6 
80-5 
80-0 
30-2 
63-7 

31-6 
67-7 
60-4 
68 2 

66 3 
86-9 
90 2 
44 3 
97-2 
49-1 

42 2 
97-5 

49-5 
43-5 

100-6 
89-7 
94-8 
75-4 
91-5 

105-9 

71 2 

72-3 


640 


Component Material- 


50-2 




57-2 


Textiles 


68-6 
64-0 


Iron and its products 


86-2 
57-5 




86-1 




83-6 


Purpose— Consumers goods 

Foods, beverages and tobacco. . 


70-6 
59-3 
58-6 




87-8 




55-4 


Building and construction ma- 


76-2 


Manufacturers' materials 

Origin— Raw and partly manu- 


50-8 
51-1 


Fully and chiefly manufact'd 
Field origin — raw 


68-1 
34-5 




65-3 


Totals 


51-1 


Animal origin — Raw 


57-4 


Manufactured 


59-7 


Totals 


58-7 


Canadian farm PRODUCTS-Field 
Animal 


33-6 
57-8 


Totals 


42-7 


Marine origin — Raw. 

Manufactured 


54-9 
61-0 


Totals 


59-3 


Forest origin— Raw 


66-5 




65-1 


Totals 


65-8 


Mineral origin — Raw 


77-1 


Manufactured 


84-6 


Totals 


81-2 


Commodity Groups- 
Fruits 


75-4 


Grains. . . 


30-3 


Flour and milled products 

Rubber and its products 


50-7 
52-5 
70-5 


Tobacco . 


50-3 




59-3 


Furs. 


48 5 




27-9 


Leather, unmanufactured 

Boots and shoes 


71-8 
88-8 


Live stock 


46-5 


Meats and poultry 


46-3 


Milk and its products 


60-2 


Eggs 

Cotton, raw 


69-7 
39-5 


Cotton yarn and thread 

Knit goods 


80-5 
80-0 


Silk, raw 


29-5 


Artificial silk and its products.. 


63-7 
30-4 




67-7 




60-4 




66-6 


Pulp. 

Pig iron and steel billets 


66-3 
86-9 
90-7 


Scrap 


44-3 

97-6 


Brass, copper and products 


47-6 
42-3 


Metallic nickel 

Silver 


97-5 
46-6 




450 


Bricks 


100-6 


Coal 


91-3 


Coke 


94-8 


Petroleum and products 


75-2 
91-5 


Cement 


105-9 




71-2 




72-3 







MONTHLY REVIEW OF BUSINESS STATISTICS 



25 



Table 21. Prices of Representative Commodities, and Wholesale Prices in Other Countries, 



Description* 



Wholesale Prices of Important 
Commodities— 

Oats, No. i C.W bush 

Wheat, No. 1 Man Northern " 
Flour, First Patent 2-98'b 

jute 

Suear, raw 96° Centrifugal 

N.Y cwt. 

Sugar, granulated, Montreal " 
Rubber, ribbed, smoked 

sheets. N.Y lb. 

Rubber, Para, upriver, fine, 

NY 

Cattle, steers, good 1,000- 

1,200 lbs cwt. 

Hogs, bacon, Toronto " 

Beef hides, packer hides, 

native steers lb. 



1931 



1932 



Dec. Jan. Feb. Mar. Apr. May June July Aug. Sept 



Sole leather, mfr's. green 
hide crops 

Box sides B. mill 

Butter, creamery, finest, 
Montreal 

Cheese. Canadian, old large, 
Montreal 

Eggs, fresh extras, Montreal 

Cotton, raw 1-1 1/16', Ham- 
ilton 

Cotton yarns, 10's white 
single 

8axony, 4-50 yds to lb 

Gingham, dress, 6-50-7-75 
yds to lb 

Bilk, raw, grand double 
extra, N.Y 

Wool, eastern bright \ blood 

Wool, western range, semi- 
bright, J blood 



ft. 
lb. 

M 

doz. 
lb. 



ton 



Pulp, groundwood No. 1 

Pig iron, basic mill " 

Steel merchant bars, mill. 100 lb 
Copper, electrolytic domes- 
tic cwt. 

Lead, domestic, Montreal. . " 
Tin ingots, Straits, Toronto lb. 
8pelter, domestic, Montreal cwt. 
Coal, anthracite, Toronto. . ton 
Coal, bituminous, N.S. run- 

of-mine " 

Gasoline, Toronto gal. 

Sulphuric acid, fl6°Benume net ton 
Indexes of Wholesale Prices in 
M Other Countries— 2 
United States- 
Fisher, 200: 1926 

Bureai: of Labour, 550: 1926 

Annalist, 72: 1913 

United Kinedom — 
Board of Trade, 150: 1913. . . . 

Economist, 58: 1927 

France, Statistique General, 45: 

1914 

Germany, Federal Statistical 

f Office, 400:1913 

Behrium, Ministry of Labour, 

130:1914 

Netherlands, Central Bureau 

Statistics, 48: 1913 

Norway, Official, 95: 1913 

Sweden, Commerce Dept., 160: 

1913 

Italy, Bachi, 100:1913 

Finland, Official. 139: 1926 

India, Dept. of Statistics, 75: 

1914 

Japan, Bank of Japan, 56: 1913 
Australia, Commonwealth Sta- 
tistician, 92: 1911 

New Zealand. Official. 180: 1913 

Egypt, Dept. of Statistics, 

Cairo, 23 .-1913-1914 



•300 
•606 



5-030 



1-384 

4-560 



•056 
•067 



6-040 
4-810 



•070- 



•340 
•220 

•245 

•180 
•456 

•087 

•203 
•506 

•923 

3-162 

•130 

•100 

23-790 
18-000 
2-250 

9-450 
4-26 
•295 
4-068 
13-810 

6-000 

•175 

16-000 



67-0 
66-3 
97-6 

105-9 
65-8 

413 

103-7 

573 

85 
122 

111 

319 
92 

98 
114-1 

131-0 
133-3 



025 



065 



070- 



237 



091 



923 



65-3 
67-3 
94-0 

105-8 
65-4 

414 

100-0 

557 

84 
123 

109 
317 



97 
120-6 



130-0 
133-5 



•292 
•632 



5-100 



1-146 
4-560 



•046 



5-950 
4-940 

•055 
•065 

•340 
•210 

•214 

•180 
•310 

•091 

•203 
•506 

•923 

2-579 
•125 



23-990 
18-000 
2-250 

8-450 
4-148 
•298 
3 
13-810 

6-000 

-175 

16-000 



63-8 
66 3 
92-3 

105-3 
67-0 

421 

99-8 
554 



123 

110 

314 
93 

97 
122-0 

133-2 
132-1 

91 



085 



055- 

065 



923 



63-1 
660 
91-1 

104-6 
65-3 

427 

99-8 

548 

82 
122 

109 

315 

92 

94 
119-8 

132-2 

131-6 

93 



•725 
4-370 



•034 
•058 



5-1 
4-540 



•050- 
•060 



•231 



•203 
•495 

•923 

1-784 
•110 

085- 

•090 
22-429 
18-010 
2-250 

7-467 

3-609 

•255 

3-634 

12-342 

6-000 

•175 

16-000 



62-2 
65-5 
90-7 

102-4 
62-7 

425 



539 

80 
120 

109 

311 

89 

92 
116-5 

131-5 

130-7 

90 



100 



063 



043 

310 
200 

197 

189 
209 

076 

205 
495 

923 

688 
100 

080- 
085 

160 
000 
250 

968 
320 

280 
564 
510 

o;o 

185 

coo 



61-0 
64-4 
88-8 

100-7 
•5 

421 

97-2 

526 



109 
305 



89 
113-6 



129-4 
130-4 



275 

031 

063 

160 
580 

030- 
040 

290 
190 



191 



072 



59-6 

63-9 



408 



514 

78 
120 

108 

297 
87 

86 

110-6 

127-8 
129-9 



•352 
•547 



4-800 



1-304 
4-370 



•064 

6-140 
5-030 

•038- 
•048 

•280 
•190 

•196 

•160 
•245 

•079 

•190 
•495 

•923 

1-638 
•090 

•085 

21-145 
18-000 
2-250 

6-850 
3-083 
•285 
3-355 
12-510 

6-000 

•180 

16-000 



60-4 
64-5 
92-1 

97-7 
60-1 

404 

95-9 

512 

76 
122 

108 
296 



87 
111-6 



128-4 
129-9 



78 



•563 
4-800 



1-323 
4-370 



6-050 
5-210 



•055- 
•065 



•180 

•212 

•160 
•281 

•096 

•210 
•495 

•923 

2-059 
•095 

•100 

20-968 
18-000 
2-250 

7-030 
3-217 
•300 
3-561 
12-757 

6-000 

•180 

16-000 



61-8 
65-2 
94-2 



61-S 
394 
95-4 
524 

75 



91 
117-7 



130-1 
130-2 



77 



4-600 



1-197 
4-370 



-043 



5-360 
5-110 

•075 
•085 

•280 
•190 

•245 

•180 
•330 

•092 

•225 
•506 

•923 

2-107 
•095 

•105 

20-472 
18-000 
2-250 

7-616 
3-482 
•318 
3-802 
12-981 

6-000 

•180 

16-000 



62-7 
65-3 
95-2 

102-1 
64-0 

397 

95-1 



132-4 
129-5 



78 



Oct 



•235 
•482 



4-500 



1-277 
4-370 



4-700 
4-500 



•070- 



•190 

•240 

•180 
•394 

•082 

•225 
•484 

•923 

2-024 
•095 

•105 

19-573 
18-000 
2-250 

7-310 
3-264 
•315 
3-667 
13-328 

5-250 

•180 

16-000 



611 
64-4 
91-0 

101-1 
62-0 

392 

94-3 

529 

77 
123 

110 



91 

127-8 



129-0 



Nov. 



•500 



1-254 
4-370 



4-220 
3-920 



•055- 
■065 



•270 
•190 



•235 



•490 



•225 

•484 

•959 

2-006 
•095 

•105 

19-795 
18-000 
2-250 

7-305 

3-373 

•315 

3-834 

13-323 

5-230 

•180 

16-000 



60-3 
63-9 

S8-4 

101-1 
62-3 

391 

93-9 

525 

77 
124 

109 

298 
91 



134-5 



Dec. 



•210 
•424 

4-400 

•943 
4-180 

•038 

•077 

4-100 
3-970 

•043 
•053 

•260 
•190 

•238 

•180 
•406 

082 

•210 
•484 



1-967 



•103 

19-763 
18-000 
2-250 

7-021 
3-386 
•305 
3-971 
13-328 

5-250 

•180 

16-000 



58-5 
'85-7 



'For full description see Prices and Price Indexes sent free on request. 

•The description includes the authority, the number of commodities and the baae year. 



26 MONTHLY REVIEW OF BUSINESS STATISTICS 

Table 22. Total Value of Imports and Exports, by Groups, in Thousands of Dollars 












Imports of Merchandise 


for Consumption in Canada 






Month 


Total 
Imports 


Vege- 
table 
Products 


Animal 
Pro- 
ducts 


Textiles 


Wood 
and 
Paper 


Iron and 
its Pro- 
ducts 


N on- 
Ferrous 
Metals 


Non- 
Metallic 
Minerals 


Chemic- 
als and 
Allied 

Products 


Miscel- 
laneous 
Com- 
modities 


1930 

Tune 

Julv 


1000 

91,544 
84,651 
77,906 
87.900 
78.358 
76,325 
60,338 

50.414 
50,994 
75 348 
51,189 
73.457 
52.508 
48,379 
47,308 
45,379 
45,933 
46.911 
40,290 

34,115 
35,586 
57,437 
29 794 
44.361 
40.743 
35.711 
36.527 
34.504 
37.095 
37,769 
28.961 


1000 

17,554 
17,530 
13.650 
16.587 
15,231 
15,146 
13,535 

9.181 
9.014 
15.739 
11,367 
17.839 
9.966 
10.411 
9,371 
8,870 
9,927 
12,074 
10,676 

6,094 
7,538 
14,489 
5 283 
9 416 
8,702 
7,462 
7,098 
6.814 
8.225 
8,639 
7.830 


$000 

5,121 
3,549 
3.784 
4,579 
3.867 
3,324 
2,451 

2.665 
2,540 
4,187 
2.240 
3.344 
2.362 
2.287 
2,206 
2,150 
1,796 
1,544 
1,309 

1,482 
1,640 
2,204 
1 096 
1.756 
1.611 
1,330 
1.251 
1,265 
1,425 
1,427 
977 


$000 

11,002 
11.491 
11,977 
12.947 
10,756 
12,738 
9.036 

8.025 
8,711 
11.825 
6.987 
8.717 
7.251 
7,152 
7,372 
6,530 
6,344 
5.985 
5,254 

6,2°5 
6,602 
9,401 
4601 
6,074 
5.310 
4,552 
5.587 
4.935 
5.428 
5,450 
4.725 


$000 

4,284 
4,863 
3,79fl 
3.951 
4,198 
3,693 
3,059 

2,808 
2,815 
3.951 
2.798 
3,530 
3 146 
2,790 
2,743 
2.6Q6 
2,862 
2.505 
2,279 

1.968 
2,032 
2,660 
1 553 
2,078 
1,922 
1,778 
1,745 
1,754 
1,907 
1,959 
1.566 


$000 

21.476 
18.627 
16.269 
15.415 
13.563 
12,839 
10 837 

10,051 
11,353 
17.282 
11.925 
14.807 
9.989 
8.108 
7,377 
6,893 
6,285 
6,470 
5,881 

5,085 
6.009 
9.983 
5 820 
7,169 
6.710 
5,130 
4,394 
4.233 
4.288 
5,262 
3 624 


$000 

5,958 
5.162 
5.494 
5.504 
5,452 
5.914 
4,394 

3.202 
3.363 
4 620 
3,018 
3,953 
3.157 
2.984 
2.958 
2.958 
3.05i 
2,949 
2.335 

2,256 
2,091 
2.688 
1 688 
2,085 
1,733 
1,513 
1,402 
1.496 
1.655 
1,908 
1.129 


$000 

16,036 
14.654 
14.517 
19.244 
15.871 
13.304 
10,127 

8,246 
7,834 
9,691 
6,969 
12.152 
9.838 
8.382 
8,139 
8,614 
9,432 
9,626 
7,209 

6,656 
5,438 
9.691 
5 567 
9.476 
9.229 
9,367 
9,143 
8.501 
8,626 
8,138 
5.509 


$000 

3,454 
2,899 
2.525 
3.241 
3,151 
3.384 
2.549 

1,935 
2.094 
3 372 
2.375 
3,898 
2.530 
2.290 
2.666 
2.537 
2,422 
2,721 
2,497 

1,950 
1,874 

2.971 
1 998 
2.942 
2.556 
2,081 
2,217 
2.336 
2.770 
2,577 
1.588 


$000 

6,659 
5,772 
5,895 
C.433 
6,289 


August 

September 


November 


5,374 
4,349 


1931 

January 


4,300 




3,271 




4.681 




3,512 




5,217 




4.270 


July 

August 

September 

October 


3,975 
4,477 
4,142 
3.809 
3,127 




2.851 


1932 


2,338 




2,362 


March 


3.351 




2.188 


May , 


3.366 




2,969 


July 


2.499 




3,691 




3 169 




2.771 


November 

December 


2,509 
2.012 





Exports of Merchandise from Canada 




Totat 
Exports 

of 
Mdse. 








Domestic 


Produce 










Month 


Total 
Exports 
of Can- 
adian 
Produce 


Vege- 
table 
Pro- 
ducts 


Animal 
Pro- 
ducts 


Tex- 
tiles 


Wood 
and 
Paper 


Iron 
and 
its 
Pro- 
ducts 


Non- 
Ferrous 
Metals 


Non- 
Metallic 
Miner- 
als 


Chemi- 
cal and 
Allied 
Pro- 
ducts 


Miscel- 
laneous 
Com- 
modi- 
ties 


1930 


$000 

80.536 
77.906 
70.613 
82.190 
84.298 
74.592 
68.053 

45,634 
44,914 
56296 
34,674 
60.845 
55. 3^0 
50.671 
49,894 
49.909 
56.534 
5*. 430 
54,218 

39,063 
37,019 
41,019 
27 455 
41.402 
41.701 
43.032 
41.855 
42.665 
57,160 
46.621 
43.109 


$000 

78.703 
76.408 
69. 290 
81.046 
82.781 
73.060 
66.820 

44.683 
43.873 
55 048 
33,935 
59.833 
54.348 
49,675 
48.764 
49.991 
55.538 
57.4°7 
53,255 

38,367 
36.431 
39,749 
26 976 
40,594 
40,945 
42,321 
41.314 
42,187 
56.626 
45.945 
42.616 


$000 

29,302 
27.689 
25,729 
33.911 
37.358 
34.542 
24,647 

11,638 
13.541 
15.982 
7.625 
26.502 
21.394 
14.496 
14,611 
13.958 
19.337 
27.^20 
22.945 

11.079 
12.363 
12,291 
8 722 
16.920 
15,042 
17,302 
15,664 
20.382 
30.638 
21.978 
21 676 


$000 

7.853 
7.749 
7.289 
9.084 
8.320 
7.765 
6.322 

6,211 

5.059 
5 783 
3,851 
3,778 
5.194 
7,008 
6,604 
7,842 
8,336 
5,820 
5,453 

5,693 
4,989 
4,231 
2.434 
3,412 
4.232 
6,212 
6,252 
4.645 
4.888 
3.773 
4.797 


$000 

949 
1.069 
751 
467 
501 
369 
343 

240 
233 
383 
258 
757 
670 
642 
590 
357 
419 
517 
328 

234 

304 
436 
218 
462 
781 
506 
384 
422 
471 
328 
269 


$000 

22.252 
22.228 
19.274 
21 159 
20.964 
17.584 
19.724 

14,281 
14.274 
19.120 
13.409 
16.424 
17.105 
15.365 
15.851 
15.192 
15.705 
14.<?13 
13,956 

12.919 
11.165 
13.839 

9 675 
11.210 
12.678 
10,333 
11.521 

9.392 
11.399 
10,685 

9.167 


$000 

4,340 
3,632 
3.995 
3 663 
3.372 
2,483 
3.322 

2.459 
1.786 
2.297 
1,608 
1.947 
1.674 
1,559 
1.253 
1.422 
1,297 
877 
907 

867 
879 
1,173 
958 
1,253 
1.203 
2,016 
1.611 
1.505 
2.239 
1,557 
1.065 


$000 

8.770 
9.413 
7.559 
8.110 
7,737 
5,882 
8,458 

6,996 
5,615 
7,215 
4,192 
6,251 
4.726 
6.922 
6,546 
7,298 
6.976 
4,259 
6,846 

5,446 
4,631 
4.990 
2.687 
4 004 
3,970 
3.459 
3,422 
3.286 
3,890 
4,770 
3 585 


$000 

2,322 
1,880 
2,057 
1.918 
1,840 
1.823 
1,804 

1,118 
1.212 
1.449 
855 
1,456 
1.281 
1,319 
1,292 
1.094 
1.360 
1,329 
1,220 

807 
629 
823 
464 
778 
940 
739 
785 
788 
1,064 
1,074 
768 


$000 

1,324 
974 
1,061 
1.071 
1.072 
1,096 
845 

664 
889 

1.400 
997 

1,175 
958 
859 
800 
673 
872 
805 
666 

736 
836 

1.067 
971 

1,472 

1,184 
711 
749 
816 
915 

1,078 
761 


$000 
1.591 


Julv 


1,774 




1.674 




1,663 




1,616 




1,517 




1,355 


1931 


1,07(1 




1.265 




1.418 




1,140 


May 


1.543 


June 


1.347 


July 


1.506 


August 


1.217 




1.164 


October 


1,236 


November 

December 

1932 

January 

February 


1,150 
934 

586 
635 
911 




847 


May 


1,054 




917 


July 


1,043 




925 




951 




1.122 


November 

December 


701 
528 



MONTHLY REVIEW OF BUSINESS STATISTICS 



27 



Table 23. 



Canada's Domestic Exports in Thousands of Dollars, and Indexes of the Cost 

of Living 



Classification 


1931 












1932 














Dec. 


Jan. 


Feb. 


Mar. 


April 


May 


June 


July 


Aug. 


Sept. 


Oct. 


Nov. 


Dec. 


Exports of Canadian Produce— 

Agricultural and Vegetable 
Products— 
Alcoholic beverages (chiefly 


1,556 
838 

16,022 
970 

14,009 

643 

113 

393 

1,601 

199 
447 
2,046 
1,151 
115 
231 
590 

26 
56 
44 
32 

8,663 

1,151 

380 

130 

202 

2,394 

98 

47 
111 

65 
269 
111 

87 

189 

3,778 
399 
439 
896 
269 

539 

207 

82 

191 

171 

69 
232 

202 
275 
262 

85-9 
71-2 
94-2 
99-3 
76-4 
97-1 

7-85 
3 10 
6-77 
17-76 


860 
641 

6,175 
109 

5,517 

580 

50 

351 

1,172 

110 

96 

1,840 

2.407 

124 

232 

386 

"63 
17 
34 

8,957 
987 
403 
153 
118 

1,830 

205 
' 42 

120 
50 

184 
77 

109 

95 

2,779 
314 
221 
713 
518 

279 
173 
43 
180 

241 
130 
216 

182 
148 
134 

85-4 
69-6 
93-9 
99-3 
76-4 
97-1 

7-68 
3 11 
6-77 
17-59 


1,475 
732 

6,623 
147 

5,881 

450 

181 

497 

1,184 

69 

85 

1,715 

1,836 

44 

237 

528 

15 
91 
18 
11 

7,192 

1,093 

201 

139 

230 

1,747 

167 
77 

165 
55 

200 
96 
44 

78 

1,772 
194 
421 
944 
400 

207 
129 
82 
76 

216 
189 
217 

154 
141 
162 

84-5 
66-5 
93-8 
99-3 
76-4 
97-1 

7-34 
3-10 
6-77 
17-25 


816 
328 

6.779 
149 

6.134 

614 
135 

414 
1,469 

137 
119 
1,457 
982 
80 
270 
646 

2 
128 
15 
21 

8,521 

1.474 

269 

266 

225 

2,249 

221 
35 

200 
84 

351 
86 
60 

127 

1,878 
260 
355 
831 
507 

279 
132 
93 
110 

144 

377 
261 

138 
399 
212 

83-9 
66-0 
93-6 
99-3 
74-5 
96-8 

7-27 
3-08 
6-77 
17-16 


616 

77 

5,534 

267 
4.537 

414 
45 
171 
895 

146 
52 
649 
713 
36 
163 
357 

9 

72 
!2 

10 

6,938 
825 
118 
152 
105 

1,258 

178 
41 

170 
86 

262 
49 
73 

106 

856 
149 
195 
542 
290 

170 
68 
77 
65 

81 
364 
293 

143 
381 
175 

83-7 
65-4 
92-8 
99-3 
74-5 
97-0 

7-22 
3-07 
6-77 
17-09 


1,195 

120 

11.852 

775 

9.627 

528 

323 

182 

1,648 

298 
167 
1.174 
404 
35 
195 
694 

148 

82 
10 
4 

7,507 

1,175 

231 

206 

121 

1,328 

195 
69 

120 
83 

491 
55 
63 

227 

1,339 
255 
256 
725 
406 

290 
102 
167 
109 

144 

643 
241 

143 
409 
300 

81-8 
62-9 
91-0 
93-9 
74-5 
97-1 

6-90 
3-04 
6-47 
16-45 


444 

58 

11,159 

470 

9,655 

539 

74 

80 

1,963 

348 
473 
1,911 
352 
16 
165 
571 

438 
107 

7 
16 

7.668 

2.170 

478 

245 

123 

1,295 

315 
34 

174 
98 

330 

101 
47 

169 

1,831 
302 
181 
521 
376 

232 

75 
299 
221 

98 
426 
277 

132 
338 

272 

81-0 
62-1 
90-9 
93-9 
71-9 
97-1 

6-79 
3-02 
6-35 
16-20 


580 
111 

13,464 
781 

11,210 

555 

139 

119 

1,443 

411 
1.591 
1.823 

758 
18 

152 

742 

187 
94 
16 
17 

6.515 
773 
718 
166 
214 

1.340 

653 

736 
143 
68 
464 
69 
58 

89 

1,017 
385 
270 
550 

420 

197 
148 
93 
178 

58 
115 
191 

167 
308 
344 

■ 80-8 
61-4 
90-7 
93-9 
71-9 
96-8 

6-78 
3-06 
6-34 
16-21 


384 

72 

12,212 

678 

10.642 

684 

110 

280 

1,094 

332 
1,659 
1.807 

879 
21 

194 

739 

27 

101 

10 

42 

7,546 
971 
580 
224 
113 

1,487 

627 
125 
132 
65 
403 
61 
39 

1,025 

478 
441 
276 
252 
427 

223 

135 

46 

229 

87 
219 
184 

149 

265 
300 

81-5 
63-5 
91-9 
93-9 
71-9 
96-8 

7-01 
3-04 
6-33 
16-42 


469 

571 

16.176 

392 

4,166 

590 

75 

293 

1,290 

90 

1,468 

1,270 

507 

28 

167 

456 

45 
98 
17 
43 

5,633 
628 
739 
249 
30 

1,373 

666 
136 
76 
50 
270 
41 
40 

158 

716 
447 
284 
377 
504 

277 
95 
154 
143 

170 
182 
179 

172 
179 
434 

81-0 
63-0 
91-7 
93-9 
70-7 
96-6 

6-98 
3-01 
6-32 
16-34 


1,572 
2,095 

22,636 
277 

21,471 

692 

98 

403 

1,690 

74 

1,589 

1,423 

424 

32 

244 

487 

122 

19 

67 

7,037 

980 

558 

334 

76 

1,791 

979 
536 
76 
114 
230 
61 
63 

107 

1.065 
449 
459 
600 
525 

373 

84 

172 

200 

255 
155 

204 

185 

386 
348 

80-4 
63-6 
90-7 
90-0 
70-7 
96-6 

70-7 
2-98 
6-30 
16-40 


1,581 
1,565 

15,024 
314 

13,959 

547 

66 

268 

1,799 

74 

1,185 

1,261 

101 

50 

228 

327 

1 
99 
11 
22 

6,858 

837 

363 

239 

93 

1,814 

634 
273 
72 
72 
197 
102 
44 

1,186 

1,532 
285 
244 
754 
327 

298 

162 

36 

360 

169 

224 
299 

133 
169 
263 

80-4 
63-9 
90-4 
900 
70-7 
96-6 

7-09 
2-93 
6-04 
16-10 


1,698 


Fruits 


1.389 


Grains (Total) 


15,074 


Barley 

Wheat 


91 
14,505 


Rubber (chiefly tires and 


478 




52 




247 


Wheat flour 

Animals and Animal Pro- 
ducts — 
Cattle 


1,535 
41 




432 


Fish 


1,550 


Furs, (chiefly raw) 


1,592 


Hides, raw 


57 


Leather, unmanufactured 


78 
605 


Fibres, Textu,es and Pro- 
ducts — 




Rags 


78 
16 




35 


Wood, Wood Products and 
Paper (chiefly newsprint) 


5,952 
1,592 




171 


Shingles 


137 


Timber, square 


113 


Wood-pulp 


1,365 


Iron and Its Products — 
Automobile parts 


405 

71 


Farm implements 


77 


Hardware and cutlery 

Machinery 


61 
216 


Pigs and ingots 


86 


Tubes and pipes 

Non-Ferrous Metal Pro- 
ducts— 


36 
537 


blister) 


9,668 




444 


Lead 


256 


Nickel 


473 


Silver 


261 


Non-Metallic Nineral Pro- 
ducts— 

Asbestos, (chiefly raw) 

Coal 


353 
130 


Petroleum and products 


30 

147 


ducts- 


210 




196 




150 


Miscellaneous Commodities— 


91 


Films 


109 




189 


and Costs of Services- 
Total 


80-4 


Food 


64-0 


Fuel 


89-6 


Rent 


90-0 


Clothing 


70-7 


Sundries 


96-6 


Cost per Week of a Family 
Budget- 
All foods $ 

Fuel and light $ 

Rent $ 


7-04 
2-94 
5-99 
16-01 



28 MONTHLY REVIEW OF BUSINESS STATISTICS 

Table 24. Summary of Canada's Imports, in Thousands of Dollars 



Classification 


1931 


1932 


Dec. 


Jan. 


Feb 


Mar. 


April 


May 


June 


July 


Aug. 


Sept 


Oct. 


Nov. 


Dec. 


Imports of Principal Commodi- 
ties— 

Agricultural and Vegetable 
Products— 


3.299 
105 
367 

2,082 
109 
422 
650 
133 

1,125 
490 
305 

186 
240 
107 
126 
134 

267 
923 
158 
733 
463 
44 
132 
512 
141 
110 
110 
185 
192 
301 
378 

1,013 
586 

330 

239 

51 

69 

47 

788 

137 

320 

131 

170 

1,650 

167 

987 

349 

105 

51 

86 

54 

383 
213 
146 
125 
907 
124 
79 

481 
2.595 
183 
389 
1,692 
646 
207 

226 
318 
417 
77 
67 
217 


1,406 
108 
324 
862 
133 
206 
378 
129 
318 
523 
418 

132 
511 
198 
181 
122 

339 
543 
183 
1,014 
589 

54 
207 
768 
213 

68 
130 
279 
261 
412 
406 

848 
556 

265 
193 
49 
52 

181 

980 

115 

476 

129 

147 

1,315 

21 

490 

332 

77 

51 

92 

60 

380 
178 
76 
84 
981 
79 
63 

383 
2,383 
157 
386 
2,336 
282 
217 

207 

301 

117 

55 

47 
194 


1,155 
141 
391 

1.094 
120 
231 
392 
104 
657 

1.46?" 
418 

110 
547 
196 
20 c 
254 

35« 

569 
21s 
1.030 
576 
132 
155 
679 
231 
94 
125 
302 
213 
554 
612 

796 
621 

300 

209 

46 

48 

113 

1,435 

124 

591 

148 

1S3 

1,512 

26 

48S 

303 

79 

71 

72 

79 

330 

216 

63 

84 

807 

87 

93 

418 
1,845 
20« 
375 
1,3 C 6 
485 
155 

262 

283 

16 

60 

51 

173 


3,505 
159 
554 

1.741 
177 
360 
538 
323 

2.143 

l,38n 
866 

156 
589 
297 
233 
313 

453 

833 

335 

1,432 

757 
180 
129 
852 
290 
151 
42« 
662 
274 
613 
592 

1,019 
838 

360 

274 

53 

96 

255 

2,175 

238 

981 

495 

226 

2,462 

39 

976 

499 

140 

89 

126 

154 

423 
287 
106 
108 
905 
141 
137 

583 
3,852 
525 
518 
2,145 
859 
222 

390 

396 
94 

101 
79 

291 


521 
53 
195 
1.071 
147 
163 
30 » 
173 
613 
199 
687 

70 
253 
109 
167 
158 

224 
493 
166 
856 
392 
57 
113 
405 
196 
75 
83 
140 
163 
304 
297 

555 
473 

204 
157 
24 
134 

147 
971 
131 

G22 
92 

108 

1,758 

17 

690 

292 
96 
60 
77 
89 

283 
179 
63 
75 
561 
89 
80 

344 
2,035 
170 
402 
1,142 
554 
141 

217 

246 
144 
49 
58 
134 


831 
191 
463 

1.908 

97 

261 

315 

301 

2.017 
143 

1,057 

83 
323 

248 
198 
292 

211 
918 
222 
1.032 
573 

93 
175 
381 
219 

67 
203 
194 
221 
340 
392 

744 
707 

300 
210 
31 
57 

163 

1.112 

126 

697 

202 

195 

1,689 

61 

1,275 

403 

144 

01 

117 

69 

236 
236 
102 
106 
831 
105 
63 

578 
2.663 
157 
492 
3,436 
876 
254 

295 
311 
344 
72 
58 
246 


1,328 

95 

316 

2,216 
14 
210 
402 
121 

1,233 
170 
955 

90 

369 

83 

150 
288 

240 
234 
190 
1,108 
587 

64 
102 
314 
244 

54 
131 
146 
144 
340 
472 

786 
576 

309 

173 

19 

38 

74 

1.270 

156 

646 

152 

175 

1,544 

40 

1.216 

346 

134 

80 

99 

92 

176 
187 
114 
70 
626 
06 
83 

566 

2,249 

163 

488 

3,519 

1,022 

198 

2?2 
266 
132 
86 
71 
249 


890 

95 

315 

1,903 

103 

133 

288 

18 

1,816 
228 
330 

130 

223 
68 

177 
59 

193 
287 
178 
781 
451 

54 
320 
252 
133 

25 

70 
154 
194 

53 
600 

861 
481 

247 
113 
25 
25 

68 
778 
108 
468 
176 
159 
1,127 

31 
923 
272 
132 

67 
104 

76 

187 
185 
72 
49 
529 
89 
60 

481 
2,612 
213 
322 
3,557 
901 
185 

234 

335 

7 

49 

53 

178 


1,122 

60 

206 

1,746 

77 

108 

219 

19 

2,042 

261 

95 

98 
211 

95 
220 
109 

198 
472 
201 
812 
510 
122 
140 
460 
193 
90 
96 
174 
171 
284 
433 

828 
496 

247 
101 
26 

47 

63 

553 

102 

369 

286 

125 

949 

14 

784 

227 

107 

62 

58 

38 

144 
170 
70 
35 
493 
118 
31 

479 
2.744 
216 
273 
3,304 
953 
148 

157 

331 

240 

54 

166 
179 


1,053 

113 

175 

1,505 

97 

111 

435 

21 

1,562 

287 

81 

126 
246 
96 
197 
147 

199 
441 
232 
747 
425 
101 
159 
584 
225 
98 
83 
230 
143 
228 
441 

874 
517 

213 
93 
23 
10 

60 

632 

103 

306 

220 

129 

909 

11 

740 

247 

96 

45 

85 

43 

284 
140 
73 
49 
49'i 
68 
78 

393 
2,600 

176 

303 
2,674 
1,064 

191 

155 
292 
285 
51 
190 
254 


1,358 
135 
276 

1,651 

107 

274 

231 

28 

1,872 

502 

91 

174 
201 
233 
190 
117 

200 
656 
336 
75« 
589 

50 
227 
548 
211 

92 
116 
255 
222 
154 
387 

907 
567 

215 
140 
39 
33 

38 

460 

157 

248 

96 

132 

1,086 

8 

7S4 

311 

90 

51 

82 

42 

287 
15! 
93 
39 
572 
92 
76 

404 

3,134 

316 

31? 

2.657 

7"8 

137 

244 
337 
229 
61 
117 
234 


1,537 
136 
352 

1,338 

110 

521 

266 

43 

1.479 
377 
200 

147 
180 
240 
156 
91 

165 

1.181 

140 

728 

603 

25 

221 

471 

97 

76 

157 

346 

221 

138 

347 

871 
536 

232 
147 
17 
43 

33 

557 

150 

342 

71 

197 

1,031 

23 

1,603 

294 

102 

48 

69 

74 

552 
157 

98 

47 

508 

129 

77 

445 
2,00? 
214 
467 
2,122 
845 
245 

215 

369 
349 
64 
56 
278 


2,305 




147 




389 


Fruits 


1.567 


Gums and resins 


61 


Nuts (edible) 


183 




185 




109 


Sugar, chiefly for refining 

Tea 


897 
339 




211 


Animal Products— 
Fish 


116 


Furs, chiefly raw 


176 


Hides 


118 


Leather, unmanufactured 


135 

77 


Textile Products— 


168 




1,122 




149 


other 


552 




491 




13 




242 


Silk— Raw 


327 




70 




57 




191 




296 


Woollen varn 


185 


Worsted and serges 


138 




282 


Wood and Paper— 


744 
421 


Wood — Furniture and other 
manufactured wood 


201 
116 


Veneers 

Other unmanufactured wood. 
Iron and Steel — 


11 

73 

14 




658 




80 




268 




135 




141 




1.086 




6 




417 


Other rolling mill products 

Stamped and coated products.. 
Tools 


144 

82 
49 


Tubes and pipes 


47 


Wire 


29 


Non-Ferrous Metals — 


123 




119 




98 




33 




399 




72 


Tin 


40 


No^-Metallic Products— 


331 


Coal 

Coke . 


2,318 
252 




216 


Petroleum , crude 


1,190 


Gasolene 


457 


Stone and products 


112 


Chemicals— 


171 


Dyeing and tanning materials... 


276 
161 




36 




25 




160 







MONTHLY REVIEW OF BUSINESS STATISTICS 



29 



Table 25. Banking and Currency, in Million Dollars Unless Otherwise Stated 



Classification 



1931 



1932 



Nov. I Dec. Jan. Feb. I Mar. I Apr. I May I June I July I Aug. | Sept. I Oct. I Nov. 



Banking— 

Readily Available Assets— 

Specie 

Dominion notes 

In Central gold reserves. . . 
In United Kingdom banks 

In foreign banks 

Foreign currency 

Government securities. . . . 

Call loans abroad 

Total quick assets... 
Loans and Securities except 
Canadian Governments- 

Public securities 

Railway securities 

Canadian call loans 

Current loans 

Current loans abroad 

Provincial loans 

Municipal loans 

Total loans, etc 

Other Assets— 

Non-current loans 

Real estate 

Mortgages 

Premises 

Letters of credit 

Loans to companies 

Other assets 

Note circulation deposits.. . 
Inter- » an k balances, notes of 

other banks 

Cheques of other banks. . . 
Balances due by other banks 

Grand total assets 

Liaptlites to the Public — 

Note circulation 

Dominion Government 

Provincial Government 

Government advances 

Deposits by public — 

Savings deposits 

Demand deposits 

Total deposits 

Foreien deposits 

Due banks abroad, etc. — 

United Kingdom 

Foreien 

Bills payable 

Letters of credit 

Other liabilities 

Total public liabilities. .. 

Due between banks 

Liabilities to Shareholders— 

Dividends $000 

Reserve 

Capital 

Grand total liabilities. . 
Surplus of notice deposits over 

current loans 

Perc*»ntaee of current loans to 

notice deposits., p.c 

Currency- 
Net issues of Dominion notes 
other than according to 

Finance Act. 1927 1 

Dominion notes issued per 

Finance Act. 1027 

Gold held against notes 

Gold included in C.G.R 

All notes in hands of public 2 

Index Numbers— 

(With seasonal adiustment 
1926 - WO) 

Demand deposits 

Notice deposits 

Current loans 

Investment holdings 

Call loans, Canada 

Call loans elsewhere 

Total issue Dom. notes 

Gold held by Finance Dept. 

against notes 

Notes in hands of public 











End of Month 












87-61 


65-82 


64-91 


62-59 


58-70 


55-91 


55-49 


54-97 


54-85 


55-69 


55-48 


55-03 


153-65 


12S-86 


131-11 


123-81 


116 93 


111-86 


115-42 


127 39 


123-10 


115-28 


112 40 


122 51 


25-38 


25-73 


21-58 


20 -0' 


23 63 


23-03 


22-58 


22-88 


24-78 


21-83 


23-08 


21-38 


4-60 


4-97 


5-63 


7-89 


10-40 


10-95 


8 75 


7-69 


8-82 


8 81 


13-94 


13-51 


90-13 


104-71 


92-30 


71-47 


85-47 


97-72 


99 44 


95-42 


90-75 


98 14 


87-13 


100-60 


19-12 


14-74 


13-64 


13-21 


14-38 


15-33 


15 25 


15-57 


16-48 


16-56 


16-90 


18-26 


507-76 


477-91 


467-56 


460-03 


466-40 


469-97 


465 48 


462-31 


466-93 


494-57 


494 20 


515-54 


112-75 


83-12 


65-92 


98-95 


83 13 


73-15 


65-29 


73-67 


75-65 


96-39 


95-19 


87-53 


1,001 


906 


863 


858 


859 


858 


848 


860 


867 


907 


898 


934 


155-12 


154-11 


144-87 


142-74 


144-77 


138-52 


140-81 


152-04 


153-44 


155-15 


152-17 


159-63 


56-60 


62-01 


61-29 


60-99 


60-39 


57-76 


57 13 


54-98 


53-69 


53-39 


52-87 


51-76 


156-90 


134-73 


131-17 


129-77 


130-71 


122-36 


113-83 


109-87 


111-93 


114-07 


114-95 


117-21 


1,102 


1,082 


1.071 


1.063 


1.071 


1.070 


1.057 


1,037 


1.028 


1.004 


1,003 


1,018 


183 75 


188-36 


189-73 


190-65 


188-76 


184-58 


187 08 


174-90 


164-34 


159-04 


158-98 


159 04 


42 05 


45-56 


43-44 


56-24 


43-99 


39-43 


36 67 


34-34 


20- 19 


19-41 


22-19 


34-25 


11813 


125-6^ 


132-86 


139-29 


14915 


154-01 


153-52 


139-22 


130-65 


123-67 


116-62 


109-21 


1.815 


1,793 


1.774 


1.783 


1.788 


1,766 


1.746 


1.703 


1,663 


1,629 


1,621 


1,649 


10 «8P 


10-33 


10-69 


10-86 


10-96 


11-21 


11 94 


12-51 


12-91 


13-15 


13-46 


13-46 


6-42 


6-57 


6-58 


6-65 


6-78 


6-86 


6-96 


7-19 


7-26 


7-37 


7-51 


7-61 


6.22 


6-25 


6-29 


6-26 


6-27 


6-27 


619 


6-01 


6-02 


6-01 


6-28 


6-55 


79-85 


79-79 


79-91 


79-99 


79-83 


79-99 


79 95 


79-90 


79-95 


80-06 


79-92 


79-59 


58-94 


55-47 


51-35 


49-73 


51 16 


51-94 


48-90 


48-49 


48-32 


48-44 


48-27 


47-28 


14-40 


14-31 


12-75 


12-47 


13 03 


13-00 


12-85 


13-01 


12-92 


12-89 


13-15 


13-04 


1-72 


1-5? 


1-80 


1-66 


1-49 


1-80 


1-64 


1-42 


1-32 


1-40 


1-48 


1-56 


6-81 


6-82 


6-82 


6-82 


6-83 


6-83 


6-83 


6-95 


6-59 


6-59 


6-59 


6-60 


14-33 


11.94 


11-07 


12-71 


11-08 


11-91 


11-87 


10-51 


11-90 


10-42 


9-52 


13-14 


114-19 


102-12 


73 -IP 


81-03 


82-56 


83-05 


83 11 


96-87 


69-44 


76-16 


90-12 


99-27 


3-23 


4-08 


3-73 


3-07 


3-54 


3-37 


3-44 


2-78 


3-14 


3-36 


3-57 


3-87 


3.133 


2,998 


2,901 


2,912 


2.926 


2,900 


2,868 


2,848 


2,790 


2,802 


2.799 


2,875 


145-53 


145-01 


133-67 


134-29 


132-57 


137-35 


131-07 


136-30 


134-57 


127-77 


132-24 


133-03 


113-11 


HM* 


94-65 


79-76 


86-11 


65-76 


50-38 


36-42 


15-54 


19-04 


15-90 


44-76 


18-08 


19 -7P 


20-5° 


20-06 


20-97 


24-05 


19-31 


20-67 


33-06 


32-31 


31-87 


40-70 


66-00 


46-50 


43-00 


35-50 


32-00 


27-50 


29-60 


40-50 


38-50 


29-00 


23-00 


27-50 


1,396 


1.360 


1,36° 


1,390 


1,389 


1,393 


1,387 


1,373 


1,363 


1,367 


1.359 


1,371 


617-04 


566-5^ 


506-94 


496-49 


500-48 


494-64 


497 99 


188-94 


462-09 


475-36 


480-66 


493-28 


2,013 


1,937 


1,875 


1,886 


1.889 


1,888 


1.885 


1.862 


1,825 


1,842 


1,840 


1,864 


320-21 


310-0P 


296-18 


305-82 


308-12 


304-81 


308-94 


308-22 


299-38 


306-55 


307-14 


324-51 


5-74 


4-°5 


3-6° 


4-79 


5-82 


5-11 


4-94 


5-73 


5-67 


4-50 


4-85 


4-54 


65-37 


42-32 


41-86 


52-02 


56-60 


54-36 


51 35 


51-36 


51-78 


49-60 


48-91 


46-52 


3-60 


3-21 


3-11 


2-57 


1 85 


1-61 


1 25 


1-19 


1-71 


1-47 


1 55 


1-22 


58-94 


55-47 


51-35 


49-73 


51 16 


51-94 


48 90 


48-49 


48-32 


48-44 


48-27 


47-2« 


3-13 


2-98 


2-79 


2-77 


2 91 


2-43 


2 22 


2-18 


2-22 


2-14 


2-17 


2-13 


2,803 


2,664 


2,566 


2,574 


2,587 


2,562 


2.533 


2,513 


2,456 


2 463 


2,457 


2,536 


10-06 


11-3° 


9-95 


9-84 


10-13 


9-48 


10-86 


11-04 


8-09 


10-85 


14-21 


11-29 


3,516 


783 


1,344 


2,767 


820 


1,370 


3,532 


817 


1,194 


3,008 


720 


1,157 


162-00 


162-0* 


162-00 


162-00 


162-00 


162-00 


162-00 


162-00 


162-00 


162-00 


162-00 


162-00 


I44.50 


144-50 


I44.50 


144-5* 


144-50 


144-50 


144-50 


144-50 


144-50 


144-50 


144-50 


144-50 


3.123 


2,9«2 


2,884 


2,893 


2.905 


2.880 


2,854 


2,832 


2.772 


2,783 


2,778 


2,855 


+293 


+278 


+298 


+327 


+312 


+323 


+330 


+336 


+335 


+ 363 


+ 356 


+353 


78-9 


79-6 


78-2 


76-5 


77-4 


76-8 


76-2 


75-6 


75-5 


73-5 


73-8 


74-8 


130-8 


.125-4 


125-4 


125-4 


125-4 


125-4 


128 9 


127-8 


127-7 


128-2 


127-1 


134-8 


66-5 


49-o 


45-0 


36-5 


32-0 


27-5 


29 6 


40-5 


38-5 


29-0 


23-0 


27-5 


68-6 


64-6 


66-8 


64-6 


63 8 


63-9 


64 3 


64-8 


65-4 


66-2 


67-5 


71-2 


110 


10-7 


10-7 


10-7 


10-7 


10-7 


111 


111 


111 


111 


111 


111 


160-5 


160-6 


151-0 


150-3 


149-0 


154-1 


147-2 


154-9 


152-1 


145-5 


152-5 


148-4 


106-5 


99-3 


91-5 


91-5 


91-3 


89-7 


91-2 


88-2 


85-7 


89-1 


87-4 


86-4 


104-1 


101-8 


102-0 


103-5 


103-1 


103-5 


103-2 


102-5 


101-6 


101-8 


101-7 


102-7 


117-4 


116-7 


116-6 


115-8 


114-9 


112-4 


111-7 


110-4 


110-3 


108-2 


107-2 


107-1 


137-5 


131-7 


127-2 


124-6 


126-5 


124-8 


123-7 


123-9 


125-5 


131-7 


131-1 


135-4 


111-3 


93-8 


93-3 


92-5 


93-4 


88-4 


82 8 


79-0 


82-2 


83-1 


82-9 


79-3 


42-6 


32-6 


26-3 


38-4 


33-8 


30-0 


26 1 


29-0 


30-8 


38-6 


39-3 


26-5 


90-3 


81-7 


88-9 


86-0 


85-2 


82-5 


86-1 


92-2 


91-7 


85-3 


83-5 


84-0 


59-7 


56-2 


62-6 


60-5 


60-4 


59-8 


59-7 


60-1 


60-4 


61-2 


61-6 


63-5 


89-2 


88-1 


86-3 


84-4 


82-2 


86-8 


83-4 


86-5 


87-2 


82-5 


83-7 


77-8 



76-13 
163-50 

18-88 

8-44 

146-65 

18-75 
551-16 

99-37 

1,083 



159-60 
48-71 

107-61 
999 

153-56 
34-20 

107-04 
1,610 

13-36 
7-45 
6-39 
78-78 
47-54 
13-36 
1-54 



8-71 
80-28 

3-35 
2,960 

125-05 
105-75 
31-33 
65-14 

1,379 
472-17 

1,851 
349-12 

4-51 

51-05 

•80 

47-54 

2-45 
2,634 
10-27 

2,988 
162-00 
144-50 

2,953 

+380 
72-5 



172-9 

65-1 
73-0 
11-1 
139-5 



63-6 
73-8 



1 The grand total includes note issues totalling $26,000,000 under authority of Chap. 4 of the Statutes of 1915. 
1 Includes smaller Dominion Notes in hands of public together with Bank Notes in circulation, except those in the 
hands of hanks other than the bank of issue. 



30 



MONTHLY REVIEW OF BUSINESS STATISTICS 







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MONTHLY REVIEW OF BUSINESS STATISTICS 31 

Table 26. Index Numbers of Security Prices, Foreign Exchange, and other Financial Factors. 



Classification 


1931 


1932 


Dec. 


Jan. 


Feb. 


Mar. 


Apr. 


May 


June 


July 


Aug. 


Sept. 


Oct. 


Nov. 


Dec. 


Security Prices— 

Common Stock Prices — 
Total (130) 


64-8 
74-3 
77-2 
10-7 
65-9 

108-7 
45-2 
98-9 
42-1 
87-7 
59-3 
38-0 
90-5 
80-3 
51-5 
64-8 
39-7 
92-9 

390-7 

59-0 
59-0 
62-4 
27-6 

63-0 
108-6 

5-20 

135, 

308 

•92 


64-8 
73-7 
77-2 
10-5 
66-5 

107-8 
44-9 
94-7 
42-5 
86-9 
59-1 
40-9 
88-3 
76-8 
54-3 
67-1 
42-9 
90-3 

402-8 

59-7 
60 1 

62-5 
26-5 

60-8 
119-8 

5-74 

125, 

989 

45-94 


63-5 
71-1 
76-5 
9-9 
64-9 

106-3 
39-6 
89-6 
40-6 
81-7 
59-1 
43-3 
82-0 
75-3 
54-5 
65-2 
44-8 
86-1 

400-8 

57-3 
57-5 

61-2 
22-2 

60-4 
115-9 

5-55 

136, 

387 

21-27 

25-57 

1-165 
1-129 
1-145 
1-131 

4-000 
3-920 
3-960 
3-945 


64-1 
71-5 
79-2 
10-1 
65-5 

106-8 
38-3 
87-8 
40-3 
82-4 
59-8 
46-2 
81-1 
73-6 
55-8 
67-0 
45-7 
86-0 

413-6 

57-8 
57-6 
63-4 
21-4 

59-6 
110-6 

5-30 

180, 

070 

35-72 

22-76 

1-131 

1-106 
1-118 
1-109 

4-230 
3-915 
4-064 
4-230 


54-0 
58-2 
62-5 
9-2 
63-7 
87-7 
32-5 
83-2 
36-1 
62-2 
48-9 
34-4 
68-8 
63-7 
47-4 
59-1 
37-1 
85-8 
304-2 

52-4 
52-6 
56-5 
18-3 

55-8 
111-8 

5-33 

187, 

313 

12-07 

18-92 

1-128 
1-105 
1-112 
1-120 

4-215 
4-070 
4-173 
4-100 


45-8 
51-4 
44-9 
8-6 
63-1 
90-1 
29-1 
76-5 
26-3 
47-1 
36-9 
26-0 
63-8 
45-0 
49-4 
66-3 
34-9 
65-7 
261-2 

48-4 
50-2 
47-9 
15-5 

50-2 
113-2 

5-42 

204. 

522 

25-68 

15-14 

1-154 
1-116 
1-131 
1-140 

4-245 
4-095 
4-157 
4-203 


43-2 

48-8 
40-5 
8-4 
62-6 
84-8 
28-3 
73-0 
30-2 
43-3 
34-9 
24-7 
59-6 
42-7 
46-5 
59-6 
35-1 
60-5 
251-0 

48-3 
49-9 
47-8 
16-8 

46-8 
114-4 

5-48 

176, 

041 

20-82 

13-87 

1-163 
1-140 
1-153 
1-146 

4-280 
4-120 
4-205 
4-120 


49-6 
56-6 
51-1 

7-9 
38-3 
97-0 
28-9 
81-2 
35-6 
55-2 
41-8 
31-5 
59-9 
51-6 
49-9 
65-6 
36-4 
67-1 
306-6 

55-6 
57-2 
55-6 
21-0 

47-5 
110-6 

5-30 

283, 

953 

27-32 

13-02 

1-161 
1-135 
1-148 
1-148 

4-123 
4-028 
4-076 
4-028 


59-0 
69-9 
63-5 
8-8 
47-4 

110-0 
38-5 
89-7 
44-1 
78-2 
51-9 
42-7 
71-6 
60-4 
52-7 
72-8 
35-7 
73-9 

408-0 

59-7 
58-1 
69-7 
26-3 

49-2 
103-3 

4-95 
544, 
528 
9-42 
13-77 

1-152 
1-119 
1-142 

Mia 

4-045 
3-885 
3-975 
3-885 


63-0 
73-8 
69-1 
4-4 
53-0 

113-0 
42-3 
90-8 
44-1 
89-2 
56-9 
47-6 
76-3 
65-9 
56-5 
77-6 
38-7 
76-1 

470-6 

60-9 

56-4 
81-0 
28-4 

48-3 
101-9 

4-88 

506. 

926 

73-19 

14-12 

M18 

1-101 

1-108 

.1-105 

3-880 
3-805 
3-847 
3-820 


54-8 

63-1 

55-9 

3-5 

49-8 
97-4 
38-0 
86-5 
40-7 
73-9 
49-1 
39-0 
73-4 
57-7 
47-4 
64-3 
331 
74-4 
393-6 

57-5 
55-0 
71-0 
24-4 

46-7 
98-1 

4-70 
206, 

902 
101-64 
13-99 

1-110 

1-080 
1-096 
1-106 

3-815 
3-615 
3-723 
3-635 


53-4 

62-5 

51-3 

31 

48-3 
95-9 
38-7 
85-9 
43-3 
74-2 
46-6 
38-2 
70-8 
53-1 
48-3 
67-9 
31-8 
69-6 
377-9 

60-9 
58-1 
76-5 
23-6 

45-1 
102-3 

4-90 

193. 

093 

1-09 

13-82 

1-191 
1-104 
1-148 
1-179 

3-810 
3-64S 
3-760 
3-770 


51-3 


Industrials, total (96) 


58-4 


Iron and Steel (19) 


45-5 




2-5 


Milling (5) 

Oils (4) 


43-3 
90-8 


Textiles and Clothing (9) 

Food and Allied products (21) 


37-6 
83-0 
37-1 




70-1 


Utilities total (18) 


45-4 




37-1 


Telephone and telegraph (2) . . 

Power and traction (14) 

Companies abroad total (8) . . . 


68-3 
50-8 
43-3 
69-1 


Utility (7) 


32-0 


Banks (8) 


67-5 




359-5 


Mining Stock Prices — 
Total (20) 


63-1 


Gold (11) 


62-7 




70-9 


Silver and miscellanoues (5) . . 
Financial Factors- 


21-9 
43-4 




102-7 


Yield on Ontario Government 

bonds p.c. 

Shares traded, Montreal 

New Issues of Bonds $000,000. 
Brokers' loans 1 $000, 000 


4-92 

149, 

733 

•14 

13-80 


Foreign Exchange — 
New York Funds in Montreal 
High 


1-250 
1-158 
1-211 

1-200 

4-320 
3-840 
4-092 
4-090 


1-191 
1-153 
1-173 
1-156 

4-130 
3-970 
4-028 
3-990 


1-183 




1-130 




1-154 




1-130 


London Sterling in Montreal- 
High 


3-845 




3-750 




3-787 




3-760 







JFirst Thursday of following month. 

Table 27 — Tonnage of Vessels Entered and Cleared from Six Canadian Ports. 



Month 


Saint John 


Halifax 


Quebec 


Montreal 


Toronto 


Vancouver 


Entered 


Cleared 


Entered 


Cleared 


Entered 


Cleared 


Entered 


Cleared 


Entered 


Cleared 


Entered 


Cleared 


1930 
Dec 

1931 


250,607 

225,629 
204.354 
232.910 
156.726 
117.953 
134,577 
157,804 
159.173 
143.789 
123.283 
111.908 
245.265 

212.902 
217.548 
225.255 
154,213 
134,036 
117,838 
167,357 
163,457 
133.519 
134,442 
122,838 


236,829 

238,529 
197,957 
220.986 
190.913 
112,438 
133,917 
153.857 
152,128 
149,604 
115,918 
97.835 
239.022 

215.925 
210,751 
216,788 
179,015 
116,228 
127.282 
151,103 
168,431 
138,231 
129,967 
118,719 


468,632 

378.590 
408.139 
425.210 
336.792 
292,850 
265.680 
382,400 
491,816 
383.252 
313.163 
315.144 
509.661 

817,890 
701,478 
745,359 
556,999 
480,041 
401,282 
611,795 
650,575 
580,821 
471.867 
411,317 


515,001 

361.876 
381,844 
448.568 
356.915 
275.776 
267,278 
368,024 
509,859 
382.838 
314,250 
293,338 
518,954 

799,072 
697.095 
728.678 
546,060 
477.700 
389,421 
603,205 
652,078 
573,970 
463,161 
398,628 


14,709 


15,491 


8,836 


32,292 


45,348 


19,853 


977,920 

964,215 

891.542 

912.598 

99,253 

1,073,385 

1,174,789 

1,249,577 

1,138,081 

1,035,018 

925.023 

897,484 

876,423 

942,575 
800,842 
898,393 
904.904 
938.589 
938.402 
1,003.648 
999,488 
936,323 
951,217 
862.305 
318,794 


987,853 
980,374 


Feb 














884,226 




i,468 
189,333 
659,269 
719,307 
654,543 
829,425 
607,711 
734,401 
584.215 
23,220 












952,401 


April 

May 

June 

July 


142,533 
542.131 
641,197 
549,199 
717,468 
569,752 
641,713 
510,256 
6.447 


328,102 

1,302,740 

1,111,508 

1,122,190 

1,103,291 

1,004,220 

944,352 

884,283 

39,488 


230,080 

1,238,649 

1,128,082 

1,100,798 

1,088.734 

1,041,495 

934,061 

959,323 

39,154 


56.651 
193,046 
434,706 
444,811 
460,602 
399.690 
228,223 
280,352 

55,468 


83.701 
199.626 
434,223 
476,416 
459,728 
399.687 
221,966 
262,808 

21,944 


9979,146 
1,077,685 
1,324,129 
1,249,972 
1,127,397 


Sept 

Oct 


1,004,453 
925,653 


Nov 

Dec 

1932 
Jan 


884,263 
914,688 

933,039 


Feb 














849,787 


Mar 


341 

140.727 
327,682 
414,030 
422,444 
453,409 
410,428 
312,412 
311,553 
67,500 


341 
133,203 
334,859 
378.322 
458,433 
468,762 
387,713 
314,965 
316,413 
74,495 










904,000 


April 

May 

June 

July 

Aug 

Sept 

Oct 


330,035 
1,089,169 
1,158,746 
1,107,539 
1,190,652 
1,093,061 
1,108,660 

891,773 
43,699 


237,399 
1,018,084 
1,151,8^5 
1,176,390 
1,145,509 
1,141,267 
1.052,666 

975,932 
93.924 


73,238 
251,098 
397,299 
506,002 
492,502 
384,804 
236,730 
284,356 

52,102 


122,927 
244,621 
401,962 
517,252 
490,108 
382,034 
240,741 
266,217 
17,608 


879,000 
930,000 
950,000 

1,002,000 
999,000 
916,327 

1,045,718 


Nov 

Dec 


856,233 
313,774 



32 



MONTHLY REVIEW OF BUSINESS STATISTICS 



Table 28. Canadian Public Finance. Revenue and Expenditures. 



Classification 


Quarter 

ending 

June 30, 

1932 


Quarter 

ending 

Sept. 30, 

1932 


Quarter 

ending 

Dec. 31, 

1932 


Total to 

December 

31, 

1932 


Revenue:— 


$ 

21,146,162 

10,449,361 

17,907,737 

44,094,669 

1,570,960 

7,728,854 

1,587,759 

1,002,229 


$ 

16,752,778 

11,107,266 

21,731,314 

7,502,056 

2,435,303 

6,970,615 

1,711,881 

3,828,632 


$ 

17,538,143 
9,342,415 

22,792,728 
5,843,550 
2,983,049 
9,371,217 
2,347,374 
2,612,506 


55,437,083 




30,899,042 




62,431,779 




57,440,276 




6,989,313 


Post Office 


24,070,685 




5,647,015 


Miscellaneous 


7,412,988 


Total 


105,487,731 


72,076,839 


73,369,351 


250,933,921 






Current Expenditures:— 


1,813,845 
117,950 
61,032 
161,544 

49,899,998 
2,037,162 


2,123,077 
113,972 
60,720 
145,117 

10,113,082 

1,958,071 

6,834,296 

238,582 

2,159,251 

486,030 

33,012 

440,660 

1,035,923 

34,763 

1,123,663 

602,471 

747,336 

162,745 

2,817,902 

121,744 

13,393 

33,908 

1,772,786 

511,883 

3,528,079 

1,239 

2,230,496 

484,978 

13,617,936 

291,169 

7,901,233 

44,589 

11,317 

45,825 

3,384,939 

936,976 

2,305,710 

1,568,913 

108,980 

203,916 

1,791,393 


1,901,093 

99,264 

59,434 

367,233 

53,752,330 
1,891,991 


5,838,015 




331,186 


Civil Service Commission 

External Affairs 


181,186 
673,894 


Finance — 


113,765,410 


Premium Discount and Exchange 


5,887,223 




6,834,296 






14,938 

1,185,396 

441,300 

35,566 

419,852 

1,010,235 

44,452 

689,983 

618,105 

729,453 

156,675 

2,860,485 

611,965 

15,880 

201,142 

1,381,195 

506,311 

3,316,222 

19,376 

2,226,621 

481,548 

13,519,560 

192,019 

7,874,087 

59,826 

11,988 

39,819 

3,151,158 

1,106,909 

2,700,907 

1,453,081 

96,317 

201,152 

1,987,804 


253,519 




1,065,244 

385,070 

33,650 

413,401 

1,209,967 

30,172 

984,672 

123,445 

572,386 

176,259 

46 

825,892 

17,265 

291,080 

1,264,341 

375,016 

2,953,080 

5,969 

2,283,785 

500,444 

13,507,743 

191,123 

6,232,809 

50,027 

11,427 

39,924 

3,420,269 

764,894 

4,401,520 

1,392,078 

97,378 

222,315 

1,331,961 


4,061,261 


Fisheries 


1,313,000 




102,227 




1,273,913 




3,256,125 


Insurance 


109,388 
2,798,318 




1,671,749 




2,049,174 


Labour 


495,579 




5,678,433 


Legislation: 


1,559,601 




46,538 


Senate 


526,130 




4,418,322 




1,393,210 




9,785,542 


National Gallery 


26.584 


National Revenue 


6,740,901 




1,466,970 


Pensions and National Health — 


40,645,239 


Health 


674,311 


Post Office 


22,008,129 




154,442 


Privy Council 


34,732 


Public Archives 


125,568 




9,956,366 




2,808,778 




9,408,136 




4,414,072 


Secretary of State 


302,674 




627,383 


Trade and Commerce 


5,111,490 


Total Current Expenditure 


99,266,181 


72,142,574 


107,436,237 


278,812,582 


Unemployment and Farm Relief — 




3,000 

200,048 

9,824,927 

9,293 

14,777 

581,183 

709,299 

13,900 

12,504 
11,000 




3,000 




190,628 

5,294,400 

61,634 

6,338 

209,630 


420,176 




22,646,418 




70,927 




122,472 




1,109,909 




1,876,260 


Cost of Loan Flotations 


902,920 

16,396 
76,842 


937,721 




40,738 




87,842 


Total Special Expenditure 




11,379,932 


6,758,838 


27,315,464 






Capital Expenditure and Non- Active Loans:— 

Total Capital Expenditure and Non-Active 


4,316,161 


2,570,197 


3,293,308 


10,179,666 


Total Expenditure 


112,726,629 


86,092,703 


117,488,383 


316,307,713 


Other Disbursements:— 


9,463,297 


6,901,954 


3,867,357 

468,750 

1,990,879 

11,162,000 

112,196 

112,972 


20,232,607 




468,750 




1,308,800 

12,687,500 

327,472 

115,078 


559,909 

26,508.251 

220,281 

291.696 


3,859,588 


Canadian National (Temporary Loans) 


50,357,751 




659,949 


Soldier and General Land Settlement 


519,746 


Total Loans and Advances 


23,902,147 


34,482,091 


17,714,154 


76,098,391 



1 Information not available. 



MONTHLY REVIEW OF BUSINESS STATISTICS 

Table 29. Significant Statistics of the United Kingdom 



33 



Classification 



1931 



Dec. 



1932 



Jan. Feb. Mar. April May June July Aug. f Sept. Oct. Nov Dec 



Production— 

Iron 000 metric tons 

Steel 000 metric tons 

Coal 000 metric tons 

Electricity 

Generated mill, k.w.h 

New orders received.. 1920 =100 

Copper Available 000 tons 

Raw Cotton Delivered to 

Mill mill, lb 

Production, Artificial Silk 

Yarn and Waste.... mill, lb 
Natural SilkDbliveriesOOO lb 
Crude Rubber 

Available 000 tons 

Building Plans 

Approved 1924 = 100 

Other 1924 = 100 

Employment— 
Insured Workers in 

Employment mill 

Number Unemployed 000 

Percentage Unemployed... 

Coal mining 

Iron and steel 

General engineering 

Electrical engineering 

Shipbuilding and marine en- 
gineering 

Base metal working 

Cotton 

Woollen 

Building 

Public works contracting 

Trade— 
Imports, Total £ mn. 

Food, drink and tobacco£ mn. 

Raw materials £ mn. 

Manufactured £ mn. 

Total, net imports £ mn. 

Exports, Total £ mn. 

Food, drink and tobacco £ mn. 

Raw materials £ mn. 

Manufactured £ mn. 

Bank Clearings, Country 
and Provincial Daily 
Average £ mn. 

Provincial £ mn. 

Postal Receipts, Daily.. £000 
Transportation— 
Shipping— 

Entrances mill, net tons 

Clearances...... mill, net tons 

Index of shipping 

freights 1924 = 100 

Railways — 

Gross passenger 
receipts £ mill. 

Gross freight receipts. £ mill. 

Freight traffic, total.mill. tons 

Merchandise mill, tons 

Coal mill, tons 

Minerals and other 

merchandise mill, tons 

Prices— 
Wholesale Prices 1913=100 — 

Board of trade 

Economist 

Statist 

Times 

Retail Foods 

Cost of living 

Banking— 
Bank of England — 

Private deposits £ mn. 

Bank and currency notes £ mn. 

Gold reserve £ mn. 

Nine Clearing Banks — 

Deposits £ mn. 

Discounts £ mn. 

Advances £ mn. 

Investments £ mn. 

Treasury Bills £ mill. 

Money— 

Day to Day Rate p.o. 

Three Months Rate p.c. 

Security Values— 

Fixed Interest 1921 = 100 

Variable Dividend. .1921=100 
Total 1921 = 100 



336 

429 

19,887 

1,223 
59 
7-1 

125 

607 
257 

6-75 

77-6 
116-2 



9-59 
2,602 
20 
19 

450 
26-8 
15 

58-1 
24-7 
27-4 
160 
28-4 
35-6 

77-0 
39-7 
18-5 
18-2 
71-5 
32-1 
2-9 
4-0 
22-7 



13-2 

97-0 

173 



4-86 
4 



3 

7 
24-0 

4-2 
161 

3-7 



105 
90-6 
100-5 
99-5 
132 
148 



111 

364 

121-3 



,700 
244 

887 



4-21 
5-84 



102-2 
90-7 
98-61 



335 

437 

18,973 

1,162 

56 

4-3 

121 

6-44 
271 

5-13 

87-6 
93-7 



9-37 
2,784 
22-4 
18-7 
46-5 
28-1 
17-6 

58-0 
26-1 
28-2 
16-9 
32-6 
38-1 

62-3 
31-5 
16-9 
13-3 

570 

311 

2-8 

3-6 

23-4 



13-8 

960 

129 



4-23 
4-55 



62-1 



31 
6-7 

211 
3-8 

14-1 

3-2 



105-8 

900 

99-6 

98-9 

131 

147 



107 

355 

124-6 

1,677 
237 



653 

4-46 
5-65 

104-7 
92-8 
100-9 



329 

488 

18,815 

1,133 

58 

120 

111 

6-52 
245 

5-50 

103-3 



9-40 
2,742 
22-0 
18-5 
46-7 
28-1 
17-2 

57-5 
25-6 
26-0 
16-3 
32-4 
37-8 

70-2 
33-6 
15-4 
20-1 
64-7 
300 
2-8 
3-5 



12-7 

980 

125 



4-65 
4-10 



65-2 



6-9 
21-3 

3-8 
141 

3-4 



105-3 
92-2 
102-0 
100-0 
131 
147 



102 

345 

124-6 

1,621 
205 
888 
264 
574 

4-27 
511 

106-5 
Dl-7 
101-7 



341 

470 

9,091 

1,090 
57 
7-4 

118 

6-32 
267 

4-14 

121-8 



9-55 
2,595 
20 
18 

67-7 
27-2 
16-6 

56-7 
24-8 
23-4 
14-7 
28-8 
37-5 

611 
30-9 
16-5 
130 
55-7 
31-2 
2-7 
3-5 
24-2 



13-2 

102-0 

128 



4-13 

4-28 



3-8 
6-6 

20-8 
3-7 

13-8 

3-3 



104-6 



97-4 
129 
146 



105 

354 

124-6 



322 

440 

18,663 

987 
59 
8-2 

120 

6-45 
290 

7-28 

125 
93-8 



9-48 
2,662 
21-4 
18-4 
63-4 
27-4 
16-4 

56-5 
25-6 
24-9 
17-0 
26-8 
37-4 

53-5 
27-5 
13-4 
11-8 

48-8 

34-8 

2-9 

4-0 



130 

950 

130 



4-35 
4-46 



68-5 



3-4 
6-4 

201 
3-6 

13-2 



215 



576 

2-48 
2-64 

111-6 

92-7 

105-5 



320 

424 

17,275 



6- 

309 



7-02 



132-2 

108-5 



9-40 
2,754 
22-1 
20-6 
500 
28-6 
16-4 

57-5 
26-3 
33-4 
24-0 
26-2 
37-2 



3-3 



102-4 

86-3 

97-0 

96-7 

126 

144 



108 

358 

124-6 

1,643 
238 
866 
272 
612 



2-36 

110-6 
84-5 
102-1 



12-6 

94-0 

128 



4-77 
4-25 



65-6 



40 
60 

18-6 
3-4 

12-1 



100-7 

83-3 

94-4 

93-9 

125 

143 



111 

358 
132-4 

1,661 

245 
858 
284 
617 

1-38 
1-57 

111-4 
82-0 
101-8 



316 

467 

17,028 

822 

58 

10-8 

101 

6-23 
318 

8-28 

159-5 
88-0 



9-39 
2,770 
22-3 
210 
46-9 
27-8 
16-3 

57-3 
270 
30-4 
24-8 
25-8 



57-5 
31-4 
13-5 
11-8 
53-3 
29-7 
2-3 
3-6 
22-9 



120 

90-0 

126 



513 
4-65 



57-7 



4-4 
61 

18-9 
3-4 

12-2 

3-2 



98-1 
80-9 
90-6 
90-3 
123 
142 



122 

357 

140-0 

1,727 
276 
838 
324 



111-0 

78-9 
100-6 



297 

437 

15,275 

806 
52 
10 



5-71 
333 



7-58 



1150 
108-8 



9-32 
2,839 
22-9 
21-5 
47-8 
28-8 
16-4 

57-5 
28-5 
31-1 
251 
27-3 
42-8 



51-9 
29-3 
10-8 
11-4 

48-6 



3-5 

22-4 



13-3 

108-0 

129 



503 
4-81 



56-3 



6-4 
5-8 

17-5 
3-4 

110 



3-1 



97-7 
82-7 
92-8 
93-2 
125 
143 



117 

366 

141-5 

1,765 
316 
822 
333 
750 

•67 



115-6 
84-5 
105-5 



264 

367 

15,542 

815 

54 

14-8 



8-90 



78-0 
50-0 



9-28 
2,866 
23-1 
22-6 
48-6 
28-8 
16-3 

57-7 
26-2 
33-5 
25-4 
27-1 
43-4 

53-3 
28-2 
11-7 
13-1 
49-8 
28-6 
2-6 
3-4 
21-7 



11-9 

92-0 
121 



5-13 
4-50 



59-0 



6-1 
5-5 

16-5 
3-2 

10-7 

2-7 



99-5 
85-2 
94-9 
96-0 
123 
141 



123 

366 

139-8 

1,813 
373 
803 
348 
791 

•71 
•72 

1161 
92-5 
108-4 



265 

437 

16,360 

922 

56 

10-7 



5-70 
298 



7-20 



123! 

93 •! 



9-15 

2,849 
22-8 
22-9 
46-8 
30-8 
16-0 

62-1 
27-3 
34-8 
20-3 
28-5 
421 

54-3 
30-6 
11-2 

121 
51-4 
26-2 
2-5 
3-2 
19-8 



11-4 

88-0 
131 



4 
4-77 



280 

445 

17,112 



55 
101 



64- 



4 

5-7 
17-2 

3-3 
11-0 

2-8 



102-1 

88-1 

94-6 

97-7 

123 

141 



123 

362 

140-3 

1,826 
390 
789 
367 
854 

•65 
•69 

118-4 
96-8 
111-4 



101 



7-30 



155-8 
94-5 



9-40 
2,737 
21-9 
22-9 
47-7 
30-2 
16-0 

61-9 
26-6 
25-7 
16-5 
29-5 
42-8 

60-8 
351 
11-9 
13-5 

571 

30-4 

2-9 

3-9 

22-7 



12-8 

105-9 
134 



272 

480 

17,328 

1,228 

53 

12-0 

103 

6-59 
321 

9-12 

155-5 
85-2 



9-37 
2,774 
22-2 
23-1 
46-8 
301 
16-2 

61-4 
25-6 
24-3 
16-7 
30-7 
43-8 



34-1 
15-3 



22-9 



12-5 

102-5 

135 



4-35 
4-41 



64-5 



61 
18-8 

3-6 
12 4 

2-8 



1011 

85-3 

91-5 

96-5 

125 

143 



119 

361 

140-4 

1,853 
387 
780 
396 
872 

•71 

•84 

120-3 
96-3 
112-5 



101-1 

85-7 

91-6 

95-3 

125 

143 



116 

359 

139-4 

1,859 
389 
770 
409 



136 

371 

119-8 



115-9 
96-8 
109-6 



34 



MONTHLY REVIEW OF BUSINESS STATISTICS 



Table 30. Significant Statistics of the United States. 



Classification 


1931 














1932 












Dec. 


Jan. 


Feb. 


Mar. 


April 


May 


June 


July 


Aug. 


Sept. 


Oct. 


Nov. 


Dec. 


ITnitrd States Statistics— 




























Wheat, Visible Supply. Mil. bush. 
Receipts, principal 

markets 000 bush. 

Shipments, principal 
markets 000 bush. 


221 


212 


210 


202 


183 


172 


167 


178 


18-8 


194 


190 


177 




13,766 


17,072 


25,000 


13,412 


13,198 


15,344 


13,473 


41,006 


40,732 


38,410 


27,238 


17,584 




15,470 


11,005 


11,537 


9,562 


13,221 


15,942 


11,507 


17,294 


19,648 


21,313 


17,541 


23,464 




Exports, including 






























11,924 


7,962 


7,852 


8,435 


11,777 


8,764 


8,001 


4,772 


5,768 


4,226 


4,422 


5,995 




Wheat Flour Produc- 




tion 000 bbls . 


8,148 


8,180 


7,694 


8,483 


8,196 


7,739 


7,820 


7,828 


9,005 


9,394 


9,353 


8,723 




Sugar Meltings, 8 




Ports 000 long tons 


284 


246 


267 


346 


298 


306 


382 


355 


353 


395 


288 


227 





Tobacco Consumption, 






























305 


343 


348 


355 


350 


369 


400 


361 


401 


405 


437 


419 




Cigarettes Millions 


7,295 


8,963 


7,680 


8,447 


7,562 


8,685 


10,560 


9,534 


9,559 


9,311 


8,351 


7,614 




Cattle ' Receipts, Primary 




























Markets 000 


1,453 


1,376 


1,281 


1,377 


1,376 


1,397 


1,338 


1,291 


1,606 


1,689 


1,896 


1,543 




Hog Receipts, Primary 




























Markets 000 


4,210 


4,218 


3,659 


2,939 


2,960 


3,050 


2,545 


2,159 


2,405 


2,505 


2,691 


2,775 




Cotton Consumption. . .000 bales 


416 


435 


450 


489 


367 


332 


321 


279 


403 


492 


502 


504 




Newsprint Produc- 




























tion 000 s. tons 


93-9 


94-2 


87-2 


100-0 


91-2 


88-1 


854 


74-5 


79-5 


70-6 


76-7 


81-7 




Newsprint Consump- 






























160-1 


151-2 


142-9 


156-2 


148-4 


152-3 


138-2 


157-1 


123-9 


127-4 


145-0 


145-9 




Pig Iron Production.. 000 1. tons 


980 


973 


964 


967 


.853 


784 


628 


572 


531 


593 


645 


631 


546 


Steel Ingot Produc- 




























tion 000 1. tons 


1,302 


1,461 


1,460 


1,411 


1,240 


1,107 


897 


793 


832 


975 


1,069 


1,015 


845 


Unfilled Orders U.S. 




























Steel Co 000 1. tons 


2,735 


2,648 


2,546 


2,472 


2,327 


2,177 


2,035 


1,966 


1,970 


1,985 


1,997 


1,968 


1,968 


Automobile Produc- 






121-5 


119-3 


117-4 


119-0 


148-3 


184-3 


183-1 


111-1 


90-3 


84-1 


48-7 


59-6 






21,868 
129,842 


22,471 
129,909 


21,474 
129,532 


22,448 
129,477 


20,575 
132,020 


18,605 
132,575 


16,423 
134,027 


14,716 
135,902 


13.611 
133,153 


13,260 
125,775 


15,217 
121,840 


15,958 
121,798 


18,489 




124,705 


Lead Production s. tons 


33,576 


32,180 


28,081 


30,345 


23,236 


25,902 


26,068 


15,819 


17,118 


20,498 


21,092 


24,465 




Petroleum Produc- 




























tion 000 bbls. 


73,174 


66,884 


62,484 


67,189 


67,717 


68,523 


64,835 


66,310 


66,220 


65,036 


65,219 


63,384 




Consumption (to 
stills) 000 bbls. 


72,721 


68,715 


63,814 


68,502 


71,131 


74,669 


72,327 


71,455 


67,271 


63,913 


66,69« 


63,913 






35,563 


33,007 


31,265 


31,789 


33,093 


34,599 


33,312 


33,705 


32,883 


30,908 


33,212 


32,072 






30,529 
136-9 


26,845 
84-8 


25,344 
89-0 


29,451 
112-2 


30,488 
121-7 


31,574 
146-2 


38,766 
113-1 


31,317 
128-8 


35,207 
134-0 


33,645 
127-5 


32,255 
107-5 


30,294 
105-3 








Car,loadings 000 cars 


2,273 


2,270 


2,245 


2,287 


2,773 


2,088 


1,966 


2,422 


2,345 


2,245 


3,158 


2,195 


2,487 


Electric Power Pro- 




























duction mill. k.h. 

Index Factory Employ- 


7,775 


7,401 


6,997 


7,321 


6,781 


6,635 


6,548 


6,525 


6,740 


6,740 


7,044 




















ment 1923-5 — 100 


69-4 


68-1 


67-8 


66-4 


64-3 


62-1 


60-0 


58-3 


58-8 


60-3 


61-1 


61-2 






58,821 


31,975 


32,581 


33,959 


39,745 


38,718 


39,889 


32,073 


33,777 


39,156 


45,423 


41,281 




Ten Cent Sales, 4 Chains. . .$000 


79,989 


34,029 


35,638 


40,512 


39,359 


38,869 


36,864 


34,361 


34,538 


36,632 


41,605 


38,040 




Imports 8000,000 


152-9 
183-6 


135-2 
149-9 


131-0 
153-9 


131-3 

155-3 


126-7 
135-2 


112-0 
132-0 


111-4 
114-3 


79-4 
106-8 


91-1 
109-2 


98-4 
132-0 


106-4 
153-5 


104-0 
139-0 




Exports $000,000 
































duction 1923-5 = 100 


69-0 


71-0 


68-0 


65-0 


61-0 


59-0 


58-0 


57-0 


59-0 


65-0 


65-0 


63-0 




Mineral Production. .1923-5 = 100 


83-0 


77-0 


78-0 


84-0 


79-0 


67-0 


63-0 


64-0 


< 65-0 


70-0 


74-0 


740 
































tion 1923-5 = 100 


71-0 


72-0 


70-0 


68-0 


64-0 


60-0 


59-0 


58-0 


60-0 


66-0 


66-0 


65-0 




F.R. Banks, Bills Dis- 






























638 


899 


828 


639 


556 


490 


440 


538 


433 


332 


326 


309 




Reserve Ratio p.c. 


66-5 


66-6 


68-6 


70-7 


67-1 


62-1 


57-6 


56-5 


58-9 


61-1 


62-1 


62-6 




Member Banks Loans 
and Discounts Mil. Dolls. 


13,104 


12,830 


12,588 


12,211 


11,880 


11,631 


11,263 


10,996 


10,796 


10,706 


10,441 


10,413 


10,297 


Net Demand 

Deposits Mil. Dolls. 

Interest Rates, Time Loans, .p.c. 


11,871 


11,166 


11,003 


10,941 


11,144 


11,102 


10,925 


10,751 


10,982 


11,229 


11,401 


11,745 


11,758 


3-50 


3-75 


3-63 


3-13 


2-30 


1-75 


1-50 


1-38 


1-38 


1-38 


•88 


•51 


•50 


Call loans renewal p.c. 


2-70 


2-65 


2-50 


2-50 


2-50 


2-50 


2-50 


2-08 


2-08 


2-00 


1-35 


1-04 


1-00 


Prime commercial paper, 
4-6 months p.c. 


3-88 


3-88 


3-88 


3-75 


3-50 


3-13 


2-75 


2-50 


2-68 


2-13 


2-00 


174 


1-50 


Bond Prices High Grade 
Rails (10) 


75-29 
53-23 

57-7 


76-95 
57-47 

58-0 


75-30 
57-23 

56-5 


79-28 
58-25 

56-8 


73-23 
49-42 

43-9 


69-69 
43-08 

39-8 


68-78 
41-39 

34-0 


70-97 
42-98 

35-9 


79-32 
53-35 

53-3 


82-07 
55-01 

52-2 


80-76 
49-86 

49-9 


78-19 
47-51 

47-5 








Prices Common Stocks 

(404) 1926=100 




(Copyright Standard Statistics Co.) 
Industrials (338) 


54-3 
33-0 
95-6 
64-8 
24-9 


54-4 
36-6 
94-4 
64-2 
24-5 


52-9 
34-2 
92-8 
60-2 
22-8 


53-8 
32-1 
93-4 
54-5 
23-9 


41-7 
22-2 
73-3 
34-3 
18-7 


38-1 
17-4 
67-8 
30-1 
17-9 


33-5 
14-1 
55-0 
25-5 
15-1 


44-4 

21-2 
55-4 
35-2 
20-6 


51-5 
29-2 
84-2 
44-5 
28-5 


.55-8 
34-5 
91-4 
54-2 
32-9 


47-7 
27-5 
80-6 
42-8 
23-9 


45-4 
25-5 
77-6 
39-5 
22-6 




Railways (33) 




Utilities (34) 








Tires and rubber goods (17) 




57-4 
35-2 
43-9 
31-0 
34-0 
31-0 
15-8 
90-6 
50-2 


57-3 
36-1 
42-9 
31-0 
32-1 
30-7 
17-8 
98-3 
34-3 


56-3 
32-1 
42-4 
30-7 
32-2 
30-6 
17-0 
99-1 
31-7 


57-9 
29-6 
45-0 
30-4 
32-3 
30-7 
16-8 
104-6 
33-1 


49-2 
21-8 
380 
21-9 
23-1 
25-6 
11-0 
89-5 
31-4 


41-7 
20-4 
38-6 
19-7 
19-9 
23-4 
9-1 
82-9 
23-2 


34-8 
22-0 
36-5 
17-3 
16-3 
20-0 
6-5 
70-3 
23-0 


43-6 
29-6 
50-1 
26-4 
24-9 
27-2 
11-4 
93-0 
23-1 


49-3 
37-7 
54-6 
29-8 
33-0 
33-1 
15-8 
98-0 
82-6 


52-8 
47-0 
53-9 
31-8 
42-1 
38-7 
17-3 
101-4 
67-4 


48-2 
34-4 
47-4 
26-4 
32-5 
32-5 
12-9 
90-5 
29-2 


47-1 
32-1 
47-1 
24-8 
27-7 
29-9 
111 
82-9 
23-0 








Oil (16) 












Textile (31) . 
















Bond Sales, N.Y Mil. Dolls. 


337-8 


286-5 


217-4 


252-7 


252-4 


258-4 


257-2 


240-7 


333-1 


250-3 


178-6 


158-9 






587 


512 


525 


533 


379 


300 


244 


242 


332 


380 


325 


338 


347 


Bank Debits, N.Y Mil. Dolls. 


19,233 


17,676 


14,381 


16,160 


15,558 


12,912 


14,202 


12,728 


13,458 


14,163 


12,944 


9,815 


13,967 


Outside, 140 centres. Mil. Dolls. 


17,112 


15,893 


12,870 13,729 14,366 12,498 12,908 


12,572 12,188 11,767 12,354 10,935 12,817 



REVUE MENSUELLE DE LA SITUATION ECONOMIQUE 

Vol. VIII OTTAWA, JANVIER, 1933 N° 1 

Statisticien du Dominion: R. H. Coats, B.A., F.S.S. (Hon.), F.R.S.C. 

Chef de la Section de la Statistique Generale: S. A.. Cudmore, M.A., F.S.S. 

Adjoint (Statistiques Economiques): S. B. Smith, M.A. 

STATISTIQUE COURANTE DES AFFAIRES AU CANADA 

Bien que Tetat des affaires au Canada en 1932 reflete la depression, des developpements 
constructifs la derniere partie de Tannee laissent entrevoir une plus grande resistance au courant 
des quatre dernieres annees. Le declin a £te a peu pres general dans les facteurs economiques 
majeurs au cours des six premiers mois de Tannee, mais vers le milieu de Tannee il y eut renverse- 
ment dans la psychologie commerciale qui a resulte en un arret temporaire. L'indice du volume 
physique des affaires marquait 78-3 en juillet comparativement a 75-3 en avril, le point le plus 
bas du premier semestre. Malgre Timpulsion donnee a, un lourd mouvement de ble a la suite 
d'une recolte considerablement plus grande que Tordinaire, Telan indique dans les operations 
commerciales a ete contre-balance par une reaction vers la fin de Tannee. 

Les premiers six mois de 1932 les prix de gros au Canada ont continue de flechir et comme 
resultat notre indice etait a 66-6 en juin comparativement a 69-4 en Janvier. Le dernier tri- 
mestre il y a eu renversement de course, Tindice refletant une reprise moderee. La reaction du 
dernier trimestre n'a pu qu'absorber le gain des trois mois precedents, et a la fin de Tannee le 
cours des marchandises etait a un nouveau bas dans le mouvement present, equivalant aux 
niveaux d'avant-guerre. 

La reprise des actions ordinaires le troisieme trimestre a ete un des mouvements frappants 
de Tannee. Le bas de Tapres-guerre a ete touche en juin alors que Tindice officiel sur la base 
de 1926 marquait 43-2. Le gain de Tindice trois mois suivants n'a pas ete de moins de 46 p.c 
Une partie de ce gain a ete reabsorbee par le recul du dernier trimestre mais le point touche en 
juin reste le plus bas de la presente depression. 

Le developpement le plus significatif du dernier semestre de 1932 a ete la hausse des effets 
du gouvernement. Apres que la Grande-Bretagne eut ete forcee d'abandonner Tetalon or en 
septembre 1931, le cours des obligations du gouvernement canadien a subi une violente reaction 
touchant son plus bas point en Janvier 1932. II y a eu amelioration moderee les six premiers 
mois de Tannee. Le troisieme trimestre a vu un gain rapide et la plus grande partie de cette 
amelioration a continue jusqu'a la fin de Tannee. Le rendement moyen de quatre emissions de 
reemprunt du gouvernement canadien est calcule a 4.78 p.c. en decembre comparativement a 
5-23 en juin et 5-37 en Janvier. Le rendement des obligations du gouvernement d'Ontario a 
suivi la meme marche, etant a 4-90 p.c. en decembre comparativement a 5-48 p.c. en juin et 
5 • 94 p.c. en Janvier 1932. Le declin dans le rendement des obligations de tout repos est considere 
comme un developpement sain, favorisant Tengagement des fonds disponibles dans les entre- 
prises productives. A ce point de vue le rendement des obligations du gouvernement peut etre 
considere comme un excellent barometre des conditions du credit au Canada. 

Jauges economiques 

Afin de pousser plus loin les analyses sur la situation presente au Canada Tattention est 
attiree sur les cinq jauges de Timportance economique couvrant toute la periode d'apres-guerre. 
La relation entre le volume des affaires et les prix de gros occupe la premiere position. Le cycle 
primaire de prosperite d'apres-guerre qui a eu son zenith en 1920 repose en grande partie sur 
Tinflation des prix et par consequent a 6te" de courte duree. La deflation de 1921 et 1922 a 6te 
severe, Tindice annuel tombant de 156 en 1920 a 97 en 1922. Les sept annees qui ont suivi, les 
fluctuations ont ete plutot moderees, le niveau comparativement stable des prix servant comme 
arriere plan d'encouragement a Texpansion commerciale. La stabilite des prix de cette periode 
est en contraste frappant avec la marche des operations commerciales. La phase de prosperite 
du deuxieme cycle d'apres-guerre a ete caracterisee par une stabilite relative des affaires bien que 
si le developpement normal avait ete conforme aux precedents historiques il aurait du y avoir 
une avance considerable du cours des marchandises. L' expansion prononcee du volume des 
entreprises productives a ete le premier element de la periode de prosperite de 1929 a 1932, les 
deux facteurs montrant une course parallele. L'indice des operations commerciales en 1932 
est un a niveau semblable a celui de 1922, tandis que Tindice moyen des prix de gros est seule- 
ment legerement plus 6leve" qu'en 1913. ' 



36 REVUE MENSUELLE DE LA SITUATION ECONOMIQUE 

La relation entre importations et exportations de l'apres-guerre peut etre considered en 
trois sections. D'abord le premier cycle d'apres-guerre au cours duquel il y a une forte balance 
favorable commerciale en 1919 et qui se transforme en une legere balance defavorable l'ann6e 
suivante. Au cours de la deuxieme section de reprise des affaires entre 1921 et 1927 les exporta- 
tions augmentent d'annee en annee tandis que l'expansion des importations est beaucoup moins 
rapide et s'arrete meme en 1924. En consequence, le surplus des exportations sur les importa- 
tions donne un tres grand total pour cette periode de sept ans. Les exportations accusent un 
declin en 1928 et la balance commerciale est mod6r6ment defavorable de 1928 a 1931. Bien que 
nos exportations de marchandises ne comprennent pas une quantite considerable d'or des mines 
canadiennes expedie" a la Monnaie Royale du Canada ou il est affine, au lieu d'etre exporte" a 
l'exterieur sous sa forme brute, la balance du commerce a ete de nouveau favorable en 1932, 
renversant la situation commerciale des quatre annees precedentes. Les exportations de 1932 
s'elevent a $501,839,000, soit $49,225,000 de plus que les importations se chiffrant a $452,614,000. 
L'annee precedente le surplus des importations sur les exportations etait de $10,855,000, les im- 
portations se chiffrant a $628,098,000 et les exportations a $617,243,000. 

Les depots a terme detenus par les banques a charte ont ete en moyenne plus eleves que les 
prets courants chaque annee de la periode d'apres-guerre, excepte en 1920. Cette annee-la, les 
prets courants ont atteint un point eleve et le declin qui a suivi a atteint son maximum en 1925 
seulement. Les depdts a terme ont touche leur sommet d'apres-guerre en 1928 et le declin qui 
a suivi a ete relativement modere. Un sommet cy clique des prets courants a ete atteint en 1929 
et depuis lors ces comptes ont ete tellement ecourtes que l'ecart entre les depots a terme et les 
prets courants s'est toujours elargi. A la fin de novembre les depots a terme se chiffrent a $1,378,- 
700,000 et montrent un surplus de $380,000,000 sur les prets courants qui etaient de $998,934,000 
le 30 novembre 1931. Les depots a terme ont ete* de $1,396,000,000 et les prets courants de 
$1,102,000,000 laissant un surplus de $293,000,000. 

La fluctuation cyclique des depots des banques est d'un caractere plus modere que celle des 
debits des banques ceux-ci etant beaucoup plus eleves en temps de prosp6rite qu'en temps de 
depression. La proportion de moyenne mensuelle des debits des banques aux depots des ban- 
ques etait de 115-2 p.c. en 1932 comparativement a 178-0 p.c. en 1929. Le niveau actuel des 
dep6ts bancaires est suffisant pour une expansion considerable des affaires et de la speculation. 
En temps de depression la faiblesse des prix et l'inactivite ont pour resultat une plus faible velo- 
city des depots des banques. Si la meme relation avait ete maintenue en 1932 qu'en 1929, les 
paiements par cheques dans les trente-deux centres de compensations auraient ete de $39,933,- 
000,000 comparativement au total actuel de $25,844,000,000. 

Facteurs significatifs 

Le declin des operations productives au Canada en 1932 n'a pas ete aussi violent que dans 
l'une ou l'autre des deux annees precedentes. L'indice officiel du volume physique des affaires 
a indique une resistance considerable devant les influences deprimantes sp6cialement apres le 
premier trimestre. Malgre le declin des quatre annees precedentes les operations sont encore 
plus considerables que dans la premiere depression d'apres-guerre, celle de 1921. Le niveau 
actuel est semblable a celui de la mi-annee 1922. Le point le plus bas dans l'histoire d'apres- 
guerre a ete atteint en mars 1921, soit 60-6 comparativement a environ 73 -0 en decembre dernier. 

Production d'or 

Les mines d'or sont a la t&te de toutes les industries favorablement situees au cours d'une 
depression majeure. L'expansion de la production d'or au Canada, qui a ete continue dans la 
periode d'apres-guerre, a ete acceieree ces deux dernieres annees. Le nouveau haut atteint en 
1932 est en contraste frappant avec les conditions ordinaires dans la majorite des industries 
canadiennes. La production d'or fin des mines canadiennes en 1932 s'eieve a 3,055,000 onces 
valant $63,156,000, sans compter la prime sur le change s'eievant a $6,103,000. La production 
a ete 13-4 p.c. plus grande qu'en 1932 et 65 p.c. au-dessus de celle d'il y a cinq ans et 142 p.c. 
au-dessus de la production il y a dix ans. 

L'avenir de l'industrie est indique par les etats annuels de plusieurs des plus grandes compa- 
gnies productives qui toutes mentionnent d'amples reserves en disponibilite; dans le contenu 
appreciable d'or trouve en association avec les metaux communs dans les minerais de Noranda, 
de ^International Nickel, de Flin Flon et de Sullivan; dans nombre de proprietes nouvelles 
mises en production; dans des decouvertes hautement prometteuses qui sont signages de temps 



REVUE MENSUELLE DE LA SITUATION ECONOMIQUE 37 

a autre et qui, presque toutes. se trouvent dans les zones minerales le moins au nord; et en der- 
nier lieu il y a encore des regions immenses qui n'ont ete que partiellement explorees mais que les 
geologistes croient renfermer un sous-sol favorable a la production de Tor. L'extraction de Tor 
a ete un facteur puissant dans la consolidation de la charpente financiere du Dominion pendant 
cette periode de depression industrielle, servant a maintenir l'optimisme au Canada et a inspirer 
les autres pays de confiance dans la stabilite commerciale du Dominion. 

Energie hydroelectrique 

Bien que les deux dernieres annees montrent un declin dans la production d'energie hydro- 
electrique, la recession a ete comparativement moindre que dans la plupart des industries cana- 
diennes importantes. La production d'energie hydroelectrique a et6 de 15,986,414,000 k.w.h. 
en 1932 comparativement a 16,315,676,000 k.w.h. en 1931 et 18,093,802,000 k.w.h. en 1930. La 
production de 1932 est considerablement superieure a celle de toute annee anterieure a 1928. 
La reduction dans la production globale d'energie electrique en 1932 provient presque en entier 
de la perte en exportations qui ont decline de 46 p.c. comparativement a 1931. 

Une nouvelle installation de turbines d'une capacite de 378,923 h.p. a ete completee et 
mise en operation en 1932. L' augmentation provient en plus grande partie du developpement 
Beauharnois dans le Quebec, des chutes des Chats, sur la riviere Ottawa, et du developpement 
Corra Linn sur la riviere Kootenay. Les grandes captations en construction en 1932 sont celles 
du Rapide Blanc, sur le Saint-Maurice, et le Canyon du bas Abitibi. Le programme de nou- 
velles captations hydrauliques trace il y a trois ou quatre ans arrive presque a sa realisation et 
aucune nouvelle entreprise d'une certaine magnitude n'a ete lancee en 1932. 

Industries de consommation 

Comme les industries produisant les marchandises de consommation courante sont nor- 
malement les premieres a se relever d'une depression, l'attention se dirige naturellement vers 
ce groupe en 1932. Bien que les niveaux actuels de production dans les industries de la chaus- 
sure et des cotonnades soient beaucoup plus bas que les annees prosperes d'apres-guerre, les 
developpements des dernieres deux annees donnent des pronostics interessants sur les fluctua- 
tions cycliques futures. La production de chaussures en 1932 s'est a peu pres maintenue au 
niveau de l'annee precedente qui etait considerablement plus eleve que celui de 1930. Les 
importations de coton brut en 1932 donnent 97,360,000 livres comparativement a 94,910,000 
livres en 1931. 

Chemins de fer 

Les chargements de wagons sont au nombre de 2,173,087 en 1932 comparativement a 2,575,- 
011 en 1931 et 3,146,247 en 1930 et ceci en depit d'un mouvement relativement lourd du grain 
les quatre derniers mois de 1932. Dans les dix premiers mois de 1932 les revenus bruts d'op6- 
ration des deux grands chemins de fer sont de $244,754,000 comparativement a $295,953,000 
la meme periode de 1931, ou un declin approximatif de $51,000,000. Toutefois, les frais d'ex- 
ploitation ont ete reduits d'une maniere encore plus energique et comme resultat les revenus 
nets de Fan dernier sont au-dessus de ceux de la meme periode de 1931 s'elevant a $28,208,000 
en 1932 comparativement a $25,266,000 en 1931. Le revenu des operations pour la meme 
periode, apres paiement des loyers et taxes, est de $19,400,000 en 1932 comparativement a 
$16,500,000 en 1931. 

Orientation de decembre 

Les affaires ont ete a un niveau un peu plus bas en decembre que le mois precedent, l'indice 
.du volume physique du commerce, compose de 45 facteurs, montrant un declin d'environ trois 
points. La production minerale est le seul groupe ne suivant pas la marche generale. Les 
arrivages d'or a la Monnaie et les exportations d'or donnent 260,469 onces comparativement 
a 248,629 onces en novembre; les exportations de cuivre, nickel et zinc sont plus considerables 
en volume et la production de plomb montre un gain. Les expeditions d'argent sont moins 
fortes et les importations de bauxite montrent aussi une reduction prononcce. Les exportations 
d'amiante de qualite superieure ont ete considerablement plus fortes en novembre. Le declin 
de l'indice de la production manufacturiere a ete modere, marquant 70-2 comparativement a 
72-3 le mois precedent. La production de farine montre un gain le dernier mois sur lequel les 
statistiques sont etablies, soit 1,942,800 barils comparativement a 1,721,600 barils. II y a aussi 
gain dans la production d'avoine roulee et de farine de mais. La production de sucre raffine, 



38 REVUE MENSUELLE DE LA SITUATION ECONOMIQUE 

les quatre dernieres semaines sur lesquelles nous avons des chiffres, est de 122,457,000 livres 
comparativement a 115,874,000 livres, les quatre semaines precedentes. Les abatages de pores 
donnent 268,300 tetes en decembre comparativement a 249,858 tetes en novembre, et le d£clin 
dans les abatages de bovins est inferieur a la normale pour la saison. Le declin des exportations 
de fromage a ete plus fort que d'ordinaire pour la saison, tandis que les exportations de saumon 
en conserve ont 6t6 plus considerables. L'indice de la production alimentaire a 94-4 en de- 
cembre se compare a 86 • 7 en novembre. 

Les d^douanements de tabac en feuilles, cigares et cigarettes montrent un declin plus que 
normal pour la saison. Le nombre de cigarettes dedouanees etant de 304,614,000 comparative- 
ment a 388,774,000 en novembre. La reduction de la taxe d'accise sur les cigarettes de $6.00 
a $4.00 par mille appliquee le 13 octobre dernier a certainement contribue a un lourd dedouane- 
ment le mois qui a suivi. 

Le declin dans la fabrication d'enveloppes de bandages pneumatiques a ete considerable- 
ment au-dessus de la normale pour la saison. Les importations de caoutchouc brut s'elevent a 
2,109,000 livres comparativement a, 3,568,000 livres le mois precedent. La production de chaus- 
sures en cuir le dernier mois sur lequel les statistiques sont etablies est de 1,017,053 paires com- 
parativement a, 1,301,000 le mois precedent. 

Les importations de coton brut a 13,819,000 livres se comparent a 15,376,000 livres en no- 
vembre, un declin contraire aux indices saisonniers. Apres rajustement de ces indices il y a 
des gains dans les importations de files de coton, de laine brute et de files de laine. L'indice 
de la production textile a 96 • 3 se compare a, 104 • 1 en novembre. 

La production de papier a. journal a touche un bas niveau de 138,682 tonnes comparative- 
ment a 161,334 tonnes en novembre, une partie de ce declin etant de nature saisonniere. Les 
exportations de planches et madriers montrent un gain apres rajustement saisonnier tandis 
que celles de pulpe de bois et de bardeaux ont decline. L'indice de la production de bois et 
papier a 60-0 se compare a 65-8 en novembre. La production d'automobile apres rajustement 
saisonnier montre un gain modere sur le bas niveau du mois precedent. La production d'acier 
en loupe est de 30,755 tonnes comparativement a 37,088 tonnes et la production de fonte en 
gueuse a 27,031 tonnes se compare a 14,147 tonnes. Les importations de petrole brut donnent 
32,308,000 gallons comparativement a 51,706,000 en novembre, un declin marque* apres rajuste- 
ment saisonnier. 

Les nouveaux contrats de construction sont a, bas niveau en decembre, se chiffrant a $4,- 
190,100 comparativement a, $10,170,000 tandis que les permis de batir dans 61 cites donnent 
une valeur de $1,480,700 comparativement a $2,505,000 en novembre. Dans les deux cas le 
declin depasse la normale de la saison. 

L'indice de la production d'energie electrique en decembre donne 131-3 comparativement 
a, 134-4 en novembre apres rajustement pour le nombre de jours dans le mois et pour tendances 
saisonnieres. La production des plus grandes centrales electriques donne 1,433,159,000 k.w.h. 
representant une faible diminution sur decembre 1931 mais un declin de 1-02 p.c. sur novembre 
dernier. 

Les chargements de wagons sont de 152,562 en decembre comparativement a 192,575 en 
novembre, un declin de pres de 3 p.c. apres rajustement saisonnier. Les importations donnent 
un declin marque tandis que les exportations montrent un gain modere apres rajustement 
saisonnier. 

La situation au Royaume-Uni 

Les chiffres preliminaires du commerce de l'Angleterre en 1932 donnent des importations 
totales de £703,133,000 comparativement a £862,175,000 en 1932, tandis que ses exportations 
domestiques sont a £365,138,000 comparativement a £389,164,000, et les reexportations a 
£50,914,000 comparativement a £64,035,000. L'excedent des importations sur les exportations 
de marchandises est de £287,081,000 en 1932, comparativement a £408,976,000 en 1931, une 
reduction de £121,895,000. 

En 1932 la moyenne des prix de gros a ete de 85- 1 p.c. sur la base de 1930 comparativement 
a 87-2 p.c. moyenne de 1931. La moyenne de decembre a ete de 84-5 comparativement a 88-6 
en decembre 1931. Malgre" l'abandon de l'etalon-or, la moyenne de 1932 est legerement infe- 
rieure a celle de 1931 qui comprend neuf mois au cours desquels le Royaume-Uni £tait sur la 
base or. 
Bureau federal de la statistique, Ottawa, 21 Janvier 1933. 



PUBLICATIONS ISSUED BY THE DOMINION BUREAU OF STATISTICS 



1. ANNUAL OR SPECIAL REPORTS ISSUED DURING THE MONTH ENDED 

JANUARY 16, 1933 

Population. — Unemployment among wage earners, bulletin No. 1, Saint John, New Brunswick, Pt. 1, 

unemployment, Pt. 2, earnings and weeks employed. Immigrants by years of arrival in Canada, 

1931. 
Production. — Agricultural Production. — Summary of cold storage reports 1932. Routing of Canadian 

grain for export. Forest Products. — Paper-using industries in Canada, 1930. Animal Products. — 

The Leather industry in Canada, 1931. 

Manufactures. — The manufacturing industries of Canada, 1930 (from the Canada Year Book, 1933). 
Vegetable Products. — Report on the brewing industry in Canada, 1931. Report on the rubber 
industry in Canada, 1931. CheMiCALS and Allied Industries. — The paints, pigments and varnishes 
industry in Canada, 1931, The medicinal and pharmaceutical preparations industry in Canada, 
1931. The toilet preparations industry in Canada, 1931. 

Internal Trade. — Census of merchandise and service establishments, 1931, summary of retail trade 
in the province of Ontario. Census of retail merchandising and service establishments in Ontario, 
1930 (Preliminary provincial summary). Prices and price indexes, 1913-1931 (commodities, secur- 
ities, exchange services, import and export valuations). 

Transportation, Communications and Public Utilities.— Index numbers of rates for electricity for 
residence lighting and tables of monthly bills for domestic services, commercial light and small 
power. Statistics of steam railways of Canada for the year ended December 31, 1931. 

Justice. — 56th annual report of statistics of criminal and other offences for the year ended September 
30, 1931. 



2. PUBLICATIONS REGULARLY ISSUED BY THE WEEK, MONTH OR QUARTER 

Weekly Bulletins. — Canadian Grain Statistics, Carloadings of Revenue Freight. Investors' and Traders' 
Indexes of Security Prices. Index Number of 20 Mining Stocks. 

Monthly Bulletins. — Agricultural Statistics. The Wheat Situation: Review; statistical supplement. 
Cold Storage Holdings. Production of — (a) Flour, (b) Sugar, (c) Boots and Shoes, (d) Auto- 
mobiles, (e) Iron and Steel, (f) Coal and Coke, (g) Leading Mineral Products, (h) Asbestos, 
(i) Asphalt Roofing, (j) Cement, (k) Clay Products. (1) Copper, (m) Feldspar, (n) Gold, 
(o) Gypsum, (p) Lead, (q) Lime, (r) Natural Gas. (s) Nickel, (t) Petroleum, (u) Salt, 
(v) Silver, (w) Zinc, (x) Concentrated Milk Products, (y) Creamery Butter. Building Permits. 
Summary of the Trades of Canada current month and 12 months. Summary of Canada's domestic 
exports. Summary of Canada's Imports. Asbestos trade. Farm implements and machinery. 
Footwear trade. Exports: Grain and flour, Lumber; Meats; lard and sausage casings; Milk, milk 
products and eggs; Non-ferrous ores and smelter products; Paints and varnishes; Petroleum and its 
products; Pulpwood, wood pulp and paper; Rubber and insulated wire and cable; Vehicles (of iron). 
Imports: Coffee and tea; Lumber; Meats, lard and sausage casings; Milk and its products and eggs; 
Non-ferrous ores and smelter products; Paints and varnishes; Petroleum and its products; Rubber; 
Stoves, sheet metal products; Refrigerators; Vehicles (of iron). 
Railway Operating Statistics. Traffic of Canadian Railways. Canal Statistics. 
Price and Price Indexes. Automobile Financing. Changes in the value of retail sales. 
The Employment Situation as reported by Employers. Commercial Failures. Bank Debits. 
Review of Business Statistics. — Price $1.00 per year. 
Vital Statistics, Births, Marriages and Deaths, by provinces. 



Quarterly Reports.— Trade of Canada— Price $2.00 per year. 



t The publications listed above will be furnished upon application addressed to the Dominion Statis- 
tician, Dominion Bureau of Statistics, Ottawa. They will be supplied free of charge, with the exception 
of the Monthly Review of Business Statistics and the Quarterly Report of the Trade of Canada, for which 
the annual subscription price is $1.00 and $2.00, respectively. 



Volume VIII jBBfo N 




lumero 



CANADA 

BUREAU FEDERAL DE LA STATISTIQUE 
SECTION DE LA STATISTIQUE G&NERALE 



REVUE DE LA SITUATION ECONOMIQUE 



JANVIER 1933 



Publie par ordre de l'Hon. H. H. Stevens, M.P., 
Ministre du Commerce 



OTTAWA: F. A. ACLAND 

Imprimeur de Sa Tres Excellente Majeste le Rot 

1933 



Prix: Un dollar par an. 







Volume VIII MSks Number 2 



CANADA 
DOMINIO N BUREAU OF STATISTICS 

GENERAL STATISTICS BRANCH 



MONTHLY REVIEW OF BUSINESS STATISTICS 



FEBRUARY, 1933 




Published by Authority of the Honourable H. H. Stevens, M.P., 
Minister of Trade and Commerce 



OTTAWA: F. A. ACLAND 

Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty 

1933 



Price: One Dollar per year. 



MONTHLY REVIEW OF BUSINESS STATISTICS 



SUMMARY OF CONTENTS 



Pa oh 

Chart of Three Representative Factors 4 

General Review 3-7 

Table 1. Weighted Indices of the Physical Vol- 
ume of Business 8 

Table 2. Trend of Business Movements. 

Imports of raw materials. Exports of lumber. 
Production of basic industries. Exports of certain 
commodities. Operations of railways. Canal 
traffic. Strikes and lockouts. Reports of the em- 
ployment offices. Immigration. Bank clearings. 
Failure* 9 

Chart of World Stocks and Prices 10 

Table 3. Receipts and Visible Supply of Canadian 
Grain 11 

Table 4. Exports and Cash Price of Canadian 
Grain 11 

Table 5. Consumption of Grain and Production 
by the Milling Industry 12 

Table 6. Receipts, Manufactures and Stocks of 
Sugar 12 

Table 7. Tobacco, Cigars and Cigarettes Entered 
for Consumption. 

Tob«vH50,cut. Tobacco, plug— Cigarettes. Cigar- 
ettes, '•»"nr-weight. Cigars. Foreign Raw Leaf 
Tobaco 13 

Table 8 Production of Boots and Shoes 13 

Table 9. Cold Storage Holdings, Sales and 
Slaughterings of Live Stock and Retail Food 
Prices 14 

Chart of Economic Ratios of Canada 15 

Table 10. Output of Central Electric Stations in 
Canada 16 

Table 11. Railway Freight Loaded at Stations. . 17 

Table 12. Index Numbers of Employment by 
Industries 18 

Electrical Energy Available for Consumption 18 

Table 13. Seasonally Adjusted Indexes of Em- 
ployment, Indexes of Retail Sales and Auto- 
mobile Financing. 19 

Table 14. Trend of Business In the Five Economic 
Areas. 

Canada, Maritime Provinces, Quebec, Ontario, 
Prairie Provinces, British Columbia — Construction 
Contracts Awarded. Building Permits. Index of 
Employment. Bank Debits. Sales of Insurance. 
Commercial Failures 20 

Table 15. Mineral Production by Months. 

Metals— Gold, Silver, Nickel, Copper, Lead, 
Zinc, Fuels— Coal, Petroleum, Natural Gas, Non- 
Metals — Asbestos, Gypsum, Feldspar, Salt, Struc- 
tural Materials— Cement, Clay Products, Lime. . . 20 



Pagb 

Table 16. Weekly Factors of Economic Activity in 
Canada. 

Grain Receipts and Prices, Live Stock Sales and 
Prices, Carloadings, Security Prices, Mining Stock 
Prices 21 

Table 17. Bank Debits to Individual Accounts 
in the Clearing House Centres of Canada 22 

Table 18. Indexes of Employment by Cities 22 

Table 19. Building Permits Issued in Sixty-one 
Cities * 23 

Table 20. Index Numbers of Wholesale Prices .... 24 

Table 21. Prices of Representative Commodities 
and Wholesale Prices in Other Countries. 

United States, United Kingdom, France, Ger- 
many, Belgium, Netherlands, Norway, Sweden, 
Italy, Finland, India, Japan, Australia, New 
Zealand, Egypt 25 

Table 22. Total Value of Imports and Exports, 
by Groups, in Thousands of Dollars 26 

Tabic 23. Canada'sDomestic Exports by Principal 
Commodities 27 

Indexes of Cost of Living and Cost per Week of a 

Family Budget 27 

Table 24. Summary of Canada's Imports by 
Principal Commodities 28 

Table 25. Banking and Currency 29 

Chart of Economic Conditions of United States 30 

Table 26. Index Numbers of Security Prices. 

(a) 1. Common Stocks— Industrials, Total, Iron 
and Steel, Pulp and Paper, Milling, Oils, Textiles 
and Clothing, Food and Allied Products, Beverages, 
Miscellaneous. Utilities, Total, Transportation, 
Telephone and Telegraph, Power and Traction. 

(b) Common Stocks, continued— Companies 
abroad, Total, Industrial, Utilities, Banks, General 
Index Number, Traders' Index, Preferred Stocks, 
Interest Rates, Yields on Bonds, Shares Traded, 
Montreal. Mining Stocks— Gold, Copper, Silver 

and Miscellaneous, Total Index 31 

Table 27. Tonnage of Vessels Entered and Cleared 
from Canadian Ports 31 

Tabic 28. Cycle Indexes 32 

Table 29. Significant Statistics of the United 
Kingdom 3J 

Table 30. Significant Statistics of the United 
States 34 

List of Current Publications of the Dominion 
Bureau of Statistics 39 

General Review (in French) 35-38 



MONTHLY REVIEW OF BUSINESS STATISTICS 

Vol. VIII OTTAWA, FEBRUARY, 1933 No. 2 

Dominion Statistician: R. H. Coats, B.A., F.S.S. (Hon.), F.R.S.C. 

Chief, Branch op General Statistics: S. A. Cudmore, M.A., F.S.S. 

Assistant on Business Statistics: Sydney B. Smith, M.A. 



THE BUSINESS SITUATION IN CANADA 

Economic conditions in Canada showed a slight improvement in January over the preceding 
month. The chief element in that recovery was the decided strength in government bonds. 
The yield on four refunding bonds of the Dominion Government averaged 4-55 p.c. in January 
compared with 4-78 p.c. in the last month of 1932, and the yield on Ontario Government bonds 
was 4 • 75 p.c. compared with 4 • 92 p. c. The decline in high grade bond yields has a direct bearing 
on the credit situation in Canada, and the firmness in bond prices since the beginning of the year 
has consequently been one of the most constructive factors. The level of speculative stock 
prices was more than maintained in January, the index of 130 common stocks traded on the 
Montreal and Toronto stock exchanges being 51 -6 in January compared with 51-3 in December. 
Weekly indexes for the first part of February disclose reaction but the level is still higher than 
the low point reached in June, 1932. The marked gain in the stocks of gold mining companies 
since midsummer 1932 directs attention to an industry operating under favourable conditions. 
The index of 11 gold stocks was 77-5 in the week of February 9 compared with 48-5, the low 
point of 1932. 

Bank deposits at the end of December, after seasonal adjustment, showed a moderate 
gain. It is noteworthy that notice deposits were greater on December 31 than on the corres- 
ponding date of 1931, while in the meantime current loans have been consistently liquidated. 
This leaves a greatly increased surplus of notice deposits o\er current loans, the total being 
$413,000,000 compared with $278,000,000 in December, 1931. The investment holdings of 
the banks at $778,252,000 reached on December 31 the highest point in the history of Canadian 
banking. 

While wholesale prices reached in January a new low point since pre-war days, the decline 
in the index from the preceding month was limited to one tenth of one point. Wheat averaged 
slightly higher, a strength which was continued during the early weeks of February. Wheat 
prices on February 17 touched the highs of 1933 on two futures, the May and July. They sold 
at 49 cents and 49| cents, respectively, equivalent to the peaks of the present calendar year 
established on January 11. The index of raw materials showed a slight gain in January over 
the preceding month, while fully or chiefly manufactured goods recorded a decline. 

Business Operations 

The improvement in the financial background failed to bring about greater activity in 
productive enterprise and in many lines a new low point on the present movement was reached. 
Mineral production declined from the preceding month and the output of foodstuffs was in 
lesser volume. After adjustment for seasonal tendencies, the construction, iron and steel and 
automobile industries showed moderate gains but levels of operation were decidedly low. 

Exports of nickel were 3,079,000 pounds compared with 2,175,000 in December. The 
exports of fine copper in ore and blister were 1,362,000 pounds compared with 4,336,000 in the 
preceding month. Lead production showed reduction in December, and zinc spelter exports 
declined in the month under review. The receipts of gold at the Mint from mines were 253,430 
ounces compared with 238,999 in December, but shipments including exports showed a gain 
less than normal for the season. Silver shipments showed a considerable decline. Asbestos 
shipments declined less than normal for the season, while bauxite imports for the manufacture 
of aluminium showed decline. 

59437— 1| 



MONTHLY REVIEW OF BUSINESS STATISTICS 




MONTHLY REVIEW OF BUSINESS STATISTICS 5 

Flour production showed considerable contraction in the last month for which statistics 
are available, and the output of oatmeal and rolled oats was in lesser volume. Sugar in the first 
four weeks of the year was produced in limited quantities, most of the decline being explained 
by seasonal considerations. Cattle and sheep slaughterings showed a gain in January, while 
hogs were slaughtered in reduced numbers. Cheese and canned salmon exports dropped off 
in January even after seasonal adjustment. Release for consumption of raw leaf tobacco and 
cigarettes showed gain in January, the latter numbering 310,145,000 compared with 304,614,000. 
Cigars were withdrawn from bond in lesser volume. Imports of crude rubber showed a gain, 
the total being 2,663,000 pounds compared with 2,109,000. The output of leather boots and 
shoes showed decline in December after being well maintained throughout the preceding months 
of 1932. Imports of raw cotton at 8,765,000 pounds compared with 13,819,000, showed marked 
decline, while imports of cotton yarn were greater. Wool for further manufacture showed a 
considerable decline. 

The gain in the output of newsprint was less than normal for the season. Exports of wood 
pulp, planks, boards and shingles showed gain in January after seasonal adjustment, the move- 
ment of shingles being 83,718,000 compared with 73,138,000. 

Production of steel ingots was 40,766 tons compared with 30,755 and the pig iron output 
was 29,209 tons compared with 27,031. The activity at Sydney was the main factor in the gain 
during January. The output of automobiles was 3,358 units compared with 2,139, a slight 
gain being shown after seasonal adjustment. Production of coke in December was 150,253 
tons compared with 142,616 in November. Imports of crude petroleum were 35,085,000 gallons 
compared with 32,808,000, the index after seasonal adjustment being 86-0 compared with 71-0 
in December. 

The decline in building permits and construction contracts awarded was less than normal 
for the season, the new business acquired during the two months being at a low level. 

The decline in the output of electric power on an average daily basis was slightly less than 
normal for the season. The total production was 1,396,658,000 k.w.h. compared with 1,433,- 
.159,000. As the exports to the United States were 48,018,000 k.w.h., the energy available for 
consumption was 1,348,640,000 k.w.h. in January, no allowance being made for loss in trans- 
mission. As exports were 41,609,000 k.w.h. in December, the amount available for consumption 
was 1,391,550,000 k.w.h. Consumption in Quebec was 604,900,000 k.w.h., exports from the 
province being 180,242,000 k.w.h. Consumption in the same month of 1932 was 576,900,000 
k.w.h., provincial exports being 144,927,000 k.w.h. Both production and consumption in 
Quebec showed gains in the twelve-month comparison. 

Distribution 

The index of distribution was 84-3 compared with 86-1 in December. Car loadings and 
employment in retail and wholesale trade and merchandise imports showed decline while exports 
gained after seasonal adjustment. Carloadings numbered 134,432 compared with 152,562, part 
of the decline being explained by seasonal considerations. The weekly reports in the first part 
of February reflect a reactionary tendency. The index of employment in trade was 109-4 
compared with 119-6 at the first of January, the decline after seasonal adjustment being 1-6 
p.c. 

World Commodity Stocks 

An index of the stocks of nine commodities of fundamental importance in international 
trade shows that the supply of these commodities is now about twice as great as it was in 1928 
just before the depression began. An index of the prices of the same commodities has fallen 
to a third of the pre-depression level. 

There is an impressively close inverse relationship between the movements of these two 
indexes, throwing important light on the nature of the depression. When prices decline in hard 
times, the stocks of commodities rise; and when stocks decline in prosperous periods, prices 
rise. The nine commodities are wheat, tea, sugar, rubber, coffee, cotton, silk, copper and tin. 
At the beginning of 1920 the world's warehouse stocks of these staples were not abnormally 
large, for the war demands had been enormous, trade was active and prices were very high. 
Then came the price collapse, the depression of 1921 and an immediate sharp increase in the 
world stocks of these commodities. The curtailment of demand was the chief element in the 
sudden increase in stocks. 

59437-2 



6 MONTHLY REVIEW OF BUSINESS STATISTICS 

Stocks declined between 1921 and 1923, contrasting with a recovery in wholesale prices. 
Then followed a period of unprecedentedly keen international competition during which new 
sources of production created by war demands continued their operations and all sources that 
had been restricted by war conditions strove to regain their former markets, This was a period 
characterized by the protection of markets and the stimulation of production by pools, tariffs, 
cartels, bonus differentials, and artificial price control schemes for most of these staples. Pro- 
duction was stimulated beyond demand, and stocks steadily accumulated while world 
prices were moving moderately downward from 1925 through to 1928. The second post-war 
depression commenced in 1929 and for four years prices have shown drastic declines, while 
commodity stocks have accumulated with embarrassing persistence. 

During the latter half of 1932 there occurred the first important interruption to the growth 
in stocks of primary commodities which previously had been practically continuous from 1928. 
The index of the prices of the nine commodities on a gold basis has also exhibited a more con- 
structive tendency in the last six months. 

As trade in these staples largely determines the general level of world prices, the inverse 
relationship of the two indexes suggests that the corrective for the international depression 
must be sought in international cooperative action. 

The index of wheat stocks adjusted for seasonal tendencies showed reduction of world stocks 
in the latter half of 1932. The highest point in world stocks of sugar was reached in June, 1932, 
a decline being shown in subsequent months. Rubber stocks reached high levels in 1932, the 
increase in evidence from 1929 to 1931 being discontinued during the year. Stocks of coffee 
reached a high point in March, 1932, a decline being shown in later months. Maximum cotton 
stocks were recorded in August, 1932, and silk stocks also show substantial reduction in the 
current period. Statistics of copper stocks were unavailable after October, 1932, when a maxi- 
mum was shown. Tin stocks showed decline in the latter part of 1932. 

The prices of most of the nine commodities reached new low points during 1932, moderate 
recovery being shown in some cases before the end of the year. (See chart page 10). 

Economic Ratios 

The interrelation of the main economic factors of Canadian business has been demonstrated 
in the last seven years. The chief price and volume factors tend to move upward or downward 
in harmony with the corresponding phases of the business cj^cle. Divergence from these estab- 
lished sequences are worthy of study in appraising the current economic position of Canada. 

A significant exception to conventional cycle development was the moderate decline in the 
trend of wholesale prices from 1926 to 1929. During these years the industrial expansion of 
Canada was more rapid than at any other period. Since 1929 the correlation between the indexes 
of the physical volume of business and wholesale prices has been remarkably close, the pro- 
nounced decline in these factors being the main element in the depression. The downward 
trend in 1932 was more moderate than in either of the two preceding years, and the greater resist- 
ance presented to depressing influences during the last twelve months is one of the brighter aspects 
of the situation. The index of the physical volume of business was 68 • 1 in January compared with 
72 • 6 in December, while the index of wholesale prices was 63 • 9 compared with 64-0 in the pre- 
ceding month. 

Decline in the volume of business payments of all kinds is measured roughly by the decrease 
in the total amounts charged by banks to the accounts of their depositors representing chiefly 
transfers by cheque. The total volume of money payments during a year exceeds many times 
the national income, for these payments include not only those made on account of salaries, 
wages, services, profits and other items of net income, but also payments made at each stage in 
the manufacture and merchandising of commodities as well as payments involved in all other 
money transactions such as the transfer of securities and the purchase of real estate. 

Bank debits in October, 1929, were $4,713,473,000, representing a turnover during the 
month of 2-12 times for the deposits of the chartered banks as reported at the end of the pre- 
ceding month. In January, 1933, the turnover was limited to 1-07 times, the debits during the 
month being $1 ,968,876,000. Bank deposits were $1,843,733,000 at the end of December, 1932, 
compared with $2,255,814,000 on November 30, 1929. 



MONTHLY REVIEW.PF BUSINESSjflSTATISTICS 7 

The analysis of the rate at which bank deposits are utilized by the depositors indicates that 
the decline in the volume of business activity and in the price level between 1929 and 1932 was 
accompanied by a corresponding decrease in the volume of money payments, and that the decrease 
in the rate of turnover by deposits was much larger than the decrease in the total volume of 
deposits. 

The fluctuation in dividend prospects in different periods leads to sharp changes in common 
stock prices, the trend of government bond prices being relatively stable. An index of bond 
prices after being at a lower level from 1926 to the first quarter of 1931, has been for the last 
two years comparatively higher than common stocks. A moderate gain in both indexes was 
shown in January, the common stock index being 51-6 compared with 51-3 in December, while 
the yield on Ontario government bonds was 4-75 p.c. compared with 4-92 p.c. (See chart page 
15.) 

CONDITIONS IN THE UNITED STATES 

Economic conditions in the United States from 1919 to the present are illustrated in a chart 
on page 30. Industrial production after the primary post-war depression showed rapid recovery 
during 1922. The recession in 1924 was relatively moderate, considerable expansion being 
shown in 1928 and the early months of 1929. The lowest point of industrial activity occurred 
in July, 1932, the gain in September being well maintained until the end of the year. 

The severe decline in wholesale prices was the essential factor in the primary post-war 
depression culminating in 1921. The recovery in 1922 was moderate and no important trend 
developed during the eight-year period to 1929. The decline in the last three years was persistent, 
resulting during December in a new low point for the period under consideration. The trend 
of the sum of the time and demand deposits of the member federal reserve banks in leading 
cities was upward during the post-war period. The total was well maintained in 1932 after a 
considerable drop in the preceding year. 

Interest rates on prime commercial paper have fluctuated widely in the last 14 years. The 
highest point was reached in the latter part of 1920, when reactionary credit conditions prevailed. 
From 1922 to 1927 money rates were at a relatively low level, while sharp advances were shown 
in the last two years of the prosperous period. The remarkable decline in rates since October, 
1929, was interrupted by the rise in the last quarter of 1931. Rates in the current period are 
lower than at any time in the 14 years of the post-war period. 

The most spectacular feature of the post-war period was the extreme fluctuation in spec- 
ulative stocks. The index used in this connection was 50 in August, 1921, advanced to 225 in 
September, 1929, and reacted to 35 in June, 1932. A rally in July and August raised the level 
of common stock prices somewhat above the low point reached in the preceding month. Recent 
irregularity has not counterbalanced that rally and the level of last June remains the lowest for 
the post-war period. 

Referring to recent developments, the increase in industrial activity in January was not 
as great as the usual seasonal gain. Weekly indexes of wholesale prices reflected decline during 
the month. Average stock prices showed practically no change during January, keeping well 
within the narrow range in which they had moved since October. Moderate reaction was shown 
in the early weeks of February. (See chart page 30.) 

CONDITIONS IN GREAT BRITAIN 

Available statistics from Great Britain indicate no pronounced change in January. Imports 
in that month were valued at £54,120,000 as compared with £62,266,000 in the same month of 

1932. Total exports showed a smaller decline, being £33,380,000 in January, 1933, as compared 
with £36,362,000 in January, 1932. Thus the excess of imports was £20,740,000 in January, 

1933, as compared with £25,904,000 in the same month of 1932 and £31,969,000 in January, 
1931. As is usually the case in January, the number of unemployed showed an increase to 
2,903,000 on the 23rd of the month, an increase of approximately 180,000 over the figure for 
December 19th. 

New capital issues other than those of the British Government amounted to £113,038,000 
in 1932, of which £83,817,000 was for domestic purposes, £28,873,000 for empire countries and 
only £348,000 for foreign countries. 

Dominion Bureau of Statistics, Ottawa, February 21, 1933. 

59437— 2\ 



8 



MONTHLY REVIEW OF BUSINESS STATISTICS 



Table 1. Weighted Indexes of the Physical Volume of Business and Agricultural Factors in 
Canada, Based on the Monthly average for 1926 and Corrected where Necessary for Seasonal 
Variation. 



1932 



Jan. Feb. Mar. April May June July Aug. Sept. Oct. I Nov. Dec 



Jan. 



Physical Volume of Business. . 

INDUSTRIAL PRODUC- 
TION 



80-0 

99-0 
95-7 
68-4 
93- 
172-6 
136-2 
105-1 
46-3 
100-6 
75-0 

71-6 

66-8 

51-5 

71-1 

52-5 

23 

84 

124 
85 

139-4 

103 
82 
46 
42 
77 

46-5 
77 

110 
50-3 
44 
58 
29-3 
40 
18-1 
39 
26 
88 

178 
92-7 

107-0 
57-0 
90-0 

Electric Power 133-6 

94-3 
1191 
69-1 
67-4 
63-6 



Mineral Production 

Copper exports 

Nickel exports 

Lead production 

Zinc exports 

Gold shipments 

Silver shipments 

Asbestos exports 

Bauxite imports 

Coal production 

Manufacturing 

Foodstuffs 

Flour production 

Oatmeal production. . . 

Sugar manufactured . . . 

Cheese exports 

Salmon exports ; . . 

Tobacco 

Cigars 

Cigarettes 

Rubber imports 

Boots and shoes production. 
Textiles 

Raw cotton imports . . . 

Cotton yarn imports. . 

Wool, raw and yarn.... 
Forestry 

Newsprint 

Wood pulp exports 

Planks and boards exports 

Shingles exported 

Iron and steel 

Steel production 

Pig iron production 

Iron and steel imports. . . 

Automobileproduction . . 

Coke production 

Crude petroleum imports. . . 

Construction 

Contracts awarded 

Building permits 

Cost of construction 



DISTRIBUTION 

Trade employment 

Carloadings 

Imports 

Exports 

Agricultural Factors— 
AGRICULTURAL MARKET- 
INGS 

Grain Marketings 

Wheat 

Oats 

Barley 

Flax 

Rye 

Live Stock Marketings 

Cattle 

Calves 

Hogs 

Sheep 

ANIMAL PRODUCTS- 
INSPECTED Slaughterings— 

Cattle 

Sheep 

Hogs 

Cold Storage Holdings 



101-4 
184-8 
102- 
133- 
231- 
1761 
51-5 
56 
115-1 

Mutton J 177- 

Poultry 215- 

Lard 87- 

Veal 77- 



Butter. 
Cheese. 
Beef. . . 
Pork... 



56-4 

52-1 

54-3 

911 

19 

22 

15 

75 



85-4 

81-3 

104-2 
86-9 

125-0 
90-6 

116-6 

150-1 
83-8 
27-7 
93-8 
90-0 

74-2 
70-6 
57-C 
78-4 
35-5 
31-2 
120-4 
128-2 



105' 
94' 
115 



61-3 
63-1 
90-5 
41-3 
78-1 

108-4 
54 
47-2 
51-7 
34-3 
45-7 
18-4 
44-2 
31-6 
93-5 

152-1 

85-2 
103-5 
39-5 
89 

134-4 



119-5 
75-8 
70 

63 



77 
75 

81-8 
66-7 
20-5 
16-1 
350 
87-7 
69-0 
120-8 
106-4 
162-0 



111-7 

2131 

109-9 

157-6 

326-3 

180-9 

58-4 

68-2 

110-9 

166-3 

430-3 

92-5 

76-8 



76-9 

89-9 
56-7 
72-8 
83-8 
129-0 
136-5 
73-2 
26-9 
93-0 
77 

76 

78-2 

65-0 

102-1 
58-1 
46-1 

124 

116-3 
83-8 

128 

100-7 
94-3 
82-3 
76-8 

121-0 
97-1 
74-4 

104-6 
52-7 
42-0 
60-5 
42-6 
59-5 
27-5 
46-7 
39-9 
92-8 

146-2 

53-5 
62-2 
31-9 
89-8 

136-5 

95-4 
117-5 
73-0 
81-5 
53-5 



103-5 

105 

115-4 
90-3 
38-8 
6-1 
51-0 
92-6 
73-0 
94-6 

113-6 

195-0 



107-5 

230-5 

106 

150-2 

329-3 

157-8 

54-8 

72-1 

110-3 

171-4 

384-5 

69-4 

73-8 



75-3 



68-2 

105-0 
60-0 
92-2 
88-2 
157-8 
213-2 
73-2 
25-0 
85-6 
64-6 

66-5 

68-3 

54-0 

99 

45 

39-3 

74-2 
101-1 

88-9 
106-0 

97-1 

90 

61 

66 

83-0 

25-1 

74-1 
111 

49-0 

34 

56-0 

33 

52-3 

27 

36-0 

29-0 

89-1 
129-0 

27-9 
28-5 
26-5 



1390 

95-0 
117-3 
77-2 
61-6 
61-9 



105 

113 
67 
47 
23 

138 
87-2 
61-4 
79-6 

120 



91-2 
237-4 
108-2 
144-1 
313-5 
143-7 

64-9 

73-3 
103-1 
174-9 
343-1 

71-5 
121-2 



79- 



74-6 

94-4 
56-6 
68-2 
86-9 
143-9 
182-7 
87-0 
28-7 
49-3 
59-4 

77-4 
77-9 
68-1 
50-5 
61-2 
44-7 
65 

102-2 
70 

113-9 
79-9 
96-5 

120-9 

129 
96 
83 
71 

107 
46-3 
33-3 
40 
34 
40 
19 

36-0 
34-4 
78-6 

230-1 

31-8 
32-2 
30-9 
89-1 
131-2 

94-5 
117-8 
71-2 
72-9 
58-4 



23 

36 

28 
106 

91 

67-8 

78-4 
125 1 
172 



87-1 
175-8 
121 
120-9 
134-0 
178-0 

54-4 

77 

101-9 
210 
297 

73-1 

94 



81-4 



76-9 

92-3 
67-9 
36-1 
92-8 
51-6 
211-3 
82-0 
17-7 
23-5 
61-2 

82-1 
94-0 
85 

62-4 
70-1 
55-5 
223-6 
120-0 
78-9 
134-4 
169-9 
93-3 
53-9 
50-4 
79-5 
63-2 
74-5 
102-6 
35-0 
51-8 
50-1 
32-9 
25-6 
12-7 
38-1 
36-7 
75-3 
176-8 

28-1 
28-3 
27-6 
88-5 

130-5 

93-7 
117-4 
70-3 
69-7 
59-3 



221-4 
250 

279-9 
29 

48 

77 

218 



92 

116-5 
186-4 



91-9 
233-4 
128-8 
116 
113-0 
167 

62-0 

81 

107-7 
205-4 
245 

74-2 
104 



78-3 



74-2 

83-4 
103-2 



76 
93-3 



84-0 
68-9 

155-4 
96-7 
72-8 

105-5 
89-6 
84-3 
42-4 
41-7 
87-5 
28-8 
55-9 
89-5 
39 
17 
37 
41-1 
45-7 
11-7 
31-1 
47-0 
83-2 

192-9 

39-4 
42-6 
31-4 
88-0 

129-0 

89-6 
115-9 
60-5 
63-2 
62-9 



135-9 
147-9 
158-5 
112-5 
66-5 
32-7 
170-7 
821 
64-9 
87-1 
105-5 
131-3 



85-7 
178-5 
122-8 
112-2 
103-6 
143-1 

73-5 

82-4 
103 
292-9 
199-9 

80-3 
100-0 



78-1 



73-6 

84-8 
7-6 
160 
98-2 
64-0 
186-5 
73-9 
24-3 
16-4 
56-8 

75-5 

97-6 

103 
70-1 
93-2 
77-0 
99 

102 
71 

114 
61 

93-0 
73 
73 
98 
63 

59-6 
91-4 
38-3 
25-0 
46-2 
27-3 
43-2 
9-3 
26-5 
26-4 
72-7 

172-7 

37-1 
40-1 
28-4 
87-8 

137-1 

90-4 
115-3 
64-3 
63-8 
63-0 



196-6 

222 

242-8 
53-1 

121-0 
66-2 

177-8 
79-9 
59-4 
83-9 

111-8 

112-2 



143 
119 
106 

98 
114-8 

62 

94 
114 
337 
170-9 

64 



77-1 

71-9 

89-5 
17-2 
26-3 
88-7 
90-8 
185-0 
88-9 
30 
67-6 
68-5 

74-3 

94-5 

85 

60 

98-7 

54-1 

35 

102 
69-0 

114-8 

201 
95-0 
67 
66 

116-8 
60-1 
60 

99-2 
33-2 
18-0 
53-6 
20-4 
41-0 
9-9 
27-9 
15-3 
82-8 

136-4 

31-5 

36-1 
20-0 
88-3 

128-0 



114-3 
68-1 
64-7 
64-6 



189-0 

213-9 

239-1 

140-9 

34-2 

121 

21-3 

77-1 

55-9 

92-8 

110-4 

94-2 



79-3 
115 
100 
104-9 
103 
112-8 

59-3 

92-5 
1151 
351 
123-0 

62 
111 



75-3 

70-4 

99-3 
38-5 
40-1 
84-2 
135-2 
185-1 
101-2 
41-6 
92-8 
75-5 

70 
88 

78-0 
55-1 

131-1 
56-0 
34 
78-7 
68-6 
82-8 
74-0 
83-3 
71 
68-3 

141-2 
63-9 
64 
07 
50 
25 
61 

22-4 
27-1 
10-9 
30-1 
21-2 
81-3 

140-0 

30-7 
32-6 
26-2 
88-6 

127-8 

88-8 
113-7 
59-8 
67-5 
66-4 



95-3 
108-2 



66-4 
107-4 
89-9 
96-7 
108-4 
119-1 
58-4 
82-9 
102-7 
207 
73-9 
36-9 
102-1 



75-8 



86-4 
21-3 
46-4 

119-1 
58-3 

164-1 
69-6 
2^-7 

202-3 
75-3 

72-3 
86-7 
93-5 
48-4 

125-4 
57-7 
27-1 

126-5 
70-3 

148 
96-5 
81-0 

104-1 

110-9 
65-8 
81-9 
65-8 

101 
51-6 
23 
50 
2S 
57 
24 

39-7 
18-9 
90-2 

102-0 
39-4 
44-7 
26-0 
88-6 

134-4 



111-6 
60-1 
70-6 
47-3 



62-3 
59-5 
65-1 
55-3 
10-5 
21-7 
4 

74-5 
41 

101-0 
123-7 
120-3 



67 
115-0 

99 

98 
121-2 



72-6 



67- 

90-5 
45-8 
38-2 
82 
91-7 
198-1 
61-4 
43 

25-9 
73-8 

70 
04 
61 
23 

127 
39 
56-1 

106- 
60-0 

124-1 
59-3 
C3-7 
96-3 
94-8 
66-4 

115-3 
60 
92-7 
40 
23 

42-6 
29 
51 
48 
29-4 
21-6 
931 
71-0 

19-5 
20-5 
17-1 
88-1 

131-3 

86-1 
113-4 

58-4 
59 

47 



59-1 
56-6 
61 
49 
27-3 
18 
5 

70-3 
55 
81 
03 
76 



73-6 
118-3 
105-3 
98-3 
130-5 
139-8 
52-8 
54-7 
101-3 
111-2 
47-0 
64-9 
67-5 



73-0 
161-6 
39-4 
57-3 
16-3 
66-5 



MONTHLY REVIEW OF BUSINESS STATISTICS 
Table 2. Trend of Business Movements 



Items 



Trend of Business Movements— 

Rubber, Crude Imports. 000 lbs. 

Cotton, Raw Imports 000 lbs. 

Wool, Raw Imports 000 lbs. 

Planks and Boards 
Exports Mil. bd. ft. 

Timber Scaled in B.C. Mil. bd. ft. 

Newsprint Production.. 000 tons 

Shipments 000 tons 

Stocks 000 tons 

Pig Iron Production. .000 1. tons 

Ferro-alloys Production. . .tons 

Steel Ingots and 
Castings 000 1. tons 

Passenger Automobile Pro- 
duction No. 

Truck Productton No. 

Total Cars and Trucks No. 

Exports— Auto Complete or 
Chassis No. 

Exports — Automobiles and 
Parts $000 

Petroleum, Crude Imports 

000,000 gal. 

Condensed Milk Output 000 lbs. 

Evaporated Milk Output 000 lbs . 

Fish Exports 000 lbs. 

Fish Exports $000 

Canned Salmon Exports 

000 cases 

RArLWAYS — 

Canadian National— 

(exclusive of eastern lines) 

Operating Revenues $000 

Operating Expenses $000 

Operating Income $000 

Freight carried one mile 

000,000 tons 
Passengers carried one mile 
000,000 pass. 
Canadian Pacific — 

Operating Revenues $000 

Operating Expenses $000 

Operating Income $000 

Freight carried one 

mile 000,000 tons 

Passengers carried 

one mile 000,000 pass. 

All Railways- 
Operating Revenues $000 

Operating Expenses $000 

Operating Income $000 

Freight carried 

one mile 000,000 tons 

Passengers carried 

one mile 000,000 pass. 

Carloadings 000 cars 

Canal Cargo Traffic— 

Sault Ste. Marie 000 s. tons 

Welland 000 s. tons 

St. Lawrence 000 s. tons 

Coal Available 000 s. tons 

Coke Production 000 tons 

Strikes and Lockouts — 

Disputes in existence No. 

Number of employees No. 

Time loss in working days 

Percentage of unemploy- 
ment in Trade Unions.. P.C. 
Employment Office Reports — 

Applications No. 

Vacancies No. 

Placements No. 

Immigration— Total No. 

From U . Kingdom No . 

From U. States No. 

From other Countries No. 

Returned Canadians No. 

Bank Clearings $000, 000 

Failures No. 

Liabilities $000 



1932 



Jan. 



3,911 

6,528 

634 

53-85 

85-7 
171-32 
171-84 
53-68 
10-31 
1,823 

25-06 

3,112 

619 

3,731 

548 

248 

72-73 

736 

1,854 

39,921 

1,896 

87-40 



9,024 
9,584 

747 1 

673 

39 

9,116 

8,250 

617 

640 

49 

22,120 

21,781 

486 > 

1,605 

113 

165-83 



1,748 
146 

11 

1,044 
10,729 

22-0 

57,755 

31,538 

30,721 

1,067 

142 

725 

200 

957 

1,056 

238 

4,061 



Feb. Mar. April May June July Aug. Sept. Oct. Nov. Dec 



3,859 

7,074 

513 

60-45 
80-1 
158-54 
150-95 
61-19 
10-51 
1,431 

28-42 

4,494 

983 

5,477 

383 

214 

48-58 

853 

2,200 

28,287 

1,751 

105-11 



9,072 

9,774 

879 1 

702 

38 

8,848 
8,461 

229 

679 

47 

22,294 

22,196 

821i 

1,659 

107 
174-18 



1,670 
144 

17 
3,611 
14,679 

20-6 

55,558 

33,426 

32,633 

1,039 

109 

684 

246 

862 

1,015 

221 

3,651 



5,797 
10.212 
1,829 

77-55 
110-2 
166-76 
163-81 
63-55 
17-99 
1,295 

43-57 

6,617 
1,701 
8,318 

567 

257 

67-64 
1,045 
3,713 
27,693 
1,568 

124-58 



10,213 

9,813 

256 

863 

42 

10,273 
8,742 
1,171 

736 

58 

25,027 

22,550 

1,612 

1,814 

125 
186-01 



1,708 
156 

11 

1,501 

26,410 

20-4 

55,271 

35,275 

34,275 

1,438 

270 

903 

265 

1,035 

1,036 

208 

3,399 



3,585 

6,230 

347 

42-52 
165-5 
176-66 
186-44 
53-90 
16-90 
2,185 

36-03 

5,660 
1,150 
6,810 

321 

219 

38-57 
1,102 
4,872 
10,575 
691 

32-51 



9,991 

8,984 

848 

803 

39 

9,511 

8,237 
918 

663 

50 

23,851 

21,052 

1,932 

1,653 

113 
180-18 

369 

465 

279 

1,264 

143 

11 

1,413 
34,556 

23-0 

57,580 

34,961 

33,744 

2,059 

386 

1,274 

399 

1,538 

1,073 

190 

3,171 



3,171 
12,463 
1,096 

62-95 
184-3 

175-89 
172-95 
57-01 
13-34 
1,132 

29-24 

7,269 

952 

8,221 

333 

264 

109-52 
913 

6,271 
15,313 

1,214 

34-30 



9,907 

9,128 

596 

816 

41 

9,517 

8,425 

737 

673 

50 

23,400 

21,245 

1,191 

1,632 

110 

182-73 

1,568 
1,037 

884 
1,694 

129 

13 

1,521 

31,905 



6,349 

4,486 

816 

110-69 
178-5 
161-37 
164-31 
50-03 
8-16 
893 

18-12 

6,308 

804 

7,112 

768 

349 

113-95 
979 

6,947 
17,228 

1,933 

86-89 



10,666 
9,420 
1,138 

891 

44 

10,497 
8,558 
1,579 

933 

63 

24,813 
21,654 
2,328 

2,257 

129 
185-15 

1,988 
1,065 

905 
1,694 

119 

17 
3,011 

38,147 



22-1 21-9 



3,425 

3,590 

344 

37-85 
129-0 
142-49 
145-43 
47-02 
7-31 
892 

27-51 

6,773 

699 

7,472 

740 

1,089 

104-21 
1,495 
5,307 

16,123 
1,831 

69-33 



10,032 

9,144 

703 

717 

52 

9,685 

8,460 

860 

670 

71 

22,970 

21,053 

1,027 

1,790 

147 

157-37 

2,638 
1,030 

822 
1,679 

127 

26 
6,121 
50,397 

21-8 

46,692 



2,173 

5,995 

670 

53-61 
121-1 
157-92 
154-88 
50-03 
5-99 
871 

26-71 

3,166 

901 

4,067 

1,523 

752 

89-78 
1,666 
5,173 
23,167 
1,859 

66-20 



9,746 

9,420 

137 

708 

52 

10,172 

9,119 

697 



65 

23,099 

21,922 

268 

1,813 



6,204 

4,553 

535 

35-46 
97-2 
150-69 
152-62 
48-06 
5-71 
732 

23-14 

1,741 

601 

2,342 

1,654 

802 

76-91 
1,419 
3,959 
23,813 
1,390 

48-13 



12,498 
9,657 
2,681 

1,429 

44 

13,256 
9,271 
3,723 

1,416 

55 

23,9^8 
22,254 
5,949 

3,043 



138 122 
175-62 215-65 



3,095 
1,162 

938 
1,894 

121 

16 
4,972 
62,492 

21-4 

48,815 

28,397 

27,355 

1,944 

270 

1,338 

336 

1,611 

1,058 

188 

2,825 



3,807 
1,292 
1.061 
2,092 
127 

16 
4,251 
10,995 

20-4 

53,437 

32,111 

29,944 

1,871 

357 

1,279 

235 

1,378 

1,087 

192 

3,926 



2,704 

7,029 

857 

55-26 
110-1 
157-51 
157-57 

48-41 
6-73 

1,599 

17-10 

2,361 

562 

2,923 

2,416 

1,515 

83-45 
1,351 
2,990 
27,166 
1,477 

57-72 



12,299 
9,534 
2,537 

1,190 

37 

12,290 
8,005 
3,924 

1,193 

42 

28,190 

20,839 

6,385 

2,607 

96 
211-53 

3,924 
1,252 
1,014 
2,543 
131 

15 
2,225 
14,470 

22-0 



3,568 
15,376 
1,070 

46-37 
99-8 
161-33 
164-33 
45-46 
14-15 
1.544 

37-09 

1 , 660 

535 

2,204 

1,438 

906 

51-71 
134-8 
261-9 
38,583 
1,304 

42-39 



10,166 
9,087 



936 

34 

10.726 
7,053 
3,324 

1,023 

40 

24,276 
19,308 
4,057 

2,181 

90 
192-58 

2,877 
1,087 

751 
2,738 

143 

12 
1,130 
3,653 

22-8 



, 105 
, 683 
,383 
, 258 
188 
817 
263 
,026 
.13" 
229 
,3 53 



2,109 
13,819 
1,283 

37-54 



138-68 

140-77 

42-34 

27-03 

1,090 

30-76 

1,561 

578 

2,139 

1,090 

476 

32-81 
1,385 

2,872 

27,189 

1,581 

69-53 



,046 



9,483 
7,091 
2,311 

753 

54 



152-56 

215 

147 

51 

2,023 

150 

12 
2,375 
10,378 



49,736 

30,885 

29,192 

938 

110 

617 

211 

2,632 

1,063 

196 

7,836 



1933 

Jan. 



8,765 
919 



39-18 



140-54 
133-06 
49-84 
29-21 
1,217 

40-77 

2,921 

437 

3,358 

475 

368 

35-09 

852 

2,025 

26,740 

1,439 

51-26 



6,735 



7,676 



134-43 



622 
5,936 



56,873 
28,602 
27,304 



978 



Deficit. 



10 



MONTHLY REVIEW OF BUSINESS STATISTICS 



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MONTHLY REVIEW OF BUSINESS STATISTICS 
Table 3. Receipts and Visible Supply of Canadian Grain 



11 



Year 

and 

Month 



1930 

July 

August 

September. 
October — 
November. 
December. 

1931 

January. . . . 
February. . 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September 
October . . . 
November. 
December. 

1932 

January 

February.. 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September. 
October — 
November. 
December. 

1933 

January.... 



Receipts at Country Elevators and Platform Loadings 



Wheat | Oats | Barley I Flax 



Rye 



Visible Supply of Canadian Grain 



Wheat | Oats | Barley 



Flax 



2,989 
21,248 
105,065 
53,800 
52,445 
17,320 



9,256 

9,843 

9,589 

8,418 

6,145 

8,205 

5,437 

11,862 

47,443 

74,086 

43,056 

19,613 



10,851 

12,245 

12,746 

5,982 

8,197 

15,050 

3,780 

17,633 

120.538 

79.564 

36,457 

18,486 



11,300 



Thousand Bushels 



473 


168 


15 


52 


102,528 


6,834 


19,869 


434 


695 


1,167 


24 


1,145 


96,448 


5,995 


21,335 


449 


5,080 


7.735 


1,185 


3,223 


152,211 


9,129 


27,892 


1,003 


3,967 


2,440 


1,223 


1,291 


188,673 


11,206 


31,879 


1,904 


3,992 


1,123 


1,271 


839 


207,386 


13,847 


31,608 


2,405 


2,055 


839 


182 


233 


217,643 


15,022 


31,339 


2,074 


1,681 


516 


65 


153 


202,283 


14,207 


30,436 


2,080 


2,304 


404 


48 


97 


190,202 


13,802 


29,527 


2,104 


3,733 


614 


74 


362 


180,540 


14,887 


27,551 


2.059 


2,097 


688 


60 


266 


162,041 


13,242 


24,081 


1,856 


1,334 


803 


42 


287 


132,593 


10,840 


15,447 


1,254 


2,049 


1,412 


79 


418 


115,672 


9,624 


11,944 


1,127 


1,970 


892 


60 


247 


110,731 


8,886 


10,260 


742 


2,784 


1,047 


49 


252 


101,733 


8,847 


8,471 


758 


2,893 


4,569 


167 


349 


126,462 


9,568 


11,338 


883 


5,270 


1,023 


900 


315 


163,133 


10,864 


11,274 


1,588 


6,495 


1,586 


399 


522 


185,811 


13,609 


10,282 


1,549 


3,350 


1,380 


99 


209 


192,305 


15,614 


11,494 


11,473 


1,909 


801 


26 


128 


195,510 


4,626 


11,402 


1,396 


4,013 


943 


36 


130 


186, 120 


14,279 


11,183 


1,363 


4,788 


1,194 


68 


245 


183,956 


14,801 


11,100 


1,383 


1.834 


543 


70 


153 


164, 562 


11.055 


9,220 


1,267 


2,353 


454 


24 


67 


149,251 


6,443 


6,706 


1,424 


2,094 


514 


44 


57 


138,572 


5,659 


4.401 


1,347 


1,091 


402 


48 


57 


121,474 


6.204 


3,627 


1.283 


1,184 


929 


53 


448 


113,036 


5,857 


3.056 


1.208 


3,441 


2,599 


282 


540 


198.240 


7,273 


5,813 


1,400 


4,082 


1,125 


693 


270 


239,435 


8,316 


5,874 


1,497 


3,031 


1,338 


179 


131 


237,194 


9,115 


6,024 


1,582 


1,612 


1,219 


88 


98 


237,391 


9,233 


6,772 


1,436 


1,095 


474 


57 


74 


229,186 


9,345 


6,806 


1,480 



Rye 



8,566 
8,124 
9,446 
12,225 
12,924 
13,158 



13.458 
13,391 
13,275 
13,448 
12,970 
12,549 
12,600 
12,163 
12,358 
12,309 
13,024 
12,572 



12,355 
12,864 
12,323 
11,122 
10,242 
7,563 
5,541 
5,129 
5,359 
5,256 
4,770 
4,990 



5,020 



Table 4. Exports and Cash Price of Canadian Grain 



Year 

and 

Month 



Exports of Grain 



Wheat 



Oats 



Barley 



Flax 



Rye 



Bushels 



Average Cash Price 
(Basis in store Fort William and Port Arthur* 



Wheat 
No.l 
Nor. 



Oats 
No. 2 
C.W. 



Barley 
No. 3 
C.W. 



Flax 
No. 1 
N.W.C. 



Dollars per Bushel 



Rye 
No. 1 
C.W. 



1930 

July 

August 

September. . 

October 

November. 
December.. 

1931 

January 

February. . . 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September . 
October 
November. 
December.. 

1932 

January 

February... 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September. . 

October 

November., 
December. , 

1933 

January 



19,868,298 
17.639,228 
27,817,053 
29,784,275 
31,217,624 
22,230,397 



9,608,852 
10,296,603 
12,995,567 

4.680,769 
29,521,699 
20,783,219 
12.004,817 
11,909,108 
14.335.637 
18,925,303 
27,452,063 
22,355,975 



9,472,346 
9,898,363 
9,920,634 
7.513.289 
15,543.013 
15,857,427 
19.620,224 
18.289,832 
26,874,237 
40,192.415 
27,301,976 
27,735,999 



568,678 
158,564 
220,519 
345,661 
381.088 
666,166 



260,342 

127, 170 

308.087 

158.382 

1,646,844 

2,291,951 

1,257,248 

753,105 

694,908 

1,082.074 

1,364,700 

1,232,261 



1,184,647 
1,139,568 
1,035.612 
1,748,438 
1,622,815 
1.239.599 
513,384 
800,804 
1,050,470 
2,139,232 
1,528,634 
1,433,865 



14,706.801 354,614 191,524 



8,749 

1,250 

146,107 

524,849 

1,129,144 

734,683 



244,953 

120,034 

458.125 

755.247 

6,281,068 

6,199,012 

2,655,725 

3,287,465 

757,930 

220.752 

1.129,468 

2,205,976 



231,707 

323,221 

346.107 

613.805 

1,711,716 

1,021.578 

1,688,500 

1,547,340 

769,088 

718,213 

748,801 

272,667 



69 

*i72,*338 

102,496 
421,428 
502,899 



150 

2,700 
168 



483,290 
49,049 

263,500 
61,500 





"*i84,'263 


1,200 
3,672 


'"3621578 


< 



1,400 



24,812 
11,305 

425,398 
24,226 

623,614 



20,000 
49,340 
10,642 



109,036 
689,380 
122,094 
145,273 
483,039 
71.978 
742,391 
1,249,981 



218,504 

302,33? 

245,800 

299.906 

1,691.542 

1,115,445 

2,480,942 

1.194,388 

425.911 

403,802 

504,716 

17,143 



17,143 



■951 
•925 
•781 
•725 
•643 
•553 



•539 
•592 
•56" 
•596 
•606 
•607 
•572 
•551 
•536 
•598 
•672 
•606 



•600 
•632 
•631 
•626 
•628 
•551 
•547 
•563 
•518 
•482 
•467 
• 423 



•442 



•438 


•391 


1-788 


•402 


•390 


1-823 


•331 


•316 


1-435 


•328 


•282 


1-292 


•282 


•233 


1-052 


•267 


•250 


•978 


•261 


•221 


•950 


•276 


•221 


•968 


•277 


•251 


1-033 


•281 


•282 


1-040 


•291 


•310 


1-061 


•296 


•328 


1-070 


•293 


•322 


1-182 


•282 


•317 


1-037 


• 273 


• 306 


•973 


•312 


•331 


-945 


•336 


•425 


1-056 


•300 


•383 


•990 


•293 


•377 


•985 


•295 


•383 


1-015 


•300 


•398 


1-016 


•323 


•410 


•985 


•355 


•402 


-837 


•338 


•377 


•717 


•351 


•365 


•682 


•300 


•344 


-715 


•261 


•288 


•785 


•235 


• 257 


•708 


•240 


•302 


•696 


•210 


•277 


•701 


•225 


•276 


•770 



•523 
•551 
•425 
•373 
•306 
•300 



•271 
•286 
■312 
•316 
•341 
•355 
•327 
•293 
-325 
•370 
-487 
-427 



•426 
•441 
-478 
-457 
-412 
•337 
-331 
•334 
■318 
■292 
■295 
•297 



•310 



12 MONTHLY REVIEW OF BUSINESS STATISTICS 

Table 5. Consumption of Grain and Production by the Milling Industry- 



Year 

and 

month 



1930 
September. , 
October 
November , 
December.. 

1931 

January 

February... 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September. 

October 

November. 
December. 

1932 

January. . . . 
February. . . 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August 
September. 

October 

November. 
December. 



Mill grind inga 



Wheat 



Bushels 

7,254,614 
8,348,434 
7,788,827 
5,225,805 



4,833,535 
4.607.154 
5,158,112 
4.718,805 
5.304.076 
5,033,072 
5,932,146 
5,902,000 
6,772,319 
7,565,330 
8,101,645 
5,275,097 



3,708 
3,751 
4.685 
4.446 

643, 
5,173 
5.379, 

716, 

151, 
7,670, 

63*, 
4.493, 



Oats 



Bushels 

1,054,097 
1.173,911 
1,085,491 
1,125,885 



997.080 

940,355 

843,761 

822.047 

785 196 

769,942 

937,695 

836.410 

1,166,178 

1.506,473 

1,761,877 

1.151,246 



902,969 

789.941 

882.368 

666,203 

616,418 

650,403 

695,557 

939.418 

1,081,749 

1,346,502 

1,453.153 

909,581 



Corn 



Bushels 

151,357 
183,786 
176,074 
148,866 



160,976 
170,167 
141,271 
176.096 
157.539 
167,195 
175,921 
149.814 
170,265 
172,015 
209,080 
158,509 



145,738 
153,980 
175.321 
178,754 
129,879 
135,783 
183,623 
187 020 
147,992 
120,236 
209,490 
151.518 



Barley 



Bushels 

90,074 
131,307 
128,156 
136,065 



125,357 
129,777 
134,297 
116.171 
84,809 
73,578 
81,527 
107,612 
126,363 
126,710 
129,541 
106,230 



80,204 
68,471 
85.835 
73,738 
53,386 
44,464 
40,894 
74.088 
72,056 
77,770 
102,760 
60.0 C 2 



Mixed 
grain 



Bushels 

1,059,204 
1,432,239 
1,872.362 
1.886,930 



915,710 
657.462 
660,573 
565.891 
189,023 
962,081 
938,413 
029,935 
272,527 
705,240 
791,642 
123,600 



788,207 
701,800 
818.416 
416,128 
045,021 
873,889 
716,067 
895,616 
17^,201 
447,920 
941,348 
829,953 



Percent- 
age of 
operation 



Mill production 



Wheat flour 



57-2 
62-0 
62-1 
38-7 



36-6 
37-3 
38-9 
36-3 
411 
43-7 
47-1 
47-8 
56-7 
60-5 
70-0 
40-9 



31-3 
31-3 
37-2 
35-9 

38-6 
43-0 
41-3 
42-7 
50-0 
62-4 
70 5 
35 1 



Quan- 
tity 



Barrels 

1,624,238 
1,868,675 
1,739,375 
1,170,025 



086,272 
035.383 
,168,408 
058.311 
183.280 
121,115 
,319,008 
,333,287 
515,613 
603,925 
812,457 
175,152 



851,192 
842,123 
053.770 
993,385 
040.693 
151,286 
201,965 
272 009 
384,500 
721,508 
042,844 
000.790 



Oatmeal 



Pounds 

1,017,130 
1,160,492 
1,278,662 
3,636,850 



449,163 
461,180 
568,252 
925.422 
865.362 
569,155 
600,250 
408,475 
439,682 
589,165 
520,322 
659,093 



,700,72=; 
,788,903 
.653,557 
,551,310 
888,497 
880,560 
402,937 
658 480 
777,966 
,387,585 
,193,036 
499,733 



Rolled 
oats 



Pounds 

13,825,936 
13,588,271 
13,326,255 
10,723,499 



870,397 

434,204 

674,493 

945.416 

659.185 

528,39 

272,542 

530,679 

520,597 

498,451 

901,503 

513,316 



534,327 
218,910 
454.423 
594.244 
315.048 
027,410 
940,843 
301.642 
124,180 
683, f 29 
871,610 
532,277 



Corn 

flour and 

meal 



Pounds 

1,755,038 
1,948,686 
1,499,621 
1,070,225 



155,518 
894,492 
158,556 
612 040 
130.887 
072,918 
612,240 
277,749 
039,254 
288,754 
588,050 
714,434 



,802,005 
.309,160 
233,622 
.591,116 
,908,770 
,099,028 
,628,909 
.738.376 
,226,154 
,776,832 
,466,753 
,898,580 



Wheat 

flour 

exported 



Barrels 

734,349 
813,691 
792,271 
601,894 



392,256 
414,773 
560,553 
326,117 
481.265 
490,294 
466,967 
522,178 
556,565 
558,459 
476,487 
451,310 



331,806 
357,513 
414.779 
255,390 
461,867 
570.861 
446,379 
330,382 
385,113 
528,794 
576,864 
492,033 



Table 6. 


Receipts, Manufactures and Stocks of Sua 


ar in Thousand Pounds 






Raw Sugar 


Refined Sugar 


Year and 
4-week period 


Stock 
on hand 
at be- 
ginning 
of period 


Re- 
ceipts 


Melt- 
ings 
and 
ship- 
ments 


Stock 
on hand 
at be- 
ginning 
of period 


Manu- 
factured 
granu- 
lated 


Manu- 
factured 
yellow 

and 
brown 


Total 

manu- 
factured 


Total 
domes- 
tic 

ship- 
ments 


Ship- 
ments 
granu- 
lated 


Ship- 
ments 
yellow 

and 
brown 


Total 
ship- 
ments 


1930 


82,707 
93,369 
53,544 
60,779 
104,507 

108,269 
115.726 
91,476 
71.255 
74.881 
117,363 
123,541 
110,325 
76,658 
96,140 
66,512 
91,033 
96,785 

98,423 
102,650 
83.834 
67.702 
60,295 
122,205 
122,425 
110,656 
38.489 
77,116 
60,036 
106,861 
109,097 

109,232 


90,592 
59,575 
75,781 
115,341 
49,803 

34,506 
18.680 
34,275 
49,907 

123.518 
79,112 
77,162 
66,006 

107,722 
54,318 

110,354 
00,828 
50,737 

32,199 

8,639 

36,780 

27. 237 

126,477 
75, 2^4 
85,435 
35,112 

120.743 
75.160 

123,367 
80,043 
37,886 

11,432 


87.681 
99,399 
68,547 
71,613 
46,040 

27,050 
42.930 
54,407 
46.282 
81.036 
72,933 
90,378 
90,674 
88,230 
83,055 
85,833 
85,076 
49,090 

27,973 
27,454 
52,912 
34.644 
64,567 
75,005 
97,204 
107,288 
82.116 
02,230 
76,543 
7«,707 
37,750 

18,767 


87,835 
86,137 
89.321 
102,122 
131,418 

136,260 
111.178 
98,886 
96,086 
71,354 
79,818 
77,289 
74,075 
76,046 
82,326 
88,407 
130,302 
162,469 

174,985 
155,110 
131.044 
129.590 
109,901 
111,503 
123,942 
108,248 
124 079 
174,985 
174.985 
155,411 
188,834 

194,558 


80.516 
86,561 
91,957 
97,293 
57,875 

23,643 
35 380 
47,504 
37,025 
66.180 
63,254 
78,414 
84,879 
82,700 
86,307 
109,523 
110,785 
51,744 

24,211 

22,640 
44,332 
30.275 
53,212 
63.996 
84,990 
91,620 
73.687 
97,775 
105,208 
109,777 
54,028 

24,239 


6,914 
9,878 
7,731 
11,265 
9,202 

3,540 
5.029 
8,085 
5.331 
10.476 
6,106 
6,881 
6.993 
6,706 
9,789 
12.267 
13,635 
9,868 

3,6*0 
3,041 
7,544 
5.605 
5.540 
9,725 
7,503 

10,080 
8.230 
8,238 
7.576 

12,679 
7,317 

3,064 


87,430 
96,439 
99,688 
108,558 
67,077 

27,184 
40.408 
55.589 
42,356 
76.655 
69,360 
85.295 
91.871 
89,406 
96.185 
121,701 
124,420 
61,613 

27,891 
25,681 
51.876 
35,879 
58,751 
73,722 
92,583 
101,700 
81,017 
106,613 
115,874 
122,457 
61,345 

27,303 


86,739 
90,865 
84,386 
77,119 
52,812 

51,595 
52.161 
57,641 
66.091 
66. 933 
70,882 
87,386 
88,342 
82,097 
87,601 
77,662 
90,849 
48,712 

47,270 
49.221 
52.838 
55.229 
56,256 
60,354 

107,377 
84,478 
79.741 

101,052 
84,813 
87.675 
55,183 

48,263 


81,696 
83,912 
77,202 
67,650 
46,364 

46,867 
46.216 
51,188 
60,250 
60.766 
65,395 
81,810 
84,102 
75,001 
80,321 
69,411 
76,060 
42,927 

42,439 
43,691 
47,136 
47. 723 
51,129 
55,403 
100,986 
79,862 
' 74 845 
95.456 
76.537 
77, P5 
49,016 

43,449 


7,432 
9,342 
9,685 
11,612 
7,494 

5,399 
6.485 
7,200 
6,839 
7.425 
6,494 
6,699 
5,708 
8,125 
9,783 
10,305 
15,374 
6,170 

5,327 
6,055 
6,195 
7 846 
6.020 
5.880 
7.291 
6,007 
7,262 
9.451 
9.521 
11.848 
6,604 

5,251 


89,129 


October 4 


93,254 

86,887 




79,262 


December 31 

1931 

January 31 

February 28 

March 28 

April 25 

May 23 

June 20 

July 18 

August 15 


53,858 

52.266 
52.700 
58,388 
67,088 
68.191 
71.889 
88,510 
80,900 
83,126 


October 10 

November 7 

December 5 

December 31 


90,104 
70.806 
92.342 
49,097 


1932 

January 30 

February 27 


47,766 
49.747 


March 26 


53,330 


April 23 


55.569 


May 21 

June 18 


57.149 
61.283 


July 16 


108,277 


August 13 


85,869 


September 10 


82.107 


October 8 

November 5 


104.008 
86.058 


December 3 

December 31 

1933 
January 28 


80,033 
55,621 

48,700 



MONTHLY REVIEW OF BUSINESS STATISTICS 



13 



Table 7. Tobacco, Cigars and Cigarettes Entered for Consumption. 



and Month 



1930 

June 

July 

August 

September 

October 

November , 

December 

1931 

January 

February 

March 

April , 

May , 

June 

July 

August 

September 

October 

November 

December 

1932 

January 

February 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July , 

August. 

September 

October 

November 

December 

1933 
January 



Tobacco, 
cut 



Pound 

1,361,430 
1,386,779 
1,322,441 
1,406,258 
1,381,943 
1,224,840 
1,312,936 



1,057,507 
1,163,399 
1,372.596 
1,250,655 
1,487,028 
1,480.478 
1,468,877 
1,449,103 
1,457,618 
1,452,865 
1,451,340 
1,366,936 



1.144.298 
1,272,469 
1,414.941 
1.659.842 
1,436.417 
1,493.496 
1.488,431 
1,559,663 
1,662,365 
1,551,042 
1,427,688 
1,209.81? 



1.085 534 



Tobacco, 
plug 



Pound 

577,7 

583,668 

552,148 

476,020 

452,670 

455,503 

471,292 



366,785 
430,463 
459.155 
439,384 
514,005 
503.867 
453 . 989 
469,793 
417,050 
439,268 
410,253 
426,968 



382,000 
343,887 
3S9.797 
425 577 
421,248 
425,89') 
391,668 
419,483 
368,601 
379,960 
358,572 
340,791 



CigaretteH 



Number 

434,948,266 
529,519,070 
477,205,140 
483,960,240 
438,497,550 
401,175,589 
326,147,670 



319,555,340 
327,255,230 
349.681,715 
382,303,130 
382,951,155 
430.179.170 
474,415,620 
425,133,580 
371,311,090 
344,956,140 
355,716,768 
369,235,870 



278,416,630 
281,496,910 
304,243,772 
269.309 750 
312,790,432 
376,779.975 
338,874,828 
329.466,3^4 
313,709,922 
214,301,678 
388,625.140 
301,613,955 



300,491 310.144.850 



Cigarettes, 
over- 
weight 



Number 

97,100 
71,000 
51,800 

167,700 
17,900 
38,200 

144,300 



78.300 

68,500 

117,800 

500 

31,820 
164.250 
227,450 
200,400 

76,600 
135,450 
115,200 
148,210 



57,200 
56.700 
50.150 
49.050 
37.350 
66.300 
40,300 
43,700 
39,400 
57,100 
148,400 
39,260 



28,420 



Cigars 



Number 

16,654,019 
16.947,724 
17,944,831 
19,333,469 
22,515,666 
17,418,328 
11,408,452 



7,259,572 
7,650,784 
9.984,215 
11,116,740 
14,734,327 
14,380.513 
14,091,692 
12.P60.61C 
15,270,873 
17,316,957 
15,753,873 
11,329,243 



7,595,920 

5,154,663 

9,657,775 

10 208.636 

10,552,455 

12,754,263 

11,492.868 

12.298,501 

12,799.348 

14,424,229 

14,071,178 

9,014,869 



3,965,735 



Foreign 
raw leaf 
tobacco 



Pound 

1,110,358 
1,416,720 
1,482,179 
1.514,2*3 
1,505,683 
1,139,124 
1.064,933 



1,288,600 
1,072,285 
1.115 135 
1,284,691 
1,434,154 
1,382.348 
1,328,631 
1,283,479 
1,076.864 
1,177,265 
1,144,401 
994,476 



1,063,412 

889,417 

942.999 

1.120 066 

1,108,312 

1,320.001 

1.149.197 

1,083,602 

1,042,140 

938.889 

1,027,873 

744,579 



832,534 



Table 8. — Production of Boots and Shoes. 



June 

July 

August 

September . , 
October. . . . 
November., 
December.., 

1931 

January 

February.... 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September. . 

October 

November.. 
December.. 

1932 

January 

February... 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September . . 

October 

November. 
December . . 



Boots and shoe9 with leather or fabric uppers 



Welts 



255,538 
335,729 
306,544 
310,184 

290,812 
204.928 
193,340 

231,498 

278,200 
326,112 
332,306 
293,408 
252,037 
281,175 
274,644 
275,156 
235.904 
181,474 
171,294 

212,534 
272,581 
281,244 
243,435 
241.653 
235,079 
247,387 
273,591 
267,515 
213.345 
198,801 
167,762 



McKays 

and 

all 

imitation 

welts 



618.747 
548,897 
722,749 
740,557 
663,654 
422,543 
406,884 

426,112 
600,694 
880,851 
810,653 
892,177 
782,256 
683.700 
816.379 
824,847 
723,099 
494.143 
433,536 

532,297 
774,827 
907,035 
781,111 
821,112 
746,474 
610,920 
828,070 
807,126 
679,722 
450,418 
306.383 



Nailed 
pegged, 
screw 
or wire 
fastened 



107,369 
115,584 
144,308 
160,270 
161,697 
113,951 
113,786 

111,106 
123,809 
152,328 
134,025 
146,830 
119,495 
121,877 
164,848 
195,496 
182,548 
150,854 
132,822 

123,365 

158,460 
150,132 
120,920 
125.907 
118,518 
129,595 
180,350 
185,458 
189.725 
166,034 
114,304 



Stich- 
downs 



220,562 
168,963 
129,710 
125,639 
123,372 
114,824 
128.353 



Total 



1,250,886 
1,232,993 
1,368,683 
1,406,149 
1,305.315 
900,345 
877,041 



126,310 

138,121 I 

177,142 1 

207,343 

233.114 

234,244 

174,632 

148,542 

124,722 

130,528 

138,910 

148,777 



132,897 
171,322 
212,237 
216,884 
264.754 
243,324 
169,801 
148,365 
136,672 
151.068 
135,217 
124.894 



921.878 
,184,316 
,596,409 
546.111 
622,637 
,442,330 
,316,349 
,467,600 
,482,835 
337,126 
013,879 
919,847 

,029,556 
,414,816 
,607,280 
,413.214 
507.574 
,400,508 
,202,968 
,484,042 
,470,476 
,301,011 
,017,153 
753,573 



Total footwear 



Mens' 



393.345 
439,235 
465,095 
483,554 
494,271 
350,806 
339,476 

296,301 
368. 102 
472.669 
443,797 
445.979 
403.207 
421,682 
434,443 
454,133 
431,115 
363,011 
348,868 

300,352 
420,882 
441,320 
370,801 
422.104 
436.647 
409.588 
469,002 
471,961 
449,281 
403,661 
311.351 



Boys' 

and 

youths' 



68,316 
63,899 
81,408 
100.482 
97,210 
77,582 
85,163 

72,959 
68,363 
97,515 

92,829 
85.643 
70,458 
74,836 
85,615 
104,041 
119.592 
107,503 
104,437 

79,681 
91,177 
87.098 
68,822 
75.047 
65,144 
54,778 
91,741 
109.625 
108.139 
110,661 
67.645 



Women's 



626,824 
634,137 
719,083 
754,204 
670,404 
430,139 
384,526 

386,168 
554,616 
790,849 
756.981 
817,519 
766,049 
674,325 
804,318 
839.989 
711,900 
513.384 
418.306 

491,281 

731.280 
807,022 
742,845 
803,803 
746,658 
665,684 
863,149 
858,238 
748,048 
568,263 
404,451 



Misses' 

and 

childrens 



201,050 
171,396 
182,347 
176,812 
183,661 
175,803 
159,008 

144.793 
188,776 
244.120 
252,635 
260.635 
210.498 
187,098 
196,594 
184.536 
197,983 
178,972 
174,731 

163,531 
214,295 
264,903 
232,427 
248.460 
214,127 
160,666 
183,565 
187,436 
202.130 
187,757 
134,308 



Babies 

and 
infants' 



108,909 
106, 205 
94,753 
100,807 
106.846 
90,468 
96,019 

84,703 
97,108 
124,777 
123,675 
131,016 
117.239 
98,881 
106,036 
89.738 
93,554 
91,926 
87, 192 

77,337 
100. 779 
119,865 
108.597 
106.674 
96.616 
88.768 
100,902 
95,942 
91,592 
90,992 
60,309 



Total 



1,398,444 
1,414,872 
1,542,686 
1,615,859 
1,552.392 
1,124.798 
1.064.192 



984,924 
276,965 
,729,930 
669,917 
740.792 
,576,449 
,456.822 
,627,006 
672,437 
554,144 
254,698 
133,534 

112,192 
558,413 
720,208 
523,492 
656,088 
559,192 
379.484 
708,359 
723,202 
599,190 
361,334 
978,064 



59437—3 



14 



MONTHLY REVIEW OF BUSINESS STATISTICS 



Table 9. — Sales and Slaughterings of Live Stock, Retail Food Prices, and Cold Storage Holdings. 



Classification 



1932 



Jan. 



Feb. 



Mar. April May June 



July Aug. Sept. Oct. Nov. Dec 



1933 



Jan. 



Sales on Stock Yds: 

(Current month 
prelim.) 

Cattle 

Calves 

Hogs 

Sheep 

Inspected Slaugh- 
terings: 

Cattle 

CalveB 

Sheep 

Lambs 

Swine 

Av. Retail Prices, In 
cents, of Food in 
Canada: 

Beef chuck lb. 

Veal roast " 

Mutton roast. . . " 

Pork fresh " 

Bacon break- 
fast « 

Lard pure " 

Eggsfresh....doz. 

Milk qt 

Butter cream- 
ery lb. 

Cheese " 

Bread " 

Flour " 

Rolled oats... " 

Rice " 

Beans " 

Apples evapor- 
ated " 

Prunes " 

Sugar granul- 
ated " 

Tea " 

Coffee " 

Potatoes peck 



42,573 

14,653 

127,558 

22,351 



47,875 
17,305 
10,171 
38,101 
263,785 



13-3 
15-3! 
22-2 
16-0 

20-8 
12-8 
41-8 
10-7 

27-5 

21-1 

6-3 

3-1 

4-7 
8-7 
4-8 

16-6 
11-7 

6-1 
51-4 
44-6 
15-81 



36,234 

17,606 

111,246 

13,443 



39,379 
22,679 
5,258 
29,454 
239,921 



13-4 
15-7 
22-2 
15-8 

19-3 
12-5 

29-7 
10-4 

25-9 
21-4 
6-3 
3-0 
4-7 
8-7 
4-6 

16-3 
11-4 

6- 
51- 

44- 



1 
3 
3 
16-1 



43,992 
29,112 
117, 
15,157 



44,505 

43,253 

2,801 

34,304 

232,875 



13-7 

15-7 
22-5 
15-6 

18-4 
11-8 
32-8 
10-2 

24-1 
21-3 
6-3 
3-0 
4-7 
8-7 
4*4 

16-4 
11-4 

6-1 
50-6 
43-5 
15-8 



38,244 

35,424 

112,178 

11,388 



43,302 

46,612 

28,448 

1,426 

229,124 



13-4 
14-6 
22-2 
15-3 

17-8 
11-5 
24-8 
10-1 



3-0 
4-7 
8-5 
4-3 

15-8 
11-0 

6-0 
50-3 
43-7 
15-3 



44,226 
38,482 
119,341 
11,867 



44,156 

51,240 

16,685 

6,519 

254,836 



13 

13-6 
22-9 
15-2 

17-2 
11-5 
19-5 
10-0 

24-5 
21-0 
6-2 
3-0 
4-7 
8-6 



15-9 
10-8 

60 

45-2 
42-6 
15-2 



38,833 
30,026 
104,127 
30,434 



41,818 
43,171 
12,726 
37,472 
247,722 



22-6 
20-7 
6-2 
3-0 
4-7 
8-5 
4-3 

15-5 
11-0 

5-9 

45-5 
42-4 
14-7 



44,941 
25,356 
81,557 
38,457 



41.228 
32.252 
11 369 
52.640 
191,577 



13-4 
13-4 

21-8 
15-0 

16-8 
11-3 
21-5 
9-6 

21-6 
20-1 
5-7 
2-9 
4-8 
8-6 
4-3 

15-7 
10-9 

5-9 
45-0 
42-1 
14-9 



64,884 



83,187 
60,488 



47,184 
31,598 
11,983 
73,856 
189,253 



13-1 
13-2 
21-4 
15-6 

17-6 
11-4 
24-1 



22-1 



56,647 
24,305 
62,737 
60,044 



52,174 
29,450 
11,286 
89,869 
166,352 



12-7 
13-1 
20-4 
15-9 



18-8 
12-1 

25-6 



15-9 
11-0 

5-8 
44-6 
41-6 
26-4 



16-1 
11-2 

5-9 
45-2 
42-4 
18-4 



58,195 
25,299 
76,081 
103,224 



50,408 
27,248 
8,216 
137,368 
189,222 



12-4 
13-2 
19-3 
15-7 

19-6 
12-6 
30-3 

9-5 

26-9 
20-0 
5-6 
2-9 
4-8 
8-4 
4-3 

15-7 
10-8 

5-8 
44-5 
41-3 
17-3 



66,598 31,800 
26,072 11,460 
126,986 101,857 
75,412 20,329 



5S,03« 
23,722 
8,982 
109,900 
249,858 



11-9 
12-7 
17-9 
14-5 

10-2 
13-3 



26-4 
19-9 
5-6 
2-8 
4-7 
8-3 
4-2 

15-8 

10-7 

5-8 
43-8 
41-2 
17-3 



45,075 

14,919 

5, 

44,019 

268,300 



10 
12-2 
16-6 
12-9 

18-6 
12-9 
45-2 



25-9 

19 
5 

2-7 
4-6 
8-2 
4-0 

15-5 
10-6 

5 

43-7 
41-0 
18-1 



45,666 
14,972 
100,591 
22,842 



50,521 
20,255 
5,054 
43,522 
247,081 



11-0 
12-0 
16-7 
12-7 



18-1 

12-3 

39-1 

9-7 



19-6 
5-7 
2-6 
4-6 
8-2 
3-9 

15-4 

10-8 

5-8 
43-2 
40-9 
19-0 



Cold Storage 
Holdings 



Feb. Mar. April May June July Aug. Sept. Oct. Nov. Dec 



1933 



Jan. Feb. 



Cold Storage Holdings as at 
First of Month: 

(000 lbs. or doz.) 
Btttter — 

Creamery 

Dairy 

Totals 

Cheese 

Eggs— 

Cold Storage 

Fresh 

Frozen 

Pork — 

Fresh frozen 

Fresh not frozen 

Cured dry salted 

Cured sweet pickled 

In process of cure 

Totals 

Lard 

Beef — 

Fresh frozen 

Fresh not frozen 

Cured 

In process of cure 

Totals 

Veal— 

Fresh frozen 

Fresh not frozen 

Totals 

Mtttton and Lamb — 

Frozen 

Not frozen 

Totals 

Poultry 

Fish— 

Fresh frozen 

Fresh not frozen 

Smoked, etc 

Fresh frozen during preceding 
month 



.536 
602 

,725 

143 
333 
539 
638 
387 
045 
233 



10,212 

144 

10,356 

7,936 

282 

251 

3,252 

20,210 
3,371 
573 
7,859 
8,423 

40,436 
2,738 

5,019 

4,033 

314 

235 

9,600 

453 
241 



6,048 

182 

6,230 

11,668 

10,724 

84 

6,795 

1,642 



4,433 

63 

4,496 

7,661 

246 

422 

3,298 

21,862 
3,822 
378 
5,97 
8,214 

40,251 
2,845 

3,931 

4,419 

353 

210 

8,914 

367 

639 

1,006 

4,846 

176 

5,022 

9,458 

9,247 

65 

4,974 

1,118 



2,816 

32 

2,848 

5,934 

3,416 

534 

3,458 

22,455 

2,840 

702 

57,695 
7,784 

41,476 
3,286 

3,416 

4,299 

233 

198 

8,146 

484 
447 
930 



161 
4,107 
7,701 

8,569 

48 

4,544 

1,014 



,292 

93 

,385 

,535 

,870 
584 
,312 

,593 
0S0 
,048 
,991 
,580 
, 20H 
,743 

,975 
,992 
458 
175 
,600 

648 
508 
,156 

,172 
140 
,312 
,368 

,288 
151 
,830 



16,472 

334 

16, 

16,022 

10,879 

829 

5,081 

18,458 
3,122 
982 
5,848 
8,999 

37,409 
4,257 

2,329 

3,583 

327 

162 

6,401 

716 

453 

1,169 

1,506 

214 

1,747 

5,257 

10,173 
51 

5,218 



25,283 

259 

25,542 

19,355 

11,211 

820 

5,158 

13,862 
2,695 
394 
6,422 
11,180 
34,553 
3,566 

2,668 

4,094 

302 

224 

7,288 

802 

414 

1,215 

1,001 

277 

1,277 

4,414 

14,086 
56 
5,522 



3 
1,624 



30,943 

338 

31,281 

22,119 

11,896 

995 

5,023 

10,255 
3,118 
710 
6,083 
9,788 

29,954 
2,707 

2,792 

4,596 

287 

177 

7,852 

893 

323 

1,216 

872 

366 

1,239 

3,374 

16,734 
83 
6,228 



33,318 

257 

33,575 

21,764 

11,056 
1,205 
4,848 



2,463 
369 
5,051 
8,053 
22,402 
1,183 

2,813 

4,989 

239 

72 

8,113 



471 
1,360 

1,020 

449 

1,469 

2,404 

19,512 

46 

6,825 



31,181 

136 

31,316 

20,423 

8,229 

519 

4,506 

5,236 
2,573 
267 
4,451 
9,624 
22,152 
1,913 

3,294 

5,002 

110 



958 

416 

1,374 

3,070 

383 

3,453 

2,057 

21,706 

52 

7,177 



26,361 

109 

26,470 

13,229 

4,123 

271 

3,988 

6,649 
3,830 
409 
4,912 
7,767 
23,567 
1,539 

4,64 

4,850 

79 

93 

9,665 

894 

359 

1,253 

4,856 

439 

5,295 

3,549 

19,953 

89 

7,173 



20,328 

69 

20,397 

12,944 

1,254 

273 

3,773 

11,765 
4,281 
461 
6,219 
6,827 

29,552 
2,327 

5,113 

3,421 
222 
184 

8,940 

702 
180 
882 

5,043 

274 

5,291 

8,341 

17,121 

40 

6,734 



3,912 4,107 2 740 1,680 840 



15,476 

45 

15,521 

11,511 

433 

650 

3,524 

14,148 
3,770 
514 
5,032 
7,874 

31,338 
2,653 

4,639 

4,655 

229 

113 

9,636 

335 
247 
582 

3,733 

276 

4,009 

7,230 

14,046 

113 

5,960 



MONTHLY REVIEW OF BUSINESS STATISTICS 



15 



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16 



MONTHLY REVIEW OF BUSINESS STATISTICS 



Table 10. Output of Central Electric Stations in Canada. (A) Monthly Output. 

(Thousands' of Kilowatt Hours) 





Totals for Canada 


Generated by Water-Power 


Generated by Fuel 




Month 








Mari- 
time 
Pro- 
vinces 






Prairie 


British 


Prairie 


Other 


Total 




Water 


Fuel 


Total 


Quebeo 


Ontario 


Pro- 


Colum- 


Pro- 


Pro- 


Exports 














vinces 


bia 


vinces 


vince? 




1930 -February.... 


1,371,215 


26,880 


1,398,095 


28,705 


686.957 


489,210 


82,397 


83,946 


18,702 


8,178 


117,176 


March 


1.491,040 


24.425 


1,515,465 


34,469 


741,411 


528,404 


89.826 


98,930 


18.222 


6,203 


126,894 


April 


1,480,953 


21.385 


1,502.338 


42,968 


744,861 


509,615 


92,601 


90,908 


16.437 


4.948 


117.504 


May 


1,523.521 


21.108 


1,544,627 


44,139 


761,327 


524,679 


100.116 


93,260 


16.466 


4.640 


129,138 


June 


1,414,236 


20,375 


1.434,611 


42,632 


709.245 


485,791 


87.683 


88,885 


15,801 


4,574 


13R.016 


July 


1,404,009 


21,681 


1,425,690 


40,667 


722,335 


460,611 


89,169 


91,227 


16,522 


5,159 


131,817 


August 


1,391,054 


20,806 


1,411,860 


41,788 


710,842 


457,424 


84.925 


96,075 


14,898 


5.908 


142,571 


September.. 


1,419,051 


23,910 


1,442,961 


38,662 


704,123 


485,151 


92,060 


99,055 


14,882 


9.028 


153,657 


October 


1,549,846 


24,714 


1,574,560 


39,480 


781,996 


521,991 


05,005 


111,374 


18,874 


7.840 


161,323 


November. 


1,488,175 


27,228 


1,515,403 


41,264 


764,490 


480,131 


92,292 


109,998 


19,506 


7,722 


141.587 


December . . 


1,513,152 


29,156 


1,542.308 


44,295 


764,612 


480,442 


111,443 


112,360 


19,748 


9,408 


149,295 


1931- January 


1,456,326 


32,395 


1,488,721 


44,394 


735,385 


469,438 


104,099 


103,010 


20,187 


12.208 


162,443 


February.... 


1,311,136 


27,851 


1.338,987 


31,097 


674,560 


422,213 


88,481 


94.785 


17,298 


10.553 


145,461 


March 


1,391,982 


25,576 


1,417,558 


34,338 


703,708 


451,912 


95,991 


106,033 


15,992 


9,584 


127,940 


April 


1,388,034 


23,056 


1,411,09(1 


52,154 


717,900 


415,482 


101,539 


100.959 


13.360 


9,696 


97,677 


May 


1,342.940 


22,846 


1,365,786 


53,433 


693,853 


394,243 


102,640 


98,771 


12,781 


10.065 


86,824 


Juno 


1,267,869 


21,959 


1,289,828 


52,675 


638,719 


379,568 


101.337 


95,570 


12.139 


9,820 


88,602 


July 


1,230,622 


20,700 


1,251,322 


50,712 


620, 634 


369,294 


100,480 


89,502 


12,297 


8.403 


95.085 


Aueust 


1,234.266 


21,883 


1,256,149 


44,924 


644,446 


352,877 


98,119 


93,900 


12,905 


8,978 


99,780 


September. . 


1,263,412 


25,001 


1,288,413 


46,251 


662,400 


355,122 


102,835 


96.804 


13.436 


11,565 


93,288 


October 


1,400,704 


27,638 


1,428,342 


55,743 


736,381 


384,065 


123,087 


101,428 


15,332 


12,306 


95.423 


November.. 


1,385,378 


29,642 


1,415,020 


56,725 


731,014 


373,084 


125,867 


98,688 


18,819 


10,823 


73,357 


December .. 


1,397,876 


34,306 


1,432,182 


55,214 


722,508 


385,407 


130,407 


104,340 


20,908 


13,398 


69,362 


1932- January 


1,382,794 


31,124 


1,413,918 


48,584 


721, »27 


374,534 


129,950 


107,899 


20,382 


10,742 


61,767 


February 


1,297,892 


27,241 


1,325,133 


46,998 


682.589 


355,865 


115,399 


97.041 


18,125 


9,116 


52,422 


March 


1,363,912 


24,784 


1,388,696 


44.292 


713.227 


394,206 


110.943 


101.244 


15.410 


9,374 


55.414 


April 


1,306,753 


22,736 


1,329.489 


50,445 


700,575 


363,099 


99,544 


93,090 


12,413 


10,323 


54,982 


May 


1.249.226 


21,789 


1,271,015 


53.897 


661.740 


344,635 


95,863 


93.091 


12,294 


9,495 


51,354 


June 


1,176,673 


21,559 


1,198,232 


47.894 


633.614 


325,476 


83.542 


86.147 


11,996 


9,563 


64,864 


July 


1,133,555 


22,026 


1,155,581 


38,583 


606.872 


317,815 


81,519 


88,766 


11.986 


10,040 


59.015 


August 


1,206.682 


23,538 


1,230,220 


44,786 


663.911 


326,021 


82,129 


89,835 


13.530 


10,008 


69,192 


September. . 


1,254,644 


24,496 


1,279,140 


48.069 


687.536 


337.472 


90.0^2 


91.485 


13.976 


10,520 


71,500 


October 


1,362,670 


27,474 


1,390,144 


50,989 


763,577 


348.530 


104,78" 


94,794 


16.072 


11,402 


50,737 


November. . 


1,417.074 


31,153 


1,448,227 


53,110 


823.035 


333,565 


111.404 


95.960 


18,393 


12,760 


35,023 


December . 


1,400,793 


32,398 


1,433,191 


52,587 


801,939 


326.173 


116.933 


103.161 


19,679 


12,719 


41,609 


1933-January 


1,366,336 


30,322 


1,396,658 


44,535 


785,142 


318,039 


116,099 


102,521 


18,249 


12,073 


48,018 


(B) Average Daily Output. 


1930-February... 


48.972 


960 


49,932 


1,025 


24. 53^ 


17.472 


2,943 


2.99R 


668 


292 


4,185 


March 


48.098 


788 


48.886 


1,112 


23.916 


17.045 


2,898 


3,127 


588 


200 


4,093 


April 


49.365 


713 


50,078 


1,432 


24.829 


16,987 


3.087 


3.030 


548 


165 


3,917 


May 


49.146 


681 


49.827 


1,424 


24.559 


16.925 


3.230 


3.008 


531 


150 


4,166 


June 


47.141 
45.291 


679 
699 


47.820 
45,990 


1.422 
1,312 


23,842 
23,301 


18.193 
14.858 


2.922 

2.877 


2,962 
2.943 


527 
533 


152 
16R 


4 . 534 


July 


4,252 


August 


44.873 


671 


45,544 


1,348 


22,930 


14,756 


2.740 


3.099 


481 


190 


4,599 


September. . 


47,301 


797 


48.098 


1,288 


23.470 


16.172 


3,069 


3,302 


496 


301 


5,122 


October 


49.995 


797 


50.792 


1,273 


25,226 


16.838 


3.065 


3,593 


544 


253 


5.204 


November. . 


49.606 


908 


50,514 


1,375 


25, 48^ 


16.004 


3,077 


3,667 


850 


258 


4,720 


December.. 


48.811 


940 


49,751 


1,429 


24,665 


15.498 


3,595 


3,624 


637 


303 


4,816 


1931-Jantiary 


46.978 


1,045 


4S.023 


1,432 


23,722 


15.143 


3.358 


3.323 


651 


394 


5,240 


February.... 


46,826 


995 


47,821 


1,111 


24.091 


15,079 


3,160 


3,385 


618 


377 


5,195 


March 


44.903 


825 


45,720 


1,108 


22,700 


14,578 


3,096 


3,421 


516 


300 


4,127 


April 


46.268 


76<* 


47,036 


1,738 


23,930 


13,849 


3,385 


3,366 


445 


323 


3,253 


May 


43,320 


737 


44,057 


1,723 


22,382 


12,718 


3,311 


3.186 


412 


325 


2.800 


June 


42,262 
39.698 


732 
667 


42,994 
40.365 


1,756 
1,636 


21,291 
20,020 


12,652 
11,913 


3,378 
3,242 


3,185 
2,887 


405 
396 


327 
271 


2.953 


July 


3,067 


August. 


39.815 


706 


40,521 


1.449 


20,789 


11.383 


3,165 


3,029 


416 


290 


3,219 


September. 


42.114 


833 


42,947 


1,542 


22,080 


11,837 


3,429 


3,227 


44<? 


3<?5 


3,110 


October 


45,184 


891 


45,980 


1,7ns 


23,754 


12,389 


3,971 


3.272 


494 


397 


3,078 


November. . 


46.179 


98» 


47,167 


1.891 


24,367 


12,436 


4,105 


3,290 


627 


361 


2,445 


December . . 


45,093 


1.106 


46,199 


1,781 


23.307 


12,436 


4,207 


3,366 


674 


432 


2,237 


1932-January 


44.606 


1.004 


45,610 


1,567 


23,285 


12,081 


4,192 


3,481 


657 


347 


1,992 


February 


44,754 


939 


45,693 


1,621 


23.537 


12,271 


3,079 


3,346 


625 


314 


1,808 


March 


43.997 


799 


44,796 


1,429 


23.007 


12,716 


3.579 


3.266 


497 


302 


1.788 


April 


43.558 


758 


44,316 


1,681 


23.353 


12,103 


3,318 


3,103 


414 


344 


1.833 


May 


40,298 


702 


41,000 


1,739 


21,346 


11,117 


3,092 


3,003 


396 


306 


1,657 


June 


39,222 
36.566 


719 
711 


39,941 
37,277 


1,597 
1,244 


21.120 
19.577 


10.849 
10.252 


2,785 
2,630 


2,872 
2,863 


400 
387 


319 
324 


2,lfi2 


July 


1,904 


August 


38,925 


759 


39,684 


1.445 


21,416 


10.517 


2,649 


2,S98 


436 


323 


2,232 


September. . 


41,821 


817 


42,638 


1.602 


22.918 


11,249 


3,003 


3,049 


466 


351 


2,38** 


October 


43,957 


886 


44,843 


1,642 


24,632 


11,243 


3,380 


3,058 


518 


368 


1,637 


November. . 


47,236 


1.038 


48,274 


1,770 


27,435 


11,119 


3,713 


3,199 


613 


425 


1,167 


December . . 


45,186 


1,045 


46,231 


1,696 


25,868 


10,522 


3,772 


3,328 


635 


410 


1,342 


1933-January 


44,075 


978 


45,053 


1,437 


25,327 


10,259 


3,745 


3,307 


589 


389 


1,549 



MONTHLY REVIEW OF BUSINESS STATISTICS 



17 



Table 11 — Railway Revenue Freight Loaded at Stations in Canada in Tons. 



Commodities 



Railway Freight Loaded— 

Agricultural Products— 

Wheat 

Corn 

Oats 

Barley 

Rye 

Flaxseed 

Other grain 

Flour 

Other mill products 

Hay and straw 

Cotfon 

Apples (fresh) 

Other fruit (fresh) 

Potatoes 

Other fresh vegetables 

Other agricultural products . . . 
Animal Products — 

Horses 

Cattle and calves 

Sheep 

Hogs 

Dressed meats (fresh) 

Dressed meats (cured, salted, 
canned) 

Other packing house products 
(edible) 

Poultry 

Eggs 

Butter and cheese 

Wool 

Hides and leather 

Other animal products (non- 
edible) 

Mine Products — 

Anthracite coal 

Bituminous coal 

Lignite coal 

Coke 

Iron ores 

Other ores and concentrates. .. 

Base bullion and matte 

Clay, gravel, sand, stone 
(crushed) 

Slate — Dimensions or block 
stone 

Crude petroleum 

Asphalt 

Salt 

Other mine products 

Forest Products — 

Logs, posts, poles, cordwood. . 

Ties 

Pulpwood 

Lumber— Timber— Box shooks 
—Staves heading 

Other forest products 

Manufactures and Miscellan- 
eous— • 

Refined Petroleum and its pro- 
ducts 

Sugar 

Iron, pig and bloom 

Rails and fastenings 

Bar and sheet iron— Structural 
iron and iron pipe 

Castings, machinery & boilers 

Cement 

Brick and artificial stone. ... 

Lime and plaster 

Sewer pipe and drain tile 

Agricultural implements and 
vehicles other than autos.. . . 

Automobiles and auto trucks.. 

Household goods 

Furniture 

Liquor beverages 

Fertilizers, all kinds 

Paper, printed matter, books . 

Wood-pulp 

Fish (fresh, frozen cured, etc.) 

Canned goods (all canned food 
products) 

Other manufactures and mis- 
cellaneous 

Merchandise 



1931 



Nov 



,284,241 

2,792 

122,310 

35,664 

7,190 

11,481 

10,218 

155,807 

124,491 

36,709 

323 

44,761 

1,397 

35,225 

18,300 

81,007 

8,116 
45,813 

6,086 
23,118 

7,961 

1,473 

6,193 
673 

1,120 

3,922 
867 

3,386 

4,106 

1,675 

506,799 

431,561 

64,667 

138 

74,432 

4,946 

357,334 

9,509 
2,593 
7,280 

13, 

63,954 

156,643 

1,010 

98,679 

197,298 
19,707 



132,412 

14,647 

12,517 

1,532 

31,676 
8,290 
90,661 
14,657 
18.744 



2.313 

2,902 

5,035 

2,647 

14,341 

27,960 

126,164 

57,051 

5,738 

11,527 



1932 



Feb. Mar. Apr. May June July Aug. Sept 



2,749 
19,055 

1,334 
20,975 

6,841 



4,550 
327 
610 

2,838 
347 

2,785 

2,933 

346 

407,264 

357,941 

77,555 

66 

60,641 

24,242 

73,921 

8,445 

1,765 

1,769 

12,343 

57,983 



196,522 

3,512 

205,311 

155,516 
11,692 



79,650 

13,625 

8,130 

1,320 

23,377 

6,208 

27,117 

7,870 
14,726 
3,478 

1,930 
8, 739 
1,954 
1,819 
9,482 

18.313 
137,793 

46,835 
8,298 

13.942 



200 
125.: 



843 



25,970 
1,464 

21,941 
7,603 

2,582 

4,473 
351 
736 

2,491 
376 

2.812 

3,062 

921 

429,537 

233,985 

71,469 

232 

69,138 

26,883 

96, 740 

8 

2! 409 

1,443 

14,573 

58,322 

238,218 

5,291 

231,621 

186.279 
14,910 



100,973 

20,430 

9,493 

9,822 

24.762 
6,359 

31,244 
7,595 



8,064 
27,905 

1,342 
18,981 

6,322 

3,148 

4,089 
265 

2,159 

2,213 
280 

2,588 

2,661 

317 

357,117 
97,088 
46,589 
825 
64,586 
29,300 

174,647 

8,582 

2,332 

2,748 

15,325 

50,512 

189,524 

3,600 

130,010 

181,851 
12,116 



126,604 
15,468 
6,698 
8,852 

22,259 
7,630 

50,260 
1,655 



19,2141 18,208 
4.026 3 



3,644 
13,607 

3,850 

1,845 
12,350 
37,108 
141,924 
44,400 

4,640 

15,916 

186, 096 
154.735 



4,196 
11,304 

7,167 

1,804 

11,154 

75,682 

121,966 

42,477 

2,514 

10,905 



24,479 

596 

19,908 

6,588 

4,335 

4,366 
148 

3,280 

3,670 
331 

2,028 

2,630 



429,206 
51,665 
19,168 
1,010 
51,428 
23,193 

252,232 

11,618 
1,879 
8,126 
15,326 
62,587 

127,518 
5,154 
93,734 

187,905 
11,047 



174,806 
11,097 
4,835 
2,055 

26,511 
6.573 
60.179 
11,181 
18,267 
2,485 

2,567 

10,835 

5,114 

1,409 

10,887 



1,170,526 

7.922 

41,235 

21,337 

12,947 

5,548 

1,718 

103,031 

84,255 

12,353 

187 

183 

1.429 

16.127 

2.193 

9,276 

2.871 
25,889 

1,480 
20, 934 

5,700 

4,499 

5,139 
42 
1,765 
7,153 
460 
2,332 

2,613 

946 
429,465 
33,191 
19,111 
942 
45,778 
25.924 

292.715 

10,342 
708 
18,936 
15,615 
68,111 

98,556 

6,120 

58,434 

199,350 
22. 644 



157,460 
15,712 
3,713 
2,924 

25,117 
5.372 
60,099 
11,889 
16.260 
2,254 

3,345 

10,697 

4,109 

1.194 

10,580 



88,803| 20,485 

133,5011115,217 

40,254 35,061 

2,363 2,657 



8.177 



166,607 168,976 
169,161 149.078 



, 830 



3,017 
31,219 

1,902 
14,944 

5,882 

3,643 

5,873 
159 
1,241 
8,347 
1,937 
2,054 

2,093 

1,558 
409,383 
33,841 
22,265 
848 
45,649 
23,909 

177,172 

5,802 
733 
17,396 
14,577 
72,116 

69,906 
3,159 
63,977 

135,208 
15,993 



177,601 

23,058 

4,514 

9,156 

20,059 
5,601 
57,693 
11,739 
16,888 
1,936 

4,934 
8,941 
3,592 
1,620 

10,913 

9.7C9 

106,001 

33,399 
2,872 

9,054 



2,471 
34,139 

2,610 
13,106 

7,048 

3,249 

4,747 
167 

1,328 

6,415 
485 

2,031 



1,667 

414,123 

83,943 

23,853 

1,032 
21,354 
23,185 

292,224 

9,050 

1,106 

16,311 

13,481 

55,814 

70,067 

2,694 

47,763 

125,939 
13,093 



208,541 
17,138 
6,905 
1,376 

17, 

5,659 
57,194 

9,393 
15.639 

3,277 

7,214 

5,242 

2,603 

1,374 

11,435 

13,373 

102,453 

37,939 

3,559 

9.877 



169,566 187,213 160,890 144,933 
138.492 121,859 133,121 130,766 



2,318,995 

1,686 

43,973 

64,765 

9,814 

1,495 

2,121 

109,753 

76,883 

10,868 

488 

34,47* 

17,704 

9,405 

20,002 

40,362 

1,973 
41,505 

4,170 
12,325 

6,459 

2,943 

5,133 
191 
772 

4,895 
743 

2,612 

2,997 

2,725 
443,921 

199,236 
35,818 
542 
25,848 
28,949 

215,154 

6,587 

1,752 

12,221 

12,729 
66,725 

110,374 

1,537 

63,795 

128,157 
11,378 



185,461 
19,816 
4,193 



20,232 
5,630 
53,426 
12,466 
14,281 
1,694 

3,639 

3,047 

2,644 

1,611 

10,132 

18,216 

102,204 

37,895 

3,712 

10,462 



Oct. 



,670,793 

3,041 

59,399 

32,749 

10,955 

7,037 

7,047 

144,778 

91,206 

15,999 

455 

67,081 

9,193 

30,366 

18,830 

107,973 

2,369 
38,232 
11,203 
14,516 

7,496 

2,373 

4,526 
242 
505 

4,332 
439 

2,782 

3,064 

4,505 

426,425 

430,350 

57,711 

360 

31,238 

28,123 

209,773 

6,309 

1,630 

9,187 

13,977 

77.499 

182,086 

702 

71,378 

136,595 
14,113 



147,274 
17,707 
8,839 
1,084 

13,098 
4,401 

40,414 
8,603 

15,421 
1,922 

1,752 
3.634 
4,842 
2,031 
10,591 
18,744 
112,913 
47,546 
5,654 

12,708 



Nov. 



5,792 

72,368 

30.338 

2.942 

8.434 

7.153 

155,185 

104,479 

16,957 

303 

42.905 

1,634 

29,963 

12.546 

96,375 

3,031 
34.925 

6.612 
19,803 

7,967 

2,393 

3,772 
763 
613 

2,471 
569 

2,347 

2,693 

7,392 

458.900 

406, 823 

71,593 

93 

30, 844 

22,579 

127,553 

3.896 
1,757 
3,621 
14.616 
68,008 

185. 190 

1,545 

79,356 

120,448 
18,053 



112.366 

23 405 

8,222 

1.033 

13.389 
4.174 

12,618 
4,631 

12,566 
1.143 

1,739 
4.099 
3,802 
1,471 
9,619 

25.063 
117.770 

54,326 
5,758 

12,239 



154,431 151,470 
128,5111 131.085 



18 



MONTHLY REVIEW OF BUSINESS STATISTICS 



Table 12. 


Indexes of Employment by Industries, Year 1926 = 100 






Industries— First of Month 


1932 


1933 


Feb, 


Mar. 


April 


May 


June 


July 


Aug. 


Sept. 


Oct. 


Nov. 


Dec. 


Jan. 


Feb. 


Indexes of Employment Un- 
adjusted- 
All Industries 

Manufacturing 

Animal products — edible 


89-7 
85-9 
92- 1 
76-9 
86-2 
57-8 
41-8 
91-0 
80-4 
59-7 
91-1 
88-8 
73-4 
93-4 
107-9 
90-9 
96-3 
103-8 
106-1 

88-8 

80-6 
119-2 
120-9 
115-5 

97-9 
110-3 

76-7 
^115-7 
1124-9 

73-4 

67-4 

81-8 
29-7 
77-9 
70-3 

68-0 
68-9 

84-9 

77-0 

75 3 

93-7 
115-0 
104-0 

68-5 
102-4 

97-8 
133-9 

65-4 

97-3 

97-5 

97-3 

83-4 

110-9 

79-7 

67-8 

90-4 

59-1 

160-0 

60-2 

112-1 

105-4 

12S-4 

117-3 

117-2 

123-7 

102-5 


88-7 

87-0 

91-6 

79-8 

89-5 

58-2 

42-2 

84-9 

86-1 

48-7 

93-2 

87-2 

71-4 

95-6 

105-2 

91-1 

100-2 

108-6 

109-6 

92-6 

83-2 
120-9 
121-1 
120-0 
113-5 
109-6 

76-0 
116-0 
123-1 

74-9 

67-0 

81-8 
32-4 
80-7 
74-8 

65-8 
73-2 

83-2 

74-2 

76-8 

95-9 
116-2 
100-4 

60-6 
101-1 

94-4 
134-0 

69-7 

95-2 

95-8 

95-1 

81-9 

110-0 

77-8 

68-0 

83-3 

55-0 

138-6 

62-5 

114-7 

110-2 

130-2 

117-4 

113-6 

119-6 

100-0 


87-5 

87-3 

92-7 

76-9 

90-6 

58-8 

43-0 

81-2 

89-7 

40-1 

93-2 

88-6 

74-4 

94-7 

105-6 

89-7 

101-0 

109-2 

110-9 

93-5 

83-2 

~116-8 

?115-2 

118-6 

93-1 

112-7 

75-8 

115-6 

"119-9 

75-6 

71-3 

82-9 
29-1 
81-7 
75-6 

67-9 
76-4 

77-2 

73-6 

77-6 
92-8 
116-3 
102-3 
.31-1 
101-0 
93-8 
135-1 

70-3 
93-9 
94-4 
93-8 
81-9 
110-9 
77-6 
67-5 
79-9 
51-7 
134-9 
59-4 
113-9 
107-7 
127-9 
119-4 
114-3 
120-2 
100-8 


87-5 

85-8 

97-1 

75-9 

91-4 

60-1 

45-5 

771 

91-6 

33-7 

93-4 

87-3 

72-4 

96-2 

104-2 

85-9 

100-7 

108-5 

111-2 

93-0 

83-9 
120-6 
120-3 
120-3 

91-5 
113-6 

77-0 
1141 
116-5 

70-5 

65-2 

81-7 
27-3 
73-7 
817 

65-9 
73-2 

71-2 

74-9 

76-0 
83-2 
119-4 
102-8 
32-5 
97-9 
89-4 
131-1 

73-1 

94-1 

96-6 

93-5 

84-3 

112-3 

77-7 

82-0 

83-2 

58-5 

130-7 

65-8 

H4-7 

107-4 

130-3 

121-4 

/16-2 

123-0 

101-0 


89-1 
86-0 

106-3 
86-0 
90-5 
64-2 
51-3 
77-4 
93-3 
31-3 
96-9 
88-3 
72-8 
99-1 

105-3 
86-4 
98-9 

107-0 

108-6 

91-9 

81-0 
112-4 
107-1 
119-7 

78-8 
1141 

83-1 
117-4 
109-9 

69-4 

58-8 

78-6 
27-4 
73-8 
86-3 

65*4 
76-5 

66-0 

74-3 

75-3 
78-4 

123-3 
97-5 
37-9 
96-8 
86-5 

133-0 

74-4 

94-1 

98-0 

931 

85-5 

1131 

77-1 

91-4 

92-9 

P2-9 

147-7 

74-0 

116-8 

111-1 

129-4 

121-9 

116-1 

122-1 

102-4 


88-7 
85-4 

114-7 
84-6 
86-5 
64-8 
54-7 
71-2 
91-0 
29-4 

100-5 
87-9 
73-7 
96-7 

104-0 
86-2 
96-2 

103-6 

107-7 

89-1 

77-6 
112-0 
106-7 
118-5 

82-7 
109-9 

78-2 
117-4 
109-0 

68-2 

61-7 

77-6 
28 1 
72-7 
87-8 

62-4 
72-6 

63-8 

69-9 

72-5 
78-2 

123-6 
99-8 
34-2 
95-0 
83-2 

132-2 

76-1 

93-1 

95-3 

92-7 

85-9 

114-0 

77-7 

90-4 

93-3 

59-1 

149-7 

77-3 

119-9 

118-2 

130-7 

119-5 

115-4 

121-8 

100-8 


86-3 
82-6 

113-3 
82-0 
88-8 
59-8 
51-8 
62-4 
82-2 
34-9 

103-6 
86-6 
73-1 
94-0 

102-2 
80-7 
91-8 

101-2 

103-5 

81-8 

75-2 
110-4 
106-3 
115-2 

67-1 
105-9 

71-2 
116-9 
105-7 

64-3 

54-2 

72-5 
23-4 
69-1 
72-5 

69-8 
64-3 

61-6 

71-0 

67-7 
78-3 

120-6 
97-2 
29-1 
94-8 
83-5 

132-3 

73-9 

93-5 

98-2 

92-4 

85-3 

114-0 

76-8 

90-0 

90-0 

57-1 

146-9 

72-3 

117-0 

114-4 

126-9 

118-2 

113-8 

118-9 

102-0 


86-0 
83-1 

112-7 
79-6 
91-4 
69-4 
50-4 
67-3 
81-0 
50-1 

109-2 
88-5 
76-1 
98-3 

101-7 
80-7 
93-9 

102-6 

104-7 

87-4 

70-9 
112-6 
106-3 
121-1 

84-6 
106-9 

69-9 
117-6 
101-3 

62-1 

60-8 

71-4 
22-4 
64-8 
57-3 

66-4 
78-5 

53-9 

61-5 

65-4 
80-6 

122-2 
96-4 
26-0 
96-5 
87-6 

130-0 

72-6 

92-9 

96-0 

92-2 

86-5 

118-4 

77-3 

90-2 

84-4 

52-8 

133-4 

73-3 

119-4 

120-1 

128-9 

116-0 

113- 1 

117-3 

103-1 


86-7 
84-1 

109-7 
88-6 
90-6 
58-1 
46-6 
72-9 
82-2 
48-5 

121-0 
87-3 
73-4 
99-7 

101-7 
81-0 
98-6 

105-0 

110-0 

92-1 

80-9 
115-2 
109-8 
122-7 

95-9 
107-5 

70-2 
113-9 
105-2 

61-1 

59-8 

68-9 
21-4 
62-4 
46-0 

61-8 
81-7 

54-8 

64-9 

67-4 
81-7 

121-4 
99-1 
28-4 
98-2 
89-2 

131-9 

74-0 
91-2 

91-8 
91-0 
87-2 
120-7 
77-7 
90-7 
84-3 
49-1 
137-3 
73-4 
109-8 
104-5 
128-6 
113-0 
114-5 
119-0 
103-8 


84-7 

81-7 

98-2 

87-0 

89-3 

54-7 

40-9 

75-8 

80-4 

48-0 

111-7 

88-0 

73-8 

101,4 

102-3 

82-0 

99-2 

106-2 

115-2 

91-8 

75-9 
109-6 
103-0 
118-9 
117-7 
108-1 

61-1 
111-6 
108-0 

57-6 

61-2 

62-4 
21-9 
55-3 
47-5 

64-3 
82-4 

52-6 

66-5 

67-9 

82-9 
119-0 
101-0 

37-9 
101-2 

93-9 
134-9 

70-7 

89-6 

89-5 

89-6 

84-5 

1191 

74-5 

87-8 

77-9 

42-4 

134-9 

63-6 

106-5 

98-7 

126-5 

113-2 

115-4 

121-2 

102-5 


83-2 
80-3 
950 
810 
86-7 
50-6 
36-2 
73-9 
76-2 
43-9 

102-9 
861 
70-2 
99-3 

102-9 
86-1 
96-3 

105-4 

1151 

85-0 

73-5 
121-7 
125-4 
115-6 
105-2 
106-9 

53-9 
110-6 
101-5 

60-5 

63-7 

67-7 
24-2 
62-1 
50-9 

54-5 
72-0 

46-2 

62-8 

65-3 
79-8 

118-2 
98-4 
56-2 
99-9 
93-4 

134-0 

65 3 

89-3 

84-6 

90-5 

83-9 

116-6 

72-9 

94-2 

67-6 

37-4 

115-4 

56-3 

103-7 

94-8 

125-3 

111-8 

117-8 

124-8 

101-3 


78-5 
74-4 
92 
77-8 
77-6 
43-2 
30-0 
64-1 
67-0 
22-9 
88-4 
82-2 
67-1 
89-4 
100-5 
75-6 
88-1 
100-6 
103-0 

75-3 
65-9 
120-6 
124-8 
113-0 
108-9 
101-8 
50-1 
108-3 
96-4 
56-3 

47-7 

63-1 
22-9 
64-2 
57-9 

53-2 
54-3 

43-4 

57-0 

53-2 

74-7 
115-4 
93-5 
74-5 
96-9 
91-6 
129-8 

59-3 

87-5 

83-9 

88-4 

78-3 

114-2 

71-6 

64-7 

58-5 

29-7 

97-1 

53-7 

102-2 

95-2 

116-6 

109-2 

119-6 

128-4 

98-9 


76-8 
75-0 

88-1 
65-8 


Leather and products 


82-2 
44-4 


Rough and dressed lumber. 


31-2 
64-1 


Other lumber products 


69-3 
22-3 


Plant products — edible 

Pulp and paper products 


89-8 
83-3 
67-7 




94-5 


Printing and publishing 


100-4 
72-3 




89-2 


Thread, yarn and cloth 

Hosiery and knit goods 

Garments and personal fur- 


99-3 

102-4 

77-9 


Other textile products 

Plant products (n.e.s.) 


72-0 
114-5 
116-6 


Distilled and malt liquors.. 
Wood distillates and extracts. 
Chemicals and allied products 
Clay, glass and stone products 


110-6 
112-5 
103-6 
48-6 
106-7 




90-2 


Iron and steel products 

Crude, rolled and forged 


58-2 
46-4 


Machinery (other than ve- 


62-3 


Agricultural implements 


30-3 
66-9 


Automobiles and parts... . 
Steel shipbuilding and re- 


64-4 
52-5 


Heating appliances 

Iron and steel fabrication 

(n.es.) 

Foundry and machine shop 


51-7 

44-5 
52-9 


Other iron and steel pro- 


57-0 


Non-ferrous metal products.. . 


76-8 
116-0 




92-4 


Logging 


67-3 


Mining 


94-0 


Coal 


85-8 




132-8 


Non-metallic minerals (ex- 


57-3 


CoMMUNICATIONS 


85-7 




82-3 




86-6 


Transportation 


75-0 


Street railways and cartage... 


1124 

68-5 


Shipping and stevedoring 

Construction and Maintenance. 


58-6 
54-8 
28-7 




88-9 


Railwav 


51-0 


Services 


104-2 


Hotels and restaurants 


97-7 
125-1 


Personal (chiefly laundries)... 
Trade 


108-9 
109-4 


Retail 


114-9 


Whol<*»)e 


96-5 



Electrical Energy Available for Consumption, Million K.W.H. 1 




1933 


Area Jan. 


Feb. 


Mar. 


April 


May 


June 


July 


Aug. 


Sept. 


Oct. 


Nov. 


Dec. 


Jan. 


Maritime Provinces. 57-7 

Quebec 576-9 

Ontario 4590 

British Columbia. 107-1 


55-0 
546-3 
440-9 

96-5 


52-2 
584-6 
468-8 
100-5 


59-7 
576-7 
433-1 

92-7 


62-2 
522-6 
433-6 

92-6 


56-3 
492-9 
402-4 

85-1 


47-4 
467-7 
399-1 

87-9 


53-5 
509-9 
412-5 

89-1 


57-3 
527-2 
427-6 

90-5 


61-0 
600-2 
462-5 

94-0 


64-5 
654-6 
468-0 

950 


63-9 
632-0 
455-8 
102-1 


55-2 
604-9 
451-5 
101-6 



'Production plus provincial imports less provincial exports. 



MONTHLY REVIEW OF BUSINESS STATISTICS 



19 



Table 13. Indexes of Employment with Seasonal Adjustment, Indexes of Retail Sales 

Automobile Financing. 



Classification 



1932 



Feb. Mar. I April I May I June I July I Aug. I Sept. I Oct. Nov. Dec 



1933 



Jan. | Feb. 



Seasonally Adjusted Indexes of 
Employment— AH Industries. 

Manufacturing 

Leather and products 

Rough and dressed lumber 

Furniture 

Musical Instruments 

Pulp and paper 

Paper products 

Printing and publishing 

Rubber products 

Textile products 

Thread, yarn and cloth 

Hosiery and knit goods 

Clay, glass and stone products. . 

Electric current 

Electric apparatus 

Iron and steel products 

Crude, rolled and forged pro- 
ducts 

Machinery otherthan vehicles 

Agricultural implements 

Automobiles and parts 

Logging 

Mining 

Metallic ores 

Non metallic minerals except 
coal 

Telephones 

Transportation 

Street railways and cartage.. 

Steam railways , 

Shipping and stevedoring 

Construction and Maintenance 

Building , 

Highway , 

Railway , 

Hotels and Restaurants 

Trade 

Retail 

Wholesale , 



Economic areas and cities — 

Maritime Provinces 

Quebec 

Ontario 

Prairie Provinces 

British Columbia 



Montreal... 

Quebec 

Toronto. . . . 

Ottawa 

Hamilton.. 

Windsor 

Winnipeg... 
Vancouver. 



Indexes of Retail Sales, January, 

1929 = 100— 

Boots and shoes (6) 

Candy (6) 

Clothing (9) 

Drugs (7) 

Dyers and cleaners (4) 

Furniture (4) 

General and departmental, 25 

stores and 4 chains 

Groceries and meats (23) 

Hardware (5) 

Music and radio (4) 

Restaurants (11) 

General index 



Automobile Financing— 

Total new and used cars — 

Number 

Percentage change, 1932 to 1931, 

Financing in dollars $000 

Percentage change, 1932 to 1931, 



First of Month 



91-7 

89-1 

84-7 

57-5 

90 

60-7 

76-7 

94-5 

106-2 
88-7 
95-5 

103-5 

105 
87-1 

122-4 

125-2 
74-9 

71-4 
82-0 
29-1 
73-3 
45-9 
101-1 
137-4 

75-5 
100-1 

88-3 
115-2 

82-0 

90-3 
133-9 

77-1 



104-9 
91-6 
96-3 
96-7 
84-7 



95-2 
106-8 
102-1 
114-4 
94-7 
79-9 
93-4 
96-7 



93-2 


92-7 


89 6 


86-8 


84-9 


82-3 


82-4 


83-4 


820 


82-4 


84 i 


88-6 


88-3 


85 1 


83-4 


83-0 


80-1 


81-0 


81-8 


80-9 


81-4 


81-0 


87-0 


88-6 


92-3 


92-9 


88-3 


90-9 


92-5 


90-1 


87-9 


84-5 


79-5 


56-3 


54-2 


47-6 


43-4 


42-9 


39-8 


39-8 


38-9 


39-7 


43-6 


43-2 


83-6 


79-7 


75-5 


76-8 


71-2 


63-2 


69-2 


72-2 


74-0 


71-7 


70-4 


49-2 


41-0 


34-6 


32-9 


30-9 


36-9 


51-2 


46-4 


43-7 


39-9 


22-8 


74-1 


77-1 


72-8 


70-1 


71-3 


69-9 


72-8 


71-7 


73-2 


71-6 


71-2 


96-1 


94-3 


95-9 


98-9 


97-6 


95-5 


98-2 


96-9 


98-6 


95-4 


95-7 


105-0 


106-5 


104-8 


105-6 


104 -3 


102-6 


104-0 


102-6 


102-2 


102-4 


98-4 


88-2 


87-1 


84-2 


84-3 


85-0 


80-7 


82-8 


83-2 


83-C 


85-6 


81-6 


98-1 


98-4 


98-4 


98-8 


97-7 


94-1 


96-0 


98-3 


97-4 


95-6 


92-4 


106-6 


109-0 


107-5 


107-0 


105-3 


102-7 


105-1 


105-1 


105-1 


103-8 


100-7 


108-3 


109-8 


110-0 


108-6 


109-2 


106-2 


106-9 


109-7 


111-3 


110-3 


109-3 


85-8 


81-0 


77-7 


78-8 


72-7 


65-0 


64-8 


66-6 


58-5 


53-2 


56-4 


123-1 


122-0 


117-7 


115-9 


113-1 


110-5 


110-9 


109-4 


108 ■? 


110-7 


112-7 


122-5 


121-0 


117-0 


110-8 


110-3 


110-1 


102-0 


103-6 


104-7 


98-4 


96-7 


72-6 


74-1 


68-7 


66-7 


67-3 


63-9 


62-6 


61-7 


58-2 


60-6 


61-4 


65-4 


68-7 


61-5 


55-5 


61-2 


53-8 


62-0 


60-1 


62-1 


64-9 


51-9 


81-7 


82-0 


79-8 


79-2 


77-2 


71-4 


70-8 


68-4 


62-8 


68-2 


66-3 


30-7 


27-1 


260 


26-2 


27-0 


23-4 


24-8 


23-9 


22-7 


24-1 


24-1 


66-0 


64-7 


66-1 


72-4 


83-4 


82-6 


59-1 


47-8 


52-5 


60-3 


82-7 


44-1 


40-0 


42-9 


46-3 


51-5 


49-4 


38-5 


33-6 


32-8 


38-9 


53-1 


102-3 


104-0 


100-5 


98-8 


96-1 


95-7 


96-5 


96-6 


98 -< 


97-4 


94-9 


139-0 


140-0 


133-8 


132-1 


130-2 


128-3 


126-6 


128-6 


131-2 


132-7 


133-4 


80-5 


79-6 


74-7 


70-9 


69-9 


67-1 


66-2 


67-1 


66-4 


64-6 


66-4 


96-9 


95-5 


93-9 


92-9 


91-6 


90-7 


90-1 


89-5 


89-3 


90-2 


89-3 


87-6 


86-9 


87-5 


84-7 


83-8 


82-7 


83-3 


82-8 


80-2 


80-8 


811 


116-2 


117-4 


114-4 


1120 


111-9 


110-5 


114-6 


115-1 


114-4 


1151 


117-9 


81-4 


81-3 


811 


78-0 


76-5 


74-9 


74-9 


74-8 


71-6 


71-2 


72-0 


90-9 


83-6 


89-5 


78-5 


79-6 


80-1 


80-0 


78-5 


76-1 


83-2 


82-3 


126-0 


119-3 


99-9 


87-1 


73-6 


65-9 


63-3 


66-2 


661 


69-9 


82-6 


74-7 


65-8 


66-ii 


62-2 


53-1 


46-9 


42-4 


40-1 


36-1 


36-0 


37-0 


416-2 


394-4 


269-4 


163-2 


97-5 


81-8 


77-5 


87-2 


100-7 


120-9 


161-0 


84-3 


81-1 


70-3 


60-8 


581 


54-6 


59-6 


64-4 


60-6 


66-8 


73-2 


121-9 


118-9 


117-6 


109-0 


103-5 


97-2 


102-3 


97-3 


102-9 


102-8 


104-4 


117-5 


117-3 


117-8 


117-4 


115-9 


115-3 


114-0 


114-3 


113-7 


111-6 


113-4 


123-8 


123-0 


124-8 


124-1 


123-7 


120-7 


120-6 


120-9 


120-2 


115-2 


117-8 


103-0 


103-5 


102-8 


103-5 


100-9 


101-2 


100-9 


100-4 


99-6 


99-2 


99-6 


96-9 


92-1 


89-6 


95-3 


91-1 


85-3 


83-7 


81-8 


87-0 


86-1 


83-2 


91-1 


90-6 


88-9 


85-2 


83-9 


80-1 


81-4 


81-3 


79-6 


81-3 


84-9 


94-6 


95-1 


911 


88-4 


83-9 


84-6 


82-5 


82-7 


80-3 


82-6 


84-3 


951 


95-2 


92-8 


88-9 


86-2 


84-6 


87-0 


90-4 


86-0 


83-3 


88-1 


84-1 


84-6 


82-9 


81-7 


80-2 


76-1 


77-4 


77-7 


75-2 


74-2 


77-4 


96-7 


95-5 


92-3 


88-9 


85-4 


82-1 


82-7 


83-9 


81-1 


82-5 


82-9 


110-9 


105-9 


107-4 


109-8 


102-4 


97-2 


101-4 


94-2 


92-7 


93-4 


94-8 


102-2 


100-2 


97-9 


96-7 


94-3 


91-8 


90-0 


90-8 


89-7 


87-8 


87-6 


106-0 


109 9 


103-1 


95-9 


92-9 


91-5 


92-6 


88-2 


91-9 


94-4 


91-7 


93-8 


89-0 


86-6 


83-9 


82-9 


78-9 


75-8 


75-9 


76-1 


75-3 


73-0 


74-7 


94-1 


80-3 


81-8 


87-8 


78-0 


69-3 


50-3 


66-0 


65-5 


85-5 


92-8 


91-3 


89-2 


86-7 


870 


85-1 


82-5 


82-2 


81-0 


78-5 


79-6 


92-1 


89-7 


87-3 


89-7 


87-3 


84-2 


84-8 


85-1 


86-2 


84-5 


86-1 



1931 



Dec. 



125-5 
146-0 
132-1 
103-9 
78-7 
88-6 

195-9 
96-6 

142-1 
82-6 
78-5 

141-7 



4,901 
-28-5 
1,827 
-38-9 



1932 



Jan. 



64-5 
66-9 
60-7 
85-7 
76-4 
48-3 

79-5 
90-6 
56-8 
42-0 
66-7 
78-7 



4,052 
-19-6 
1,445 
-34-2 



Feb. 



481 
69-8 
52-1 
87-4 
75-4 
64-5 

78-7 
83-8 
54-1 
34-9 
65-0 
75-3 



4,170 



1,529 
-35-2 



Mar. 



62-5 
103-0 
85-8 
90-8 
88-3 
49-5 

89-3 
89-5 
65-6 
31-9 
67-3 
85-7 



4,950 



2,025 
-43-0 



April 



87-3 
72-3 
98-4 
87-4 
127-8 
53-6 

103-1 
92-4 
93-9 
28-6 
68-0 
94-5 



7,345 
-49-5 
3,000 
-52-5 



May 



75-3 
91-7 
79-3 
119-6 
52-9 

103-9 
85-7 

120-1 
26-6 
64-5 
91-8 



9,615 
-33-9 
3,788 
-40-1 



June 



107-5 
63-7 

110-8 
84-4 

119-2 
43-7 

102-3 
83-4 

109-5 
20-9 
62-6 
92-6 



9,151 

-20-7 
3,472 



July 



83-1 
70-9 
68-7 
79-0 
93-2 
32-7 

88-0 
86-7 
89-2 
15-9 
63-9 
82-0 



6,632 
-35-8 

2,475 
-41-0 



Aug. 



57-3 
69-2 
51-6 
79-3 
92-2 
44-9 

81-6 
76-0 
94-0 
22-1 
65-6 
74-1 



-10-9 
2,185 

-24-8 



Sept. 



71-6 
62-7 
80-7 
76-8 
123-5 
54-9 

94-0 
80-6 
104-5 
38-8 
64-7 
84-2 



5,018 
-15-8 

1,897 
-27-4 



Oct. 



76-5 
68-3 
87-2 
81-2 
108-8 
58-4 

109-9 
88-2 

102-7 
39-0 
61-5 
94-0 



4,361 
-32-2 
1,583 
-40-5 



Nov. 



77-3 
57-0 
85-6 
79-3 
92-2 
55-6 

97-7 
80-4 
79-4 
40-7 
56-1 
85-7 



4,286 
-17-0 
1,334 
-37-8 



3,619 
-26-2 

1.125 
-38-4 



20 



MONTHLY REVIEW OF BUSINESS STATISTICS 
Table 14. Trend of Business in the Five Economic Areas 1 



A reus and Items 



Business in Five Economic 
Areas— 

Canada — 

Contracts awarded $000 

Building Permits $000 

Employment. Average 1826-100 

Bank Debits $000,000 

Sales of Insurance $000 

Commercial Failures... Number 

Maritime Provinces— 

Contracts Awarded $000 

Building Permits $000 

Employment.Average 1926=100 

Bank Debits $000,000 

Sales of Insurance $000 

Commercial Failures... Number 

Quebec — 

Contracts Awarded $000 

Building Permits $000 

Emolovment. Average 1926—100 

Bank Debits $000,000 

Sales of Insurance $000 

Commercial Failures... Number 

Ontario— 

Contracts Awarded $000 

Building Permits $000 

Employment.Average 1926-100 

Bank Debits $000,000 

Sales of Insurance $000 

Commercial Failures... Number 

Prairie Provinces— 

Contracts Awarded $000 

Building Permits $000 

Employment.Average 1926—100 

Bank Debits $000,000 

Sales of Insurance $000 

Commercial Failures... Number 

British Columbia — 

Contracts Awarded $000 

Building Permits $000 

Employment.Average 1926-100 

Bank Debits ...$000,000 

Sales of Insurance $000 

Commercial Failures... Number 



1932 



Jan. Feb. Mar. April May June July Aug. Sept. Oct 



12.738 

2,762 

89-7 

2,071 

37,082 

238 

416 

85 

99-9 

48-4 

2.207 

15 

2.P20 

930 

85-9 

666 

11,167 

82 

6,347 

1.053 

92-7 

863 

16,537 

91 

1.906 

317 

91-3 

359 

5,203 

35 

1,249 
376 
77-5 
134-7 
1,96? 
15 



14,803 

2. 579 

88-7 

1,990 

37,85? 

221 

3,023 

80 

93 1 

39-6 

2,275 

12 

7,0*0 

797 

86-5 

576 

12,157 

92 

3,956 

1,174 

91-8 

922 

16,390 

79 

243 

281 

88-2 

329 

4,923 

30 

501 

247 

78-7 

123-3 

2,112 



10,767 

3,324 

87-5 

2,024 

37,206 



72 

88-3 

41-2 

2,395 

13 

3,297 

950 

85-0 

638 

11,354 



4,579 

1,698 

91-1 

861 

16,035 

68 

2,006 

345 

86-1 

353 

5,031 

40 

572 

259 

80-9 

130-4 

2,391 

9 



10,113 

4,237 

87 5 

2,074 

33,425 

190 

585 

473 

87-8 

42-5 

1,781 

13 

2,948 

830 

86-0 

596 

9,845 

75 

4,018 

1.820 

89-5 

925 

14,851 

79 

1,724 

825 

87-6 

379 

4,702 

17 



288 

82-7 

1311 

2,246 

6 



14,186 

5,290 

89-1 

2,175 

30,779 

204 

338 

147 

96-4 

49-2 

1,939 

14 

7.390 
1,467 

87-8 
676 



12,155 12,540 

4,388 4,227 

88-7 86-3 



2,203 

40,744 

176 

1.333 

131 

96-4 

43-6 

2,242 

18 

4,16« 

1,535 

86-6 

693 



8,913)13.116 

8.0 61 



4,168 

1.511 

89-9 

967 

13,660 

79 

1,417 

1,904 

89-3 

358 

4,289 

20 

874 

262 

83-7 

124-9 

1,978 

11 



4,321 

2,064 

89-2 

944 

17,258 

70 

1,852 

470 

90-5 

397 

5.750 

17 

474 



124-1 

2,378 

10 



2,176 

34,226 

175 

630 

207 

90-1 

46-2 

2,381 



3,444 

2,120 

84-4 

647 

9,924 

72 

6,793 

1,115 

86-9 

975 

14,587 

65 

1,023 

480 

90-1 

388 

5,323 

21 

651 

304 

81-4 

118-3 

2,011 

9 



12,689 
3,331 
86-0 
2,116 
28,124 
188 

961 

118 

87-8 

41-8 

1,797 



6,858 

1,145 

85-3 

641 

8,533 



3,360 

977 

851 

895 

11,608 

72 



367 
91-6 

406 

4,370 

15 

679 

724 

82-8 

131-8 

1,816 



9,647 

2,204 

86-7 

2,098 

25,023 

192 

344 

71 

84-9 

43-3 

1,532 



3,475 

455 

85-8 

623 

7,757 



4,691 

901 

86-1 

917 

10,433 

64 

644 

337 

94-6 

402 

3.633 

21 

493 

439 

82-1 

112-1 

1,668 



Nov. Dec 



8,876 
3,056 
84-7 
2,367 
29,657 
199 

508 

139 

86-8 

43-2 

1,749 

15 

4,859 

1.289 

83-6 

692 

8,92* 



2,722 

1,154 

84-2 

927 

12,498 

73 



222 
91-6 



159 

253 

77-8 

124-6 

1,802 

5 



10,170 

2,505 

83-2 

2,466 

33,739 

229 

348 

134 

83-8 

40-6 

2,068 

15 



82-9 

710 

9,895 



2,861 
1,522 
84-1 
1,158 
14,461 
SO 

828 

104 

86-7 

435 

5,291 

35 

1,196 

136 

73-8 

122 2 

2,024 

10 



4,190 

1,481 

78-5 

2.085 

33,249 

196 

542 

72 

801 

39-4 

2,042 

10 

1,248 

261 

77-8 

606 

9,793 

80 

1,476 

939 

78-8 

904 

14,290 

69 

48 

137 

84 

410 

5,083 

31 

875 

72 

69-7 

125-3 

2,041 



1933 



Jan. 



3,362 

1,164 

76-8 

1,969 

29,171 



124 

43 

76-5 

38-2 

1,914 



1,523 
328 

75-7 

607 

8,879 



950 
316 
78-5 
853 
12,013 



101 
308 
30-4 
354 

,377 



168 
68-0 
117-4 
1,988 



'Employment indexes apply to first of following month. 



Table 15. Mineral Production by Months 



Minerals 


1931 


1932 


Dec. 


Jan. 


Feb. 


Mar. 


Apr. 


May 


June 


July 


Aug. 


Sept. 


Oct. 


Nov. 


Dec. 


Mineral Ftoduction- 

Metals — 
Gold 


000 oz. 
000 oz. 

tons 

tons 

tons 
tons 

000 tons 

000 bbls. 

000 M cu. ft. 

tons 

000 tons 

tons 

tons 

ALS— 

000 bbls. 
$000 
tons 


240-6 
1,525 
1.765 
11,645 
10,686 
7,289 

1,203 
106-2 
2,899 

10,523 

53-20 

591 

13,641 

371 

526 
23,972 


233 -i 

1.773 
1,594 
9,838 
10,734 
7,555 

1,188 

96-9 

3,220 

10,190 
6 41 

700 
9,723 

271 

335 
23,685 


225-9 
1,601 
1,787 
11,214 
10,077 
7,112 

1,230 

90-8 

3,044 

7,706 

6-10 

945 

10,332 

236 

296 

23,632 


255-7 
1,460 
1,877 
11,831 
10.666 
7,583 

1,049 

97-5 

3,010 

8.937 

5-86 

1.160 

13,093 

276 

311 

29,108 


246-4 
1,645 
1,692 
11,039 
10,812 
7,325 

739 

95-6 

2,354 

8.830 

15-55 

415 

15,326 

427 

362 

26,744 


268-5 
1,418 
1,736 
10,678 
10,075 
7,624 

697 
95-2 
1,760 

9,942 

32-24 

423 

15,406 

531 

404 

30,014 


270-5 
1,311 
1,581 
10,335 
11,228 
7,333 

752 
89-5 
1,131 

7,977 

70-71 

479 

15,409 

567 

428 

27..290 


247-9 
1,825 
1,480 
9,045 
10,027 
7,603 

653 

86-9 

982 

7,164 

80-14 

635 

13,869 

457 

375 

27,185 


262-6 
1,447 
420 
8.802 
10,899 
6,866 

720 

85-2 

912 

9.918 

69-46 

360 

14,331 

510 

386 

27,733 


260-5 
1,172 
339 
9,406 
9,947 
6,651 

929 
79-8 
1,158 

11.001 

52-53 

375 

15,218 

509 

356 

28,550 


253-1 
1,511 
1,071 
11,293 
9,930 
6,852 

1,229 
78-8 
1,712 

13,232 

52-34 

482 

16,683 

411 

323 

34,822 


252-5 
1,515 
614 
8,858 
13,180 
6,653 

1,263 

77-1 

2,182 

11,616 

27-60 

433 

18,640 

193 

249 

29,211 


266-7 






Nickel 

Copper 

Lead 


684 
11,105 
9,972 


Zinc 

Fuels— 

Coal 

Petroleum 

Natural Gas 

Non-metals— 
Asbestos 


6,984 

1,160 
80-8 
2,699 

14,478 
19-61 


Feldspar 

Salt 

Structural Materi 


493 


Clay products 

Lime 





MONTHLY REVIEW OF BUSINESS STATISTICS 



21 



Table 16. Weekly Indicators of Economic Activity 


in Canada 


, 1932-3 








December 




January 


February 


Items 














3 


10 


17 


24 


31 


7 


14 


21 


28 


2 


9 


Statistics of Grain Trade— 
























Receipts Country Elevators — 
























Wheat 000 bushels 


6,548 


6,212 


3,618 


3,128 


1,897 


2,365 


2,423 


2,236 


2,412 


3,233 




Oats 000 bushels 


646 


550 


347 


287 


178 


183 


213 


226 


290 


427 




Barley 000 bushels 


392 


421 


249 


235 


161 


136 


104 


77 


118 


123 




Flax 000 bushels 


19 


28 


16 


21 


14 


20 


11 


10 


12 


14 




Rye 000 bushels 


36 


31 


14 


21 


17 


14 


22 


13 


18 


20 




Visible Supply — 
























Wheat 000,000 bushels 


237-2 


235-8 


236-9 


236-1 


237-4 


236-9 


231-2 


229-5 


229-2 


230-1 


229-5 


Oats 000 bushels 


9,115 


9,359 


9,537 


9,322 


9,233 


9,205 


9,090 


9,225 


9,345 


9,389 


9,244 


Barley 000 bushels 


6,024 


6,233 


6,515 


6,630 


6,772 


6,755 


6,740 


6,770 


6,806 


6,776 


6,768 


Flax 000 bushels 


1,582 


1,501 


1,473 


1,421 


1,436 


1,451 


1,458 


1,474 


1,480 


1,483 


1,454 


Rye 000 bushels 


4,770 


4,865 


4,911 


4,979 


4,990 


5,002 


5.009 


5,008 


5,020 


5,020 


5,044 


Aver. Cash Price Ft. William and Pt. 
























Arthur — 
























Wheat No. 1 Nor % per bush . 


•457 


•443 


•420 


•409 


•416 


•445 


•445 


•445 


•452 


•457 


•471 


OatsNo.2C.W 


•225 
•239 

•685 


•217 
•286 
•693 


•204 
•281 
•691 


•201 
•267 
•702 


•217 
•266 
•720 


•224 
•275 
•780 


•223 
•277 
•778 


•224 
•273 
•761 


•229 
•280 
•773 


•226 
•275 
•772 


•230 


Barley No. 3 C.W 


•275 


Flax No. 1 N.W.C 


•777 


Rye No. 1 C.W 


•295 


•309 


•299 


•290 


•289 


•315 


•315 


•300 


•310 


•314 


•319 


Sales and Prices of Live Stock— 




Sales on Stock \ards — 
























Cattle No. 


14,633 


11,612 


9,079 


5,114 


5,234 


6,003 


12,619 


12,000 


10,709 


9,504 


8,691 


Calves " 


4,884 


3,371 


3,423 


2,759 


1,746 


2,514 


3,783 


3,430 


3,409 


4,013 


4,085 


Hogs " 


30,951 


26,917 


28,920 


26,294 


16,553 


10,813 


27,532 


24,613 


25,760 


22,217 


17,401 


Sheep " 


12,598 


6,509 


6,669 


5,137 


1,692 


4,185 


6,425 


6,000 


5,167 


3,696 


2,625 


Prices at Toronto — 
























Steers, 1,000-1,200 lbs per cwt. $ 


3-97 


3-52 


3-53 


3-76 


3-93 


3-45 


3-64 


3-72 


3-58 


3-53 


3-59 


Calves, good veal " $ 


5-75 


5-74 


6-22 


5-84 


6-65 


6-24 


6-04 


6-00 


6-25 


6-29 


6-54 


Hogs, thick smooth " $ 


4-13 


4-05 


3-79 


3-95 


4-00 


3-75 


3-80 


3-82 


3-75 


3-65 


3-68 


Lambs, good handy weight " $ 


4-74 


4-75 


5-34 


5-41 


5-00 


5-79 


6-02 


6-13 


5-69 


5-69 


5-66 


Carloadings, Totals- 
























Grain and grain products 


9,431 


6,395 


4,991 


3,853 


2,684 


2,854 


4,730 


4,497 


4,119 


3,715 


2,619 




1,658 
5,011 


1,315 

5,964 


1,273 

6,264 


951 

4,968 


845 
3,725 


1,080 
4,208 


1,201 
5,082 


1,400 
4,956 


1,221 
4,387 


1,164 
4,825 


819 


Coal 


5,507 


Coke 


759 

734 

649 

1,370 


819 

697 

588 

1,407 


1,146 
603 
441 

1,331 


1,062 
538 
643 

1,150 


542 
377 

478 
889 


696 

383 

640 

1,189 


875 

418 

710 

1,456 


851 

545 

773 

1,501 


661 

523 

922 

1,258 


886 

592 

980 

1,221 


1,389 




575 




928 


Pulp and paper 


1,425 


Other forest products 


2,236 


1,846 


1,926 


1,763 


1,321 


1,328 


1,341 


1,325 


1,444 


1,471 


1,293 


Ore 


620 
12,572 


604 
12,182 


656 
12,096 


701 

11,147 


725 
9,097 


649 
8,749 


602 
10,731 


625 
10,836 


500 
11,006 


541 
10,610 


613 


Mdse L.C.L. . . 


10,411 




7,227 
42,267 


6,187 
38,004 


5,767 
36,494 


4,987 
31,763 


4,388 
25,071 


5,006 
26,782 


5,480 
32,626 


5,641 
32,950 


5,396 
31,437 


5,906 
31,911 


5,112 


Total cars loaded 


30,691 


Total cars received from connections 


17,984 


17,547 


17,697 


17,339 


14,271 


14,995 


17,070 


17,984 


17,474 


17,119 


16,211 


Indexes of Carloadings, 1926=100 — 


























53-42 
55-84 
61-33 
152-10 
22-63 
49-39 
55-60 


42-56 
44-74 
73-92 
139-52 
24-18 
40-78 
56-44 


39-60 
44-59 
80-63 
219-54 
22-53 
28-47 
51-69 


37-44 
45-07 
66-51 
199-25 
20-51 
32-77 
45-65 


34-98 
70-95 
59-36 
118-34 
18-02 
26-23 
43-24 


38-91 
66-75 
71-39 
172-28 
19-78 
28-34 
61-80 


50-23 
50-53 
70-49 
184-60 
17-50 
22-98 
59-33 


51-93 
65-30 
73-50 
176-92 
20-23 
19-96 
59-71 


53-77 
60-06 
68-35 
136-01 
19-13 
22-36 
50-77 


48-20 
59-36 
75-95 
179-72 
20-07 
21-26 
49-06 


33-27 




43-11 


Coal 


93-15 


Coke 


294-90 


Lumber 


19-12 


Pulpwood 


19-18 


Pulp and paper 


56-12 


Other forest products 


71-48 


60-96 


69-36 


72-28 


66-99 


69-71 


51-42 


41-51 


44-06 


39-07 


33-75 


Ore 


40-82 
75-48 
54-11 
59-64 
65 06 
52-43 


40-19 
72-89 
50-04 
56-86 
59-51 
53-14 


43-47 
74-03 
51-02 
58-73 
60-69 
55-98 


47-62 
70-99 
46-82 
55-08 
55-24 
54-88 


56-38 
70-98 
41-20 
54-68 
57-42 
50-20 


50-39 
74-49 
60-34 
60-10 
60-77 
59-00 


43-85 
77-63 
56-45 
59-73 
59-83 
59-66 


44-36 
76-57 
54-76 
58-57 
56-07 
63-03 


36-58 
76-29 
53-45 
56-60 
55-07 
59-47 


39-23 
72-47 
55-14 
55-93 
54-87 
57-96 


43-23 


Merchandise 


70-00 


Miscellaneous 


46-49 


Total for Canada 


53-22 


Eastern Division 


53-41 


Western Division 


52-80 


Indexes of Common Stock Prices— 




Industrials — 
























Total (96) 


54-7 


53-7 


53-3 


52-6 


52-0 


53-5 


54-7 


53-7 


53-5 


52-0 


51-5 


Iron and steel(19) 


43-6 
1-8 
40-5 
88-7 
31-9 
77-0 
37-8 
65-3 


41-5 
1-8 
39-5 
86-0 
32-7 
76-3 
37-4 
64-9 


41-2 
1-8 
40-1 
85-0 
32-3 
77-0 
37-2 
64-6 


41-5 
1-7 
40-1 
83-9 
31-1 
75-1 
36-0 
64-0 


41-5 
1-4 
38-2 
83-1 
31-1 
76-0 
35-2 
63-4 


44-4 
1-4 
38-0 
85-8 
30-6 
75-8 
35-1 
65-4 


45-5 
1-3 
38-6 
89-4 
29-9 
75-9 
35-0 
66-2 


44-8 

1-2 

37-2 

88-3 
29-2 
74-9 
34-7 
64-3 


45-4 
1-1 
37-2 
86-6 
30-5 
76-0 
33-9 
65-1 


43-0 
1-7 
35-9 
83-3 
28-5 
75-2 
33-5 
63-6 


40-5 


Pulp and paper (9) 


1-8 


Milling (5) 


34-6 


Oils (4) 


80-5 


Textiles and clothing (9) 


28-1 


Food and allied products (21) 


74-8 


Beverages (8) 


32-9 


Miscellaneous (21) 


65-8 


Utilities— 




Total (18) 


40-7 
32-0 
60-7 
46-2 


40-0 
311 

60-5 
45-7 


40-4 
31-5 
62-0 
45-8 


41-0 
33-1 
61-2 
45-4 


40-5 
32-6 
60-2 
45-1 


41-4 
33-4 
61-2 
46-1 


41-6 
33-4 
62-0 
46-4 


40-6 
31-5 
62-3 
46-1 


40-0 
30-2 
64-1 
45-8 


37-1 
26-8 
59-3 
43-8 


36-3 


Transportation (2) 


25-7 


Telephone and telegraph (2) 


58-1 


Power and traction (14) 


43-5 


Companies Abroad— 




Total (8) 


44-3 
62-1 
29-5 

47-7 


43-9 
61-5 

29-2 
46-9 


44-5 
62-5 
29-4 
47-0 


44-3 
60-8 
30-4 
47-0 


43-6 
59-7 
30-1 
46-4 


44-7 
61-7 
30-5 
47-6 


44-5 
61-7 
30-2 
48-1 


43-4 
60-6 
28-9 
47-1 


43-4 
60-6 
28-9 

46-8 


41-4 
57-4 
27-9 
44-5 


41-5 


Industrial (1) 


58-4 


Utility (7) 


27-1 


Grand total (122) 


44-0 


Mining Stocks — 
























Gold (11) 


61-4 
77-1 
23-1 
63-5 


62-6 
75-0 
22-6 
64-0 


63-1 
72-1 
22-0 
63-7 


61-9 
68-4 
21-0 
61-9 


63-1 
68-0 
22-0 
62-7 


65-4 
72-3 
24-6 
65-5 


65-4 
73-5 
25-8 


64-9 
72-0 
2fi-n 


67-6 
76-8 
28-3 
68-3 


70-6 
79-0 

27-6 
70-9 


77-5 


Copper (4) 


86-9 


Silver and miscellaneous (5) 


29-7 


Total Index (20) 


65-81 65-1 


77-9 



22 

Table 17. Bank 
Millions 


MONTHLY REVIEW OF BUSINESS STATISTICS 

Debits to Individual Accounts in the Clearing House Centres of Cana 
of Dollars, with Annual Totals for Leading Cities and Economic Areas 


da in 


Year 


Canada 


Halifax 


Saint 
John 


Montreal 


Toronto 


Winnipeg 


Vancou- 
ver 


Maritime 
Provinces 


Quebec 


°*"*> i5££. 


British 
Columbia 


1924 
1925 
1926 
1927 
1928 
1929 
1930 
1931 
1932 


27,157 
28,126 
30,358 
36,094 
43,477 
46,670 
37,491 
31,536 
25,844 


249 
292 
310 
325 
405 
425 
362 
330 
258 


262 
208 
215 
219 
249 
273 
246 
235 
214 


7,502 
7,766 
9,133 
11,780 
13,962 
15.558 
12,271 
9,757 
7,136 


7,659 
7,588 
8,210 
10,537 
12,673 
13,714 
10, 055 
9,512 
8,066 


3,793 
4,183 
3,877 
4,005 
5,188 
4.789 
3,712 
3,280 
1 3,138 


1,410 
1,475 
1,553 
1,596 
1.982 
2,366 
1,813 
1,416 
1,190 


585 
572 
605 
628 
745 
798 
708 
653 
519 


8,133 
8,475 
9,909 
12,744 
14,913 
16,488 
13,137 
10,550 
7,766 


11,209 
11,236 
11.998 
14,642 
17,312 
18,543 
15,044 
13,377 
11,259 


5,505 
6,000 
5,886 
6,127 
8,005 
7,923 
6,279 
5,201 
4,797 


1,725 
1,842 
1,960 
2.053 
2,499 
2,923 
2,322 
1,806 
1,503 


Clearing House 
Centres 


1932 


1933 


Jan. 


Feb. 


Mar. 


April 


May 


June 


July 


Aug. 


Sept. 


Oct. 


Nov. 


Dec. 


Jan. 


Bank 

Marit 
Hali 
Mon 
Sain 

T 

QUEBE 

Mon 
Quel 
Sher 

T 

Ontar 
Brar 
Cha 
Fort 
Han 
Kinj 
Kite 
Lone 
Otta 
Pete 
Sarn 
Sudt 
Tore 
Wine 

T 

Prair 
Brar 
Catg 
Edrr 
Leth 
Med 
Moo 
Prin 
Reei 
Sask 
Winr 

T 

Britis 
New 
Van( 
Vict 

T 

T 


Debits 

[me Provinces 
fax 


S 

22-2 

7-5 
18-7 


t 

17-7 
6-3 
15-6 


$ 

19-7 
5-7 
15-9 


% 

211 
6-3 
15-2 


26-3 
6-0 
16-9 


5 

21-4 
6-4 
15-7 


S 

24-1 
6-2 
15-9 


S 

20-3 
5-6 
15-9 


22-6 
5-6 
15-1 


$ 

21-7 
5-7 
15-8 


1 

21-1 
6-0 
13.5 


S 

19-9 
6-2 
13-3 


$ 

19-4 

6-5 

12-4 


cton 


otals 


48-4 


39-6 


41-2 


42-5 


49-2 


43-6 


46-2 


41-8 


43-3 


43-2 


40-6 


39-4 


38-2 


c— 


617-6 
42-4 
5-9 


530-7 

39-5 

6-1 


587-9 
45-0 
5-4 


548-9 

41-0 

6-0 


612-0 

58-2 

60 


639-7 

47-4 

6-3 


587-6 

54-3 

5-5 


592-6 

43-1 

5-8 


576-6 
40-S 
5-8 


631-1 

55-4 

5-7 


654- 1 

49-9 

5-7 


556-8 

43-5 

5-8 


546-4 

55-4 

5-1 








666-0 


576-2 


638-3 


595-9 


676-2 


693-4 


647-4 


641-4 


623-3 


692-2 


709-7 


606-1 


607-0 


IO— 






7-1 
5-6 
3-9 

44-9 
4-7 
9-1 

27-0 

122-0 

5-6 

5-6 

3-5 

606-8 

171 


6-3 
5-1 
4-3 

43-2 
3-6 
7-5 

24-9 

127-4 

4-6 

7-7 

3-1 

666-0 

17-6 


6-5 

5-1 

3-4 

45-9 

3-9 

7-3 

25-7 

122-6 

4-6 

6-4 

3-5 

607-8 

18-6 


7-4 

5-6 

4-4 

46-8 

4-5 

8-2 

25-6 

141-2 

4-7 

6-9 

3-7 

646-2 

20-3 


6-9 

60 

4-6 

48-1 

4-8 

7-9 

28-0 

174-6 

4-4 

8-5 

3-4 

650-8 

18-9 


7-7 

5-2 

5-1 

45-4 

5-0 

8-8 

32-1 

159-0 

4-7 

8-8 

4-3 

639-7 

18-5 


8-5 

4-3 

5-4 

40-1 

5-4 

8-1 

28-8 

132-6 

4-8 

8-8 

3-1 

708-8 

17-0 


6-2 

4-8 

4-6 

43-2 

4-2 

6-9 

23-3 

124-4 

3-9 

6-8 

2-9 

644-6 

18-4 


6-6 
11-0 

4-4 
45-4 

5-3 

7-6 
22-7 
83-8 

4-4 
11-8 

3-2 

692-7 

18-1 


7-5 

4-4 
4-2 

41-5 
4-8 
8-2 

26-3 

89-5 

4-0 

9-2 

3-2 

707-2 

17-3 


6-9 

6-8 

5-6 

43-4 

4-3 

8-6 

24-9 

203-1 

4-3 

6-6 

3-3 

823-4 

17-3 


7-7 


6-4 
5-3 
3-6 

32-5 
3-9 
7-7 

24-5 

86-8 

3-9 

6-7 

2-6 

655-3 

13-3 




7-7 
5-4 

39-0 
4-7 
8-0 

26-6 

99-2 

5-4 

8-1 

3-1 

672-1 

16-7 


William 










rborough 








otals 


862-9 


921-5 


861-3 


925-3 


966-9 


944-2 


975-9 


894-2 


917-0 


927-4 


1,158-5 


903-8 


852-5 


tE Provinces- 


2-6 

42-6 

44-9 

2-9 

1-7 

5-5 

1-8 

33-3 

9-9 

213-8 


2-4 

40-7 

29-5 

2-6 

1-6 

4-4 

1-7 

27-5 

8-1 

210-8 


2-8 

40-2 

41-0 

2-4 

1-7 

4-6 

1-7 

44-1 

9-0 

205-2 


2-5 

40-5 

35-7 

2-9 

1-7 

4-4 

20 

45-3 

9-9 

234-1 


3-0 

42-0 

31-2 

2-9 

1-5 

5-0 

1-8 

39-3 

9-8 

221 4 


2-8 

48-9 

32-3 

31 

1-6 

5-2 

1-8 

34-2 

9-3 

258-3 


2-7 

34-6 

28-9 

3-0 

1-7 

5-6 

1-7 

35-9 

8-8 

264-7 


2-7 

37-3 

30-6 

3-3 

1-5 

4-4 

1-6 

36-7 

9-7 

278-8 


3-1 

43-4 

28-2 

3-6 

1-7 

5-1 

1-6 

41-0 

10-0 

264-6 


3-5 

51-0 

34-0 

3-7 

2-4 

6-1 

1-8 

61-6 

11-5 

404-2 


2-8 

48-6 

26-8 

3-5 

2-0 

5-2 

1-8 

34-1 

9-8 

300-8 


2-6 

43-9 

30-4 

3-3 

1-8 

5-3 

1-0 

29-8 

9-2 

281-7 


2-2 

43-9 

37-6 

2-6 

1-5 

4-5 

1-4 

27-2 

7-7 

225-2 








icine Hat 


ce Albert 

na 






otals 


359-0 


329-4 


352-8 


379-1 


357-9 


397-5 


387-8 


406-5 


402-2 


579-7 


435-3 


410-0 


353-8 


h Columbia— 
Westminster. 


4-7 
104-6 
25-4 


4-0 

101-6 

17-7 


4-2 
100-6 
25-6 


4-6 

105-6 
21-0 


4-4 
97-9 
22-5 


4-2 
961 
23-8 


4-6 
91-7 
22-0 


4-2 
105-1 
22-5 


4-2 
89-1 
18-9 


4-2 
102-1 
18-4 


3-6 
97-9 
20-6 


4-1 
98-1 
23-0 


3-5 
91-3 

22-5 




otals 


134-7 


123-3 


130-4 


131-1 


124-9 


124-1 


118-3 


131-8 


112-1 


124-6 


122-2 


125-3 


117-4 




otals Cai 


tada. 


2,071-0 


1,990-0 


2,024-0 


2,073-9 


2,175-2 


2,202-8 


2.175-6 


2,115-7 


2,097-1 


2,367-2 


2,466-3 


2,084-6 


1,968-9 



Table 18. Indexes of Employment by Cities, 1926 = 100 



1st of Month 


1931 


1932 


1933 










Nov. 


Dec. 


Jan. 


Feb. 


Mar. 


Apr. 


May 


June 


July 


Aug 


Sept. 


Oct. 


Nov. 


Dec. 


Jan. 


Feb. 


Employ- 


































ment- 


































Montreal 


95-4 


96-7 


88-0 


87-4 


89-8 


91-2 


911 


91-7 


88-6 


85-5 


86-3 


88-0 


84-8 


85-1 


77-5 


76-1 


Quebec 


120-0 


108-7 


100-8 


100-9 


101-9 


102-0 


104-0 


105-6 


104-8 


101-0 


105-8 


100-2 


98-5 


95-9 


92-6 


88-9 


Toronto 


105-6 


104-8 


99-6 


97-8 


97-8 


97-8 


97-5 


96-8 


94-6 


92-3 


91-6 


93-5 


92-5 


91-2 


86-5 


84-7 


Ottawa 


118-6 


112-7 


108-9 


104-5 


96-6 


101-7 


102-5 


100-9 


99-3 


97-6 


98-0 


94-4 


94-1 


92-6 


85-8 


85-7 


Hamilton 


96-3 


94-0 


91-3 


90-2 


90-4 


87-4 


86-9 


84-9 


84-4 


80-6 


77-1 


77-6 


77-8 


76-6 


70-7 


70-4 


Windsor 


67-7 


72-3 


83-5 


81-4 


80-4 


89-8 


88-3 


91-0 


89-6 


80-0 


71-8 


58-7 


62-5 


63-7 


63-9 


67-2 


Winnipeg 


93-5 


93-2 


92-5 


89-6 


88-5 


86-8 


86-1 


85-2 


87-0 


86-0 


85-1 


85-6 


84-3 


82-2 


80-8 


77-8 


Vancouver. . . 


101-5 


98-3 


91-1 


90-1 


87-8 


87-8 


87-ff 


89-4 


88-7 


87-9 


89-0 


88-5 


87-9 


85-8 


82-5 81-2 



MONTHLY REVIEW OF BUSINESS STATISTICS 



23 



Table 19. Building Permits Issued by Sixty- 


one Cities in Canada in 


Thousands of Dollars 


City 


1932 


1933 


Jan. 


Feb. 


Mar. 


April 


May 


June 


July 


Aug. 


Sept. 


Oct. 


Nov. 


Dec. 


Jan. 


Building Permits— 

Nova Scotia 


77 


66 


56 


213 


106 


92 


120 


67 


51 


102 


109 


49 


37 




65 


66 


51 

1 
5 


108 
26 
79 


95 
2 
9 


89 

1 
3 


105 

1 

14 


67 


40 


92 
2 

8 


108 


49 


37 








13 






10 
















New Brunswick. . . 


8 


14 


16 


260 


40 


39 


88 


51 


49 


36 


25 


23 


6 








2 
2 
13 


3 

32 
225 


4 
12 

24 


3 

6 

31 


5 

58 
24 


1 
23 

27 


""29 

20 


2 
5 

29 












12 

2 


6 
19 






Saint John 


8 


22 


6 


Quebec 


930 


797 


950 


830 


1,467 


1,536 


2,116 


1,151 


530 


1.290 


609 


261 


328 






Montreal and Mai- 
sonneuve 


865 
35 


728 

34 

5 

26 

4 


839 
72 

14 

24 

1 


661 

70 
7 
18 
32 
42 


1,311 

115 

2 

20 

13 

5 


1,420 
52 

4 
28 

8 
23 


1,810 
241 

46 

8 
12 


973 
99 

6 
32 

8 
33 


338 
61 

77 

11 

1 

43f 


1,149 

68 

1 

12 

59 


248 

320 

4 

4 

33 


216 
12 


308 
12 






Sherbrooke... 

Three Rivers 

Westmount 


17 

12 


2 

1 
30 


4 
"•*4 




1,054 


1,174 


1,689 


1,820 


1,512 


2,067 


1,116 


977 


901 


1,175 


1,522 


939 


316 






Belleville 


3 
46 
2 
9 
1 
4 

80 

13 

15 

69 

2 

1 

83 

4 

4 

22 

2 

2 

1 

541 

132 


23 

2 
2 
2 
6 
105 
3 
31 

5 

'""140 


2 
20 

7 
11 
19 
15 
114 
13 

5 
79 

1 

351 


17 
35 

9 
41 
13 
11 
98 
89 
138 
87 
36 

9 
145 

5 
11 
18 

4 
12 
14 

5 

9 
817 

157 
21 
11 


19 
8 
9 

63 

12 

17 

111 

108 

19 

63 

10 

6 

132 

2 

16 

156 

7 

14 
4 

15 

13 

514 

171 

4 
3 
1 


14 
7 

10 
23 
10 
38 

149 
28 
37 
49 

106 
6 

261 

14 

12 

7 

18 

8 

34 

376 

126 

8 

699 

"'2 


6 
13 

2 

28 
8 
8 
187 
8 
2 

35 
2 
1 
115 
6 
8 

31 
4 

50 
2 
4 

13 
394 

115 
3 
66 


i 

2 

12 

14 

13 

72 

30 

25 

27 

1 

1 

76 

1 

100 

5 

6 

22 

4 

29 
381 

119 
9 
13 
1 


8 
9 
6 

76 
3 

14 
105 

22 

13 

35 
2 
5 

68 
1 
1 

14 
3 
9 

14 
5 

11 
317 

129 
1 
8 
8 


29 

5 

6 

8 

3 

15 

348 

19 

33 

31 

2 

4 

91 
3 
8 

12 
12 
8 

3 

9 

383 

111 
11 
6 


2 

22 

10 

45 
7 

37 

38 
2 
7 

38 
1 
6 

25 
2 

18 
4 
5 
1 
1,197 

46 

2 


3 
2 
3 


1 








1 


Fort William 




Gait 


2 

12 

8 

8 

22 


3 




1 




39 




1 




1 




30 


Niagara Falls 


4 




48 
.... 

3 

2 

2 

.... 

2 
805 

9 
2 
2 


11 




2 


Peterborough 

Port Arthur 


11 

"'42 

2 

8 
605 

97 

2 

14 

33 


12 
3 

5 

'"k 

12 

589 

386 

6 

13 

1 


2 
1 
1 


St. Catharines 

St. Thomas 


1 
10 
3 


Sault Ste. Marie. . 


134 


York and East 

Townships 

Welland 


53 
6 




11 


11 
















l 








5 
4 

7 


6 
3 


1 

3 
11 








1 
1 
11 








Walker ville 


3 
3 


3 


1 
17 


1 
4 


3 
12 


1 

10 








Woodstock 


3 


2 


1 


Manitoba 


106 


64 


41 


199 


1,108 


135 


202 


171 


132 


79 


30 


115 


17 










1 
63 


1 
5 

36 


5 

54 
139 


7 

28 

1,073 


2 

4 
128 


6 
3 

192 


1 

10 
161 


7 

6 

118 


1 

6 

72 


30 


2 

100 
13 




St. Boniface 


1 
105 


1 
16 






Saskatchewan 


379 


218 


249 


179 


486 


155 


207 


163 


137 


90 


39 


73 


257 


Moose Jaw 


41 
30 
307 


35 
20 
163 


40 
95 
114 


61 

18 

100 


52 

26 

409 


24 
22 
108 


112 

7 

88 


15 
19 
129 


6 

18 
113 


5 

9 

76 


12 

26 


1 

1 

71 


256 




2 






Alberta 


177 


179 


85 


431 


431 


249 


191 


159 


154 


118 


51 


20 


34 








44 
23 
110 


142 
30 

7 


50 

31 

2 

2 


250 

160 

13 

8 


74 

347 

9 

1 


74 

171 

2 

1 


68 

112 

9 

1 


55 

76 

22 

5 


71 

74 

8 

1 


61 

48 

8 

1 


16 
13 

"*2i 


13 
6 

1 


15 


Edmonton 

Lethbridge 


6 
13 












British Columbia.. 


376 


247 


269 


298 


272 


198 


314 


734 


449 


253 


136 


72 


168 




1 
4 
8 
3 
339 
4 
18 


1 

5 

17 

10 

194 

3 
17 


1 
8 
13 
13 
187 
11 
36 


4 
1 
8 
1 
212 
5 
66 


11 

*"i5 

4 

203 

2 

36 


8 
4 
10 
5 
127 

44 


1 
3 

17 

10 

233 

5 

45 


3 
4 

16 

2 

634 

37 

39 


9 
5 
14 
2 

384 

4 

31 


8 

19 
9 
2 
176 
4 
35 


2 
3 
9 

""m 
"*io 


1 




Nanaimo 




New Westminster. 

Prince Rupert 

Vancouver 

North Vancouver. 
Victoria 


3 
2 

54 

1 

12 


2 

""i45 

"'20 




Total 61 cities. . . 


3,211 


2,845 


3,395 


4,37,1 


5,483 


4,749 


4,410 


3,523 


2,450 


3,171 


2,553 


1,569 


1,164 



1 Report not received. 



24 



MONTHLY REVIEW OF BUSINESS STATISTICS 
Table 20. Index Numbers of Wholesale Prices: 1926 = 100 



Classification 



Totals 

Component Material- 
Vegetable products 

Animal products 

Textiles 

Wood and paper 

Iron and its products 

Non-ferrous metals 

Non-metallic minerals 

Chemicals 

Purpose — Consumers goods 

Foods, beverages and tobacco. 

Producers' goods 

Producers' equipment 

Producers' materials 

Building and construction ma- 
terials 

Manufacturers' materials. . ..... 

Origin— Raw and partly manu- 
factured 

Fully and chiefly manufact'd 
Field origin— raw 

Manufactured 

Totals 

Animal origin— Raw 

Manufactured 

Totals 

Canadian farm PRODuers-Field 

Animal 

Totals 

Marine origin — Raw. 

Manufactured . . 

Totals 

Forest origin— Raw 

Manufactured 

Totals 

Mineral origin— Raw 

Manufactured 

Totals 

Commodity Groups- 
Fruits 

Grains 

Flour and milled products 

Rubber and its products 

Sugar and its products 

Tobacco 

Fishery products 

Furs 

Hides and skins 

Leather, unmanufactured 

Boots and shoes 

Live stock 

Meats and poultry 

Milk and its products 

Eggs 

Cotton, raw 

Cotton yarn and thread 

Knit goods 

Silk, raw 

Artificial silk and its products. . 

Wool, raw 

Wool yarns 

Newsprint 

Lumber and timber 

Pulp 

Pig iron and steel billets 

Rolling mill products 

Scrap 

Aluminium 

Brass, copper and products 

Lead and its products 

Metallic nickel 

Silver 

Zinc and its products 

Bricks 

Coal 

Coke 

Petroleum and products 

Lime 

Cement 

Asbestos 

Fertilizers 



1932 



Jim 



79 



71-2 
71-0 



Feb. Mar. April May June July Aug. Sept. Oct. Nov. Dec 



69-2 



71-2 
72-0 



691 



71-2 
720 



54 

62 
47 
39 
78 
80 
26 
64 

32 
67 
72 
71 
76 
86 
91 
45 
94 
50 

44 

97 

50 

41 
100 

91 
100 

72 

91 
105 

71-2 
71-4 



67 7 



71-2 
70-5 



66 6 



82 
39 
55 
52 
72 
50 
64 
50 
26 
77 

90 
66 
53 
55 
49 
34 
78 
80 
24 
64 

27 

67 
72 
68 
70 
86 
91 
45 
97 
47 

39 

97 

51 

39 
100 

88 
100 

76 

91 
105 

71-2 
720 



66-6 



100 

75 

91 
105 

71-2 
72-0 



66-8 



69 



40 

97 

51 

40 

99 

89 
100 

75 

91 
105 

71-2 
72-4 



66-9 



71-2 
72-0 



650 



71 2 

72-3 



64 8 



71-2 

72-3 



640 



1933 
Jan. 
63-9 



71-2 
72-3 



MONTHLY REVIEW OF BUSINESS STATISTICS 



25 



Table 21. Prices of Representative Commodities, and Wholesale Prices in Other Countries. 1 



Description* 



Wholesale Prices of Important 

Commodities- 
Oats, No. 2C.W bush 

Wheat, No. 1 Man. Northern " 
Flour, First Patent 2-98's 

jute 

Sugar, raw 96° Centrifugal 

N.Y cwt. 

Sugar, granulated, Montreal " 
Rubber, ribbed, smoked 

sheets, N.Y lb. 

Rubber, Para, upriver, fine, 

N.Y u 

Cattle, steers, good 1,000- 

1,200 lbs cwt. 

Hogs, bacon, Toronto M 

Beef hides, packer hides, 

native steers lb. 

8ole leather, mfr's. green 
hide crops M 

Box sides B. mill ft. 

Butter, creamery, finest, 
Montreal lb. 

Cheese, Canadian, old large, 
Montreal " 

Eggs, fresh extras, Montreal doz. 

Cotton, raw 1-1 1/16', Ham- 
ilton lb. 

Cotton yarns, 10's white 
single " 

Saxony, 4-50 yds to lb " 

Gingham, dress, 6-50-7'75 
yds to lb " 

Silk, raw, grand double 
extra.N.Y " 

Wool , eastern br i gh t \ blood " 

Wool, western range, semi- 
bright, § blood ** 



1932 



Jan. 



5-025 



1-351 

4-560 



•056 
•065 



5- 

5-140 



•070- 



Pulp, ground wood No. t ton 

Pig iron, basic mill '* 

Steel merchant bars, mill. 100 lb 
Copper, electrolytic domes- 
tic cwt. 

Lead, domestic, Montreal. . " 
Tin ingots, Straits, Toronto lb. 
Spelter, domestic, Montreal cwt. 
Coal, anthracite, Toronto. . ton 
Coal, bituminous, N.S. run- 

of-mine M 

Gasoline, Toronto gal. 

Sulnhtiricn'*irl. fifi'Benume netton 
Indexes of Wholesale Prices In 
Other Countries— 1 
United States— 

Fisher, 200: 1926 

Bureau of Labour, 550: 1926 

Annalist, 72: 1913 

United Kinedom — 
Board of Trade, 150: 1913.... 

Economist, 58: 1927 

France, Statistique General, 45: 

1914 

Germany, Federal Statistical 

Office, 400: 1913 

Belgium, Ministry of Labour, 

130:1914 

Netherlands, Central Bureau 

Statistics, 48: 1913 

Norway, Official, 95: 1913 

Sweden, Commerce Dept., 160: 

1913 

Italy, Bachi, 100: 1913 

Finland, Official, 139: 1926 

India, Dept. of Statistics, 75: 

1914 

Japan, Bank of Japan, 56: 1913. . 
Australia, Commonwealth Sta- 
tistician, 92: 1911 

New Zealand. Official, 180: 1913 
Egypt, Dept. of Statistics, 
Cairo, 23: 1913-1914 



•340 
•210 

•237 

•180 
•313 

•091 

•203 
•506 

•923 

2-903 
•125 

•090 

24-260 
18-0)0 

2-250 

9-750 
4-260 
•300 
4-063 
13-810 

6-000 

•175 

16-000 



65-3 
67-3 
94-0 

105-8 
65-4 



Feb. 
$ 



• 202 
•632 



5-100 



1-146 
4-560 



Mar. 



5-085 



414 

100-0 

557 

84 
123 

100 

317 

94 

97 
120-6 

130-0 
133-5 

89 



•046 

•062 

5-950 
4-940 

•055- 
•065 

•340 
•210 

•214 

•180 
•310 

•091 

•203 
•506 

•923 

2-579 
•125 

•090 

13-990 
18-000 
2-250 

8-450 
4-148 
•208 
3-936 
13-810 

6-000 

•175 

16-000 



•851 
4-465 



•037 
•057 



5-840 
4-900 



•055- 
•065 



•330 
•200 



63-8 
66 3 
92-3 

105-3 
67-0 



421 

99-8 

554 

83 
123 

110 

314 

93 

97 
122-0 

133-2 

132-1 

91 



■272 



•203 
•506 

•923 

2-184 

•120 

•090 

23-200 
18-000 
2-250 

7-63; 
3-85 

•28! 
3-82 

12-750 

6-000 
•175 

16-000 



63-1 
66-0 
91-1 

104-6 
65-3 

427 

99-8 

548 

82 
122 

109 

315 

92 

94 
119-8 

132-2 
131-6 

93 



Apr 

$ 

•323 
•626 

5 039 

•725 
4-370 

•034 

•058 

5-1 

4-540 

•050- 



•320 
•200 

•231 

•180 
•214 

•082 

•203 
•495 

•923 

1-784 
•110 

•085- 

•090 
22-429 
18-0(0 
2-250 

7-467 
3-609 
•255 
3-634 
12-342 

6-000 

•175 

16-000 



62-2 

65-5 
90-7 

102-4 
62-7 



May 


June 


$ 


$ 


•355 
•629 


•338 
•551 


5-100 


4-896 


•653 
4-275 


•868 
4-275 


•035 


•031 


•063 


•063 


5-840 
4-510 


6-160 
4-580 


•'33- 
•043 


•030- 
•040 


•310 
•200 


•290 
•190 


•197 


•191 


•180 
•209 


•160 
•241 


•076 


•072 


•205 
•495 


•205 
•495 


•923 


•923 


1-688 
•100 


1-678 
•090 



July 

$ 

•352 
•547 



1-304 
4-370 



•033 

•064 



6-140 
5-030 



-038- 
•048 



425 



539 



120 

109 
311 

89 



116-5 



131-5 

130-7 



080 

•085 

22-160 

18-000 

2-250 

6 

3-320 

•280 

3-564 

12-510 

6-000 

•185 

16-000 



61-0 
64-4 



100-7 
60-5 

421 

97-2 

526 

79 
120 

109 

305 



113-6 



129-4 
130-4 



21-690 
18-000 
2-250 

6-791 
3-145 
•270 
3- 
12-510 

6-000 

•185 

16-000 



59-6 
63-9 
88-6 

98-1 
58-8 



110-6 



127-8 
129-9 



-160 
•245 



•079 



■100 
•495 



•638 

•090 

•085 

21-145 
18-000 
2-250 

6-850 
3-083 
•285 
3-355 
12-510 

6-000 

•180 

16-000 



Aug. 



60-4 
64-5 
92-1 

97-7 
60-1 

404 

95-9 

512 

76 
122 

108 

296 



87 
111-6 



128-4 
129-9 



78 



1-323 
4-370 



•042 
•068 



6-050 
5-210 



■055- 
•065 



■289 



•212 

•160 
•281 

•096 

•210 
•495 

•923 

2-059 
•095 

•100 

20 
18-000 
2-250 

7-030 
3-217 
•300 
3-561 
12-757 

6-000 

•180 

16-000 



Sept. 



4-600 



1-197 
4-370 



61-8 
65-2 
94-2 

99-5 
61-9 

394 

95-4 

524 

75 
123 

108 
296 



91 
117-7 



130-1 
130-2 



77 



•043 



5-360 
5-110 



•075- 
•085 



•190 

•245 

•180 
•330 

•092 

•225 
•506 

•923 

2-107 
•095 

•105 

20-472 
18-000 
2-250 

7-61C 

3-482 

•318 

3-802 

12-981 

6-000 

•180 

16-000 



Oct. 



4-500 



1-277 
4-370 



62-7 
65-3 
95-2 

102-1 
64-0 

397 

95-1 

533 

76 
123 

110 

300 

90 

91 
126-5 

132-4 
129-5 

78 



•083 



4-700 
4-500 



•070- 



•190 

•240 

•180 
•394 

•082 

-225 
•484 

•923 

2-024 
•095 

•105 

19-573 
18-000 
2-250 

7-310 

3-264 

•315 

3-667 

13-328 

5-250 

-180 

16-000 



61 

64-4 

91-0 

101-1 
62-0 

392 

94-3 

529 

77 
123 

110 

298 

90 

91 
127-8 

129-0 
127-7 

80 



Nov. 



•240 
•467 

4-500 

1-254 
4-370 

•040 

•085 

4-220 
3-920 

•055- 
•065 

•270 
•190 

•235 

•180 
•490 

•086 

•225 
•484 

•959 

2-006 
•095 

•105 

19-795 
18-000 
2-250 

7-305 
3-373 
•315 
3-834 
13-328 

5-250 

•180 

16-000 



Dec. 



4-400 
•943 



60-3 
63-9 
88-4 

101-1 
62-3 

391 

93-9 

525 

77 
124 

109 

298 

91 

90 
134-4 



79 



4-100 
3-970 



•043 
•053 



•190 

•23 

•18 
■406 



■21C 

•484 

•95! 

1-965 

•09( 

■102 

19-763 
18-000 
2-250 

7-021 
3-386 
•305 
3-971 
13-328 

5-250 

•180 

16-000 



58-5 
62-6 
85-7 

101-1 
61-1 

390 

92-4 

522 

76 
123 

108 

90'" 

139-5 



1933 
Jan. 

$~ 

•225 
•442 

4-500 

•795 
4-180 

-036 

•070 

4-110 
3-760 

•055- 
•065 

•260 
•190 

•235 

•180 
•318 



■210 
■484 



•959 
•623 



-105 

19-190 
18-000 
2-250 

6-905 
3-262 
•300 
3-924 
13-328 

5-250 

•180 

16-000 



56-4 
82-4' 



x For full description see the report on Prices and Price Indexes published by the Dominion Bureau of Statistics. 
Application for this publication should be made to the Dominion Statistician. 

'The description includes the authority, the number of commo lities and the base year. 



26 MONTHLY REVIEW OF BUSINESS STATISTICS 

TaWe 22. Total Value of Imports and Exports, by Groups, in Thousands of Dollars 









Imports of Merchandise 


for Consumption in 


Canada 






Month 


Total 
Imports 


Vege- 
table 
Products 


Animal 
Pro- 
ducts 


Textiles 


Wood 

and 

Paper 


Iron and 
its Pro- 
ducts 


Non- 
Ferrous 
Metals 


Non- 
Metallic 
Minerals 


Chemic- 
als and 
Allied 

Products 


Miscel- 
laneous 
Com- 
modities 


1930 

Julv 


$000 

84,551 

77,906 
87.900 
78,358 
76,325 
60,338 

50,414 
50,994 
75,348 
51,189 
73,457 
52,508 
48,379 
47,308 
45,379 
45,933 
46,011 
40,290 

34,115 
35,586 
57,437 
29,794 
44,361 
40,743 
35,711 
36,527 
34.504 
37,095 
37,769 
28,961 

24,441 


sooo 

17,530 
13,650 
16,587 
15,231 
15,146 
13,535 

9.181 
9,014 
15,739 
11,367 

17,839 
9,966 

10,411 
9,371 
8,870 
9,927 

12,074 

10,676 

6,094 
7,538 
14,489 
5,283 
9,416 
8,702 
7,462 
7,098 
6,814 
8,225 
8,639 
7.830 

5,148 


$000 

3,549 
3,784 
4,579 
3,867 
3,324 
2,451 

2.665 
2,540 
4,187 
2,240 
3,344 
2,362 
2,287 
2,206 
2,150 
1,796 
1,544 
1,309 

1,482 
1,640 
2,204 
1 096 
1.756 
1,611 
1,330 
1,251 
1,265 
1,425 
1,427 
977 

942 


$000 

11,491 
11,977 
12,947 
10,756 
12,738 
9,036 

8,025 
8,711 
11,825 
6,987 
8,717 
7,251 
7,152 
7,372 
6,530 
6,344 
5,985 
5,254 

6,285 
6,602 
9,401 
4.601 
6,074 
5.310 
4,552 
5,587 
4.935 
5,428 
5,450 
4,725 

4,739 


$000 

4,863 
3,796 
3,951 
4,198 
3,693 
3,059 

2,808 
2,815 
3,951 
2,798 
3,530 
3,146 
2,790 
2,743 
2,696 
2,862 
2,505 
2,279 

1,968 
2,032 
2,660 
1,553 
2,078 
1,922 
1,778 
1,745 
1,754 
1,907 
1,859 
1,566 

1,304 


$000 

18,627 
16,269 
15,415 
13,563 
12,839 
10.837 

10,051 
11,353 
17,282 
11,925 
14,807 
9,989 
8,108 
7,377 
6,888 
6,285 
6,479 
5,881 

5,085 
6,009 
9,983 
5,820 
7,169 
6,710 
5,130 
4,394 
4,233 
4,288 
5,262 
3,624 

3,655 


$000 

5,162 
5,494 
5,504 
5,452 
5,914 
4,394 

3.202 
3,363 
4,620 
3,018 
3,953 
3.157 
2,984 
2,958 
2,958 
3,055 
2,849 
2,335 

2,256 
2,091 
2,688 
1.688 
2,085 
1,733 
1,513 
1,402 
1,496 
1,655 
1,908 
1,129 

914 


$000 

14,654 
14,517 
19,244 
15,871 
13,304 
10,127 

8,246 
7,834 
9,691 
6,969 
12,152 
9.838 
8,382 
8,139 
8,614 
9,432 
9,626 
7,209 

6,656 
5,438 
9,691 
5.567 
9,476 
9,229 
9,367 
9,143 
8,501 
8,626 
8,138 
5.509 

4,504 


$000 

2,899 
2,525 
3,241 
3,151 
3,384 
2,549 

1,935 
2,094 
3,372 
2,375 
3,898 
2,530 
2,290 
2,666 
2,537 
2,422 
2,721 
2,497 

1,950 
1,874 
2.971 
1,998 
2,942 
2,556 
2,081 
2,217 
2,336 
2,770 
2,577 
1,588 

1,292 


$000 

5,772 
5,895 
6,433 
6,269 
5,374 
4,349 

4,300 
3,271 
4.681 




September 




November 


1931 




March 




3,512 
5,217 
4,270 
3,975 
4,477 
4,142 




June 

July 

August 


October 


3,809 
3,127 




2,851 


1932 
January 


2,338 
2,362 




3,351 


April 


2,188 
3,366 




2,969 


July 


2,499 




3,691 




3,169 




2,771 




2,509 


December 

1933 

January 


2,012 
1,943 





Exports of Merchandise from Canada 




Total 
Exports 

of 
Mdse. 


Domestic Produce 


Month 


Total 
Exports 
of Can- 
adian 
Produce 


Vege- 
table 
Pro- 
ducts 


Animal 
Pro- 
ducts 


Tex- 
tiles 


Wood 

and 

Paper 


Iron 
and 
its 
Pro- 
ducts 


Non- 
Ferrous 
Metals 


Non- 
Metallic 
Miner- 
als 


Chemi- 
cal and 
Allied 
Pro- 
ducts 


Miscel- 
laneous 
Com- 
modi- 
ties 


1930 

Julv 


$000 

77,906 
70,613 
82,190 
84,298 
74,592 
68,053 

45,634 
44,914 
56,296 
34,674 
60,845 
55,320 
50.671 
49,894 
49,909 
68,534 
58,430 
54,218 

39,063 
37,019 
41,019 
27.455 
41,402 
41,701 
43,032 
41,855 
42,665 
57,160 
46,621 
43,109 

32,000 


$000 

76,408 
69,290 
81.046 
82,781 
73,060 
66,820 

44,683 
43,873 
55, 048 
33.935 
59,833 
54,348 
49,675 
48,764 
48,901 
55,538 
57,487 
53,255 

38,367 
36,431 
39,749 
26 976 
40,594 
40,945 
42,321 
41,314 
42,187 
56,626 
45,945 
42,616 

31,562 


$000 

27,689 
25,729 
33.911 
37,358 
34.542 
24,647 

11,638 
13,541 
15,982 
7,625 
26,502 
21,394 
14,496 
14,611 
13,958 
19,337 
27,828 
22,945 

11,070 
12,363 
12,291 
8,722 
16,920 
15,042 
17,302 
15,664 
20,382 
30,638 
21,978 
21,676 

12,042 


$000 

7,749 
7.289 
9,084 
8,320 
7,765 
6,322 

6,211 
5,059 
5,783 
3,851 
3,778 
5,194 
7,008 
6,604 
7,842 
8,336 
5,820 
5,453 

5,693 
4,989 
4,231 
2,434 
3,412 
4,232 
6,212 
6,252 
4,645 
4.888 
3,773 
4,797 

5,191 


$000 

1,069 
751 
467 
501 
369 
343 

240 
233 
383 
258 
757 
670 
642 
590 
357 
419 
517 
328 

234 
304 
436 
218 
462 
781 
506 
384 
422 
471 
328 
269 

230 


$000 

22,228 
19,274 
21,159 
20,964 
17.584 
19,724 

14,281 
14.274 
19,120 
13,409 
16,424 
17,105 
15,365 
15,851 
15,192 
15,705 
14,813 
13,956 

12,919 
11,165 
13,838 

9,675 
11,210 
12,678 
10,333 
11,521 

9,392 
11,399 
10,685 

9,167 

8,234 


$000 

3,632 
3,895 
3,663 
3,372 
2,483 
3,322 

2,459 
1,786 
2.297 
1,608 
1,947 
1,674 
1,559 
1.253 
1,422 
1,297 
877 
907 

867 
879 
1,173 
958 
1,253 
1,203 
2,016 
1,611 
1,505 
2,239 
1,557 
1,065 

1,021 


$000 

9.413 

7,559 
8,110 
7,737 
5,882 
8,458 

6,996 
5,615 
7,215 
4,192 
6,251 
4.726 
6,922 
6,546 
7,298 
6.976 
4,250 
6,846 

5,446 
4,631 
4,980 
2,687 
4.004 
3,970 
3.459 
3,422 
3,286 
3,890 
4,770 
3,585 

2,634 


$000 

1,880 
2,057 
1,918 
1,840 
1,823 
1.804 

1,118 

1.212 
1.449 
855 
1,456 
1,281 
1,319 
1,292 
1.084 
1.360 
1,329 
1,220 

807 
629 
823 
464 
778 
940 
739 
785 
788 
1.064 
1,074 
768 

698 


$000 

974 
1,061 
1,071 
1,072 

1,096 
845 

664 
889 

1,400 
997 

1,175 
958 
859 
800 
673 
872 
805 
666 

736 
836 

1,067 
971 

1,472 

1,184 
711 
749 
816 
915 

1,078 
761 

1,014 


$000 
1,774 




1,674 




1,663 




1,616 




1,517 




1,355 


1931 
January 


1,076 


February 


1,265 


March 


1,418 


April 


1,140 


May 


1,543 




1,347 


July 


1,506 




1,217 




1,164 


October 

November 


1,236 

1,150 

934 


1932 
January 


586 


February 


635 




911 


April 


847 


May 


1,054 


June 


917 


July 


1,043 


August 


925 


September 


951 


October 


1,122 


November 


701 


December 


528 


1933 
January 


499 



1 

MONTHLY REVIEW OF BUSINESS STATISTICS 27 

Table 23. Canada's Domestic Exports in Thousands of Dollars, and Indexes of the Cost 

of Living 


Classification 


1932 


1933 


Jan. 


Feb. 


Mar. 


April 


May 


June 


July 


Aug. 


Sept. 


Oct. 


Nov. 


Dec. 


Jan. 


I Exports of Canadian Produce— 

Agricultural and Vegetable 
Products — 
Alcoholic beverages (chiefly 


860 
641 

6,175 
109 

5,517 

580 

50 

351 

1.172 

110 

96 

1,840 

2,407 

124 

232 

386 


1,475 
732 

6,623 
147 

5,881 

450 

181 

497 

1,184 

69 

85 

1,715 

1,836 

44 
237 

528 

15 
91 
18 
11 

7,192 

1,093 

201 

139 

230 

1,747 

167 
77 

165 
55 

200 
96 
44 

78 

1,772 
194 
421 
944 
400 

207 
129 
82 
76 

216 

189 
217 

'154 
141 
162 

84-5 
66-5 
93-8 
99-3 
76-4 
97-1 

7-34 

3-10 

6-77 

17-25 


816 
32g 

6,779 
149 

6,134 

614 

135 

414 

1,469 

137 
119 
1,457 
982 
80 
270 
646 

2 
128 
15 
21 

8,521 

1,474 
269 
266 
225 

2,249 

221 
35 

200 
84 

351 
86 
60 

127 

1,878 
260 
355 
831 
507 

279 

132 

93 

110 

144 
377 
261 

138 
399 
212 

83-9 
66-0 
93-6 
99-3 
74-5 
96-8 

7-27 

3-08 

6-77 

17-16 


616 

77 

5,534 

267 

4,537 

414 
45 
171 

895 

146 
52 
649 
713 
36 
163 
357 

9 

72 
12 

10 

6,938 
825 
118 
152 
105 

1,258 

178 
41 

170 
86 

262 
49 
73 

106 

856 
149 
195 
542 
290 

170 
68 
77 
65 

81 
364 
293 

143 
381 
175 

83-7 
65-4 
92-8 
99-3 
74-5 
97-0 

7-22 
3-07 
6-77 
17-09 


1,195 

120 

11,852 

775 

9,627 

528 

323 

182 

1,648 

298 
167 
1,174 
404 
35 
195 
694 

148 

82 
10 
4 

7,507 

1,175 

231 

206 

121 

1,328 

195 
69 

120 
83 

491 
55 
63 

227 

1,339 
255 
256 
725 
406 

290 
102 
167 
109 

144 
643 
241 

143 
409 
300 

81-8 
62-9 
91-0 
93-9 
74-5 
97-1 

6-90 
3-04 
6-47 
16-45 


444 

58 

11,159 

470 

9,655 

539 

74 

80 

1,963 

348 
473 
1,911 
352 
16 
165 
571 

438 

107 
7 
16 

7,668 

2,170 

478 

245 

123 

1,295 

315 
34 

174 
98 

330 

101 
47 

169 

1,831 
302 
181 
521 
376 

232 

75 
299 
221 

98 
426 
277 

132 
338 
272 

81-0 
62-1 
90-9 
93-9 
71-9 
97-1 

6-79 

3-02 

6-35 

16-20 


580 
111 

13,464 
781 

11,210 

555 

139 

119 

1,443 

411 
1,591 
1,823 

758 
18 

152 

742 

187 

94 
16 
17 

6,515 
773 
718 
166 
214 

1,340 

653 

736 
143 
68 
464 
69 
58 

89 

1,017 
385 

270 
550 
420 

197 

148 
93 
178 

58 
115 
191 

167 
308 
344 

80-8 
61-4 
90-7 
93-9 
71-9 
96-8 

6-78 

3-06 

6-34 

16-21 


384 

72 

12,212 

678 

10,642 

684 

110 

280 

1,094 

332 

1,659 
1,807 
879 
21 
194 
739 

27 

101 

10 

42 

7,546 
971 
580 
224 
113 

1,487 

627 
125 
132 
65 
403 
61 
39 

1,025 

478 
441 
276 
252 
427 

223 

135 

46 

229 

87 
219 
184 

149 
265 
300 

81-5 

63-5 
91-9 
93-9 
71-9 
96-8 

7-01 

3-04 
6-33 
16-42 


469 
571 

16,176 
392 

4,166 

590 

75 

293 

1,290 

90 

1,468 

1,270 

507 

28 

167 

456 

45 
98 
17 
43 

5,633 

628 

739 

249 

30 

1,373 

666 
136 
76 
50 
270 
41 
40 

158 

716 
447 
284 
377 
504 

277 
95 
154 
143 

170 
182 
179 

172 
179 
434 

81-0 
63-0 
91-7 
93-9 
70-7 
96-6 

6-98 
3-01 
6-32 
16-34 


1,572 
2,095 

22,636 
277 

21,471 

692 

98 

403 

1,690 

74 

1,589 

1,423 

424 

32 

244 

487 

' " * 122 

19 

67 

7,037 

980 

558 

334 

76 

1,791 

979 

536 

76 

114 

230 

61 

63 

107 

1,065 
449 
459 
600 
525 

373 

84 

172 

200 

255 
155 
204 

185 

386 
348 

80-4 
63-6 
90-7 
90-0 
70-7 
96-6 

70-7 
2-98 
6-30 
16-40 


1,581 
1,565 

15,024 
314 

13,959 

547 

66 

268 

1,799 

74 

1,185 

1,261 

101 

50 

228 

327 

1 
99 
11 
22 

6,858 

837 

363 

239 

93 

1,814 

634 
273 
72 
72 
197 
102 
44 

1,186 

1,532 

285 
244 
754 
327 

298 

162 

36 

360 

169 
224 
299 

133 
169 
263 

80-4 
63-9 
90-4 
90-0 
70-7 
96-6 

7-09 
2-93 
6-04 
16-10 


1,698 
1.389 

15,074 
91 

14,505 

478 

52 

247 

1,535 

41 

432 

1,550 

1,592 

57 

78 

605 

78 
16 
35 

5,952 

1,592 

171 

137 

113 

1,365 

405 
71 

77 
61 
216 
86 
36 

537 

9,668 
444 
256 
473 
261 

353 
130 
30 
147 

210 
196 
150 

91 
109 
189 

80-4 
64-0 
89-6 
90-0 
70-7 
96-6 

7-04 
2-94 
5-99 
16-01 


397 




925 


Grains (Total) 


7,109 




62 


Wheat 


6,912 

419 
69 


Rubber (chiefly tires and 
footwear) 




236 


Wheat flour 

Animals and Animal Pro- 
ducts — 
Cattle 


1,162 
69 




47 


Fish 


1,391 


Furs, (chiefly raw) 


2,210 
81 


Leather, unmanufactured 


274 
632 


Fibres, Textiles and Pro- 
ducts — 




Cotton 


63 
17 
34 

8,957 
987 
403 
153 
118 

1,830 

206 
42 

120 
50 

184 
77 

109 

95 

2,779 
314 
221 
713 
518 

279 
173 
43 
180 

241 

130 
216 

182 
148 
134 

85-4 
69-6 
93-9 
99-3 
76-4 
97-1 

7-68 

3 11 

6-77 

17-59 


68 




15 




18 


Paper — 


5,423 
583 




90 




156 




82 




1,457 


Automobiles '. 


238 

130 




74 


Hardware and cutlery. 


71 
216 


Pigs and ingots 


102 




46 


Non-Ferrous Metal Pro- 
ducts — 


69 


Copper, (chiefly ore and 


779 


Gold, raw 


192 




197 


Nickel 


796 


Silver 


159 


Non-Metallic Nineral Pro- 
ducts — 

Asbestos, (chiefly raw) 

Coal 


272 
181 


Petroleum and products 


52 

87 


Chemicals and Allied Pro- 
ducts — 


236 




292 




228 


Miscellaneous Commodities— 


100 




129 


Settlers' effects 


152 


Indexes of Retail Prices, Bents 

Total, 1926 = 100 


79-7 


Food 


62-8 


Fuel 


89-3 


Rent 


90-0 


Clothing 


69-2 


Sundries 

Cost per Week of a Family 
Budget- 
All foods $ 

Fueland light $ 

Rent $ 

Totals $ 


96-4 

6-94 
2-93 
5-98 
15-89 



28 MONTHLY REVIEW OF BUSINESS STATISTICS 

Table 24. Summary of Canada's Imports, in Thousands of Dollars 



Classification 


1932 


1933 


Jan. 


Feb. 


Mar. 


April 


May 


June 


July 


Aug. 


Sept 


Oct. 


Nov. 


Dec. 


Jan. 


Imports of Principal Commodi- 
ties— 

Agricultural and Vegetable 
Products— 


1,406 
108 
324 
862 
133 
206 
378 
129 
318 
523 
418 

132 
511 
198 
181 
122 

339 
542 
183 
1,015 
589 

54 
207 
768 
213 

68 
130 
279 
261 
412 
406 

848 
556 

264 
193 
49 
52 

181 

979 

115 

477 

129 

147 

1,315 

21 

490 

332 

77 

51 

92 

60 

380 

178 
76 
83 

981 
79 
63 

383 
2,383 
157 
386 
2,336 
282 
217 

207 

301 

117 

55 

47 
194 


1,155 
141 
391 

1,094 
120 
231 
392 
104 
657 

1,468 
418 

110 

547 
196 
208 
254 

35« 
569 
218 
1.030 
576 
132 
155 
679 
231 
94 
125 
302 
213 
554 
612 

796 
621 

300 

209 
46 

48 

113 

1,435 

124 

591 

148 

183 

1,512 

26 

488 

303 

79 

71 

72 

79 

330 
216 
63 
84 
807 
87 
93 

418 
1,845 
20 e 
375 
1.3F6 
485 
155 

262 

2*3 

16 

60 

51 

173 


3,505 
159 
554 

1,741 
177 
360 
538 
323 

2,143 

1,380 
866 

156 
589 
297 
233 
313 

453 

833 
335 
1,432 
757 
180 
129 
852 
299 
151 
428 
662 
274 
613 
592 

1,019 
838 

360 

274 

53 

96 

255 

2,175 

238 

981 

495 

226 

2,462 

39 

976 

499 

140 

89 

126 

154 

423 
287 
106 
108 
905 
141 
137 

583 
3,852 
525 
518 
2,145 
859 
222 

390 
396 

94 
101 

79 
291 


521 
53 
195 
1,071 
147 
163 
300 
173 
613 
199 
687 

70 
253 
109 
167 
158 

224 
493 
166 
856 
392 
57 
113 
405 
196 
75 
83 
140 
163 
304 
297 

555 
473 

204 
157 
24 
134 

147 
971 
131 

622 
92 

108 

1.758 

17 

690 

292 
96 
60 
77 
89 

283 

179 
63 
75 

561 
89 
80 

344 
2,035 
170 
402 
1,142 
554 
141 

217 

246 
144 
49 
58 
134 


831 

191 
463 

1,908 

97 

261 

315 

301 

2,017 
143 

1,057 

83 
323 
248 
198 
292 

211 
918 
222 
1,032 
573 

93 
175 
381 
219 

67 
203 
194 
221 
340 
392 

744 
707 

300 

210 

31 

57 

163 

1,112 

126 

697 

202 

195 

1,689 

61 

1,275 

403 

144 

91 

117 

69 

236 
236 
102 
106 
831 
105 
63 

578 
2,663 
157 
492 
3,436 
876 
254 

295 
311 
344 

72 
58 
246 


1,328 

95 

316 

2,216 
104 
210 
402 
121 

1,233 
170 
955 

90 
369 

83 
150 
288 

240 
234 
190 
1,108 
587 

64 
102 
314 
244 

54 
131 
146 
144 
340 
472 

786 
576 

309 

173 

19 

38 

74 

1,270 

156 

646 

152 

175 

1,544 

40 

1,216 

346 

134 

80 

99 

92 

176 
187 
114 
70 
626 
96 
83 

566 
2,249 

163 

488 
3,519 
1,022 

198 

2*2 
266 
132 
86 
71 
249 


890 

95 

315 

1,903 

103 

133 

288 

18 

1,816 
228 
330 

130 
223 

68 
177 

59 

193 
287 
178 
781 
451 

54 
320 
252 
133 

25 

70 
154 
194 

53 
600 

861 

481 

247 
113 
25 
25 

68 
778 
108 
468 
176 
159 
1,127 

31 
923 
272 
132 

67 
104 

76 

187 
185 
72 
49 
529 
89 
60 

481 
2,612 
213 
322 
3,557 
901 
185 

234 

335 

7 

49 

53 

178 


1,122 

60 

206 

1,746 

77 

108 

219 

19 

2,042 

261 

95 

98 
211 

95 
220 
109 

198 
472 
201 
812 
510 
122 
140 
460 
193 
90 
96 
174 
171 
284 
433 

828 
496 

247 
101 
26 

47 

63 

553 

102 

369 

286 

125 

949 

14 

784 

227 

107 

62 

58 

38 

144 
170 
70 
35 
493 
118 
31 

479 
2.744 
216 
273 
3,304 
953 
148 

157 
331 
240 
54 
166 
179 


1,053 

113 

175 

1,505 

97 

111 

435 

21 

1,562 

287 

81 

126 
246 
96 
197 
147 

199 
441 
232 
747 
425 
101 
159 
584 
225 
98 
83 
230 
143 
228 
441 

874 
517 

213 
93 
23 
10 

60 

632 

103 

306 

220 

129 

909 

11 

740 

247 

96 

45 

85 

43 

284 
140 

73 
49 

49'i 
68 
78 

393 
2,600 

176 

303 
2,674 
1,064 

191 

155 
292 
285 
51 
190 
254 


1,358 
135 
276 

1,651 

107 

274 

231 

28 

1,872 

502 

91 

174 
201 
233 
190 
117 

200 
656 
336 
758 
589 

50 
227 
548 
211 

92 
116 
255 
222 
154 
387 

907 
567 

215 
140 
39 
33 

38 

469 

157 

248 

96 

132 

1,086 

8 

784 

311 

90 

51 

82 

42 

287 
151 
93 
39 
572 
92 
76 

404 
3,134 
316 
312 
2,657 
738 
137 

244 
337 
229 
61 
117 
234 


1,537 
136 
352 

1,338 

110 

521 

266 

43 

1,479 
377 
200 

147 
180 
240 
156 
91 

165 

1,181 

140 

728 

603 

25 

221 

471 

97 

76 

157 

346 

221 

138 

347 

871 
536 

232 
147 
17 
43 

33 

557 

150 

342 

71 

197 

1,031 

23 

1,603 

294 

102 

48 

69 

74 

552 
157 
98 
47 
508 
129 
77 

445 
2,903 
214 
467 
2,122 
845 
245 

215 
369 
340 
64 
50 
278 


2,305 
147 
389 

1,567 
61 
183 
185 
109 
897 
339 
211 

116 
176 
118 
135 

77 

168 

1,122 

149 

552 

491 

13 

242 

327 

70 

57 

191 

296 

185 

138 

282 

744 
421 

201 
116 
11 

73 

14 

658 

80 

268 

135 

141 

1.086 

6 

417 

144 

82 

49 

47 

29 

123 
119 
98 
33 
399 
72 
40 

331 
2.318 
252 
216 
1.190 
457 
112 

171 
276 
161 
36 
25 
16C 


894 




85 




454 


Fruits 


786 


Gums and resins 


109 


Nuts (edible) 


160 




201 




95 


Sugar, chiefly for refining 

Tea 


384 

366 




261 


Animal Products — 
Fish 


71 




273 


Hides 


123 


Leather, unmanufactured 


102 
49 


Textile Products— 


182 




706 




186 


other 


725 


Flax, hemp and jute 


422 




32 


Manila and sisal grass 


162 


Silk— Raw 


415 




89 




60 




138 




374 




199 




188 




378 


Wood and Paper— 
Paper 


618 

401 


Wood— Furniture and other 
manufactured wood 


173 
64 


Veneers 


9 


Other unmanufactured wood. 
Iron and Steel— 


39 
104 




868 




97 
328 




100 




134 




9 S3 




21 




232 


Other rolling mill products 

Stamped and coated products... 
Tools 


167 
59 
42 


Tubes and pipes 


37 


Wire 


29 


Non-Ferrous Metals — 


98 


Brass 


94 




42 




22 




350 




54 


Tin 


49 


Non-Metallic Products — 


291 


Coal 


1,836 


Coke 


315 




262 




1,045 




164 


Stone and products . . 


102 




175 


Dyeing and tanning materials... 


250 
14 




25 


Sono 

Soda and compounds 


16 
194 



MONTHLY REVIEW OF BUSINESS STATISTICS 
Table 25. Banking and Currency, in Million Dollars Unless Otherwise Stated 



29 



Classification 



1931 
Dec. 



1932 



Jan. Feb. I Mar. I Apr. I May I June I July I Aug. I Sept. I Oct. I Nov. Dec 



Banking— 

Readily Available Assets— 

8pecie 

Dominion notes 

In Central gold reserves. . . 
In United Kingdom banks. 

In foreign banks 

Foreign currency 

Government securities. . . . 

Call loans abroad 

Total quick assets... 
Loans and Securities except 
Canadian Governments- 

Public securities 

Railway securities 

Canadian call loans 

Current loans 

Current loans abroad 

Provincial loans 

Municipal loans 

Total loans, etc 

Other Assets— 

Non-current loans 

Real estate 

Mortgages 

Premises 

Letters of credit 

Loans to companies 

Other assets 

Note circulation deposits. . . 
Inter-bank balances, notes of 

other banks 

Cheques of other banks... 
Balances due by other banks 

Grand total assets 

Liabilities to the Public — 

Note circulation 

Dominion Government 

Provincial Government 

Government advances 

Deposits by public — 

Ravings deposits 

Demand deposits 

Total deposits 

Foreign deposits 

Due banks abroad, etc. — 

United Kingdom 

Foreign 

Bills payable 

Letters of credit 

Other liabilities 

Total public liabilities. .. 

Due between banks 

Liabilities to Shareholders — 

Dividends $000 

Reserve 

Capital 

Grand total liabilities.. 
8urplus of notice deposits over 

current loans 

Pereentaee of current loans to 

notice deposits., p.c 

Currency- 
Net issues of Dominion notes 

per,— Chapter 4. 1915 

"R.S. 1927, chap. 70 

R.S. 1927. chap. 41 

Total 

Gold held aeainst notes 

Gold included in C.G.R 

All notes in hands of public 2 



Index Numbers— 

(With $en°onal adjustment 
1926 = 100) 

Demand deposits 

Notice deposits 

Current loans 

Investment holdings 

Call loans, Canada 

Call loans elsewhere 

Total issue Dom. notes 

Gold held by Finance Dept 

against notes 

Notes in Vmnrls of public 











End of Month 












65-82 


64-91 


62-59 


58-70 


55-91 


55-49 


54-97 


54-85 


55-69 


55-48 


55-03 


76-13 


128-S6 


131-11 


123-81 


116-93 


111-86 


115-42 


127-39 


123-10 


115-28 


112 40 


122-51 


163-50 


25-73 


21-58 


20- 08 


23 63 


23-03 


22-58 


22-88 


24-78 


21-83 


23-08 


21-38 


18-88 


4-97 


5-63 


7-89 


10-40 


10-95 


8-75 


7-69 


8-82 


8-81 


13-94 


13-51 


8-44 


104-71 


92-30 


71-47 


85-47 


97-72 


99-44 


95-42 


9f>-75 


98-14 


87-13 


100-60 


146-65 


14-74 


13-64 


13-21 


14-38 


15-33 


15-25 


15-57 


16-48 


16-56 


16-90 


18-26 


18-75 


477-91 


467-56 


460-03 


466-40 


469-97 


465 48 


462-31 


466-93 


494-57 


494-20 


515-54 


551-16 


83-12 


65-92 


98-95 


83 13 


73-15 


65-29 


73-67 


75-65 


96-39 


95-19 


87-53 


99-37 


906 


863 


85S 


859 


858 


848 


860 


867 


907 


898 


934 


1,083 


154-11 


144-87 


142-74 


144-77 


138-52 


140-81 


152-04 


153-44 


155-15 


152-17 


159-63 


159-60 


62-01 


61-29 


60-99 


60-39 


57-76 


5713 


54-98 


53-69 


53-39 


52-87 


51-76 


48-71 


134-73 


131-17 


129-77 


130-71 


122-36 


113-83 


109-87 


111-93 


114-07 


114-95 


117-21 


107-61 


1,082 


1,071 


1,063 


1,071 


1,070 


1,057 


1,037 


1,028 


1,004 


1,003 


1,018 


999 


188-36 


189-73 


190-65 


188-76 


184-58 


18708 


174-90 


164-34 


159-04 


158-98 


15904 


153-56 


45-56 


43-44 


56-24 


43-99 


39-43 


36-67 


34-34 


20-19 


19-41 


22-19 


34-25 


34-20 


125-69 


132-86 


139-29 


149-15 


154-01 


153-52 


139-22 


130-65 


123-67 


116-62 


109-21 


107-04 


1,793 


1,774 


1,783 


1,788 


1,766 


1,746 


1,703 


1,663 


1,629 


1,621 


1,649 


1,610 


10-33 


10-69 


10-86 


10-96 


11-21 


11-94 


12-51 


12-91 


13-15 


13-46 


13-46 


13-36 


6-57 


6-5« 


6-65 


6-78 


6-86 


6-96 


7-19 


7-26 


7-37 


7-51 


7-61 


7-45 


6-25 


6-29 


6-26 


6-27 


6-27 


6-19 


6-01 


6-02 


6-01 


. 6-28 


6-55 


6-39 


79-79 


79-91 


79-99 


79-83 


79-99 


79-95 


79-90 


79-95 


80-06 


79-92 


79-59 


78-78 


55-47 


51-35 


49-73 


5116 


51-94 


48-90 


48-49 


48-32 


48-44 


48-27 


47-28 


47-54 


14-31 


12-75 


12-47 


13-03 


13-00 


12-85 


13-01 


12-92 


12-89 


13-15 


13-04 


13-36 


1-58 


1-80 


1-66 


1-49 


1-80 


1-64 


1-42 


1-32 


1-40 


1-48 


1-56 


1-54 


6-82 


6-82 


6-82 


6-83 


6-83 


6-83 


6-95 


6-59 


6-59 


6-59 


6-60 


6-60 


11.94 


11-07 


12-71 


11-08 


11-91 


11-87 


10-51 


11-90 


10-42 


9-52 


13-14 


8-71 


102-12 


73-19 


81-03 


82-56 


83-05 


83-11 


96-87 


69-44 


76-16 


90-12 


99-27 


80-28 


4-08 


3-73 


3-07 


3-54 


3-37 


3-44 


2-78 


3-14 


3-36 


3-57 


3-87 


3-35 


2,998 


2,901 


2,912 


2,926 


2,900 


2,868 


2,848 


2,790 


2,802 


2,799 


2,875 


2,960 


145-ni 


133-67 


134-29 


132-57 


137-35 


131-07 


136-30 


134-57 


127-77 


132-24 


133-03 


125-05 


111-10 


94-65 


79-76 


86-11 


65-76 


50-38 


36-42 


15-54 


19-04 


15-90 


44-76 


105-75 


19-79 


20-58 


20-06 


20-97 


24-05 


19-31 


20-67 


33-06 


32-31 


31-87 


40-70 


31-33 


46-50 


43-00 


35-50 


32-00 


27-50 


29-60 


40-50 


38-50 


29-00 


23-00 


27-50 


65-14 


1,360 


1,36« 


1,390 


1,389 


1,393 


1,387 


1,373 


1,363 


1,367 


1,359 


1,371 


1,379 


566-58 


506-94 


496-49 


500-48 


494-64 


497-99 


488-94 


462-09 


475-36 


480-66 


493-28 


472-17 


1,937 


1,875 


1.886 


1.889 


1,888 


1,885 


1,862 


1,825 


1,842 


1,840 


1,864 


1,851 


310-09 


296-18 


305-82 


308-12 


304-81 


308-94 


308-22 


299-38 


306-55 


307-14 


324-51 


349-12 


4-85 


3-6« 


4-79 


5-82 


5-11 


4-94 


5-73 


5-67 


4-50 


4-85 


4-54 


4-51 


42-32 


41-86 


52-02 


56-60 


54-36 


51-35 


51-36 


51-78 


49-60 


48-91 


46-52 


51-05 


3-21 


311 


2-57 


1-85 


1-61 


1-25 


1-19 


1-71 


1-47 


1-55 


1-22 


•80 


55-47 


51-35 


49-73 


51-16 


51-94 


48-90 


48-49 


48-32 


48-44 


48-27 


47-28 


47-54 


2-98 


2-79 


2-77 


2-91 


2-43 


2-22 


2-18 


2-22 


2-14 


2-17 


2-13 


2-45 


2.664 


2,566 


2,574 


2,587 


2,562 


2,533 


2,513 


2,456 


2,463 


2,457 


2,536 


2,634 


11-38 


9-95 


9-84 


1013 


9-48 


10-86 


11-04 


8-09 


10-85 


14-21 


11-29 


10-27 


783 


1,344 


2.767 


820 


1,370 


3,532 


817 


1,194 


3,008 


720 


1,157 


2,988 


162-00 


162-00 


162-00 


162-00 


162-00 


162-00 


162-00 


162-00 


162-00 


162-00 


162-00 


162-00 


144-50 


144-50 


144-50 


144-50 


144-50 


144-50 


144-50 


144-50 


144-50 


144-50 


144-50 


144-50 


2,982 


2,884 


2,893 


2,905 


2,880 


2,854 


2,832 


2,772 


2,783 


2,778 


2,855 


2,953 


+278 


+298 


+327 


+312 


+323 


+330 


+336 


+335 


+ 363 


+ 356 


+353 


+380 


79-6 


78-2 


76-5 


77-4 


76-8 


76-2 


75-6 


75-5 


73-5 


73-8 


74-3 


72-5 


26-0 


26-0 


26 


26-0 


26-0 


26-0 


26-0 


26-0 


26-0 


26-0 


26-0 


26-0 


49-0 


45-0 


36-5 


32-0 


27-5 


29-6 


40-5 


38-5 


29-0 


23-0 


27-5 


65-1 


99-4 


99-4 


99-4 


99-4 


99-4 


99-3 


101-8 


101-7 


99-2 


101-1 


107-8 


107-7 


174-4 


170-4 


161-9 


157-4 


152-9 


154-9 


168-3 


166-2 


154-2 


153-1 


161-3 


198-9 


64-6 


66-8 


64-6 


63-8 


63-9 


64-3 


64-8 


65-4 


66-2 


67-5 


71-2 


73-0 


10-7 


10-7 


10-7 


10-7 


10-7 


111 


111 


111 


111 


111 


11-1 


11-1 


160-6 


151-0 


150-3 


149-0 


154-1 


147-2 


154-9 


152-1 


145-5 


152-5 


14S-4 


139-5 


99-3 


91-5 


91-5 


91-3 


89-7 


91-2 


88-2 


85-7 


89-1 


87-4 


86-4 


81-6 


101-8 


102-0 


103-5 


103-1 


103-5 


103-2 


102-5 


101-6 


101-8 


101-7 


102-7 


102-8 


116-7 


116-6 


115-8 


114-9 


112-4 


111-7 


110-4 


110-3 


108-2 


107-2 


107-1 


106-4 


131-7 


127-2 


124-6 


126-5 


124-8 


123-7 


123-9 


125-5 


131-7 


131-1 


135-4 


145-0 


93-8 


93-3 


92-5 


93-4 


88-4 


82-8 


79-0 


82-2 


83-1 


82-9 


79-3 


76-3 


32-6 


26-3 


38-4 


33-8 


30-0 


26-1 


29-0 


30-8 


38-6 


39-3 


26-5 


37-6 


81-7 


88-9 


86-0 


85-2 


82-5 


86-1 


92-2 


91-7 


85-3 


83-5 


84-0 


91-1 


56-2 


62-6 


60-5 


60-4 


59-8 


59-7 


60-1 


60-4 


61-2 


61-6 


63-5 


63-6 


88-1 


86-3 


84-4 


82-2 


86-8 


83-4 


86-5 


87-2 


82-5 


83-7 


77-8 


73-8 



53-26 
153-18 

19-88 

7-79 

104-90 

17-94 
562-36 

91-49 

1,011 



166-96 
!-93 
103-20 
964 
151-66 
28-27 
111-57 
1,775 

13-31 

7-48 

6-39 

78-70 

42-63 

13-17 

1-49 

6-60 

12-15 

80-41 

4-32 

2,852 

127-07 
53-11 
18-93 
56-99 

1,378 
166-21 

1,844 
328-73 

7-43 

41-37 

•63 

42-63 

2-61 
2,523 
12-32 

706 
162-00 
144-50 
2,813 

+ 413 

70-0 



26-0 
57-5 
107-7 
191-2 
70-8 
11-1 
144-1 



81-6 
103-1 
104-0 
147-8 
71-8 
35-9 



61-6 
79-0 



1 The grand total includes note issues totalling $26j00U,00() under authority of Chap. 4 of the Statutes of 1915. 
1 Includes smaller Dominion Notes in hands of public together with Bank Notes in circulation, except those in the 
hands of banks other than the bank of issue. 



30 



MONTHLY REVIEW OF BUSINESS STATISTICS 



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MONTHLY REVIEW OF BUSINESS STATISTICS 31 

Table 26. Index Numbers of Security Prices, Foreign Exchange, and other Financial Factors. 



Classification 


1932 


1933 


Jan. 


Feb. 


Mar. 


Apr. 


May 


June 


July 


Aug. 


Sept. 


Oct. 


Nov. 


Dec. 


Jan. 


Security Prices— 

Common Stock Prices — 
Total (130) 


64-8 
73-7 
77-2 
10-5 
66-5 

107-8 
44-9 
94-7 
42-5 
86-9 
59-1 
40-9 
88-3 
76-8 
54-3 
67-1 
42-9 
90-3 

402-8 

59-7 
60-1 
62-5 
26-5 

60-8 
119-8 

5-74 

125, 

989 

45-94 

1-191 
1-153 
1-173 
1-156 

4-130 
3-970 
4-028 
3-990 


63-5 
71-1 
76-5 
9-9 
64-9 

106-3 
39-6 
89-6 
40-6 
81-7 
59-1 
43-3 
82-0 
75-3 
54-5 
65-2 
44-8 
86-1 

400-8 

57-3 
57-5 
61-2 
22-2 

60-4 
115-9 

5-55 

136, 

387 

21-27 

25-57 

1-165 
1-129 
1-145 
1-131 

4-000 
3-920 
3-960 
3-945 


64-1 

71-5 
79-2 
10-1 
65-5 

106-8 
38-3 
87-8 
40-3 
82-4 
59-8 
46-2 
81-1 
73-6 
55-8 
67-0 
45-7 
86-0 

413-6 

57-8 
57-6 
63-4 
21-4 

59-6 
110-6 

5-30 

180, 

070 

35-72 

22-76 

1-131 
1-106 
1-118 
1-109 

4-230 
3-915 
4-064 
4-230 


54-0 
58-2 
62-5 
9-2 
63-7 
87-7 
32-5 
83-2 
36-1 
62-2 
48-9 
34-4 
68-8 
63-7 
47-4 
59-1 
37-1 
85-8 
304-2 

52-4 
52-6 
56-5 
18-3 

55-8 
111-8 

5-33 

187, 

313 

12-07 

18-92 

1-128 
1-105 
1-112 
1-120 

4-215 
4-070 
4-173 
4-100 


45-8 
51-4 
44-9 
8-6 
63-1 
90-1 
29-1 
76-5 
26-3 
47-1 
36-9 
26-0 
63-8 
45-0 
49-4 
66-3 
34-9 
65-7 
261-2 

48-4 
50-2 
47-9 
15-5 

50-2 
113-2 

5-42 
204. 
522 
25-68 
15-14 

1-154 
1-116 
1-131 
1-140 

4-245 
4-095 
4-157 
4-203 


43-2 
48-8 
40-5 
8-4 
62-6 
84-8 
28-3 
73-0 
30-2 
43-3 
34-9 
24-7 
59-6 
42-7 
46-5 
59-6 
35-1 
60-5 
251-0 

48-3 
49-9 
47-8 
16-8 

46-8 
114-4 

5-48 

176. 

041 

20-82 

13-87 

1-163 
1-140 
1-153 
1-146 

4-280 
4-120 
4-205 
4-120 


49-6 
56-6 
51-1 
7-9 
38-3 
97-0 
28-9 
81-2 
35-6 
55-2 
41-8 
31-5 
59-9 
51-6 
49-9 
65-6 
36-4 
67-1 
306-6 

55-6 
57-2 
55-6 
21-0 

47-5 
110-6 

5-30 

283, 

953 

27-32 

13-02 

1-161 
1-135 
1-148 
1-148 

4-123 
4-028 
4-076 
4-028 


59-0 

69-9 

63-5 

8-8 

47-4 

110-0 
38-5 
89-7 
44-1 
78-2 
51-9 
42-7 
71-6 
60-4 
52-7 
72-8 
35-7 
73-9 

408-0 

59-7 
58-1 
69-7 
26-3 

49-2 
103-3 

4-95 
544, 
528 
9-42 
13-77 

1-152 
1-119 
1-142 
1-119 

4-045 
3-885 
3-975 
3-885 


63-0 
73-8 
69-1 
4-4 
53-0 

113-0 
42-3 
90-8 
44-1 
89-2 
56-9 
47-6 
76-3 
65-9 
56-5 
77-6 
38-7 
76-1 

470-6 

60-9 

56-4 
81-0 
28-4 

48-3 
101-9 

4-88 
506, 
926 
73-19 
14-12 

1-118 
1-101 
1-108 
1-105 

3-880 
3-805 
3-847 
3-820 


54-8 

63-1 

55-9 

3-5 

49-8 
97-4 
38-0 
86-5 
40-7 
73-9 
49-1 
39-0 
73-4 
57-7 
47-4 
64-3 
33-1 
74-4 
393-6 

57-5 

55-0 
71-0 
24-4 

46-7 
98-1 

4-70 
206, 

902 
101-64 
13-99 

1110 

1-080 
1-096 
1-106 

3-815 
3-615 
3-723 
3-635 


53-4 

62-5 
51-3 
31 
48-3 
95-9 
38-7 
85-9 
43-3 
74-2 
46-6 
38-2 
70-8 
531 
48-3 
67-9 
31-8 
69-6 
377-9 

60-9 
58-1 
76-5 
23-6 

45-1 
102-3 

4-90 
193, 
093 
1-09 
13-82 

1-191 
1-104 
1-148 
1-179 

3-810 
3-648 
3-760 
3-770 


51-3 
58-4 
45-5 
2-5 
43-3 
90-8 
37-6 
83-0 
37-1 
70-1 
45-1 
37-4 
68-3 
50-8 
48-9 
69-1 
32-0 
67-5 
359-5 

63-1 
62-7 
70-9 
21-9 

43-4 
102-7 

4-92 

149, 

733 

•14 

13-80 

1-183 
1-130 
1-154 
1-130 

3-845 
3-750 
3-787 
3-760 


51-6 




59-6 


Iron and Steel (19) 


49-5 




33 


Milling (5) 


41-1 


Oils (4) 


93-6 


Textiles and Clothing (9) 

Food and Allied products (21) 


36-8 
82-9 
34-0 




71-2 


Utilities total (18) 


44-6 




35-6 


Telephone and telegraph (2) . . 

Power and traction (14) 

Companies abroad total (8) . . . 


70-5 
51-2 
48-9 
69-7 


Utility (7) 


31-4 


Banks (8) 


67-5 




366-2 


Mining Stock Prices— 
Total (20) 


67-1 


Gold (11) 


66-8 




74-7 


Silver and miscellanoues (5) . . 
Financial Factors- 


26-5 
43-5 




99-2 


Yield on Ontario Government 

bonds p.c 

Shares traded. Montreal 

New Issues of Bonds $000,000. 

Brokers' loans* $000, 000 

Foreign Exchange — 
New York Funds in Montreal 
High 


4-75 
201, 

133 
19-26 
13-61 

1-185 




1-124 




1-143 




1-185 


London Sterling in Montreal- 
High 


4-025 




3-760 




3-847 




4-025 







JFirst Thursday of following month. 

Table 27 — Tonnage of Vessels Entered and Cleared from Six Canadian Ports. 



Month 


Saint John 


Halifax 


Quebec 


Montreal 


Toronto 


Vancouver 


Entered 


Cleared 


Entered 


Cleared 


Entered 


Cleared 


Entered 


Cleared 


Entered 


Cleared 


Entered 


Cleared 


1931 


225,629 
204,354 
232,910 
156,726 
117,953 
134,577 
157,804 
159,173 
143,789 
123,283 
111,908 
245,265 

212.902 
217,548 
225,255 
154,213 
134,036 
117,838 
167,357 
163,457 
133,519 
134,442 
122,838 
299,479 

274,181 


238,529 
197,957 
220,986 
190,913 
112,438 
133,917 
153,857 
152,128 
149,604 
115,918 
97,835 
239,022 

215,925 
210,751 
216,788 
179,015 
116,228 
127,282 
151,103 
168,431 
138,231 
129,967 
118.719 
267,733 

248,029 


378,590 
408,139 
425,210 
336,792 
292,850 
265,680 
382,400 
491,816 
383,252 
313,163 
315,144 
509,661 

817,890 
701,478 
745,359 
556,999 
480,041 
401,282 
611,795 
650.575 
580,821 
471,867 
411,317 
799,358 

759,453 


361,876 
381,844 
448,568 
356,915 
275,776 
267,278 
368,024 
509,859 
382,838 
314,250 
293,338 
518,954 

799,072 
697,095 
728,678 
546,060 
477,700 
389,421 
603,205 
652,078 
573,970 
463,161 
398,628 
795,357 

763,140 














964,215 

891,542 

912,598 

999,253 

1,073,385 

1,174,789 

1,249,577 

1,138,081 

1,035,018 

925,023 

897,484 

876,423 

942,575 
800,842 
898,393 
904,904 
938,589 
938,402 
1,003,648 
999,488 
936,323 
951,217 
862,305 
905,946 

839,737 


980,374 


Feb 














884,226 


Mar 


1,468 
189,333 
659,269 
719,307 
654,543 
829,425 
607,711 
734,401 
584,215 
23,220 












952,401 


April 

May 

June 

July 


142,533 
542,131 
641,197 
549,199 
717,468 
569,752 
641,713 
510,256 
6,447 


328,102 

1,302,740 

1,111,508 

1,122,190 

1,103,291 

1,004,220 

944,352 

884,283 

39,488 


230,080 

1,238,649 

1,128,082 

1,100,798 

1,088,734 

1,041,495 

934,061 

959.323 

39,154 


56,651 
193,046 
434,706 
444,811 
460,602 
399,690 
228,223 
280,352 

55,468 


83,701 
199,626 
434,223 
476,416 
459,728 
399,687 
221,966 
262,808 

21,944 


979,146 
1,077,685 
1,324,129 
1,249,972 
1,127,397 


Sept 

Oct 


1,004,453 
925,653 


Nov 

Dec 

1932 

Jan 


884,263 
914,688 

933,039 


Feb 














849,787 


Mar 


341 
140,727 
327,682 
414,030 
422,444 
453,409 
410,428 
312,412 
311,553 
67,500 


341 
133,203 
334,859 
378,322 
458,433 
468,762 
387,713 
314,965 
316,413 
74.495 










904,000 


April 

May 

June 

July 

Aug 

Sept 

Oct.... 


330,035 
1,089,169 
1,158,746 
1.107,539 
1,190,652 
1,093,061 
1,108,660 

891,773 
43,699 


237,399 
1,018,084 
1,151,8(^5 
1,176,390 
1,145,509 
1,141,267 
1.052,666 

975,932 
93.924 


73,238 
251,098 
397,299 
506,002 
492,502 
384,804 
236,730 
284,356 

52,102 


122,927 
244,621 
401,962 
517,252 
490,108 
382,034 
240, 74^ 
266,217 
17,608 


879,000 
930,000 
950,000 

1,002,000 
999,000 
916.327 

1,045,718 


Nov . 

Dec 

1933 

Jan 


856,233 

905,728 

856,514 



32 



MONTHLY REVIEW OF BUSINESS STATISTICS 



Table 28 — Indexes of Five Canadian Factors Expressed in multiples of the Standard Deviation 

from the Long-Term Trend determined by the method of least squares, 

from the period of January 1919 to June 1932. 



Jan. 



Feb. 



Mar. 



April 



May- 



June 



July 



Aug. 



Sept. 



Oct. 



Nov. 



Common Stock Prices— 

1919 

1920 

1921 

1922 

1923 

1924 

1925 

1926 

1927 

1928 

1929 

1930 

1931 

1932 

Physical Volume of Busi 
ness— 

1919 

1920 

1921 

1922 

1923 

1924 

1925 

1926 

1927 

1928 

1929 

1930 

1931 

1932 

Bond Yields— 

1919 

1920 

1921 

1922 

1923 

1924 

1925 

1926 

1927 

1928 

1929 

1930 

1931 

1932 

Bank Debits— 

1919 

1920 

1921 

1922 

1923 

1924 

1925 

1926 

1927 

1928 

1929 

1930 

1931 

1932 

Notice Deposits— 

1919 

1920 

1921 

1922 : 

1923 

1924 

1925 

1926 

1927 

1928 

1929 

1930 

1931 

1932 



+ -22 
+ -25 

- -14 

- -50 

- -37 

- -46 

- -54 

- -18 
+ -08 
+ 1-17 
+2-69 
+ -95 

- -70 
-2-16 



+ -23 
+ -53 

- -59 

- -75 
+ -59 

- -06 

- -10 
+ -48 
+ -65 
+ -71 
+ 1-68 
+1-06 

- -80 
-2-24 



+ -16 
+ -30 
+ 1-28 
+ -43 
+ -13 

- -43 
-1-13 

- -73 

- -86 
-1-58 

- -32 
+ -66 

- -05 
+3-57 



- -54 

- -15 
+1-35 

+2-69 
+ -67 

- -62 
-2-04 



-1-13 

+ -62 
+2-09 
+ -62 

- -32 

- -91 

- -53 

- -14 
+ -26 
+ -84 
+ 1-16 

- -39 

- -99 
-2-22 



+ -23 
+ -17 

- -14 

- -49 

- -34 

- -45 

- -48 

- -05 
+ -21 
+ 1-02 
+2-74 
+ -92 

- -58 
-2-21 



+ -18 
+ -78 

- -64 

- -68 
+ -42 
+ -14 
+ -01 
+ -35 
+ -59 
+ -94 
+1-87 
+ -88 

- -84 
-2-34 



•00 
+ -31 
+1-31 
+ -16 

- -12 

- -46 

- -98 

- -70 

- -85 
-1-83 

- -16 
+ -67 

- -03 
+3-06 



- -43 

- -18 
-1-1-63 

+2 -27 
-I- -65 

- -16 
-1-61 



- -80 
+ -91 
+2-14 
+ -55 

- -15 

- -82 

- -43 
05 
32 



+ 
+ 
+ 
+1-03 

- -43 

- -92 
-2-02 



+ -23 
+ -19 

- -24 

- -45 

- -31 

- -49 

- -51 

- -16 
+ -25 
+ 1-11 
+2-22 
+ -98 

- -62 
-2-21 



+ -80 

- -81 

- -59 
+ -17 
+ -11 

- -14 
+ -33 
+ -66 
+ -99 
+2-24 
+ -86 

- -79 
-2-41 



- -16 
+ -34 
+ 1-33 
+ -05 

- -24 

- -43 

- -95 

- -67 

- -97 
-1-69 
+ -30 
+ -57 

- -28 
+2-40 



- -51 

+ 102 
+ -02 

- -13 

- -79 

- -92 

- -99 

- -45 
+ -05 
+ 1-27 
+2-83 
+ -71 



+ -99 
+2-10 
+ -51 

- -10 

- -87 

- -39 
+ -09 
+ -38 
+1-06 
+ -91 

- -39 

- -85 
-2-03 



+ -24 
+ -15 

- -29 

- -39 

- -31 

- -55 

- -54 

- -19 
+ -32 
+ 1-30 
+2-22 
+ 1-23 
-1-10 
-2-53 



- -30 
+ -42 
-1-07 



+ -34 
+ -65 
+1-02 
+2-00 
+ -40 
- -85 
-2-66 



- -34 
+ -51 
+1-35 

- -07 

- -50 

- -42 

- -92 

- -66 
-1-05 
-1-66 
+ -58 
+ -59 

- -27 
+2-56 



- -31 
+ -85 
+ -32 

- -75 

- -69 

- -93 

- -64 
+ -09 

- -04 
+1-24 
+ 1-80 
+ -49 

- -29 
-1-97 



- -21 

+ 1-11 
+ 1-98 
+ -31 

- -02 

- -67 
•44 
•05 
•44 



+ 
+ 
+1-32 
+ -82 

- -48 

- -79 
-2-07 



+ -34 
+ -11 

- -29 

- -36 

- -34 

- -56 

- -51 

- -24 
+ -35 
+ 1-53 
+2-02 
+ -78 
-1-53 
-2-79 



•01 

1-31 

• 66 

•25 
•08 
•40 
•29 
•61 



+ 

+ 

+ 1-07 

+ 1-89 

-f -32 

- -95 

-2-83 



+ -54 
+ •150 

- -05 

- -47 

- -39 
-1-04 

- -63 
-1-06 
-1-35 
+ -75 
+ -62 

- -38 
+2-76 



- -19 
+ -51 

- -13 

- -37 

- -44 

- -95 
-1-10 

- -98 

- -06 
+2-20 
+1-86 
+ -38 

- -25 
-2-30 



+ -22 
+ 1-32 
+ 1-97 
+ -02 

- -02 

- -79 

- -53 

- -03 
+ -22 
+1-32 
+ -50 

- -65 

- -79 
-2-17 



+ -27 
+ -14 

- -38 

- -40 

- -35 

- -57 

- -50 

- -18 
+ -32 
+ 1-13 
+ 1-96 
+ -24 
-1-59 
-2-89 



- -10 
-1-28 

- -67 
+ -14 

- -34 

- -45 
+ -35 
+ -61 
+ 1-15 
+ 1-52 
+ -25 
-1-35 
-2-86 



- -85 
+ 1-12 
+ 1-54 

- -03 

- -46 

- -40 
-1-02 

- -61 
-1-04 
-1-19 
+ -63 
+ -57 

- -35 
+2-95 



+ -13 
+ -90 
+ -13 

- -56 

- -55 
-1-06 
-1-00 

- -57 
+ -23 
+2-18 
+ 1-40 
+ -89 

- -73 
-1-89 



+ -60 
+1-47 
+1-85 

- -22 

- -27 
-1-03 

- -67 

- -17 
+ -05 
+ -94 
+ -21 

- -97 

- -91 
-2-32 



+ -28 
+ -18 

- -47 

- -41 

- -44 

- -58 

- -47 

- -14 
+ -32 
+ 1-14 
+2-16 
+ -14 
-1-50 
-2-71 



-1-24 

- -46 

+ -09 

- -47 

- -44 
+ -41 
+ -58 
+ 1-36 
+1-72 
+ -18 
-1-47 
-2-82 



- -67 
+1-14 
+1-83 

•00 

- -43 

- -69 
-1-00 

- -59 
-1-01 

- -89 
+ -66 
+ -51 

- -20 
+2-47 



+ -32 
+ 1-14 

- -09 

- -58 

- -53 

- -36 

- -67 

- -43 

- -01 
+ 1-56 
+2-54 
+ -44 
-1-19 
-1-81 



+1-01 
+ 1-54 
+ 1-64 

- -34 

- -48 
-106 

- -68 

- -17 

- -02 
+ -91 

■00 
-1-11 

- -92 

- 2-51 



+ -24 
+ -11 

- -49 

- -37 

- -47 

- -56 

- -36 

- -05 
+ -51 
+1-00 
+2-58 

- -08 
-1-58 
-2-44 



- -36 
+ -37 
+ -68 

+ 1-47 
+1-79 
+ -02 
-1-66 
-29-0 



+ -01 

- -40 
-1-25 

- -97 

- -57 
-1-00 

- -58 
+ -54 

- -03 

- -31 
+ 1-50 



+ -23 
+ 101 

- -07 

- -65 

- -29 

- -83 

- -69 

- -02 
+ -21 
+ 1-53 
+2-37 
+ -23 
-1-19 
-1-63 



+1-25 
+1-62 
+ 1-42 
-• 53 

- -65 
-1-25 

- -65 



- -05 
+ -10 
+ -80 
+ -05 
-1-11 

- -'5 

- 2-51 



+ -24 
+ -11 

- -50 

- -34 

- -49 

- -56 

- -35 

- -02 
+ -75 
+ 1-33 
+2-86 
+ -08 
-1-98 
-2-34 



+ -20 

- -07 

- -81 

- -05 

- -10 

- -62 

+ -2 
+ -63 
+1-60 
+ 1-55 

- -02 
-1-60 
-3 04 



- -35 

+ 1-19 
+ 1-74 

- -09 



- -38 
-1-23 

- -95 

- -54 

- -97 

- -55 
+ -85 

- -43 
+ -42 
+1-33 



+ 
+ 

- 12 

- -57 

- -84 

- -54 

- -68 

- -47 
+ -46 
+ -77 
+1-55 
+ -30 

- -97 
-1 



+ 1-59 
+ 1 
+ 1-16 

- -63 

- -82 
-1-30 

- -58 

+ 

+ -77 
+ -15 

- -94 

- -79 
-2-56 



■26 



- -36 

- -52 

- -57 

- -27 

- -03 
+ -83 
+ 1-57 
+1-92 

- -62 
-2-12 
-2-60 



+ -23 

- -24 

- -71 
+ -04 

- -09 

- -64 
+ -10 
+ -40 
+ 
+1-72 
+ 1-39 

- -22 
-1-74 
-3-14 



- -19 
+1-77 
+ 1-62 

- -07 

- -31 
-1 

- -80 

- -53 
-1-09 

- -67 
+ -73 

- -27 
+1-27 
+ -85 



+ -3 C 
+ -84 

- -45 

- -74 
+ 1-25 

- -10 

- -41 

- -62 
+ ■ 
+1-68 
+2 31 
+ -22 
-1-76 
-2-30 



+2-02 
+ 1 
+ 

- -70 
-1-35 
-1-18 

- -50 

- -07 
+ -19 
+ 1-09 
+ -10 

- -82 
-2-43 



+ -24 
+ -10 

- -45 

- -40 

- -53 

- -55 

- -29 

- -01 
+ -88 
+2-03 
+ -95 

- -59 
-1-91 
-2-66 



+ 
+ 
+ 
+ 1-58 
+ 1-23 
- -45 
-1-81 
-3-23 



+ -04 
+1-79 
+ -71 
+ -09 

- -37 
-1-19 

- -78 

- -63 
-1-14 

- -65 
+ -74 

- -24 
+ 1-58 
+ 1-44 



+ -23 
+ -93 

- -25 

- -53 
+ -16 

- -46 

- -71 

- -63 
+1-36 
+ 1-70 
+ 1-12 
-1-10 
-1 
-2-27 



+ -39 
+ 1-88 
+ -94 

- -58 

- -89 

- -67 

- -26 
+ -14 
+ -34 
+ 1-20 
+ -07 

- -77 
-1-79 
-2-46 



MONTHLY REVIEW OF BUSINESS STATISTICS 



33 



Table 29. Significant Statistics of the United Kingdom 



Classification 



1932 



Jan. Feb. Mar. April May June July Aug. Sept. Oct. Nov. Dec 



1933 



Jan. 



Production— 

Iron 000 metric tons 

Steel 000 metric tons 

Coal 000 metric tons 

Electricity 

Generated mill, k.w.h. 

New orders received.. 1920 = 100 

Copper Available 000 tons 

Raw Cotton Delivered to 

Mill mill. lb. 

Production, Artificial Silk 

Yarn and Waste.... mill. lb. 
Natural SilkDeliveriesOOO lb. 
Crude Rubber 

Available 000 tons 

Building Plans 

Approved 1924 = 100 

Other 1924 = 100 

Employment— 
Insured Workers in 

Employment mill. 

Number Unemployed 000 

Percentage Unemployed 

Coal mining 

Iron and steel 

General engineering 

Electrical engineering 

Shipbuilding and marine en- 
gineering 

Base metal working 

Cotton 

Woollen 

Building 

Public works contracting 

Trade— 
Imports, Total £ mn. 

Food, drink and tobacco £ mn. 

Raw materials £ mn. 

Manufactured £ mn. 

Total, net imports £ mn. 

Exports, Total £ mn. 

Food, drink and tobacco£ mn. 

Raw materials £ mn. 

Manufactured £ mn. 

Bank Clearings, Country 
and Provincial Daily 
Average £ mn. 

Provincial £ mn. 

Postal Receipts, Daily.. £000 
Transportation— 
Shipping — 

Entrances mill, net tons 

Clearances mill, net tons 

Index of shipping 

freights 1924=100 

Railways — 

Gross passenger 
receipts £ mill. 

Gross freight receipts. £ mill. 

Freight traffic, total.mill. tons 

Merchandise mill, tons 

Coal mill, tons 

Minerals and other 
merchandise.... mill, tons 
Prices— 
Wholesale Prices 1913 = 100 — 

Board of trade 

Economist 

Statist 

Times 

Retail Foods 

Cost of living 

Banking— 
Bank of England — 

Private deposits £ mn. 

Bank and currency notes £ mn. 

Gold reserve £ mn. 

Nine Clearing Banks — 

Deposits £ mn. 

Discounts £ mn. 

Advances £ mn. 

Investments £ mn. 

Treasury Bills £ mill. 

Money — 

Day to Day Rate p.c. 

Three Months Rate p.c. 

Security Values— 

Fixed Interest 1921 = 100 

Variable Dividend. .1921 = 100 

Total 1921 = 100 

Exchange, New York $ to £.. . . 



335 

437 

18,973 

1,162 

56 

4-3 

121 

6-44 
271 

5-13 

87-6 
93-7 



9-37 
2,784 
22-4 
18-7 
46-5 
28-1 
17-6 

58-0 
26-1 
28-2 
16-9 
32-6 
381 

62-3 
31-5 
16-9 
13-3 
57-0 
311 
2-8 
3-6 
23-4 



13-8 

960 

129 



4-23 
4-55 



621 



31 
6-7 

21-1 
3-8 

14-1 

3-2 



105-8 
900 
99-6 



107 

355 

124-6 

1,677 

237 



653 

4-46 
5-65 

104-7 

92-8 

100-9 

3-430 



329 

488 

18,815 

1,133 

58 

12-0 

111 

6-52 
245 

5-50 

103-3 

86-2 



9-40 
2,742 
22-0 
18-5 
46-7 
28-1 
17-2 

57-5 

25-6 
26-0 
16-3 
32-4 
37-8 

70-2 
33-6 
15-4 
20 
64-7 
30-0 
2-8 
3-5 



12-7 

980 

125 



4-65 
4-10 



65-2 



2-8 

6 
21 

3-8 
141 

3-4 



105-3 

92-2 

102-0 

100-0 

131 

147 



102 

345 

124-6 

1,621 
205 
888 
264 
574 

4-27 
511 

106-5 

91-7 

101-7 

3-459 



341 

470 

19,091 

1,090 
57 
7-4 

118 

6-32 
267 

4-14 

121-8 
93-3 



9-55 
2,595 
20-8 
18-8 
67-7 
27-2 
16-6 

56-7 
24-8 
23-4 
14-7 
28-8 
37-5 

61-1 
30-9 
16-5 
130 
55-7 
31-2 
2-7 
3-5 
24-2 



13-2 
1020 

128 



4-13 

4-28 



6-6 



3-7 
13-8 



3-3 



104-6 



97-4 
129 
146 



105 

354 

124-6 

1,639 
215 



576 

2-48 
2-64 

111-6 

92-7 

H)5'5 

3-634 



987 
59 
8-2 

120 

6-45 
290 

7-28 



125- 
93- 



9-48 
2,662 
21-4 
18-4 
63-4 
27-4 
16-4 

56-5 
25-6 
24-9 
17-0 
26-8 
37-4 

53-5 
27-5 
13-4 

11-8 
48-8 
34-8 
2-9 
4-0 
26-8 



13-0 

95-0 

130 



4-35 
4-46 

68-5 



3-4 
6-4 

201 
3-6 

13-2 

3-3 



102-4 

86-3 

97-0 

96-7 

126 

144 



108 

358 

124-6 

1,643 
238 
866 
272 
612 

1-98 
2-36 

110-6 

84-5 
102-1 
3-752 



320 

424 

17,275 

895 

62 

9-7 

103 



309 
7-02 



132-2 
108-5 



9-40 
2,754 
22-1 
20-6 
50-0 
28-6 
16-4 

57-5 
26-3 
33-4 
24-0 
26-2 
37-2 

55-7 
29-9 
13-7 
11-6 
51-3 
30-2 
2-6 
3-6 
23-2 



12-6 

94-0 

128 



4-77 
4-25 



65- 



40 
60 

18-6 
3-4 

12-1 

3-2 



100-7 
83-3 
94-4 



111 

358 

132-4 

1,661 
245 
858 
284 
617 

1-38 
1-57 

111-4 

82-0 

101-8 

3-676 



316 

467 

17,028 

822 

58 

10-8 

101 

6-23 
318 



159-5 
88-0 



9-39 
2,770 
22-3 
21-0 
46-9 
27-8 
16-3 

57-3 

27-0 
30-4 
24-8 
25-8 
38-8 

57-5 
31-4 
13-5 
11-8 
53-3 
29-7 
2-3 
3-6 
22-9 



12-0 

90-0 

126 



5-13 
4-65 



57-7 



4-4 
6-1 

18-9 
3-4 

12-2 



297 

437 

15,275 



52 



3-2 



98-1 
80-9 
90-6 
90-3 
123 
142 



122 

357 

140-0 

1,727 
276 
838 
324 
628 

•94 
1-06 

111-0 

78-9 

100-6 

3-649 



94 



5-71 

333 



7-58 



115-0 
108-8 



9-32 
2,839 
22-9 
21-5 
47-8 
28 
16-4 

57-5 
28-5 
311 
251 
27-3 
42 

51 

29-3 
10 

11 

48 



367 
15,542 

815 

54 

14-8 



78-0 
50-0 



13-3 

108-0 
129 



5-03 
4-81 



6-4 

5 
17-5 

3-4 
11-0 



31 



97-7 
82-7 
92-8 
93-2 
125 
143 



117 

366 

141-5 

1,765 
316 
822 
333 
750 

•67 



115-6 

84-5 

105-5 

3-552 



•28 



23-1 
22-6 
48-6 
28-8 
16-3 

57-7 
26-2 
33-5 
25-4 
27-1 
43-4 

53-3 
28-2 
11-7 
13-1 



2-6 

3-4 

21-7 



11-9 

92-0 

121 



5-13 
4-50 



59-0 



265 

437 

16,360 

922 

56 

10-7 

73 

5-70 
298 

7-20 

123-9 
93-9 



9-15 
2,849 
22-8 
22-9 
46-8 
30-8 
160 

621 
27-3 
34-8 
20-3 
28-5 
421 

54-3 
30-6 
11-2 
121 
51-4 
26-2 
2-5 
3-2 
19-8 



11-4 

88-0 

131 



4-91 

4-77 



64-3 



4-4 
5-7 

17-2 
3-3 

110 



2-7 



99-5 
85-2 



123 

366 

139-8 

1,813 
373 
803 

348 
791 

•71 

•72 

116-1 

92-5 

108-4 

3-476 



445 
17,829 



55 
10-1 



2-8 



102-1 

88-1 

94-6 

97-7 

123 

141 



123 

362 

140-3 



101 



6-32 
304 



7-30 



155-8 
94-5 



9-40 
2,737 
21-9 
22-9 
47-7 
30-2 
16-0 

61-9 
26-6 
25-7 
16-5 
29-5 
42-8 



35-1 
11-9 
13-5 
57-1 
30-4 
2-9 
3-9 
22-7 



12-8 

105-9 

134 



62- 



272 

480 

18,594 

1,228 

53 

12-0 

103 

6-59 
321 

9-12 

155-5 

85-2 



9-37 

2,774 
22-2 
231 
46-8 
30-1 
16-2 

61-4 

25-6 
24-3 
16-7 
30-7 
43-8 

61-6 
34-4 
15-3 
28-7 
57-5 
31-1 
3-4 
4-1 
22-9 



12-5 

102-5 

135 



4-35 
4-41 



64-5 



28-9 

437 

21,886 



60 
11-0 



112 



5-52 
254 



7-16 



134- 
136- 



9-46 

2,700 

21-7 

22 

45-0 
29-2 
16-4 

61-6 
24-1 
23-3 
17-9 
31-7 
44-2 



32-1 
15-6 
12-7 
56-5 
32-4 

2 

3 
23-6 



13-1 

103-0 

174 



4-55 



■65 



118-4 



111-4 
3-471 



18-8 
3-6 
12-4 

2-8 



101-1 

85-3 

91-5 

96-5 

125 

143 



119 

361 

140-4 

1,853 
387 
780 
396 
872 

•71 
•84 

120-3 

96-3 

112-5 

3-399 



19-9 
3-7 
13-0 

3-1 



101-1 

85-7 

91-6 

95-3 

125 

143 



116 

359 

139-4 



389 
770 



897 



115-9 

96-8 

109-6 

3-277 



101-0 

84-1 

91-4 

94-3 

125 

143 



136 

371 

119-8 

1,944 
406 
75 
456 
935 

•75 
1-25 

116-1 

95-8 

109-4 

3-270 



10S- 



123 
142 



147 

359 

119-8 



•75 

1-81 



34 



MONTHLY REVIEW OF BUSINESS STATISTICS 



Table 30. Significant Statistics of the United States. 



1932 



Jan. Feb. Mar. April May June July Aug. Sept. Oct. Nov. Dec 



1933 



Jan. 



United States Statistics— 

Wheat, Visible Supply. Mil. bush. 
Receipts, principal 

markets 000 bush. 

Shipments, principal 

markets 000 bush. 

Exports, including 
wheat flour 000 bush. 

Wheat Flour Produc- 
tion 000 bbls. 

Sugar Meltings, 8 
Ports 000 long tons 

Tobacco Consumption, 

Cigars Millions 

Cigarettes Millions 

Cattle Receipts, Primary 
Markets 000 

Hog Receipts, Primary 
Markets 000 

Cotton Consumption. ..000 bales 

Newsprint Produc- 
tion 000 s. tons 

Newsprint Consump- 
tion 000 s. tons 

Pig Iron Production.. 000 1. tons 

Steel Ingot Produc- 
tion 000 1. tons 

Unfilled Orders U.S. 
Steel Co 000 1. tons 

Automobile Produc- 
tion 000 cars and trucks 

Zinc Production s. tons 

Stocks s. tons 

Lead Production s. tons 

Petroleum Produc- 
tion 000 bbls. 

Consumption (to 
stills) 000 bbls. 

Gasoline Production.. 000 bbls. 
Consumption 000 bbls. 

Contracts Awarded $000,000 

Car,loadings 000 cars 

Electric Power Pro- 
duction mill. k.h. 

Index Factory Employ- 
ment 1923-5 = 100 

Mail Order Sales, 2 cos $000 

Ten Cent Sales, 4 Chains. . .$000 

Imports $000,000 

Exports $000,000 

Manufacturing Pro- 
duction 1923-5 = 100 

Mineral Production.. 1923-5 = 100 

Industrial Produc- 
tion 1923-5 = 100 

F.R. Banks, Bills Dis- 
counted Mil. Dolls. 

Reserve Ratio p.c. 

Member Banks Loans 

and Discounts Mil. Dolls. 

Net Demand 
Deposits Mil. Dolls. 

Interest Rates, Time Loans, .p.c. 

Call loans renewal p.c. 

Prime commercial paper, 
4-6 months p.c. 

Bond Prices High Grade 

Rails (10) 

Forty bonds 

Prices Common Stocks 

(404) 1926=100 

(Copyright Standard Statistics Co.) 

Industrials (338) 

Railways (33) 

Utilities (34) 

Automobiles (13) 

Tires and rubber goods (17) 

Chain stores (17) 

Copper and brass (9) 

Oil (16) 

Railway equipment (9) 

Steel and iron (9) 

Textile (31) 

Amusement (7) 

Tobacco (10) 

Stock Sales, N.Y Mil Shares 

Bond Sales, N.Y Mil. Dolls. 

Brokers Loans Mil. Dolls. 

Bank Debits, N.Y... Mil. Dolls. 
Outside, 140 centres. Mil. Dolls. 



212 

17,072 

11,005 

7,962 

8,180 

246 

343 
8,963 

1,376 

4,218 
435 

94-2 

151-2 
973 

1,461 

2,648 

119-3 

22,471 
129,909 
32,180 

66,884 

68,715 
33,007 
26,845 
84-8 
2,270 

7,401 

68-1 

31,975 

34,029 

135-2 

149-9 

71-0 
77-0 

72-0 

899 
66-6 

12,830 

11,166 
3-75 
2-65 



76-95 
57-47 

58-0 

54-4 

36-6 

94-4 

64-2 

24-5 

57-3 

36-1 

42-9 

31-0 

32-1 

30-7 

17-8 

98-3 

34-3 

286-5 

512 

17,676 

15,893 



210 

25,000 
11,537 

7,852 

7, 

267 

348 
7,680 

1,281 

3,659 
450 

87-2 

142-9 
964 

1,460 

2,546 

117-4 

21,474 
129,532 
28,081 

62,484 

63,814 
31,265 
25,344 
89-0 
2,245 

6,997 

67-8 
32,581 
35,638 

131-0 

153 

68-0 
78-0 

70-0 

828 



12,588 

11,003 
3-63 
2-50 



75-30 
57-23 

56-5 

52-9 
34-2 
92-8 
60-2 
22-8 
56-3 
32-1 
42-4 
30-7 
32-2 
30-6 
17-0 
99-1 
31-7 
217-4 
525 
14,381 
12,870 



202 
13,412 
9,562 
8,435 
8,483 

346 

355 
8,447 

1,377 

2,939 
489 

100-0 

156-2 
967 

1,411 

2,472 

119-0 
22,448 

129,477 
30,345 

67,189 

68,502 
31,789 
29,451 
112-2 
2,287 

7,321 

66-4 

33,959 

40,512 

131-3 

155-3 

65-0 
84-0 

68-0 

639 
70-7 

12,211 

10,941 
3-13 
2-50 

3-75 

79-28 
58-25 

56-8 

53-8 

32-1 

93-4 

54-5 

23-9 

57-9 

29-6 

45-0 

30-4 

32-3 

30-7 

16-8 

104-6 

33-1 

252-7 

533 

16,160 

13,729 



183 
13,198 
13,221 
11,777 
8,196 



350 

7,562 

1,376 



367 

91-2 

148-4 
853 

1,240 

2,327 

148-3 
20,575 
132,020 

23,236 

67,717 

71,131 
33,093 
30,488 
121-7 
2,773 

6,781 

64-3 

39,745 

39,359 

126-7 

135-2 

61-0 
79-0 

64-0 

556 

67-1 

11,880 

11,144 

2-30 
2-50 

3-50 

73-23 
49-42 

43-9 



41 
22 
73 
34 
18 
49 
21 

38-0 

21-9 

23-1 

25-6 

11-0 

89-5 

31-4 

252-4 

379 

15,558 

14,366 



172 
15,344 
15,942 
8,764 
7,739 
306 

369 

8,685 

1,397 

3,050 
332 



152-3 

784 

1,107 

2,177 

184-3 
18,605 
132,575 
25,902 

68,523 

74,669 
34,599 
31,574 
146-2 
2,088 

6,635 

62-1 

38,718 

38,869 

112-0 

132-0 

59-0 
67-C 

60-0 

490 
62-1 

11,631 

11,102 
1-75 
2-50 

3-13 

69-69 
43-08 



38-1 

17-4 

67-8 

30-1 

17-9 

41-7 

20-4 

38-6 

19-7 

19-9 

23-4 

9-1 

82-9 

23-2 

258-4 

300 

12,912 

12,498 



167 

13,473 

11,507 

8,001 

7,820 

382 

400 
10,560 



2,545 
321 

854 

138-2 
628 

897 

2,035 

183-1 
16,423 

134,027 
26,068 

64,835 

72,327 

33,312 

38,766 

113-1 

1,966 

6,548 

60-0 

39,889 

36,864 

111-4 

114-3 

58-0 
63-0 

59-0 

440 
57-6 

11,263 

10,925 
1-50 
2-50 

2-75 

68-78 
41-39 

34-0 

33-5 

14-1 

55-0 

25-5 

15-1 

34-8 

22-0 

36-5 

17-3 

16-3 

20-0 

6-5 

70-3 

23-0 

257-2 

244 

14,202 

12,908 



178 

41,006 

17,294 

4,772 

7,828 

355 

361 
9,534 

1,291 

2,159 
279 

74-5 

157-1 

572 

793 
1,966 

111-1 

14,716 
135,902 
15,819 

66,310 

71,455 
33,705 
31,317 

128 

2,422 

6,525 

58-3 

32,073 

34,361 

79-4 

106-8 

57-0 
64-0 

58-0 

538 
56-5 



10,751 
1-38 
2-08 

2-50 

70-97 
42-98 

35-9 

44-4 

21-2 

55-4 

35-2 

20-6 

43-6 

29-6 

50-1 

26-4 

24-9 

27-2 

11-4 

93-0 

23-1 

240-7 

242 

12,728 

12,572 



18-8 

40,732 

19,648 

5,768 

9,005 

353 

401 
9,559 



2,405 
403 

79-5 

123-9 
531 

832 

1,970 

90-3 
13.611 
133,153 
17,118 

66,220 

67,271 
32,883 
35,207 
134-0 
2,345 

6,743 

58-8 

33,777 

34,538 

91-1 

109-2 

59-0 
65-0 

60-0 

433 
58-9 

10,796 

10,982 
1-38 
2-08 



79-32 
53-35 



53-3 



51 
29 
84 
44 
28 
49 
37 

54-6 

29-8 

33-0 

33-1 

15-8 

98-0 

82-6 

333-1 

332 

13,458 

12,188 



194 

38,410 

21,313 

4,226 

9,394 

395 

405 
9,311 



2,505 
492 

70-6 

127-4 
593 

975 

1,985 

84-1 
13,260 
125,775 
20,498 

65,036 

63,913 

30,908 

33,645 

127-5 

2,245 

6,735 

60-3 
39,156 
36,632 

98-4 
132-0 

65-0 
70-0 



332 
61-1 

10,706 

11,229 
1-38 
2-00 

2-13 

82-07 
55-01 

52-2 

55-8 

34-5 

91-4 

54-2 

32-9 

52-8 

47-0 

53-9 

31-8 

42-1 

38-7 

17-3 

101-4 

67-4 

250-3 

380 

14,163 

11,767 



190 

27,238 

17,541 

4,422 

9,383 



437 
8,351 

1,896 

2,691 
502 

76-7 

145-0 
645 

1,069 

1,997 

48-7 
15,217 
121,! 
21,092 

65,219 

66,698 

33,212 

32,255 

107-5 

3,158 

7,053 

61-1 

45,423 

41,605 

106-4 

153-5 

65-0 
74-0 



326 
62-1 

10,441 

11,401 

•88 

1-35 

2-00 

80-76 
49-86 



47-7 
27-5 
80-6 
42-8 
23-9 
48-2 
34-4 
47-4 
26-4 
32-5 
32-5 
12-9 
90-5 
29-2 
178-6 
325 
12,944 
12,354 



177 

17,584 

23,464 

5,995 

8,723 

227 

419 
7,614 

1,543 

2,775 
504 

81-7 

145-9 
631 

1,015 

1,968 

59-6 
15,958 
121,798 
24,465 

63,384 

65,504 

32,072 

30,294 

105-3 

2,195 

6,937 

61-2 

41,281 

38,040 

104-5 

139-4 

63-0 
75 

65-0 



10,413 

11,745 

•51 

1-04 



78-19 
47-51 

47-5 

45-4 
25-5 
77-6 
39-5 
22-6 
47-1 
32-1 
47-1 
24-8 
27-7 
29-9 
11-1 
82-9 
23-0 

158-9 
338 

9,815 
10,935 



13,859 
13,604 
3,549 
8,300 



158 
12,814 
8,375 



254 
7,319 

1,161 

3,121 

440 



132 
546 

845 

1,9 

107-4 
18,489 
124,705 
21,638 

58,044 

65,998 
31,254 

"81-2 
2,487 



471 



,006 



129,524 



83-4 
1,910 



60-6 
51,700 
66,307 

97-0 
136-0 

65-0 
78-0 

66-0 

235 

62-9 

10,297 

11,758 

•50 

1-00 

1-50 

77 
44-05 

47-4 

44-8 
25-7 
79-6 
40-4 
23-5 

46 -6 

29-6 
47-3 
24-2 
24-8 
27-6 
9 

81-4 

23-2 

241-9 

347 

13,967 

12,820 



274 
65-5 



10-166 
11,899 



260-0 

359 

12,413 

12,053 



REVUE MENSUELLE DE LA SITUATION ECONOMIQUE 

Vol. VIII OTTAWA, FEVRIER, 1933 N° 2 

Statisticien du Dominion: R. H. Coats, B.A., F.S.S. (Hon.), F.R.S.C. 

Chef de la Section de la Statistique Generale: S. A. Cudmore, M.A., F.S.S. 

Adjoint (Statistiques Economiques): S. B. Smith, M.A. 

STATISTIQUE COURANTE DES AFFAIRES AU CANADA 

Les conditions economiques au Canada laissent voir en Janvier une legere amelioration sur 
le mois precedent. La force prononcee des obligations du gouvernement est le principal element 
de cette reprise. Le rendement de quatre emissions de reemprunt du gouvernement federal 
est en moyenne de 4-55 p.c. comparativement a 4-78 p.c. le dernier mois de 1932, et le rende- 
ment des obligations de FOntario est de 4-75 p.c. comparativement a 4-92 p.c. Le declin du 
rendement des obligations de tout repos a une portee directe sur la situation du credit au Canada, 
et la fermete des obligations depuis le commencement de Fannee a ete par consequent un des 
facteurs les plus constructifs. Le niveau des titres speculatifs s'est mieux que maintenu en 
Janvier, Findice des 130 titres d'action ordinaire inscrits aux bourses de Montreal et de Toronto 
e"tant a 51-6 en janvier comparativement a 51-3 en decembre. Les indices hebdomadaires de 
la premiere partie de fevrier revelent de la reaction, mais le niveau est encore au-dessus du bas 
atteint en juin 1932. Le gain marque des titres de mine d'or depuis la mi-ete 1932 attire Fatten- 
tion sur une industrie operant dans des conditions favorables. L'indice de 11 mines d'or etait 
a 77-5 la semaine du 9 feVrier comparativement a 48-5, le minimum de 1932. 

Les depots des banques a la fin de decembre montrent un gain modere apres rajustement 
saisonnier. A noter que les depots a terme sont plus eleves le 31 decembre 1932 que la date 
correspondante de 1931, et qu'en m£me temps les prets courants ont 6te liquides avec persis- 
tance. Ceci laisse un surplus grandement augmente des depots a terme sur les prets courants, 
le total <Hanfc de $413,000,000 comparativement a $278,000,000 en decembre 1931. Les valeurs 
en portefeuille des banques, qui atteignent $778,252,000 le 31 decembre, sont a leur plus fort 
volume dans Fhistoire des banques canadiennes. 

Bien que les prix de gros aient touche* en janvier un nouveau bas depuis les jours d'avant- 
guerre, le declin de Findice s'est limite a un-dixieme de point comparativement au mois prece- 
dent. Le ble a ete en moyenne legerement plus haut, force qui s'est continuee les premieres 
semaines de fevrier. Les prix du ble le 17 fevrier ont touche les hauts de 1933 sur deux futurs, 
celui de mai et celui de juillet. II s'est vendu a 49 cents et 49| cents, respectivement, soit l'equi- 
valent des prix maxima de Fannee civile courante etablis le 11 janvier. L'indice des matieres 
premieres en janvier montre un gain leger sur le mois precedent, tandis que les articles partiel- 
lement ou entierement ouvres donnent un declin. 

Operations commerciales et industrielles 

L'amelioration de Farriere-plan financier n'a pas produit Fexpansion d'activite des entre- 
prises productives, et dans plusieurs lignes un nouveau bas a ete etabli dans le present mouve- 
ment. La production minerale a decline comparativement au mois precedent et la production 
de denrees alimentaires a ete plus faible. Apres rajustement pour tendance saisonniere la cons- 
truction, les industries du fer et de Facier et Fautomobile montrent des gains moderes, mais le 
niveau des operations est decidement bas. 

Les exportations de nickel donnent 3,079,000 livres comparativement a 2,175,000 en decem- 
bre. Les exportations de cuivre fin en minerai ou en ampoule ont ete de 1,362,000 livres com- 
parativement a 4,336,000 livres le mois precedent. La production de plomb montre une reduc- 
tion en decembre et les exportations de zinc ont decline au cours du mois sous revue. Les arri- 
vages a la monnaie d'or provenant des mines ont ete de 253,430 onces comparatrvement a 238,999 
en decembre, mais les expeditions, y compris les exportations, montrent un gain inf^rieur a la 
normale pour la saison. Les expeditions d'argent montrent aussi un declin considerable. Les 
expeditions d'amiante ont diminue a moins que la normale pour la saison et les importations 
de bauxite pour la fabrication d'aluminium montrent un declin. La production de farine accuse 
une contraction considerable le dernier mois sur lequel les statistiques sont etablies et la pro- 
duction de farine d'avoine et d'avoine roulee est en moindre volume. Le sucre a ete produit 
en quantites limitees les quatre premieres semaines de Fannee, la plus grande partie du declin 
s'expliquant par des considerations saisonnieres. Les abatages de betes a cornes et de moutons 
montrent un gain en janvier, tandis qu'ily a diminution dans le nombre de pores abattus. Les 
exportations de fromage et de saumon en boite ont baisse en janvier, apres rajustement saison- 



36 REVUE MENSUELLE DE LA SITUATION ECONOMIQUE 

nier. Les dedouanements de tabac brut en feuilles et de cigarettes montrent un gain en Janvier. 
Les cigarettes retir6es de l'accise se chiffrent a 310,145,000 comparativement a 304,614,000. 
Le nombre de cigares dedouanes a etc plus faible. Les importations de caoutchouc brut don- 
nent un gain, le total etant de 2,663,000 livres comparativement a 2,109,000 livres. La pro- 
duction de chaussures en cuir montre an declin en decern bre apres s'etre bien maintenue au cours 
des onze mois precedents de 1932. Les importations de coton brut, a 8,765,000 livres compa- 
rativement a 13,819,000, montrent un declin marque, tandis que les importations de files de coton 
ont etc plus considerables. Les importations de laine pour plus ample transformation montrent 
aussi un declin considerable. Le gain dans la production de papier a journal a ete moins que 
normal pour la saison. Les exportations de pulpe de bois, de madriers, de planches et de bar- 
deaux donnent un gain en Janvier, apres rajustement saisonnier, le mouvement des bardeaux 
etant de 83,718,000 comparativement a 73,138,000. 

La production d'acier en lingots donne 40,766 tonnes comparativement a 30,755, et la pro- 
duction de fonte en gueuse, 29,209 tonnes comparativement a 21,031. Les operations a Sydney 
sont le principal facteur de gain au cours du mois. La production d'automobiles a ete de 3,358 
unites comparativement a 2,139, ce qui donne un leger gain apres rajustement saisonnier. La 
production de coke en decembre est de 150,253 tonnes comparativement a 142,616 en novembre. 
Les importations de petrole brut s'elevent a 35,085,000 gallons comparativement a 32,808,000, 
l'indice donnant 86-0 comparativement a 71-0 en decembre, apres rajustement saisonnier. 

Le declin des permis de batir et des contrats de construction a ete moins que normal pour 
la saison, mais les nouvelles entreprises commencees au cours du mois sont encore a bas niveau. 

Le declin dans la production electrique, base sur la moyenne quotidienne, a ete legerement 
inferieur a la normale pour la saison; la production totale a ete de 1,396,658,000 k.w.h. compa- 
rativement a 1,433,159,000 k.w.h. Comme les exportations aux Etats-Unis ont ete de 48,018,000 
k.w.h., l'energie disponible pour consommation locale en Janvier a ete de 1,348,640,000 k.w.h. 
en Janvier, sans compter les deductions pour les coulages en transmission. Comme les expor- 
tations de decembre s'elevent a 41,609,000 k.w.h., la quantite de courant disponible pour con- 
sommation a ete de 1,391,550,000 k.w.h. La consommation de la province de Quebec a 6te de 
604,900,000 k.w.h., les exportations de la province s'elevant a 180,242,000 k.w.h. La consom- 
mation de chaque mois en 1932 a ete de 576,900 k.w.h. et les exportations provinciales de 144,- 
927,000 k.w.h. La production et la consommation du Quebec montrent un gain comparative- 
ment a l'annee precedente. 

Distribution 

L'indice de la distribution de Janvier etait a 84-3 comparativement a 86-1 en decembre. 
Les chargements de wagons et l'emploiement dans le commerce de gros et de detail et le commerce 
d'importation montrent des declins, tandis que les exportations montrent un gain apres rajuste- 
ment saisonnier. Les wagons charges, au nombre de 134,432, se comparent a 152,562, une 
partie de ce declin etant explique par des considerations saisonnieres. Les rapports hebdoma- 
daires de la premiere partie de fevrier refletent des tendances saisonnieres, l'indice de l'emploie- 
ment dans le commerce etant de 109-4 comparativement a 119-6 le ler Janvier, soit un declin 
de 1-6 p.c. apres rajustement saisonnier. 

Stocks mondiaux de denrees 

Un indice de neuf denrees d'importance fondamentale dans le commerce international 
montre que les stocks en sont maintenant a environ deux fois ce qu'ils etaient en 1928, imme- 
diatement avant les debuts de la depression. Un indice des prix de ces memes denrees a tombe" 
a un-tiers du niveau de predepression. 

La relation entre les mouvements de ces deux indices est aussi etroite qu'impressionnante, 
jetant une lumiere importante sur la nature de la depression. Quand les prix baissent en temps 
difficiles les stocks de denrees montent, et quand les stocks baissent en temps prosperes, les prix 
montent. Ces neuf denrees sont: le ble, le the, le sucre, le caoutchouc, le caf6, le coton, la soie, 
le cuivre et l'etain. Au commencement de 1920 les stocks mondiaux de ces differentes denrees 
de consommation courante etaient anormalement volumineux parce aue la demande de guerre 
avait ete anormalement enorme et le commerce etait actif avec des prix tres eleves. Vint l'ecrou- 
lement des prix, la depression de 1921, et immediatement une subite augmentation des stocks 
mondiaux de ces denrees. La faiblesse de la demande etait le principal element de l'augmen- 
tation soudaine des stocks. 



REVUE MENSUELLE DE LA SITUATION ECONOMIQUE 37 

Entre 1921 et 1923 les stocks ont decline en contraste avec la reprise des prix de gros. Suivit 
une periode de competition internationale sans precedent durant laquelle surgirent de nouvelles 
sources de production, creees par les demandes de guerre, qui continuerent leurs operations 
pendant que toutes les sources qui avaient ete taries par la guerre reapparaissaient et s'effor- 
caient de reprendre leurs marches perdus. Ce fut une periode caracterisee par la protection des 
marches et la stimulation de la production par les pools, les tarifs, les cartels, les boni differen- 
tiels et le controle artificiel des prix de la plupart de ces denrees. La production fut stimulee 
au-dela de la demande, et les stocks s'accumulerent graduellement, meme alors que les prix 
mondiaux flechissaient moderement de 1925 a 1928. La deuxieme depression d'apres-guerre 
commenca en 1929 et depuis quatre ans les prix ont baisse avec rapidite et continuite pendant 
que les stocks de denrees s'accumulaient avec une persistance embarrassante. 

Dans le dernier semestre de 1932 se constata la premiere interruption importante de cette 
expansion des stocks de denrees primaires qui avait ete presque continue depuis 1928. L'indice 
des prix de ces neuf denrees sur base or a moncre une tendance plus constructive les derniers 
six mois. 

Comme le commerce de ces denrees determine grandement le niveau general des prix mon- 
diaux, la relation inverse des deux indices suggere que Ton doit chercher dans la cooperation 
internationale le correctif de la depression internationale. 

L'indice des stocks de ble apres rajustement pour tendance saisonniere montre une reduc- 
tion des stocks mondiaux le dernier semestre de 1932. Le maximum des stocks mondiaux de 
sucre a ete atteint en juin 1932, les mois suivants montrant un declin. Les stocks de caout- 
chouc ont touche leur plus haut niveau en 1932, l'augmentation visible de 1929 a 1931 s'arre- 
tant au cours de l'annee. Les stocks de cafe ont atteint leur plus haut en mars 1932, la dimi- 
nution commencant les mois suivants. Les plus forts stocks de coton ont ete constates en aout 
1932, et les stocks de soie ont aussi montre une reduction substantielle dans la periode courante. 
11 est impossible d'etablir actuellement des statistiques des stocks de cuivre apres octobre 1932, 
alors qu'il y avait un maximum. Les stocks d'etain montrent un declin vers la fin de 1932. 

Les prix de la plupart de ces neuf denrees ont touche leur plus bas en 1932, quelques prix 
montrant une reprise moderee avant la fin de l'annee. (Voir le graphique p. 10). 

Jauges economiques 

La correlation entre les principaux facteurs economiques du commerce canadien a ete demon- 
tree au cours des sept annees dernieres. Les principaux facteurs des prix et du volume tendent 
a se mouvoir vers la hausse ou la baisse, en harmonie avec les phases correspondantes du cycle 
des affaires. Les divergences de ces sequences etablies meritent d'etre etudiees dans l'analyse 
de la production economique courante du Canada. 

Le declin modere des prix de gros de 1926 a 1929 a ete une exception significative au deve- 
loppement conventionnel du cycle. Au cours de ces annees l'expansion industrielle du Canada 
a ete plus rapide qu'en toute autre periode. Depuis 1929, la correlation entre les indices du 
volume physique des affaires et les prix de gros a ete remarquablement etroite, le declin prononce 
de ces facteurs etant le principal element de la depression. La baisse a ete plus moderee en 1932 
qu'en aucune des deux annees precedentes et la plus grande resistance offer te aux influences 
deprimantes au cours des derniers six mois est un des aspects le plus brillant de la situation. 
L'indice du volume physique des affaires etait a 68-1 en Janvier comparativement a 72-6 en 
decembre, tandis que l'indice des prix de gros etait 63-9 comparativement a 64-0 le mois prece- 
dent. 

Le declin dans le volume des paiements commerciaux de toutes sortes est mesure par la 
diminution des montants globaux debites par les banques aux comptes de leurs deposants et 
representant en plus grande partie des transferts par cheques. Le chiffre des paiements d'une 
annee depasse de plusieurs fois le revenu national parce que ces paiements couvrent non seule- 
ment ceux faits au compte des salaires, gages, services, profits et autres item du revenu net, 
mais aussi les paiements faits a chaque stage de la production et de l'6coulement des denrees 
aussi bien que les paiements dans toutes ies autres transactions monetaires telles que le crans- 
fert de titres et l'achat d'immeubles. 

Les debits des banques d'octobre 1929 se chiffraient a $4,713,473,000, representant un chiffre 
d'affaires au cours du mois de 2-12 fois les depots des banques chartrees tels que declares a- la 
fin du mois precedent. En Janvier 1933, ce chiffre d'affaires se limitait a 1-07 fois, les debits 
du mois donnant $1,968,876,000. A la fin de decembre 1932 les depots des banques etaient de 
$1,843,733,000 comparativement a $2,255,814,000 le 30 novembre 1929. 



38 REVUE MENSUELLE DE LA SITUATION ECONOMIQUE 

L'analyse de la velocite avec laquelle les depots des banques sont utilises par les deposants 
indique que le declin dans le volume d'activite commerciale et dans le niveau des paiements 
entre 1929 et 1932 a 6te accompagne d'une diminution correspondante dans le volume des paie- 
ments en argent et que la diminution dans la velocite de la circulation a ete* beaucoup plus grande 
que la diminution dans le volume des depots. 

La fluctuation des perspectives de dividendes en differentes periodes conduit a de violents 
changements dans le cours des titres d'action ordinaire, les obligations du gouvernement res- 
tant relativement stables. L'indice du cours des obligations, apres avoir ete a bas niveau de 
1926 jusqu'au premier trimestre de 1931, a ete comparativement plus haut que les actions ordi- 
naires au cours des deux dernieres annees. Un gain modere dans les deux indices est visible 
en Janvier, l'indice des actions ordinaires marquant 51-6 comparativement a 51-3 en decembre, 
tandis que le rendement des obligations du gouvernement d'Ontario etait a 4-75 p.c. compa- 
rativement a 4-92 p.c. (Voir graphique, p. 15). 

LA SITUATION AUX ETATS-UNIS 

Le graphique de la page 30 fait voir les conditions economiques des Etats-Unis depuis 1919 
jusqu'a date. La production industrielle montre une repiise rapide en 1922 apres la depression 
primaire d'apres-guerre. La recession de 1924 a ete relativement moderee, une expansion con- 
siderable se manifestant en 1928 et les premiers mois en 1929. Le point le plus bas de 1'activite 
industrielle se constate en juillet 1932, le gain de septembre s'etant bien maintenu jusqu'a la 
fin de l'annee. 

Le rude declin des prix de gros a ete le facteur essentiel dans la depression primaire d'apres- 
guerre culminant en 1921. La reprise de 1922 a ete moderee et aucune orientation importante 
ne se constate pendant les huit annees qui s'ecoulent jusqu'a 1929. Le declin des trois der- 
nieres annees a ete persistant, au point qu'en decembre se constate le point minimum de la periode 
sous revue. La tendance de la somme des depots a demande et a temps des banques membres 
de la Federal Reserve dans les principales villes etait a la hausse pendant la periode d'apres- 
guerre. Le total s'est bien maintenu en 1932 apres une baisse considerable l'annee precedente. 

Les taux d'interet sur le papier commercial de premiere valeur ont fluctue grandement 
depuis quatorze ans. Le maximum a etc" atteint dans la dernieie partie de 1920, alors que les 
conditions de credit ont ete autrement rcactionnaires de 1922 a 1927. Le loyer de l'argent a (He* 
a niveau relativement bas, et de vives avances se manifestent les deux dernieres annees de la 
periode prospere. Le declin remarquable des taux depuis octobre 1929 a ete interrompu par 
les hausses du dernier trimestre de 1931. Les taux de la periode courante sont plus bas qu'a 
toute epoque des 14 annees de l'apres-guerre. 

Le trait le plus frappant de cette periode d'apres-guerre a ete l'extreme fluctuation des valeurs 
speculatives. L'indice du cours de ces valeurs 6tait a 50 en aout 1921, a. 225 en septembre 1929 
et retombait a 35 en juin 1932. Une reprise en juin et aout a hausse le niveau des actions ordi- 
naires un peu au-dessus de la cote du mois precedent. L'irregularite* de ces derniers temps n'a 
pas contrebalance cette reprise et le niveau de juin reste encore le plus bas de l'apres-guerre. 

Dans des developpements plus recents l'augmentation de I'activite industrielle en Janvier 
n'a pas ete aussi grande que la normale saisonniere. Les indices hebdomadaires des prix de gros 
refletent d'autres declins au cours du mois. Les cours moyens de la bourse ne montrent guere 
de changements en Janvier, se tenant bien dans une etroite marge de fluctuations d'ou ils ne sont 
pas sortis depuis octobre. Les premieres semaines de fevrier montrent une reaction moderee. 
(Voir graphique, p. 30). 

LA SITUATION EN GRANDE-BRETAGNE 

Les statistiques etablies jusqu'a date n'indiquent aucun changement prononce en Janvier. 
Les importations du mois sont evaluees a £54,120,000 comparativement a $62,266,000 le meme 
mois de 1932. Les exportations globales accusent un dech'n plus faible, etant de £33,380,000 
en Janvier 1933 comparativement a £36,362,000 en Janvier 1932. Ainsi, Texcedent des impor- 
tations est de £20,740,000 en Janvier 1933 comparativement a £25,904,000 le mois correspon- 
dant de 1932, et $31,969,000 en Janvier 1931. Comme d'ordinaire en Janvier le nombre de sans- 
travail donne un total de 2,903,000 le 23 du mois, soit une augmentation approximative de 
180,000 sur les chiffres du 19 decembre. 

Les nouvelles emissions de capital autres que celles du gouvernement britannique se chiffrent 
a £113,038,000 en 1932 dont £28,873,000 pour pays de l'Empire, et seulement £348,000 pour 
pays strangers. 
Bureau federal de la statistique, Ottawa, 21 fevrier 1933. 









PUBLICATIONS ISSUED BY THE DOMINION BUREAU OF STATISTICS 



1. ANNUAL OR SPECIAL REPORTS ISSUED DURING THE MONTH ENDED 

FEBRUARY 16, 1933 

Population. — Unemployment among wage-earners, bulletin No. 2, Winnipeg, Manitoba; Bulletin No. 5, 
Vancouver, British Columbia. Seventh Census of Canada, 1931, bulletin No. 21, Population of Canada 
1931, by religious denominations. 

Production. — Agricultural Production. — Summary of sugar reports, 1932; receipts, meltings and 
stocks of sugar; manufactures, shipments and stocks of refined sugar; exports and imports. The 
wheat situation in the Argentine, Jan. 30, 1933. Crop reporting program, 1933-1934. 

Forest Products. — Pulp and Paper industry, 1931. Preliminary report on the engraving, stereo- 
typing and electrotyping industry and the blue printing industry in Canada, 1931. Preliminary report 
on the miscellaneous paper goods industry (paper goods n.e.s.) in Canada, 1931. Report on the lumber 
industry in Canada, 1931. Preliminary report on the stationery and envelope industry in Canada, 
1931. Preliminary report on the sporting goods industry in Canada, 1931. Preliminary report on the 
printing and publishing industry in Canada, 1931. Preliminary report on the hardwood flooring 
industry in Canada, 1931. Cooperage and cooperage stock, 1930 and 1931. 

Manufactures. — Vegetable Products. — Reports on the prepared breakfast food and other cereal pro- 
ducts industry in Canada, 1931. Preliminary report on pack of fruits and vegetables in Canada, 1932. 
Report on the wine industry in Canada, 1931. Report on the tobacco manufacturing industry in Can- 
ada, 1931. Report on the flour milling industry in Canada, 1931. Animal Products. — Report on the 
leather boot and shoe industry in Canada, 1931. Chemicals and Allied Products. — The fertilizer 
industry in Canada, 1931. The polishes and dressings industry in Canada, 1931. Textiles and 
Allied Industries. — Report on the oiled and waterproof clothing industry in Canada, 1931. 
Report on the hosiery, knitted goods and fabric glove and mitten industries in Canada, 1931. Iron 
and Steel and Their Products. — Production of wire rope and cable in Canada, 1931. Galvanized 
sheets, Canada, 1932. The wire and wire goods industry in Canada, 1931. Manufactures of Non- 
ferrous Metals. — The lead, tin and zinc products industry in Canada, 1931. Non-Metallic 
Minerals. — The miscellaneous non-metallic mineral products industry, 1931; final statistics, 1931. 
The stone industry in Canada, 1931. The abrasives industry in Canada, 1931. Miscellaneous 
Manufactures. — Report on the bed, spring and mattress industry in Canada, 1931. Report on the 
broom, brush and mop industry in Canada, 1931. Report on the button industry in Canada, 1931. 
Report on the musical instrument industry in Canada, 1931. 

External Trade.— Trade of Canada, fiscal year ended March 31, 1932. 

Internal Trade. — Census of retail merchandizing and service establishments in Ontario by counties, 
cities and towns, 1930 (preliminary report); in Quebec; in Nova Scotia; in New Brunswick. Census 
of retail merchandising and service establishments in Manitoba, 1930 (preliminary provincial sum- 
mary;. Price movements, 1932. 

General. — Canada, 1933; the official handbook of present conditions and recent progress. Annual re- 
view of employment in Canada, 1932. 

2. PUBLICATIONS REGULARLY ISSUED BY THE WEEK, MONTH OR QUARTER 

Weekly Bulletins. — Canadian Grain Statistics, Carloadings of Revenue Freight. Investors' and Traders' 
Indexes of Security Prices. Index Number of 20 Mining Stocks. 

Monthly Bulletins. — Agricultural Statistics. The Wheat Situation; Review; statistical supplement. 
Cold Storage Holdings. Production of — (a) Flour, (b) Sugar, (c) Boots and Shoes, (d) Auto- 
mobiles, (e) Iron and Steel, (f) Coal and Coke, (g) Leading Mineral Products, (h) Asbestos, 
(i) Asphalt Roofing, (j) Cement, (k) Clay Products. (1) Copper, (m) Feldspar, (n) Gold, 
(o) Gypsum, (p) Lead, (q) Lime, (r) Natural Gas. (s) Nickel, (t) Petroleum, (u) Salt, 
(v) Silver, (w) Zinc, (x) Concentrated Milk Products, (y) Creamery Butter. Building Permits. 
Summary of the Trades of Canada current month and 12 months. Summary of Canada's domestic 
exports. Summary of Canada's Imports. Asbestos trade. Farm implements and machinery. 
Footwear trade. Exports: Grain and flour, Lumber; Meats; lard and sausage casings; Milk, milk 
products and eggs; Non-ferrous ores and smelter products; Paints and varnishes; Petroleum and its 
products; Pulpwood, wood pulp and paper; Rubber and insulated wire and cable; Vehicles (of iron). 
Imports: Coffee and tea; Lumber; Meats, lard and sausage casings; Milk and its products and eggs; 
Non-ferrous ores and smelter products; Paints and varnishes; Petroleum and its products; Rubber; 
Stoves, sheet metal products; Refrigerators; Vehicles (of iron). 
Railway Operating Statistics. Traffic of Canadian Railways. Canal Statistics. 
Price and Price Indexes. Automobile Financing. Changes in the value of retail sales. 
The Employment Situation as reported by Employers. Commercial Failures. Bank Debits. 
Review of Business Statistics. — Price $1.00 per year. 
Vital Statistics, Births, Marriages- and Deaths, by provinces. 



Quarterly Reports.— Trade of Canada— Price $2.00 per year. 



For the publications listed above application should be made to the Dominion Ststistician, Dominion 
Bureau of Statistics, Ottawa. 




Volume VIII *>€llil?c Numero 2 



CANADA 

BUREAU FEDERAL DE LA STATISTIQUE 
SECTION DE LA STATISTIQUE GENERALE 



REVUE DE LA SITUATION ECONOMIQUE 



FEVRIER 1933 



Publie par ordre de l'Hon. H. H. Stevens, M.P., 
Ministre du Commerce 



OTTAWA: F. A. ACLAND 

Imprimeur de Sa Tres Excellente Majeste le Roi 
1933 



Prix: Un dollar par an. 






Volume VIII *«■? Number 3 




CANADA 



DOMINION BUREAU OF STATISTICS 

GENERAL STATISTICS BRANCH 



MONTHLY REVIEW OF BUSINESS STATISTICS 



MARCH, 1933 




Published by Authority of the Honourable H. H. Stevens, M.P., 
Minister of Trade and Commerce 



OTTAWA: F. A. ACLAND 

Printer to the King's Moat Excellent Majesty 

1933 



Price: One Dollar per year. 



MONTHLY REVIEW OF BUSINESS STATISTICS 



SUMMARY OF CONTENTS 



Page 

Chart of Three Representative Factors. 4 

General Review 3-7 

Table 1. Weighted Indices of the Physical Vol- 
ume of Business 8 

Table 2. Trend of Business Movements. 

Imports of raw materials. Exports of lumber. 
Production of basic industries. Exports of certain 
commodities. Operations of railways. Canal 
traffic. Strikes and lockouts. Reports of the em- 
ployment offices. Immigration. Bank clearings. 
Failures. 9 

Chart of Gold Conditions 10 

Table 3. Receipts and Visible Supply of Canadian 
Grain 11 

Table 4. Exports and Cash Price of Canadian 
Grain 11 

Table 5. Consumption of Grain and Production 
by the Milling Industry 12 

Tabic 6. Receipts, Manufactures and Stocks of 
8ugar 12 

TaMe 7. Tobacco, Cigars and Cigarettes Entered 
for Consumption. 

Tobacco, cut. Tobacco, plug— Cigarettes. Cigar- 
ettes, ovnr-weight. Cigars. Foreign Raw Leaf 
Tobacco 13 

Tables Production of Boots and Shoes 13 

Table 9. Cold Storage Holdings, Sales and 
Slaughterings of Live Stock and Retail Food 
Prices 14 

Chart of World Stocks and Prices 15 

Table 10. Output of Central Electric Stations in 
Canada 16 

Tabic 11. Railway Freight Loaded at Stations. . 17 

Table 12. Index Numbers of Employment by 
Industries 18 

Electrical Energy Available for Consumption — 18 

Table 13. Seasonally Adjusted Indexes of Em- 
ployment, Indexes of Retail Sales and Auto- 
mobile Financing 19 

Table 14. Trend of Business in the Five Economic 
Areas. 

Canada, Maritime Provinces, Quebec, Ontario, 
Prairie Provinces, British Columbia— Construction 
Contracts Awarded. Building Permits. Index of 
Employment. Bank Debits. Sales of Insurance. 
Commercial Failures 20 

Table 15. Mineral Production by Months. 

Metals— Gold, Silver, Nickel, Copper, Lead, 
Zinc, Fuels— Coal, Petroleum, Natural Gas, Non- 
Metals— Asbestos, Gypsum, Feldspar, Salt, Struc- 
tural Materials— Cement, Clay Products, Lime. . . 20 



Pa< 

Table 16. Weekly Factors of Economic Activity in 
Canada. 

Grain Receipts and Prices, Live Stock Sales and 
Prices, Carloadings, Security Prices, Mining Stock 
Prices 21 

Table 17. Bank Debits to Individual Accounts 
in the Clearing House Centres of Canada 22 

Table 18. Indexes of Employment by Cities 22 

Table 19. Building Permits Issued in Sixty-one 
Cities 23 



Table 20. Index Numbers of Wholesale Prices. 



24 



Table 21. Prices of Representative Commodities 
and Wholesale Prices in Other Countries. 

United States, United Kingdom, France, Ger- 
many, Belgium, Netherlands, Norway, Sweden, 
Italy, Finland, India, Japan, Australia, New 
Zealand, Egypt 25 

Table 22. Total Value of Imports and Exports, 
by Groups, in Thousands of Dollars 26 

Tabic 23. Canada'sDomestic Exports by Principal 
Commodities 27 

Indexes of Cost of Living and Cost per Week of a 

Family Budget 27 

Table 24. Summary of Canada's Imports by 
Principal Commodities 28 

Table 25. Banking and Currency 

Chart of Economic Conditions of Great Britain. 

Table 26. Index Numbers of Security Prices. 

(a) 1. Common Stocks— Industrials, Total, Iron 
and Steel, Pulp and Paper, Milling, Oils, Textiles 
and Clothing, Food and Allied Products, Beverages, 
Miscellaneous. Utilities, Total, Transportation, 
Telephone and Telegraph, Power and Traction. 

(b) Common Stocks, continued— Companies 
abroad, Total, Industrial, Utilities, Banks, General 
Index Number, Traders' Index, Preferred Stocks, 
Interest Rates, Yields on Bonds, Shares Traded, 
Montreal. Mining Stocks— Gold, Copper, Silver 
and Miscellaneous, Total Index 31 

Table 27. Tonnage of Vessels Entered and Cleared 
from Canadian Ports 31 

Table 28. World Stocks and Prices 32 

Table 29. Significant Statistics of the United 
Kingdom 33 

Table 30. Significant Statistics of the United 
States 34 

List of Current Publications of the Dominion 
Bureau of Statistics 39 

General Review (in French) 35-38 



MONTHLY REVIEW OF BUSINESS STATISTICS 

Vol. VIII OTTAWA, MARCH, 1933 No. 3 

Dominion Statistician: R. H. Coats, B.A., F.S.S. (Hon.), F.R.S.C. 

Chief, Branch op General Statistics: S. A. Cudmore, M.A., F.S.S. 

Assistant on Business Statistics: Sydney B. Smith, M.A. 

THE BUSINESS SITUATION IN CANADA 

Economic conditions in Canada were not greatly altered during February from the preceding 
month. The chief constructive influence was the continued strength in Dominion government 
bonds, prices averaging slightly higher than in January. The yield on Ontario government 
bonds was 4-73 p.c. in February compared with 4-75 p.c, indicating a moderate gain in prices. 
The strength in government bonds in Canada is partly a reflection of the open market policy 
of the banks. The bank investment holdings of different classes moved up to $784,200,000 at 
the end of January, a new high point in the history of Canadian banking. This has come about 
through the reduction in current loans. Outstanding loans were $946,000,000 at the end of 
January compared with $1,071,000,000 on the same date of last year. During the twelve- 
month interval, notice deposits showed a gain of $15,000,000. The surplus of notice deposits, 
which was $298,000,000 in January, 1932, had increased to $437,000,000 on the last date for 
which statistics are available. 

Despite the fluctuation in foreign exchange resulting in an advance of sensitive commo- 
dities, the general level of wholesale prices was slightly lower. The general index was 63-6 
in February compared with 63-9 in January. 

Influenced by the downward trend on the New York stock exchange, Canadian stock prices 
declined in February, the index standing at 47-6. In January the index was 51 -6 and in June, 
1932, the lowest point of recent years, the index registered 43-2. 

Business Operations 

While productive operations were quiet in February, the decline from the preceding month, 
after seasonal adjustment, was moderate. The index of the physical volume of business, con- 
sisting of 45 factors adjusted for seasonal tendencies, was 67 • in February compared with 68 • 1 
in January. Mineral production, based on nine factors, made a better showing, general gains 
being recorded except in asbestos. Nickel exports were 3,469,400 pounds compared with 3,079,- 
000, and exports of copper from mines showed a gain. Zinc exports were 14,007,000 pounds 
compared with 8,296,000. Gold shipments to the Mint and export markets were 225,492 ounces 
compared with 262,740, a moderate gain being shown after seasonal adjustment. Silver was 
exported in greater volume. Imports of bauxite for the manufacture of aluminium were 3,060,- 
000 pounds compared with 2,062,500 in January. The output of coal was 1,036,400 tons com- 
pared with 1,023,000, a gain of nearly 18 p.c, after seasonal adjustment. 

The index of mineral production was 94-2 compared with 80-5 in January. 

The manufacture of foodstuffs was less active than in the preceding month. Inspected 
slaughterings of live stock showed a gain after seasonal adjustment. Exports of cheese after 
the usual adjustment were somewhat greater. The milling industry was less active in the last 
month for which statistics are available. The index of the manufacture of foodstuffs was 63-0 
compared with 67-9. 

Release of cigars was 4,675,000 compared with 3,966,000, leaf tobacco and cigarettes showing 
a decline. The decline in the imports of crude rubber was less than normal for the season. The 
manufacture of boots and shoes was slightly greater in the last month for which statistics are 
available. Imports of cotton and wool for further manufacture were in lesser volume, the index 
of textile imports of this class being 56 • 1 compared with 60-0 in January. 

Further reduction was shown in the output of newsprint, the total being 125,610 tons com- 
pared with 140,539. Wood pulp exports showed a gain after seasonal adjustment, while exports 
of planks, boards and shingles recorded decline. The wood and paper index was 59 • 8 compared 
with 63-4 in January. 

Two blast furnaces were banked in February leaving no furnaces in operation at the end of 
the month. The output of pig iron and steel showed a sharp decline. The manufacture of 



MONTHLY REVIEW OF BUSINESS STATISTICS 




MONTHLY REVIEW OF BUSINESS STATISTICS 5 

automobiles was less, whereas a gain would have been normal for the season. The iron and 
steel index dropped from 31 -9 to 19-6. The imports of crude petroleum were 37,556,000 gallons 
compared with 35,085,000, the gains after seasonal adjustment being nearly 37 p.c. 

The index of manufacturing production was 58-7 compared with 62-2 in January. 

The new business obtained by the construction industry was at a low ebb in February. 
Construction contracts awarded were $3,149,000 compared with $3,362,000, while building 
permits in 61 cities were limited to $907,000. 

Electric power production on an average daily basis was 46,413,000 k.w.h., compared with 
45,053,000 in January, a gain after seasonal adjustment of nearly 3-5 p.c. 

The index of industrial production, including mining, manufactures, construction and 
electric power, was 60 • 9 compared with 62 • 2. 

Carloadings numbered 133,147 compared with 134,432, representing a slight gain after 
seasonal adjustment. Declines were shown in employment in wholesale and retail trade and in 
the volume of imports and exports. The distribution index compiled from carloadings, trade 
employment, imports and exports, was 83 • 8 compared with 84-3 in January. 

Declines in the receipts of wheat, oats, barley and rye at the Head of the Lakes and Pacific 
coast ports were less than normal for the season, the index consequently moving up from 52-5 
in January to 75-9 in February. 

The index of animal marketings on the stockyards was 79-4 compared with 71-9. The 
index of agricultural marketings moved up from 56-1 in January to 76-5 in February. Cold 
storage holdings were heavier on February 1, due allowance being made for seasonal tendencies. 

World Stocks and Prices 

The chart on page 15 shows world stocks of eight commodities by months during the post- 
war period and U.S. prices of the same commodities The general indexes disclose a close inverse 
correlation between stocks and prices of identical commodities. The gain in stocks during the 
post-war primary depression was relatively moderate, though the decline in prices in 1920 was 
one of the most drastic in history. The index of prices moved up at the beginning of 1923 and 
the two indexes were in close proximity until 1925. Toward the end of that year the index 
of world stocks moved up, while the index of prices commenced its downward course leading to 
the wide disparity of the current period. 

While a measure of variety was shown by the trends of the eight charted commodities, a 
similar general pattern was disclosed, especially in the accumulation of stocks and the drop in 
prices during recent years. The price of rubber was high in 1925 but dropped rapidly early in 
1926, when stocks commenced to pile up. The gain in the stocks of coffee was rapid from 1927 
to the early part of 1932. The disparity between the stock and price curves of cotton developed 
in 1925. The price of copper was maintained at a high level in 1929, but declined sharply in 
the second quarter of 1930. The price and stock curves for tin in the post-war period present 
an excellent sample of inverse correlation. Stocks were relatively high in 1922 and low in 1926-27, 
while prices were low in 1922 and high in 1926-27. From 1929 to 1931 stocks accumulated 
rapidly, while prices reached a new low level in post-war history. 

It is claimed bj r the English economist Henry Clay that the misdirection of production 
without any alteration in monetary policy can produce a general fall in prices. The depression 
in any one industry due to misdirection or over-production of its product will react upon all 
other industries from which the people in the first industry normally buy. Consequently a 
sufficient number of cases of error of this sort leading to excessive production of certain commo- 
dities, will result, through the loss of purchasing power by the people in these industries, in 
general depression over the whole field of industry. The decade following the war appears to 
be a period in which the misdirection of industry has been the most important influence on 
industrial activity, and has been largely responsible for the great fall in prices. 

Before the war the world's industry was in a state of balance. The war destroyed the 
balance and the world's industries have not yet found a new equilibrium. Owing to war con- 
ditions, Canada and the United' States increased the wheat acreage to fill the place left vacant 
by the loss of Russia's export. The mills of Japan and India enlarged to supply the markets 
that Lancashire could not satisfy. But this diversion of trade involved a duplication of capacity. 
The duplication of supplies of many of the most important agricultural staples and commoner 
manufacture, created a similar problem of excess capacity for their producers once the obstruc- 
tions to trade that the war created were removed. 

61155—2 



6 MONTHLY REVIEW OF BUSINESS STATISTICS 

The Gold Situation 

The lowest point of post-war gold production was reached in 1922 when the output was 
15,452,000 ounces. Lower prices in recent years have reduced costs of production and have 
favoured the gold mining industry, and during 1932 the output was 23,906,000 ounces, the 
highest ever recorded. Owing to the remarkable activity of recent years in gold mining, the 
world stock of the yellow metal has shown progressive gain. Furthermore, an increasing pro- 
portion of the total world gold stock has been concentrated in the vaults of central banks and 
governments. In 1914 these held but 34-6 p.c. of the world's total gold stocks, but since then 
gold has in many countries passed out of general circulation and the proportion held by central 
banks and governments rose to 51 • 2 p.c. in 1932. Gold reserves have shown a gain of no less 
than 116 p.c. since 1914. 

It has been demonstrated by several financial authorities that, over long periods, there 
tends to be a close correlation between wholesale prices and the relative gold stock. As the level 
of wholesale prices as measured by Sauerbeck's index number was in 1850 exactly equal to that 
of 1910, this period of sixty years has been used for a statistical proof of the so-called quantity 
theory of money. Taking the total world stock of gold in 1850 as the base of the calculation, 
it has been claimed by Prof. Cassel that an annual average increase of 2-8 p.c. of the preceding 
years stock was required to bring world gold supplies to the level at which they were in 1910. 
Consequently it required a cumulative increase of 2-8 p.c. over that sixty-year period to keep 
the price level constant. Allowing 0-2 p.c. annually for wear and tear and disappearance of 
coins, it follows that a gross cumulative increase of 3 p.c. was required. 

According to the quantity theory of money, whenever the actual annual increase of gold is 
greater than 3 p.c, the general level of prices should rise, ceteris paribus, while if the annual 
increase is less than 3 p.c. the general price level should fall. By actual test, a close correlation 
was shown between wholesale prices and the curve representing the percentage of the actual 
supply of gold to the normal gold supply as computed by increasing the gold supply in 1850 
at a cumulative rate of 3 p.c. per annum*. It was consequently concluded by Cassel that an 
annual increase of 3 p.c. in the world's gold stock would be necessary to maintain a stable price 
level. 

The experts, drawing upon this historical experience, forecast that world prices would drop 
in the present decade owing to the failure of gold production to meet normal requirements. It 
was estimated that gold production would be $402,000,000 in 1931 and $410,000,000 in 1932. 
Actual production as given in the preliminary report of mineral production of Canada for 1932 
was $458,252,000 in 1931 and $494,180,000 in 1932. Further, in the last three or four years 
a larger proportion of the production is devoted to monetary uses, while in addition large amounts 
of gold previously hoarded have been acquired by the central banks in the last two years. 

The result of the withdrawal of gold from circulation, together with the inflow of new gold, 
was that the monetary gold reserves of the world, excluding Russia, rose according to Kitchin 
between 1913 and 1929 by an amount equivalent to an increase of 5-9 p.c. per annum, a figure 
which compares with the average rate of 2-3 p.c. or 1-7 p.c, respectively, shown by the League 
of Nations' or the Federal Reserve Bank of New York's figures for the production of basic com- 
modities (foodstuffs and raw materials) for the world excluding Russia. According to the 
Federal Reserve Bulletin the gold reserves of 49 countries were $11,880,000,000 in December 
1932 compared with $10,291,000,000 at the end of 1919 a gain of 15-4 p.c 

Despite these conditions of gold supply, wholesale prices declined severely from 1929 to 
1933. With the exception of France, Switzerland, Holland and Belgium, the nations of the 
world which two years ago founded their currency and credit upon gold are no longer on the 
gold standard in the sense that restrictions are now placed either on the redemption of bank 
notes or on the export of the metal. 

In accounting for the drastic decline of wholesale prices, it is argued that an adequate Avorld 
supply of gold for use as monetary reserves is not in itself sufficient under the conditions of an 
international gold standard to insure a stable price level. The total supply must also be dis- 
tributed among the different national monetary systems in such a way that each important 
country, or group of countries, is assured of having large enough reserves to expand the gold 
basis of its currency in accordance with the development of its industry and commerce. If 
the dis tribution is not equitable in this sense, and if the steady concentration of gold in a few 

*See Annex X to the Interim Report of the Gold Delegation of the Financial Committee, League .of Nations, 
Geneva. 



MONTHLY REVIEW OF BUSINESS STATISTICS 7 

countries causes a progressive shrinkage of reserves in the other countries of the world which 
is not checked, a fall of prices in this latter group due to credit restriction will spread to the whole 
world. The gold accumulating countries will find that their ample reserves are no safeguard 
against falling prices and the attendant depression of trade. 

It is estimated that France and the United States at the end of 1932 held nearly 60 p.c. 
of the world's monetary gold stock. The trend of gold reserves in the countries exclusive of 
the five gold-accumulating nations, shows close correlation with the trend of wholesale prices 
in the last four years. This maldistribution has interfered with the normal working of the 
gold standard, and, assuming normal confidence in credit instruments, the production and supply 
of monetary gold if properly used is adequate to support a higher price level than obtains at the 
present time. 

CONDITIONS IN THE UNITED STATES 

The banking crisis interfered with productive operations in February. Carloadings and 
automobile production were factors having a depressing influence on the indexes of business 
operations. The gains in the production of iron, steel, coal and zinc were counterbalanced by 
declines in other lines. 

At the close of February, withdrawals of currency and gold increased rapidly and on March 
3 they assumed proportions that compelled on the following day suspension of gold payments 
by reserve banks. By March 15 resumption of currency payments had been generally secured. 
From a long-range standpoint, the events of the past month are regarded by some authorities 
as favourable, improving the prospect for financial recovery. 

LONG TERM BRITISH ECONOMIC CONDITIONS 

There is presented in this number a chart outlining economic conditions in Great Britain 
during the post-war period. The main feature of the general index for the period was the relative 
stability at a moderate level from 1922 to 1930, a minor depression of 1926 reflecting the strike 
of that year. The recent depression culminated in the fall of 1931, the general situation showing 
improvement during last year. 

Industrial production reached low points in 1921, 1926 and in the last two years. The 
expansion from 1921 to 1929 was interrupted temporarily by the strike conditions of 1926. The 
greatest activity during the period of observation took place from 1927 to 1929. The low point 
of industrial production to date was reached in the third quarter of 1932, a distinct gain being 
recorded in the last quarter. 

The maximum of wholesale prices in the post-war period was reached in May, 1920,- when 
the Board of Trade index on the base of 1926 was 219-8. By September, 1922, one of the most 
drastic declines of history had occurred leaving the index at 104-2, a decline of nearly 53 p.c. 
Moderate recovery was shown in the early months of 1925. Owing partly to the return to the 
gold standard at the pre-war parity, prices declined considerably between 1925 and 1929. The 
index stood at 89-5 in December, 1929 and fell to 67-0 in September, 1931, at the time of the 
departure from the gold standard. Since that time, the price level has been well maintained, 
the index in February being 66-8. 

The money factors used here have recently shown a tendency more favourable to business 
recovery than at any other time in the post-war period. The deposits of the nine London clearing 
banks have reached a new high level in the current period and the three months bankers' rate 
of interest was lower in 1932 than at any time in the last fourteen years. Stock prices have 
traced two well-defined cycles, the first post-war cycle lasting from 1919 to 1921. The maximum 
of the second cycle was reached in September, 1929, and the minimum to date in June, 1932. 
The decline in the index on the 1926 base during that intervening period was from 124-3 to 
59-3 or 47-7 p.c. 

The moderate improvement in economic conditions during 1932 as compared with 1931 is 
regarded by some authorities as a natural consequence of the abandonment of the gold standard. 
It is asserted by Keynes that Great Britain's action has had two signal consequences. The 
first has been to stop the decline in prices measured in terms of national currencies over a con- 
siderable portion of the world. A large number of countries are now linked to the future of 
sterling rather than of gold. France is the only remaining country of major importance where 
the gold standard is functioning freely. This means an abatement of the deflationary pressure 
of two years ago. 
Dominion Bureau of Statistics, Ottawa, March 21, 1933. 

61155-21 



8 



MONTHLY REVIEW OF BUSINESS STATISTICS 



Table 1. Weighted Indexes of the Physical Volume of Business and Agricultural Factors in 
Canada, Based on the Monthly average for 1926 and Corrected where Necessary for Seasonal 
Variation. 



Physical Volume of Business. 

INDUSTRIAL PRODUC- 
TION 



Mineral Production 

Copper exports 

Nickel exports 

Lead production 

Zinc exports 

Gold shipments 

Silver shipments 

Asbestos exports 

Bauxite imports 

Coal production 

Manufacturing 

Foodstuffs 

Flour production 

Oatmeal production . . . 

Sugar manufactured. . . 

Cheese exports 

Salmon exports 

Tobacco 

Cigars 

Cigarettes 

Rubber imports 

Boots and shoes production. 
Textiles 

Raw cotton imports . . . 

Cotton yarn imports. . 

Wool, raw and yarn... . 
Forestry 

Newsprint 

Wood pulp exports 

Planks and boards exports 

Shingles exported 

Iron and steel 

Steel production 

Pig iron production 

Iron and steel imports 

Automobileproduction . 

Coke production 

Crude petroleum imports . 

Construction 

Contracts awarded 

Building permits 

Cost of construction 

Electric Power 

DISTRIBUTION 

Trade employment 

Carloadings 

Imports 

Exports 



1932 



Feb. 



Agricultural Factors— 
AGRICULTURAL MARKET- 
INGS 

Grain Marketings 

Wheat 

Oats 

Barley 

Flax 

Rye 

Live Stock Marketings 

Cattle 

Calves 

Hogs 

Sheep 

ANIMAL PRODUCTS- 
Inspected Slaughterings— 

Cattle 

Sheep 

Hogs 

Cold Storage Holdings 

Eggs 

Butter 

Cheese 

Beef 

Pork 

Mutton 

Poultry 

Lard 

Veal 



85-4 

81-3 

104-2 
86-9 

125-0 
90-6 

116-6 

150-1 
83-8 
27-7 
93-8 
90-0 

74-2 
70-6 
57-6 
78-4 
35-5 
31-2 
120-4 
128-2 
86-5 
145-2 
107-5 
96 

61-3 
63-1 
90-5 
41-3 
78-1 
108 
54 
47-2 
51 
34 
45-7 
18 
44 
31 
93 
152-1 

85 

103 

39 
89 

134 

96 
119 
75-8 
70-7 
63 



77-4 
75 

81-8 
66-7 
20-5 
161 
350 
87-7 
69-0 
120-8 
106-4 
162-0 



111-7 

2131 

109-9 

157-6 

326-3 

180-9 

58-4 

68-2 

110-9 

166-3 

430-3 

92-5 

76-8 



Mar. April May June July Aug. Sept. Oct 



81-8 

76-9 

89-9 
56-7 
72-8 
83-8 
129-0 
136-5 
73-2 
26-9 
930 
77 

76-6 
78-2 
65-0 

102-1 
58-1 
46-1 

124-7 

116-3 
83 

128-7 

100-7 
94-3 
82-3 
76-8 

121-0 
97-1 
74-4 

104 
52 
42-0 
60-5 
42 
59-5 
27-5 
46-7 
39-9 
92-8 

146-2 

53 

62 
31 
89-8 

136 

95-4 
117-5 
73-0 
81 

53 



103-5 
105-9 
115 



38- 

6 
51 
92 
73 
94 
113 
195 



107-5 

230-5 

106- 1 

150-2 

329-3 

157-8 

54-8 

72-1 

110-3 

171-4 

384-5 

69-4 

73-8 



75-3 



105-0 
60-0 



157-8 
213-2 
73-2 
25-0 
85-6 
64-6 

66-5 

68-3 

54-0 

99 

45 

39-3 

74-2 

101-1 
88 

106-0 
97-1 
90-7 
61-3 
66-5 
83-0 
25-1 
74-1 

111-6 
49-0 
34-5 
56-0 
33-2 
52-3 
27-5 
36-0 
29-0 
89-1 

129-0 

27- 
28-5 
26 
89 

139-0 

95 
117 
77-2 
61 

61 



79-9 

74-6 

94-4 
56-6 
68-2 
86-9 
143-9 
182-7 
87-0 
28-7 



50 



44 
65 

102-2 
70 

113 
79 
96 

120 

129 
96-5 
83-3 
71-4 

107-9 
46-3 
33-3 
40-5 
34-1 
40-3 
19-4 
360 
34-4 
78 

230-1 

31-8 
32-2 
30 
89-1 

131-2 

94-5 
117-8 
71 

72-9 
58 



81-4 

76-9 

92-3 
67-9 
36-1 
92-8 



102-3 


84-4 


105-7 


82-8 


113-5 


89-9 


67-2 


230 


47-4 


36-4 


23-3 


28-6 


138-8 


106-3 


87-2 


91 5 


61-4 


67-8 


79-6 


78-4 


120-8 


125-1 


188-8 


172-3 


91-2 


87-1 


237-4 


175-8 


108-2 


121-7 


144-1 


120-9 


313-5 


134-0 


143-7 


178-0 


64-9 


54-4 


73-3 


77-1 


103-1 


101-9 


174-9 


210-6 


343-1 


297-8 


71-5 


73-1 


121-2 


94-3 



6 
3 

■7 
5 
•2 

82-1 

94-0 

85-9 

62-4 

70-1 

55-5 
223 
120-0 

78 

134-4 
169-9 

93-3 

53 

50 

79 

63 

74 
102-6 

35 

51 

50-1 

32-9 

25 

12 

38-1 

36-7 

75 
176 

28-1 

28 

27 



130-5 

93 
117 
70-3 



221-4 

250-8 
279-9 
29-2 



92- 
116 



91-9 
233-4 
128-8 
116-9 
1130 
167-8 

620 

81-2 
107-7 
205-4 
245-9 

74-2 
104 



78-3 

74-2 

83-4 
103-2 
32-4 
89-3 
74-3 
163-0 
74-5 
20-6 
19-3 
54-5 

76-9 
93-3 



84-0 
68-9 



155 



72 
105 
89 
84 
42 
41 

87-5 
28 
55-9 



17 

37-2 

41 

45 
11 
31 
47 
83 
192-9 

39 
42-6 
31- 
88- 

129- 

89- 
115- 

60- 
63- 
62- 



135-9 
147-9 
158-5 
112-5 
66-5 
32-7 
170-7 
821 
64-9 
87-1 
105-5 
131-3 



85-7 
178-5 
122-8 
112-2 
103-6 
143-1 

73-5 

82-4 
103-8 
292-9 
199-9 

80-3 
100-0 



78-1 

73-6 

84-8 
7-6 
160 
98-2 
640 
186-5 
73-9 
24-3 
16-4 
56-8 

75-5 

97 
103-7 

70-1 

93-2 

77-0 

99-4 
102-7 

71 
114-3 

61-2 

93-0 

73-2 

73 

98-2 

63-3 

59-6 

91 

38 

25-0 

46 

27 

43 
9 

26 

26 

72 
172 

37-1 
40-1 

28 
87-8 

137-1 

90- 
115- 

64- 
63- 
63-0 



196-6 

222- 

242-8 
53-1 

121-0 
66-2 

177-8 
79-9 
59-4 
83-9 

111-8 

112-2 



86-7 
143-6 
119-4 
106-4 

98-6 
114-8 

62-7 

94-5 
114-5 
337-6 
170-9 

64-4 



77-1 

71-9 

89-5 
17-2 
26-3 
88-7 
90-8 
185-0 
88-9 
30-8 
67-6 
68-5 

74-3 

94-5 

85 

60-4 

98-7 

54-1 

35 

102-7 
69-0 

114-8 

201-5 
95-0 
67-4 
66-0 

116-8 



75-3 

70-4 

99-3 
38-5 
401 
84-2 
135-2 
185-1 
101-2 
41-6 
92-8 
75-5 

70- 

88- 

78-0 

55 
131 

56-0 

34 

78 

68 

82 

74-0 

83 

71 

68-3 
141-2 



Nov. 



Dec 



60-1 


63-9 


60-5 


64-7 


99-2 


97-3 


33-2 


50-2 


18-0 


25-7 


53-6 


61-2 


20-4 


22-4 


41-0 


27-1 


9-9 


10-9 


27-9 


30-1 


15-3 


21-2 


82-8 


81-3 


136-4 


140-0 


31-5 


30-7 


36-1 


32-6 


20-0 


26-2 


88-3 


88-6 


128-0 


127-8 


91-3 


88-8 


114-3 


113-7 


68-1 


59-8 


64-7 


67-5 


64-6 


66-4 


189-0 


83-8 


213-9 


87-4 


239-1 


97-0 


140-9 


70-9 


34-2 


9-7 


121 


110 


21-3 


13-4 


77-1 


67-4 


55-9 


47-4 


92-8 


84-1 


110-4 


95-3 


94-2 


108-2 


79-3 


66-4 


115-4 


107-4 


100-5 


89-9 


104-9 


96-7 


103-7 


108-4 


112-8 


1191 


59-3 


58-4 


92-5 


82-9 


115-1 


102-7 


351-9 


207-9 


123-0 


73-9 


62-9 


36-9 


111-4 


102-1 



75- 

71- 

86-4 
21-3 
46-4 

119-1 
58-3 

164-1 
69-6 
2S-7 

202-3 
75-3 

72-3 
86-7 
93-5 
48-4 

125-4 
57-7 
27-1 

126-5 
70-3 

148-1 
96-5 
81-0 

104 

110 
65-8 
81 
65 

101 
51 
23 
50 
28 
57-6 
24-5 
39-7 
18-9 
90-2 

102-0 
39-4 
44-7 
26-0 



134-4 

86-9 
111-6 
60-1 
70-6 
47-3 



62 

59 

65-1 

55 

10 

21 
4 

74 

41 
101 
123 
120-3 



67 
115-0 



121-2 

126 
62 
64-6 

108-5 

114-6 
38-5 
81-9 
81-2 



72-6 



67-7 

90-5 
45-8 
38-2 
82-8 
91-7 
198-1 
61-4 
43-3 
25 
73 

70-2 

94-4 

61-7 

23 
127 

39 

56-1 
106-2 

60 
124-1 

59 

63 

96-3 

94-8 

66-4 
115-3 

60 

92 

40-6 

23 

42 

29 

51 

48 

29 

21-6 

931 

71-0 

19-5 
20-5 
17-1 
88-1 

131-3 

86-1 
113-4 

58-4 
59-8 
47-5 



59-1 
56-6 
61-0 
49-8 
27-3 
18-8 
5-8 
70-3 
55-8 
81-4 
93-8 
76-2 



73-6 
118-3 
105-3 

98-3 
130-5 
139 

52 

54 
101 
111 

47 

64 



1933 



Jan. Feb 



67-5 



MONTHLY REVIEW OF BUSINESS STATISTICS 
Table 2. Trend of Business Movements 



Items 



Trend of Business Movements— 

Rubber, Crude Imports. 000 lbs. 

Cotton, Raw Imports 000 lbs. 

Wool, Raw Imports 000 lbs. 

Planks and Boards 

Exports Mil. bd. ft. 

Timber Scaled in B.C. Mil. bd. ft. 
Newsprint Production.. 000 tons 

Shipments 000 tons 

Stocks 000 tons 

Pig Iron Production. .000 1. tons 
Ferro-alloys Production. . .tons 
Steel Ingots and 

Castings 000 1. tons 

Passenger Automobile Pro- 
duction No. 

Truck Production No. 

Total Cars and Trucks No. 

Exports— Auto Complete or 

Chassis No. 

Exports— Automobiles and 

Parts $000 

Petroleum, Crude Imports 

000,000 pal. 
Condensed Milk Output 000 lbs. 
Evaporated Milk Output 000 lbs . 

Fish Exports 000 lbs. 

Fish E xports $000 

Canned Salmon Exports 

000 case? 
Rauways— 
Canadian National— 

(exclusive of eastern lines') 

Operating Revenues $000 

Operating Expenses $000 

Operating Income $000 

Freight carried one mile 

000,000 tons 
Passengers carried one mile 
000,000 pass. 
Canadian Pacific — 

Operating Revenues $000 

Operating Expenses $000 

Operating Income $000 

Freight carried one 

mile 000,000 tons 

Passengers carried 

one mile 000,000 pass. 

All Railways — 

Operating Revenues $000 

Operating Expenses $000 

Operating Income $000 

Freight carried 

one mile 000,000 tons 

Passengers carried 

one mile 000,000 pass. 

Carloadings 000 cars 

Canal Cargo Traffic — 

Sault Ste. Marie 000 s. tons 

Welland 000 s. tons 

St. Lawrence 000 s. tons 

Coat, Available 000 s. tons 

Coke Production 000 tons 

Strikes and Lockouts — 

Disputes in existence No. 

Number of employees No. 

Time loss in working days 

Percentage of unemploy- 
ment in Trade Unions. .P.C. 
Employment Office Reports— 

Applications No. 

Vacancies No. 

Placements No. 

Immigration— Total No. 

From U. Kingdom No. 

From U. States No. 

From other Countries No. 

Returned Canadians No. 

Bank Clearings $000, 000 

Failures No 

Liabilities $000 



1932 



Feb. Mar. April May June July Aug. Sept. Oct. Nov. Dec 



3,859 

7,074 

513 

60-45 
80-1 
158-54 
150-95 
61-19 
10-51 
1,431 

28-42 

4,494 
983 

5,477 

383 

214 

48-58 

853 

2,200 

28,287 

1,751 

105-11 



1,072 
1,774 
879' 

702 



9,030 

8,461 

229 

679 

47 

22,294 

22,196 

821' 

1,659 

107 
174-18 



1,670 
144 

17 
3,611 
14,679 

20-6 

55,558 

33,426 

32,633 

1,039 

109 

684 

•246 

862 

1,015 

221 

3,651 



5,797 
10.212 
1,829 

77-55 
110-2 
166-76 
163-81 
63-55 
17-99 
1,295 

43-57 

6,617 
1,701 
8,318 

567 

257 

67-64 
1,045 
3,713 

27,093 
1,568 

124-58 



10,213 

9,813 

256 



42 

10,237 
8,742 
1,171 

736 

58 

25,027 

22,550 

1,612 

1,814 

125 
186-01 



1,708 
156 

11 

1,501 

26,410 

20-4 

55,271 

35,275 

34,275 

1,438 

270 

903 

265 

1.035 

1,036 

208 

3,399 



3,585 

6,230 

347 

42-52 
165-5 
176-66 
186-44 
53-90 
16-90 
2,185 

36 03 

5,660 
1,150 
6,810 

321 

219 

38-57 
1,102 
4,872 
10,575 
691 

32-51 



9,991 
8,981 

848 

803 

39 

9,492 

8,237 

918 

663 

50 

23.851 

21,052 

1,932 

1,653 

113 

180-18 

369 
465 
279 
1,264 
143 

11 
1,413 
34,5, 

23-0 

57,580 

34,961 

33,744 

2,059 

386 

1,274 

399 

1,538 

1,073 

190 

3,171 



3,171 
12,463 
1,096 

62-95 
184-3 
175-89 
172-95 
5701 
13-34 
1,132 

29-24 

7,269 

952 

8,221 

333 

264 

109-52 

913 

6,271 

15,313 

1,214 

34-30 



9,907 

9,128 

596 

816 

41 

9,537 

8,425 

737 

673 

50 

23,400 

21,245 

1,191 

1,632 

110 
182-73 

1,568 
1,037 

884 
1,694 

129 

13 

1,521 

31,905 

22-1 

54,745 

32,209 

31,039 

2,718 

510 

1,834 

374 

2,194 

1,037 

204 

3,148 



June 


July 


6,349 


3,425 


4,486 


3,590 


816 


344 


110-69 


37-85 


178-5 


129-0 


161-37 


142-49 


164-31 


145-43 


50-03 


47-02 


8-16 


7-31 


893 


892 


18-12 


27-51 


6,308 


6,773 


804 


699 


7,112 


7,472 


768 


740 


349 


1,089 


113-95 


104-21 


979 


1,495 


6,947 


5,307 


17,228 


16,123 


1,933 


1,831 


86-89 


69-33 


10,666 


10,032 


9,420 


9,144 


1,138 


703 


891 


717 


44 


52 


10,484 


9,685 


8,558 


8,460 


1,579 


860 


933 


670 


63 


71 


24,813 


22,970 


21,654 


21,053 


2,328 


1,027 


2,257 


1,790 


129 


147 


185-15 


157-37 


1,988 


2,638 


1,065 


1,030 


905 


822 


1,694 


1,679 


119 


127 


17 


26 


3,011 


6,121 


38,147 


50,397 


21-9 


21-8 


50,547 


46,692 


29,404 


25,917 


28,532 


25,191 


2,562 


1,974 


387 


298 


1,794 


1,299 


381 


377 


1,944 


1,807 


1,081 


1,105 


176 


175 


3,794 


2,987 



2,173 

5,995 

670 

53-61 
121-1 

157-92 

154-88 

50-03 

5-99 

871 

26-71 

3,166 

901 

4,067 

1,523 

752 

89-78 
1,666 
5,173 
23,167 
1,859 

66-20 



9,746 

9.420 

137 

708 

52 

10,172 

9,119 

697 



65 

23,099 

21,922 

2 

1,813 



6,204 

4,553 

535 

35-46 
97-2 
150-69 
152-62 
48-06 
5-71 
732 

23-14 

1,741 

601 

2.342 

1,654 

802 

76-91 

1,419 

3,959 

23,813 

1,390 

48-13 



12,498 
9,657 
2,681 

1,429 

44 

13,256 
9,271 
3.723 

1,416 

55 

2=!,9>8 
22,254 
5,949 

3,013 



138 122 
175-62;215-65 



3,095 
1,162 

938 
1,894 

121 

16 

4,972 
62,492 

21-4 

48,815 

28,397 

27,355 

1,944 

270 

1,338 

336 

1,611 

1,058 

188 

2,825 



3,807 
1,292 
1,061 
2,092 
127 

16 
4,251 
10,995 

20-4 

53,437 

32,111 

29,944 

1,871 

357 

1,279 

235 

1,378 

1,087 

192 

3, 



2,704 

7,029 

857 

55-26 
110-1 
157-51 
157-57 

48-41 
6-73 

1,599 

17-10 

2,361 

562 

2,923 

2,416 

1,515 

83-45 
1,351 

2,990 

27,166 

1,477 

57-72 



12,299 
9,534 
2,537 

1,190 

3 

12,290 
8,005 
3,924 

1,193 

42 

28,190 

20,839 

6,385 

2,607 



211-53 

3,924 
1,252 
1,014 
2,543 
131 

15 
2,225 
14,470 

22-0 

23,222 

56,877 

22,205 

1,723 

200 

1,145 

278 

1,236 

1,176 

199 

3,439 



3,568 
15,376 
1,070 

46-37 
99-8 
161-33 
164-33 
45-46 
14-15 
1,544 

37-09 

1,669 

535 

2,204 

1,438 

906 

51-71 

134- c 

261-9 

38,583 

1,304 

42-3S 



10,166 

9,087 

897 

936 

34 

10,726 
7,053 
3,324 

1,023 

40 

24,276 
19,308 
4,057 

2,181 

90 
192-58 

2,877 
1,087 

751 
2,738 

143 

12 
1,130 
3,653 



65,165 

28,683 

27,383 

1,258 

188 

817 

253 

1,026 

1,130 

229 

4,343 



2 

13,819 
1,283 

37-54 
80-5 
138-68 
140-77 
42-34 
27-03 
1,090 

30-76 

1,561 

578 

2,139 

1,090 

476 

32-81 
1,385 
2,872 
27,189 
1,581 

69-53 



8,922 
703 

695 

52 

9.483 
7,091 
2,311 

753 



21,902 
19,434 
1,904 

1,740 

130 

152-56 

215 

147 

51 

2,02.? 

150 

12 
2,375 
10,378 

25-5 

49,736 

30,885 

29,192 

938 

110 

617 

211 

2,632 

1,063 

196 

7, 



1933 
Jan. Feb. 



2,663 

8,765 

919 

39-18 



140-54 

133-06 

49-84 

29-21 

1,217 

40-77 

2,921 

437 

3,358 

475 

368 

35-09 

852 

2,025 

26,740 

1,439 

51-26 



6,735 



7,676 



134-43 



622 
5,936 



56,873 
28,602 
27,304 



978 

216 

4,050 



2,632 

6,026 

819 

37-71 



125-61 



6-14 
1,076 

12-37 

3,025 

273 

3,298 

256 

247 

37-56 



24,032 
1,120 



35-05 



7,097 



133-15 



45,919 
23,714 
22,733 



882 



» Deficit. 



10 



MONTHLY REVIEW OF BUSINESS STATISTICS 



MILLION 
OUNCES 

20 - 
15 - 

10 - 
5 - 











WORLD GOLD PRODUCTION 


























r— i 

























1914 '15 




MONTHLY REVIEW OF BUSINESS STATISTICS 
Table 3. Receipts and Visible Supply of Canadian Grain 



11 



Year 


Receipts at Country Elevators and Platform Loadings 


Visible Supply of Canadian Grain 


and 


Wheat 


| Oats 


Barley 


Flai 


Rye 


Wheat 


Oats 


Barley 


Flax 


Rye 


Month 


Thousand Bushels 


1930 

Aueust 

September.. 

October 

November.. . 
December.... 

1931 

January 

February.... 

March 

April 


21,248 
105,065 
53,800 
52,445 
17,320 

9,256 

9,843 

9.589 

8,418 

6,145 

8,205 

5,437 

11,862 

47,443 

74,086 

43,056 

19,613 

10,851 

12,245 

12.746 

5.982 

8,197 

15,050 

3,780 

17,633 

120.538 

79,564 

36,457 

18,486 

11,300 
11,543 


695 
6,080 
3,967 
3,992 
2,055 

1,681 
2,304 
3.733 

2,097 
1,334 
2,049 
1,970 
2,784 
2,893 
5,270 
6,495 
3,350 

1,909 
4,013 
4,788 
1.834 
2,353 
2,094 
1,091 
1.184 
3.441 
4,082 
3,031 
1,612 

1,095 
1,753 


1,167 
7.735 
2,440 
1,123 
639 

616 

404 

614 

688 

803 

1.412 

892 

1,047 

4,569 

1,023 

1,586 

1,380 

801 

943 

1.194 

543 

454 

514 

402 

929 

2,599 

1,125 

1,338 

1,219 

474 
479 


24 

1,185 

1,223 

1,271 

182 

65 
48 
74 
60 
42 
79 
60 
49 
167 
900 
399 
99 

26 
36 
68 
70 
24 
44 
48 
53 
282 
693 
179 
88 

57 
35 


1,145 

3,223 

1.291 

839 

233 

153 
97 
362 
266 
287 
418 
247 
252 
349 
315 
522 
209 

128 

130 

245 

153 

67 

67 

57 

448 

540 

270 

131 

98 

74 
71 


96.448 
152,211 
188,673 
207,386 
217,643 

202,283 
190,202 
180,540 
162,041 
132,593 
115,672 
110,731 
101,733 
126,462 
163,133 
185,811 
192,305 

195,510 
186,120 
183,956 
164,562 
149,251 
138,572 
121,474 
113,036 
198.240 
239,435 
237,194 
237,391 

229,186 
223,535 


5,995 
9.129 
11,206 
13,847 
15,022 

14,207 

13,802 

14,887 

13.242 

10,840 

9,624 

8.886 

8.847 

9,568 

10,864 

13.609 

15,614 

4,626 
14,279 
14,801 
11,055 
6.443 
5,659 
6.204 
5,857 
7.273 
8,316 
9,115 
9,233 

9,345 
9,767 


21,835 
27,892 
31,879 
31,608 
31,339 

30,436 
29,527 
27,551 
24,081 
15,447 
11,944 
10.260 
8,471 
11,338 
11,274 
10,282 
11,494 

11,402 
11.183 
11.100 
9.220 
6,706 
4,401 
3,627 
3,056 
5.813 
5,874 
6.024 
6,772 

6,806 
6,679 


449 
1,003 
1,904 
2,405 
2,074 

2.080 

2,104 

2,059 

1,858 

1,254 

1,127 

742 

758 

883 

1,588 

1,549 

11,473 

1,396 
1,363 
1,383 
1.267 
1.424 
1,347 
1 , 283 
1,208 
1,400 
1,497 
1,582 
1,436 

1,480 
1,461 


8,128 
9,445 
12,224 
12,924 
13,158 

13,458 
13,391 
13,275 
13,448 
12,970 




12,549 


July 


12,600 


August 

September . . 

October 

November... 
December. . . 

1932 

January 

February 

March 

April 

Mav 


12,163 
12,358 
12,309 
13,024 
12,572 

12,355 
12,864 
12,323 
11,122 
10,242 




7.563 


Julv 


5,541 


August 

September... 

October 

November.. . 
December. . . 

1933 

January 

February 


5,129 
5.359 
5,256 
4,770 
4,990 

5,020 
5,122 



Table 4. Exports and Cash Price of Canadian Grain 



Year 

and 

Month 



1930 

August 

September. . 

October 

Not ember. 
December. . 

1931 

January 

February. . . 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September . 
October .... 
November. 
December.. 

1932 

January 

February.., 

March 

April , 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September., 
October.. ., 
November., 
December. 

1933 

January...., 
February.., 



Exports of Grain 



Wheat 



Oats 



Barley 



Flax 



Rye 



Bushels 



17.639,228 
27,817,053 
29,784.275 
31. 217,624 
22,230,397 



9,608.852 
10,296,603 
12,995,567 

4,680.789 
29,521,699 
20,783,219 
12.004,817 
11,909,108 
14.335.637 
18.925,303 
27,452,063 
22,355,975 



9,472,346 
9,898.363 
9.920,634 
7,513,289 
15,543.013 
15,857,427 
19,620,224 
18.289,832 
26,874.237 
40,192,415 
27,301,976 
27,735,999 



14,706,801 
10,922,337 



158,564 
220,519 
345,661 
381,088 
686,166 



260,342 

127,170 

308.087 

158,382 

1,646,844 

2,291,951 

1,257.248 

753,105 

894,908 

1,082,074 

1,364,700 

1,232,261 



1.184,647 
1,139.568 
1,035.612 
1.748,438 
1,622,815 
1,239.599 
513,384 
800,804 
1,050,470 
2,139,232 
1,528,634 
1,433,865 



354,614 

824,704 



1,250 

146,107 

524.849 

1,129.144 

734,683 



244,953 

120,034 

458.125 

755,247 

6,281.088 

8,199,012 

2,855,725 

3,287,465 

757.930 

220,752 

1.129,46" 

2,205,976 



231,707 

323,221 

346,107 

613,805 

1,711,716 

1,021,578 

1,688,500 

1,547,340 

769.088 

718,213 

748,801 

272,667 



191,524 
223,139 



172.338 
102,496 
421,428 
502,899 



150 
2,700 



483,290 
49,049 

263,500 
61,500 



""i84,"263 

i]266 

3,672 


'"362", 578 





1,400 
2,458 



24,812 
11,305 

425,398 
24,226 

623,614 



20,000 
49.340 
10,64 



109,036 
689,380 
122.094 
145,273 
483,030 
71.978 
742.391 
1,249,981 



218.504 

302,33 

245,800 

299.906 

1,691,542 

1,115,445 

2,480,942 

1.194,386 

425,911 

403,802 

504, 71 « 

17,143 



17,143 
43,314 



Average Cash Price 
(Baftis in store Fort William and Port Arthur^ 



Wheat 
No.l 
Nor. 



Oats 
No. 2 
C.W 



Barley 

No. 3 

C.W. 



Dollars per Bushel 



Flax 
No. 1 
N.W.C. 



Rye 
No. 1 
C.W. 



925 


•402 


•390 


781 


•331 


•316 


725 


•328 


• 282 


643 


•282 


•233 


553 


•267 


•250 


539 


•281 


•221 


592 


•276 


•221 


567 


•277 


•251 


596 


•281 


•282 


606 


•291 


•310 


607 


•296 


•328 


572 


•293 


•322 


551 


•282 


•317 


536 


• 273 


• 306 


598 


•312 


•331 


672 


•336 


•425 


606 


•300 


•383 


600 


•293 


•377 


632 


•295 


•383 


631 


•300 


•398 


626 


•323 


•410 


628 


•355 


•402 


551 


•338 


•377 


547 


•351 


•365 


563 


•300 


•344 


518 


•261 


•288 


482 


•235 


•257 


467 


• 240 


•302 


423 


•210 


•277 


442 


•225 


•276 


457 


•233 


•275 



1-623 
1-435 
1-292 
1-052 
•978 



•950 



1-040 

1-061 

1-070 

1-182 

1-037 

•973 

•945 

1-056 

•990 



•551 
•425 
•373 
•306 
•300 

•271 
•286 
•312 
•316 
•341 
•355 
•327 
•293 

• 325 
•370 

• 487 
•427 



•426 
•441 
•478 
•457 
•412 
•337 
•331 
-334 
-318 
•292 
■295 
•297 



-310 

•318 



12 



MONTHLY REVIEW OF BUSINESS STATISTICS 



Table 5. Consumption of Grain and Production by the Milling Industry 



Year 

and 

month 



1930 

October 

November 
December., 

1931 
January. ... 
February... 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September. 
October. . . . 
November. 
December. 

1932 

January 

February... 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August 
September. 
October — 
November. 
December . 

1933 
January 



Mill grindinga 



Wheat 



Bushels 

8,348.434 
7,788.827 
5,225,805 

4,833,535 
4.607,154 
5,158,112 

4,718,805 
5,304.076 
5,033,072 
5,932,146 
5,992,090 
6,772,319 
7,565,330 
8,101,645 
5,275,097 

3,798,168 
,751,268 
4.685.646 
4,446,506 
4,643,15? 
5,173,525 
5,379.486 
5,716,002 
6,151,877 
7,670,515 
638,600 
4,493,143 



Oats 



Bushels 

1,173,911 
1,085,491 
1.125,885 

997,080 

940,355 

843,761 

822,047 

785,196 

769,942 

937,695 

836,410 

1,166,178 

1,506,473 

1,761,877 

1,151,246 

902,969 

789,941 

882,368 

666,203 

616,418 

650,403 

695,557 

939,418 

1,081,749 

1,346, 592 

1,453,153 

909,581 



Corn 



Bushels 

183,786 
176,074 
148,866 

160,976 
170,167 
141,271 
176,096 
157,539 
167,195 
175,921 
149.814 
170,265 
172,015 
209,089 
158,509 

145,738 
153,989 
175.321 
178,754 
129,879 
135,783 
183,623 
187,020 
147,992 
129,236 
209,499 
151,518 



.3,815,453 791,596 118,039 55,257 1,643,156 



Barley 



Bushels 

131,307 
128,156 
136,065 

125,357 
129,777 
134,297 
116.171 
84,809 
73,578 
81,527 
107,612 
126,363 
126,710 
129,541 
106,230 

89,204 
68,471 
85.835 
73,738 
53,386 
44,464 
40,894 
74,088 
72.056 
77,779 
102,769 
60,082 



Mixed 
grain 



Bushels 

1,432,239 
1,872,362 
1.886,930 



915,710 
657,462 
,660,573 
565.891 
189,023 
962,081 
938,413 
029,935 
272,527 
705,240 
791,642 
123,600 

788,297 
701,800 
818.416 
416,128 
045,021 
873,889 
716,067 
895,616 
174,201 
447,920 
941, 34R 
829,953 



Mill production 



Wheat flour 



Percent- 
age of 
operation 



620 
62-1 
38-7 

36-6 
37-3 
38-9 
36-3 
411 
43-7 
47-1 
47-8 
56-7 
60-5 
70-0 
40-9 

31-3 
31-3 
37-2 
35-9 



43-0 
41-3 
42-7 
50-9 
62-4 
70-5 
35 1 



Quan- 
tity 



Barrels 

1,868,575 
1,739,375 
1,170,025 



086,272 
035,383 
168,408 
058,311 
183,280 
121,115 
,319,008 
,333,287 
515,613 
693,925 
812,457 
175,152 

851,192 
842,123 
053.770 
993,385 
040,693 
151,286 
201,965 
272.009 
384,500 
721,598 
942,844 
009,799 



Oatmeal 



Pounds 

1,160,492 
1,278,662 
3,636,850 



449,163 
461,180 
568,252 
925.422 
865,362 
569,155 
690,259 
408,475 
439,682 
589,165 
520,322 
659,093 

799,728 
788,903 
653,557 
551,310 
888,497 
880,560 
402,937 
658,480 
777,966 
387,585 
193,036 
499,733 



30-9 859,107 401,299 9,015,044 1,363,972 



Rolled 
oats 



Pounds 

13,588.271 

13,326,255 
10,723,499 



870,397 
434,204 
674,493 
945,416 
659,185 
528.397 
272,542 
530,679 
520,597 
498,451 
901,593 
513,316 



9,534, 
8,218, 
9.454, 
6,594, 
6,315, 
8,027, 
8,940, 
12,301, 
14,124, 
16,683, 
17,871, 
10,532, 



Corn 

flour and 

meal 



Pounds 

1,948,686 
1,499,621 
1,070,225 



,155,518 
.894,492 
,158,556 
.612.040 
,130,887 
,072,918 
,612,240 
,277,749 
,039.254 
.288,754 
,588,950 
,714,434 



1,802,005 

2,309,160 

2,233,622 

2,591,116 

1,908,770 

2,099,028 

2,628,' 

2.738,376 

2.226.154 

1,776,832 

2,466,753 

1,898,580 



Barrels 



397,304 



Table 6. Receipts. Manufactures and Stocks of Sugar in Thousand Pounds 



Year and 
4-week period 



1930 
October 4, 
November 1 
November 29 
December 31, 

1931 

January 31. 
February 28 
March 28. 

April 25 

May 23. 

June 20. 

July 18, 

August 15. 

September 12. 
October 10, 
November 7. 
December 5, 
December 31. 

1932 

January 30. 

February 27. 

March 26. 

April 23 . 

May 21, 

June 18. 

July 16. 

August 13 . 

September 10. 

October 8. 

November 5. 

December 3. 

December 31. 

1933 

January 28 ... . 
February 25 . . . 



Raw Sugar 



Stock 
on hand 
at be- 
ginning 
of period 



93,369 
53,544 
60,779 
104,507 



115,726 
91,476 
71.255 
74.881 
117,363 
123,541 
110,325 
76,658 
96,149 
66,512 
91.033 
96, 785 



98,423 

102,650 

83.834 

67,702 

60,295 

122,205 

122,425 

110,656 

38,489 

77,116 

60,036 

106,861 

109,097 



109,232 
101,898 



Re- 
ceipts 



59,575 
75,781 
115,341 
49,803 



34,506 
18.680 
34,275 
49,907 

123.518 
79.112 
77,162 
66,006 

107,722 
54,318 

110,354 
90,828 
50,737 



32,199 

8,639 

36,780 

27.237 

126,477 
75,224 
85,435 
35,112 

120.743 
75.160 

123,367 
80,943 
37,886 



11,432 
29,326 



Melt- 
ings 
and 
ship- 
ments 



99,39 
68,54 
71,613 
46,040 



27,050 
42.930 
54,497 
46.282 
81.036 
72,933 
90,378 
99.674 
88,230 
83,955 
85,833 
85,076 
49,099 



27,973 
27,454 
52,912 
34.644 
64,507 
75,005 
97,204 
107,2 
82.116 
92,239 
76,543 
78,707 
37,750 



18,767 
19,041 



Refined Sugar 



Stock 
on hand 

at be- 
ginning 
of period 



86,137 
89,321 
102,122 
131,418 



136,260 
111.178 
98,886 
96,086 
71.354 
79,818 
77,289 
74,075 
76,046 
82,326 
88,407 
130,392 
162,469 



174,9*5 
155,110 
131,044 
129.590 
109,901 
111,503 
123,942 
108,248 
124,079 
174,985 
174,985 
155,411 
188,834 



194,558 
173,161 



Manu- 
factured 
granu- 
lated 



86,561 
91,957 
97.293 
57,875 



23,643 
35.380 
47.504 
37,025 
66, 180 
63,254 
78.414 
84,879 
82,700 
88,397 
109,523 
110,785 
51,744 



24,211 

22,640 
44,332 
30,275 
53,212 
63,996 
84,990 
91,620 
73.687 
97,775 
108,298 
109,777 
54,028 



24,239 
16,803 



Manu- 
factured 
yellow 

and 
brown 



9,878 
7,731 
11,265 
9,202 



3.540 
5.029 
8.085 
5.331 
10.476 
6,106 
6,881 
6,993 
6,706 
9,789 
12,267 
13,635 
9,1 



3,680 
3,041 
7,544 
5,605 
5,540 
9.725 
7,593 

10,080 
8,230 
8,238 
7.576 

12,679 
7,317 



3,064 
3,544 



Total 
manu- 
factured 



96,439 
99.688 
108,558 
67,077 



27,184 
40,408 
55.589 
42,356 
76,655 
69,360 
85,295 
91,871 
89,406 
96,185 
121,791 
124,420 
61,613 



27,891 
25,681 
51.876 
35,879 
58,751 
73,722 
92,583 
101,700 
81,917 
106,613 
115,874 
122,457 
61,345 



27,303 
20,347 



Total 

domes- 
tic 
ship- 
ments 



90,865 
81.386 
77,119 
52,812 



51,595 
52.161 
57,641 
66,091 
66.933 
70,882 
87,386 
88,342 
82,097 
87,601 
77,662 
90,849 
48,712 



47,270 
49,221 
52,838 
55.229 
56,256 
60,354 

107,377 
84,478 
79.741 

101,052 
84,813 
87,675 
55,183 



48,263 
49,749 



Ship- 
ments 
granu- 
lated 



83,912 
77,202 
67,650 
46,364 



46,867 
46.216 
51,188 
60,250 
60.766 
65,395 
81,810 
84,192 
75,001 
80.321 
69,411 
76,969 
42,927 



42,439 
43,691 
47,136 
47.723 
51.129 
55,403 
100.986 
79,862 
74.845 
95,456 
76,537 
77,185 
49,016 



43,449 
43,715 



Ship- 
ments 
yellow 

and 
brown 



9,342 
9,685 
11,612 
7,494 

5,399 
6,485 
7,200 
6,839 
7.425 
6,494 
6,699 
5,708 
8,125 
9,783 
10,395 
15.374 
6,170 



5,327 
6,055 
6,155 
7,846 
6,020 
5,880 
7,291 
6,007 
7,262 
9,451 
9,521 
11.848 
6,604 



5,251 
6,448 



Total 
ship- 
ments 



93.254 
86,887 
79,262 
53,858 



52.266 
52.700 
58,388 
67,088 
68,191 
71.889 
88,510 
89,900 
83,126 
90,104 
79.806 
92,342 
49,097 



47,786 
49,747 
53,330 
55,569 
57.149 
61.283 

108,277 
85,869 
82,107 

104,908 
86,058 
89,033 
55,621 



48,700 
50,163 



MONTHLY REVIEW OF BUSINESS STATISTICS 
Table 7. Tobacco, Cigars and Cigarettes Entered for Consumpti< 



13 



Year and Month 



1930 

July 

August 

September 

October 

November 

December 

1931 

January 

February 

March 

April 

May , 

Juno , 

July 

August 

Septem ber 

October 

November 

December 

1932 

January 

February 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September 

October 

November 

December 

1933 

January 

February , 



Tobacco, 
cut 



PouDd 

1,386,779 
1,322,441 
1,408.258 
1,381,943 
1,224,810 
1,312,936 



1,057,507 
1,163,399 
1,372.596 
1,250,655 
1,487,028 
1,480.478 
1,468,877 
1,449,103 
1,457,61* 
1,452,865 
1,451,340 
1,366,936 



1.144,298 
1,272,469 
1,414,941 
1,659.842 
1,436,417 
1,493,496 
1,488,431 
1,559,663 
1,662,365 
1,551,042 
1,427,688 
1,209,812 



1,065.534 
1,429,012 



Tobacco, 
plug 



Pound 

583,668 
552, 148 
476,020 
452,670 
455,503 
471,292 



366,785 
430,463 
459.155 
439,364 
514,005 
503.867 
453 , 989 
469,793 
417,050 
439,268 
410,253 
426,968 



3*2,000 
343.887 
389.797 
425,577 
421,248 
425,890 
391,668 
419,483 
368,601 
379,960 
358,572 
340,791 



300,491 
304,290 



Cigarettes 



Number 

529,519.070 
477,205,140 
483,960,240 
438,497,550 
401,175,589 
326,147,670 



319,555,340 
327,255,230 
349.681,715 
382,303,130 
382,951,155 
430,179,170 
474,415,620 
425,138,580 
371,311,090 
344,956,140 
355,716,768 
369,235,870 



278,416,630 
281,496,910 
304,243,772 
269 309 750 
312,790,432 
376.779.975 
338,874,828 
329,466,304 
313,709,922 
214,301,678 
388,625.140 
301,613,955 



310,144,850 
264,524,935 



Cigarettes, 
over- 
weight 



Number 

71,000 
51,800 

167,700 
17,900 
38,200 

144,300 



78.300 

68,500 

117,800 

500 

31,820 
164.250 
227,450 
200,400 

76,600 
135,450 
115,200 
148,210 



57,200 
56.700 
50,150 
49.050 
37.350 
66,300 
40,300 
43,700 
39,400 
57,100 
148,400 
39,260 



28 420 
17,890 



C'gars 



Number 

16.947.724 
17,944,831 
19,333.469 

22,515,606 
17,418,328 
11,408,452 



7,259,572 
7,650,784 
9.984.215 
11,116,740 
14,734,327 
14.380.513 
14,091,692 
12,860,616 
15,270,873 
17,316,957 
15,753.873 
11,329,243 



7.595,920 

8,154,663 

9.657,775 

10 208.636 

10,552.455 

12,754.263 

11.492,868 

12,298,501 

12,799,348 

14,424,229 

14,071,178 

9,014,869 



3,965.735 
4,675,418 



Pound 

1,416,720 
1.482,179 
1.514, 2*3 

1,505,683 
1,139,124 
1.064,933 



1.288,800 
1,072,285 
1.115.135 
1,284,691 
1,434,154 
1.382.348 
1,328,631 
1,283,479 
1,076.864 
1,177,265 
1,144,401 
994,476 



1,063,412 

8*9,417 

942,999 

1,120,066 

1,108,312 

1,320,001 

1,149,197 

1,083,602 

1,042,140 

938,889 

1,027,873 

744,579 



832,534 

742,408 



Table 8. — Production of Boots and Shoes. 



1930 

June 

July 

August 

September. . 

October 

November.. 
December... 

1931 

January 

February.. . . 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September. . 

October 

November.. 
December. . 

1932 

January 

February... 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September. . 

October 

November. . 
December . . 

1533 
January 

61155—3 



Boots and shoes with leather or fabric uppers 



Welts 



255,538 
335.729 
306,544 
310,184 
290.812 
204,928 
193.340 

231,498 
278.200 
326,112 
332. 3C6 
203.408 
252,037 
281,175 
274.644 
275, 156 
235.904 
181,474 
171,294 

212,534 
272,581 
281 , 244 
243,435 
241,653 
235,079 
247.387 
273,591 
267,515 
213.345 
196,801 
167,762 

185,162 



McKays 
and 
all 

imitation 
welts 



618,747 
548,897 
722.7J9 
740,557 
663,654 
422.543 
406,884 

426,112 
600,694 
880,851 
810,653 
802,177 
782,256 
683,700 
£16,370 
824,847 
723,009 
414.143 
433,536 

532,297 
774,827 
907,035 
781,111 
821,112 
746.474 
610,920 
828,070 
807,126 
679,722 
450,418 
306,383 

398,195 



Nailed 
pegged, 
screw 
or wire 
fastened 



107,369 
115,584 
144,308 
160,270 
161.697 
113,951 
113,786 

111,106 
123,809 
152,328 
134,025 
146.830 
119,495 
121.R77 
164,848 
19.5,496 
182,548 
150,054 

132,822 

123.365 
158,460 
150,132 
120,920 
125.907 
118,518 
129,505 
18\350 
185,458 
189.725 
166, 9?4 
114,304 

88,256 



Stich- 
downs 



220,562 
168,963 
129,710 
125,639 
123.372 
114,824 
128,353 

126,310 
138,121 
177,142 
207,343 
233 114 
234,244 
174,632 
145,542 
124,722 
130,525 
138,910 
148,777 

132,897 
171.322 
212.237 
216.884 
264.754 
243,324 
169,801 
148,305 
136,672 
151,068 
135.217 
124,894 



Total 



1,250,886 
1,232,993 
1,368.683 
1,406,149 
1.305.315 
900,345 
877,041 



921,878 
,184,316 
.506.409 
.546.111 
.622.637 
,442,330 
,316,340 
,467,600 
,482,835 
,337,126 
.013,870 

919,847 

.029,556 
,414.516 
,607,280 
.413.214 
.507.574 
.400,508 
,202,968 
,484,042 
,470,476 
,301,011 
,017,153 
753,573 



114,919 808,671 



Total footwear 



Mens* 



393,345 

439,235 
465,095 
483,554 
494,271 
350, 8°6 
339,476 

296,301 
368,102 
472,689 
443,797 
445,979 
403.207 
421, 6 5 2 
434,443 
454,133 
431,115 
363,011 
348, F65 

300,352 
420,882 
411,320 
370,801 
422.104 
436.647 
409,588 
469,002 
471,961 
449,281 
403,661 
311,351 

267,310 



Boys' 
and 

youths' 



68,316 
63,899 
81,408 
100,482 
07,210 
77,582 
85,163 

72,959 

68,363 

97,515 

92,829 

85,643 

70,458 

74,836 

85,615 

104,041 

119.592 

107,503 

104,437 

79,681 
91,177 
87 098 
68,822 
75.047 
65,144 
54,778 
91,741 
109.625 
108.139 
110,661 
67,645 

45,171 



Women's 



626,824 
634,137 
719,083 
754,204 
670,404 
430,139 
384,526 

386,168 
554,616 
790,849 
756.981 
817,510 
766.049 
674,325 
804,318 
839,989 
711,900 
513.384 
418,306 

491,281 

731.280 
807,022 
742,845 
803,803 
746,658 
665,684 
863,149 
858,238 
748,048 
568,263 
404,451 

426,723 



Misses' 

and 
childrens 



201,050 
171,396 
182.3J7 
176,812 
183.661 
175.803 
159,008 

144,793 
188,776 
244,120 
252,635 
260, 635 
210,498 
187,098 
106,504 
184,536 
197,983 
178,872 
174,731 

163,531 
214,205 
264,903 
232,427 
248,460 
214,127 
160,066 
183,565 
187,436 
202,130 
187,757 
134,308 

129,475 



Babies 

and 
infants' 



106, 205 
94,753 
100,807 
106,846 
90,468 
96,019 

84,703 
07.108 
124,777 
123,675 
131.016 
117,239 
98,881 
106,036 
89,738 
93,554 
91,026 
87,192 

77,337 

100.770 

119,865 

108.597 

106, 674 

96,616 

88,768 

100,902 

95,942 

91,592 

90,992 

60,309 



Total 



1,398,444 
1,414,872 
1.542,686 
1,615,859 
1,552,392 
1,124,798 
1,064,192 

984,924 
1,276,965 
1,729,930 
1,669.917 
1.740.792 
1.576,449 
1,456.822 
1,627,006 
1,672,437 
1,554,144 
1,254,696 
1,133,534 



112,192 
558,413 
720,208 
523,492 
656, 088 
559,192 
379,484 
708.359 
723,202 
599,190 
361 334 
978, 0W 



53,219 921,898 



14 



MONTHLY REVIEW OF BUSINESS STATISTICS 



Table 9. — Sales and Slaughterings 


Df Live Stock 


, Retail Food Prices, and Cold Storage Holdings. 


! 


1932 






1933 


Classification 














Feb. 


Mar. 


April 


May 


June 


July 


Aug. 


Sept. 


Oct. 


Nov. 


Dec. 


Jan. 


Feb. 


Jafeson Stock Yds: 




























(Current month 




























prelim.) 




























Cattle 


36,234 


43,992 


38,244 


44,226 


38,833 


44,941 


64,884 


56,647 


58,195 


66,598 


31,800 


48,018 


37,448 




17,606 
111,246 
13,443 


29,112 
117,198 
15,157 


35,424 

112,178 

11,388 


38,482 
119,341 
11,867 


30,026 
104,127 
30,434 


25,356 
81,557 
38,457 


26,638 
83,187 
60,488 


24,305 
62,737 
60,044 


25,299 
76,081 
103,224 


26,072 
126,986 
75,412 


11,460 
101,857 
20,329 


16,405 
104,202 
24,396 


16,506 




83,525 


Sheep 


14,071 


Inspected Slaugh- 




























terings: 




























Cattle 


39,379 
22,679 
5,258 


44,505 

43,253 

2,801 


43,302 
46,612 
28,448 


44,156 
51,240 
16,685 


41,818 
43,171 
12,726 


41.228 
32.252 
11.369 


47,184 
31,598 
11,983 


52,174 
29.45C 
11,286 


50,408 

27,248 

8,216 


56.03S 

23,722 

8,982 


45,075 
14,919 
5,369 


50,521 

20,255 

5,054 


42,412 




22,247 


Sheep 


3,614 


Lambs 


29,454 


34,304 


1,426 


6,519 


37,472 


52.640 


73,856 


89,865 


137,368 


109,900 


44,019 


43,522 


32,416 


Swine 


239,921 


232,875 


229,124 


254,836 


247,722 


191,577 


189,253 


166,352 


189,222 


249,858 


268,300 


247,081 


220,419 


Av. Retail Prices, in 




























cents, of Food in 




























Canada: 




























3eef chuck lb. 


13-4 


13-7 


13-4 


13-3 


13-3 


13-4 


13-1 


12-7 


12-4 


11-9 


10-9 


110 
12-0 


10-9 


Veal roast " 


15-7 


15-7 


14-6 


13-6 


13-5 


13-4 


13-2 


13-1 


13-2 


12-7 


12-2 


12-2 


Mutton roast. . . " 


22-2 


22-5 


22-2 


22-9 


22-7 


21-8 


21-4 


20-4 


19-3 


17-9 


16-6 


16-7 


17-5 


Pork fresh " 


15-8 


15-6 


15-3 


15-2 


15-0 


15-0 


15-6 


15-S 


15-7 


14-5 


12-9 


12-7 


12-2 


Bacon break- 




























fast " 


19-3 


18-4 


17-8 


17-2 


16-8 


16-8 


17-6 


18-5 


19-6 


19-2 


18-6 


181 


17-4 


Lard pure " 

Eggs fresh doz. 


12-5 


11-8 


11-5 


11-5 


11-3 


11-3 


11-4 


12-1 


12-6 


13-3 


12-9 


12-3 


11-7 


29-7 


32-8 


24-8 


19-5 


19-2 


21-5 


24-1 


25-6 


30-3 


38-6 


45-2 


39-1 


28-8 


Milk qt 


10-4 


10-2 


101 


10-0 


9-8 


9-6 


9-6 


9-6 


9-5 


9-6 


9-8 


9-7 


9-7 


Butter cream- 




























ery lb. 


25-9 


24-1 


31-2 


24-5 


22-6 


21-6 


22-1 


25 -C 


26-9 


26-4 


25-9 


26-1 


25-7 


Cheese " 


21-4 


21-3 


21-2 


21-0 


20-7 


20-1 


20-2 


19-S 


20-0 


19-9 


19-8 


19-6 


19-4 


Bread " 


6-3 


6-3 


6-2 


6-2 


6-2 


5-7 


5-6 


5-e 


5-6 


5-6 


5-8 


5-7 


5-7 


Flour " 


3-0 


3-0 


3-0 


3-0 


3-0 


2-9 


2-9 


2-? 


2-9 


2-8 


2-7 


2-6 


2-6 


Rolled oats. . . " 


4-7 


4-7 


4-7 


4-7 


4-7 


4-8 


4-8 


4-S 


4-8 


4-7 


4-6 


4-6 


4-6 


Rice " 


8-7 


8-7 


8-5 


8-6 


8-5 


8-6 


8-5 


8-5 


8-4 


8-3 


8-2 


8-2 


8-0 


Beans " 


4-6 


4-4 


4-3 


4-3 


4-3 


4-3 


4-2 


4-3 


4-3 


4-2 


4-0 


3-9 


3-8 


Apples evapor- 




























ated " 


16-3 


16-4 


15-8 


15-9 


15-5 


15-7 


15-9 


16-: 


15-7 


15-8 


15-5 


15-4 


14-9 


Prunes " 


11-4 


11-4 


11-0 


10-8 


11-0 


10-9 


11-0 


11-5 


10-8 


10-7 


10 6 


10-8 


10-6 


Sugar granul- 




























ated " 


6-1 


6-1 


6-0 


60 


5-9 


5-9 


5-f 


5-< 


5-8 


5-8 


5-8 


5-8 


5-7 


Tea " 


51-3 


50-6 


50-3 


45-2 


45-5 


45-0 


44-6 


45-2 


44-5 


43-? 


43-7 


43-2 




Coffee " 


44-3 


43-5 


43-7 


42-6 


42-4 


421 


41-6 


42-4 


41-3 


41-2 


41-0 


40-9 


40-1 


Potatoes peck 


161 


15-8 


15-3 


15-2 


14-7 


14-9 


26-4 


18-4 


17-3 


17-3 


lg-1 


19-0 


19-2 


Cold Storage 




1932 






1933 


Holdings 


Mar. 


April 


May 


June 


July 


Aug. 


Sept. 


Oct. 


Nov. 


Dec. 


Jan. 


Feb. 


Mar. 


Cold Storage Holdings a 


s at 




























First or Month: 






























(000 lbs. or doz.) 






























Butter— 






























Creamery 




10,212 


4,433 


2,816 


4,295 


16,472 


25,283 


30,943 C 


3,318 


31,181 


26,361 


20,328 


15,47o 


9,605 




144 
10,356 
7,936 


63 
4,496 
7,661 


32 
2,848 
5,934 


9: 

4.38J 
7,53£ 


334 
16,806 
16,022 


259 
25,542 
19,355 


338 
31,281 J 
22,119 5 


257 

3,575 
1,764 


136 
31,316 
20,423 


109 
26,470 
13,229 


69 
20,397 
12,944 


45 
15,521 
11,511 


19 


Totals 


9,624 




10,567 


Eggs— 










282 

251 

3,252 


246 

422 

3,298 


3,416 

534 

3,458 


8,87( 

584 

4,315 


10,879 

829 

5,081 


11,211 

820 
5,158 


11,896 1 

995 
5,023 


1,056 
1,205 
4,848 


8,229 

519 

4.506 


4,123 

271 

3,988 


1,254 

273 

3,773 


433 

650 
3,524 


88 


Freeh 


267 




3,270 


Pork— 






Fresh frozen 




20,210 
3,371 
573 
7,859 
8,423 

40,436 
2,738 

5,019 

4,033 

314 

235 

9,600 

453 

241 
694 


21,862 
3,822 
378 
5,97 
8,214 

40.251 
2,845 

3,931 

4,419 

353 

210 

8,914 

367 

639 

1,006 


22,455 

2,840 

702 

57,695 
7,784 

41,476 
3,286 

3.416 

4,299 

233 

198 

8,146 

484 
447 
930 


21,595 
3.08C 
1,04? 
5,991 
10,58( 
42,29. r 
3,74: 

2.97J 

3.995 

455 

m 

7.60C 

645 

505 

1,15( 


18,458 
3,122 
982 
5,848 
8,999 

37,409 
4,257 

2,329 

3,583 

327 

162 

6,401 

716 

453 

1,169 


13,862 
2,695 
394 
6,422 
11,180 
34,553 
3.560 

2.668 

4,094 

302 

224 

7.288 

802 

414 

1.215 


10,255 
3,118 
710 
6.083 
9,788 

29,954 1 
2,707 

2.792 

4.596 

287 

177 

7,852 

893 

323 

1,216 


6,466 
2,463 
369 
5,051 
8,053 
2,4^2 
1,183 

2,813 

4,989 

239 

72 

8,113 

889 

471 

1,360 


5,236 
2.573 
267 
4.451 
9,624 
22,152 
1,913 

3,294 

5,002 

110 

88 

8,493 

958 

416 

1,374 


6,^49 
3.830 
409 
4,912 
7,767 
23.567 
1,539 

4,642 

4,850 

79 

93 

9,665 

894 

359 

1,253 


11,765 

4,281 
461 
6,219 
6,827 
29.552 
2,327 

5,113 

3,421 

222 

184 

8,940 

702 
180 
882 


14,148 
3,770 
514 
5,032 
7,874 

31,338 
2,653 

4,639 

4,655 

229 

113 

9,636 

335 

247 
585 


15,688 


Fresh not frozen. 
Cured dry saltec 
Cured sweet pick 
In process of cure 
Total* 






3,707 






661 


led ... . 




5,134 






9,164 






34,354 


Lard 


2,831 


Beef— 


3,883 


Fresh not frozen. 
Cured 






4,275 






303 


In process of cure 
Totals 






189 






8,655 


Veal— 


178 


Freeh not frozen. 
Totals 






258 






437 


Mutton and Lamb — 










6,048 

182 

6.230 

11,668 

10,724 

84 

6,795 


4,846 

176 

5,022 

9,458 

9,247 

65 

4,974 


3,946 

161 

4,107 

7,701 

8,569 

48 

4,544 


2,175 

14( 

2,315 

6,36$ 

9.285 

151 

3,83( 


1,506 

) 214 

1,747 

5,257 

! 10,173 

51 

) 5,218 


1.001 

277 

1,277 

4,414 

14,086 

56 

5,522 


872 

366 

1.239 

3,374 

16,734 1 

83 
6,228 


1.020 

449 

1,469 

2,404 

9,512 

46 

6,825 


3,070 

383 

3,453 

2.057 

21.706 

52 

7,177 


4,856 

439 

5.295 

3,549 

19,953 

89 
7,173 


5,043 
274 

5,291 
8,341 

17,121 

40 

6,734 


3,733 

276 

4,009 

7,230 

14,046 

113 

5,960 


2,556 




288 


Totals 


2,845 


Poultry 


0,463 


Fish— 


10,600 


Freeh not frozen. 






99 






4,782 


Fresh frozen during prec 


sding 




month 




1 


,642 


1, 


118 


1,( 


14 


1,62< 


2,451 


6,073 


3.986 


3.912 


4 


107 


2 


4') 


1,680 


840 


760 






MONTHLY REVIEW OF BUSINESS STATISTICS 



15 



■S Soanre: Sergey of Ci/rres?/ fie/s/ness 



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16 



MONTHLY REVIEW OF BUSINESS STATISTICS 



Table 10. Output of Central Electric Stations in Canada. (A) Monthly Output. 

(Thousands of Kilowatt Hours) 





Totals for Canada 


Generated by Water-Power 


Generated by Fuel 




Month 








Mari- 






Prairie 


British 


Prairie 


Other 


Total 




Water 


Fuel 


Total 


time 
Pro- 
vinces 


Quebeo 


Ontario 


Pro- 


Colum- 


Pro- 


Pro- 


Exports 














vinces 


bia 


vinces 


vinces 




1930-Marc'i 


1.491.040 


24,425 


1,515.465 


34,469 


741,411 


528,404 


89.826 


98,930 


18.222 


6,203 


126,894 


April 


1,480.953 


21.385 


1.502.338 


42.968 


744,861 


509,615 


92.601 


90,908 


16.437 


4.918 


117.504 


May . 


1,523.521 


21.108 


1,544,627 


44,139 


761,327 


521,679 


100.116 


93.260 


16,486 


4.640 


129,138 


Juno 


1,414,236 


20,375 


1,434,611 


42,632 


709,245 


485,79? 


87,683 


88.885 


15,801 


4,57' 


136,016 


July 


1,404,009 


21,681 


1,425,690 


40, 667 


722.335 


400,611 


89,169 


91,227 


16,522 


5, 159 


131,817 


August 


1,391,054 


20,806 


1,411,860 


41,788 


710.842 


457.424 


84,925 


96.075 


14,898 


5,908 


142,571 


September. 


1,419,051 


23,910 


1.442,961 


38,662 


704.123 


485,151 


92,060 


99,055 


14.882 


9,028 


153,657 


October 


1,549,846 


24,714 


1.574,560 


39,480 


781,996 


521,991 


05,005 


111,374 


16.874 


7.840 


161,323 


November. 


1,488,175 


27,228 


1,515.40? 


41,264 


764,490 


480,131 


92.292 


109.998 


19.508 


7.722 


141,587 


December . 


1,513,152 


29,156 


1,542.308 


44,295 


764,612 


480,442 


111.443 


112.360 


19,748 


9,408 


149,295 


1931- January 


1,456,326 


32,395 


1,488,721 


44,394 


735,385 


469,438 


104,099 


103.010 


20,187 


12.208 


162,443 


February.... 


1,311,136 


27.851 


1.338,987 


31,097 


674,560 


422,213 


88,481 


94,785 


17.298 


10.553 


145,461 


March 


1,391,982 


25.576 


1,417.558 


34,338 


703,708 


451,912 


95,991 


106,033 


15,992 


9,584 


127,940 


April 


1,388.034 


23,056 


1.411.090 


52,154 


717,900 


415.482 


101,539 


100,959 


13.360 


9,696 


97,677 


May 


1,342.940 


22.846 


1.365,786 


53,433 


693,853 


394.243 


102,640 


98,771 


12,781 


10,065 


86,824 


Juno 


1,267,869 


21,959 


1,289,828 


52,675 


638,719 


379.568 


101,337 


95,570 


12,139 


9,820 


88,602 


July 


1,230,622 


20,700 


1,251,322 


50,712 


620,634 


369,294 


100,480 


89,502 


12,297 


8,403 


95,085 


August 


1,234,266 


21,883 


1,256,149 


44,924 


644,446 


352,877 


98,119 


93,900 


12,905 


8,978 


99,780 


September. . 


1,263.412 


25,001 


1,288,413 


46,251 


662,400 


355,122 


102,835 


96.804 


13,436 


11,565 


93,288 


October 


1,400,704 


27,638 


1,428,342 


55,743 


736,381 


384,065 


123,087 


101,428 


15.332 


12,306 


95,423 


November.. 


1,385,378 


29,642 


1,415,020 


56,725 


731,014 


373,084 


125,867 


98,688 


18,819 


10,823 


73,357 


December . . 


1,397,876 


34,306 


1,432,182 


55,214 


722,508 


385,407 


130,407 


104,340 


20.908 


13,398 


69,362 


1932- January 


1.382,794 


31,124 


1,413,918 


4^.584 


721,827 


374,534 


129,950 


107.899 


20,382 


10,742 


61,767 


February 


1,297,892 


27,241 


1,325,133 


46,998 


682,589 


355,865 


115,399 


97.041 


18,125 


9,116 


52,422 


March 


1,363,912 


24,784 


1,388,096 


44 292 


713,227 


394,206 


110.943 


101.244 


15.410 


9,374 


55,414 


April 


1,306,753 


22,736 


1,329,489 


50.445 


700,575 


363,099 


99,544 


93.090 


12,413 


10,323 


54,982 


May 


1.249.226 


21,789 


1,271.015 


53.897 


661.740 


344,635 


95.863 


93,091 


12,294 


9,495 


51,354 


June 


1,176,673 


21,559 


1,198,232 


47.894 


633,614 


325,476 


83,542 


86,147 


11,996 


9,563 


64,864 


July 


1,133,555 


22,026 


1,155,581 


38,583 


606.872 


317,815 


81,519 


88,766 


11,986 


10,040 


59,015 


August 


1,206.682 


23,538 


1,230,220 


44,786 


663.911 


326,021 


82,129 


89,835 


13,530 


10,008 


69,192 


September. . 


1,254,644 


24,496 


1,279,140 


48.069 


687.536 


337.472 


90.082 


91.485 


13.976 


10,520 


71,500 


October 


1,362,670 


27,474 


1,390,144 


50,989 


763,577 


348,530 


104,780 


94,794 


16,072 


11,402 


50,737 


November. . 


1,417.074 


31,153 


1,448,227 


53,110 


823,035 


333,565 


111,404 


95,960 


18,393 


12,760 


35,023 


December . . 


1,400,793 


32,398 


1,433,191 


52,587 


801.939 


326,173 


116,933 


103,161 


19,679 


12,719 


41,609 


1933-January 


1,366,336 


30,303 


1,396,639 


44.535 


7 P 5.142 


318,039 


116.099 


102,521 


18.230 


12,073 


48,018 


February. . , 


1,273,113 


26,453 


1,299,566 


33,143 


718,527 


323,816 


104,085 


93,542 


16,217 


10,236 


46,440 


(B) Average Daily Output. 


1930-March 


48.098 


788 


48.886 


1.112 


23,916 


17 045 


2,898 


3.127 


588 


200 


4,093 


April 


49.365 


713 


50,078 


1,432 


21,829 


16.987 


3,087 


3 030 


548 


165 


3,917 


May 


49,146 


681 


49 8?7 


1.424 


24,559 


16,925 


3.230 


3.008 


631 


150 


4,168 


June 


47.141 


678 


47.820 


1.422 


23,642 


16.193 


2.922 


2,962 


527 


15? 


4.534 


July 


45.2Q1 


699 


4 ",990 


1.312 


23.301 


14.858 


2.877 


2.943 


533 


166 


4,252 


August 


44,873 


671 


45,544 


1.348 


22 9W 


14,756 


2.740 


3.099 


481 


190 


4,699 


September. . 


47,301 


797 


48.098 


1.288 


23,470 


16.172 


3.069 


3.30? 


496 


301 


5,122 


October 


49,995 


797 


50,792 


1,273 


25,226 


16,838 


3,065 


3,593 


544 


253 


5,204 


November. . 


49,606 


908 


50,514 


1,375 


25,481 


16,004 


3.077 


3.867 


650 


258 


4,720 


December.. . 


48,811 


940 


49,751 


1.429 


24,665 


15,498 


3,595 


3.624 


837 


303 


4,816 


1931 -January 


46,978 


1.045 


48,023 


1.432 


23.722 


15.143 


3.358 


3,323 


051 


394 


5,240 


February 


40,826 


995 


47.821 


1.111 


24.091 


15,079 


3.160 


3,385 


618 


377 


5,195 


March 


44,903 


825 


45.72« 


1.108 


22,700 


14,578 


3.096 


3.421 


516 


309 


4,127 


April 


46,268 


76? 


4 ",036 


1,738 


23,930 


13,849 


3,385 


3,366 


445 


323 


3,258 


May 


43,320 


737 


44,05? 


1.723 


22,382 


12,718 


3.311 


3.186 


412 


325 


2,800 


June 


42,262 


732 


42,994 


1,756 


21,291 


12,652 


3,378 


3,185 


405 


327 


2,953 


July 


39,698 


68" 


40,365 


1.636 


20.020 


11.913 


3,242 


2,887 


396 


271 


3.067 


August 


39,815 


706 


40.521 


1.449 


20.789 


11.383 


3.165 


3,020 


416 


290 


3,219 


September. 


42,114 


833 


42,947 


1,542 


22,080 


11,837 


3.42^ 


3,227 


448 


385 


3,110 


October 


45,184 


891 


45,980 


1.79* 


23.754 


12.38'* 


8,971 


3.272 


404 


397 


3,078 


November. . 


46,179 


09" 


47,167 


1.891 


24,367 


12,436 


4,195 


8,290 


627 


361 


2,445 


December . . 


45,093 


1.105 


46,199 


1.781 


23,307 


12,436 


4,207 


3,366 


674 


432 


2,237 


WW-January 


44,606 


1.004 


45,610 


1,567 


23,285 


12,081 


4,192 


3,481 


657 


347 


1,992 


February 


44,754 


939 


45,693 


1,621 


23,537 


12,271 


3,079 


3,346 


625 


311 


1,808 


March. ..... 


43,997 


799 


44,796 


1,429 


23,007 


12,716 


3 579 


3 266 


497 


302 


1.788 


April 


43,558 


758 


44,310 


1,681 


23,353 


12,103 


3.318 


3,103 


414 


344 


1,833 


May 


40.298 


702 


41.000 


1 . 739 


21,346 


11.117 


3 . 092 


3.003 


396 


306 


1,657 


June 


39.222 
36.566 


719 
711 


39,941 
37,277 


1.597 
1.2)4 


21, 12) 

19.577 


10.849 
10.252 


2,785 
2.630 


2.872 
2.863 


400 
387 


319 
324 


2,1 '12 


July 


1,904 


August 


38.925 


759 


39,684 


1.445 


21,416 


10.517 


2.649 


2,898 


436 


323 


2,232 


September. . 


41 821 


817 


42,638 


1.602 


22.918 


11.249 


3,0 '3 


3.049 


466 


351 


2.383 


October 


43,957 


886 


44,843 


1,642 


24,632 


11,243 


3,380 


3,058 


518 


368 


1,637 


November. . 


47,236 


1.038 


48,274 


1,770 


27,435 


11,119 


3,713 


3,199 


613 


425 


1,167 


December . . 


45,186 


1,045 


46,231 


1,696 


25,868 


10.522 


3,772 


3,328 


635 


410 


1,342 


1933-January 


44,075 


978 


45,033 


1.437 


25,327 


10,259 


3,745 


3.307 


589 


389 


1,549 


February. . . 


45,468 


945 


46,413 


1,184 


25,662 


11.564 


3,717 


3.341 


579 


366 


1,659 



MONTHLY REVIEW OF BUSINESS STATISTICS 



17 



Table 11 — Railway Revenue Freight Loaded at Stations in Canada in Tons. 



Commodities 



Railway Freight Loaded— 

Agricultural Products— 

Wheat 

Corn 

Oats 

Barley 

Rye 

Flaxseed 

Other grain 

Flour 

Other mill products 

Hay and straw 

Cotton 

Apples (fresh) 

Other fruit (fresh) 

Potatoes 

Other fresh vegetables 

Other agricultural products. . . 
Animal Products— 

Horses 

Cattle and calvo3 

Sheep 

Hogs 

Dressed meats (fresh) 

Dressed meats (cured, salted, 
canned) 

Other packing house products 
(edible) 

Poultry 

Eggs 

Butter and cheese 

Wool 

Hides and leather 

Other animal products (non 

edible) 

Mine Products — 

Anthracite coal 

Bituminous coal 

Lignite coal 

Coke 

Iron ores 

Other ores and concentrates.. 

Base bullion and matte 

Clay, gravel, sand, stone 
(crushed) 

Slate — Dimensions or block 
stone 

Crude petroleum 

Asphalt 

Salt 

Other mine products , 

Forest Products — 

Logs, posts, poles, cordwood 

Ties 

Pulpwood 

Lumber— Timber— Box shooks 
— Staves heading 

Other forest products 

Manufactures and Miscellan- 
eous— 

Refined Petroleum and its pro- 
ducts 

Sugar 

Iron, pig and bloom 

Rails and fastenings 

Bar and sheet iron— Structural 
iron and iron pipe 

Castings, machinery & boilers 

Cement 

Brick and artificial stone 

Lime and plaster 

Sewer pipe and drain tile 

Agricultural implements and 

vehicles other than autos 

Automobiles and auto trucks. . 

Household goods 

Furniture ;. 

Liquor beverages 

Fertilizers, all kinds 

Paper, printed matter, books . 

Wood-pulp 

Fish (fresh, frozen cured, etc.) 

Canned goods (all canned food 
products) 

Other manufactures and mis- 
cellaneous 

Merchandise 



1931 



Dec. 



664,619 

3,877 

97,781 

38,538 

6,020 

7,936 

4,254 

93,210 

79,578 

50,410 

825 

12,318 

1,401 

23.821 

11,294 

27,113 

3,718 
27,501 

2,758 
19,976 

7,512 

1,223 

4,235 
5,148 

793 
2,049 

413 
3,456 

3,127 

814 

468,278 

307,266 

71,262 

1,412 

81,842 

4,269 

148,281 



1,891 

3,057 

11,327 

56,774 

168,253 

746 

105,475 

162,638 
30,589 



100,483 
13,277 
6,812 
1,233 

24,015 
9,029 
44,278 
14,340 
13,819 
7,265 

1,1 

3,939 
2,174 
2,166 
15,385 
12,918 
146,254 
43,120 
7,790 



1932 



Mar. Apr. May June July Aug. Sept 



440,991 



62, 



?,061 



163,523 
131,475 



8,690 
25,970 

1,464 
21,941 

7,603 

2,582 

4,473 
351 
736 

2,491 
376 

2,812 

3,062 



921 

429, 537 

233,985 

71,469 

282 

69, 138 

26,883 

96, 740 



2,409 

1,443 

14,573 

58,322 

238, 218 

5,291 

231,621 

186,279 
14,910 



100,973 
20,430 
9,493 
9.822 

24.762 
6,359 

31,244 
7,595 

19,214! 
4,026 

3,644 
13,607 

3,850 

1,845 
12,350 
37, 108 
141,924 
44,400 

4,640 

15,916 

186,096 
154,735 



8,061 
27,905 

1,342 
18,981 

6,322 

3,148 

4, 

265 
2,159 
2,213 

280 
2,588 

2,661 

317 

357,117 
97,088 
46,589 
825 
64,5«6 
29,300 

174,647 

8,582 

2,332 

2,748 

15,325 

50,512 

189,524 

3,600 

130,010 

181,851 
12,116 



126,604 
15,468 
6,698 
8,852 

22,259 
7,630 

50,260 
9,655 

18,208 
3,796 

4,196 
11,304 

7,167 

1,834 

11,154 

75,682 

121,966 

42,477 

2,514 

10,905 

166,607 
169,161 



2, 

24,479 

596 

19,908 

6,588 

4,335 

4, 

148 
3,280 
3,670 

331 
2,028 

2,630 

860 
429,206 
51,665 
19,168 
1,010 
51,428 
23,193 

252,232 

11,618 

1,879 

8,126 

15,326 

62,587 

127,518 
5,154 
93,734 

187,905 
11,047 



174,806 
11,097 
4,835 
2,055 

26,511 
6.573 
60,179 
11,181 
18,267 
2,485 

2,567 

10,835 

5,114 

1,409 

10.887 



1,170,526 

7,922 

41,235 

21,337 

12,947 

5,548 

1,718 

103,031 

84,255 

12,353 

187 

183 

1,429 

16,127 

2,193 

9,276 

2.871 
25,889 

1,480 
20, 934 

5,700 



5,139 
42 
1,765 
7,153 
460 
2,332 

2.613 

946 

429,465 

33,191 

19,111 

942 
45,778 
25, 924 



588,611 

6,229 

73,725 

30,709 

10,826 

7,163 

2,963 

105,914 

83,363 

7,353 

479 

257 

3,554 

•5,233 

3,8f;l 

8,168 

3,017 
31,219 

1,902 
14,944 

5,882 

3,643 

5,873 

159 

1,241 

8,347 
1,937 
2,054 

2.C93 

1,558 
409,383 
33,841 
22,265 
848 
45,649 
23,909 



292.715 177,172 



10,342 
708 
18,936 
15,615 
68,111 

98,556 

6,120 

58,434 

199,350 
22.644 



157,460 
15,712 
3,713 
2,924 

25,117 
5.372 
60, 099 
11,889 
16.260 
2,254 

3,345 
10,697 
4,109 
1,194 
10,580 



803 1 20,485 

133,5011115,217 

40,254 35,061 

2,363 2,657 



8.177 



168,976 
149,078 



5,802 
733 
17,396 
14,577 
72,116 

69,996 

3,159 

63,977 

135,20 

15,993 



177,601 
23,058 
4,514 
9,156 

20,059 
5,601 
57,693 
11,739 
16,888 
1,936 

4,934 
8,941 
3,592 
1,620 

10,913 

9.7C9 

106.001 

13.399 
2,872 



8,836 



169,566 
138.492 



,054 



187,213 
121,859 



811,770 

2,144 

24,543 

25,896 

10,456 

2,780 

2,819 

103,048 

79,984 

9,499 

626 

4,521 

7,513 

1,417 

8,959 

8,575 

2,471 
34,139 

2,610 
13,106 

7,048 

3,249 

4,747 
167 

1,328 

6,415 
485 

2,031 

2,416 

1,667 

414,123 

83,943 

23,853 

1,032 
21,354 
23,185 

292,224 

9,050 

1,106 

16,311 

13,481 

55,814 

70,067 

2,694 

47,763 

125,939 
13,093 



208,541 
17,138 
6,905 
1,376 

17,789 
5,659 

57,194 
9,393 

15,639 
3,277 

7,214 

5,242 

2,603 

1,374 

11,435 

13,373 

102,453 

37,939 

3,559 

9,877 



133,121 



2,318,995 

1,686 

43,973 

64,765 

9,814 

1,495 

2,121 

109,753 

76,883 

10,868 

488 

34,478 

17,704 

9,405 

20,002 

40,362 

1,973 
41,505 

4,170 
12,325 

6,459 



5,133 
191 
772 

4,895 
743 

2,612 

2.997 

2,725 
443,921 
199,236 
35,818 
542 
25,848 
28,949 

215,154 

6,587 

1,752 

12,221 

12,729 

66,725 

110,374 

1,537 

63,795 

128,157 
11,378 



185,461 
19,816 
4,193 



20,232 
5,630 
53,426 
12,466 
14,281 
1,694 

3,639 

3,047 

2,644 

1,611 

10,132 

18,216 

102,204 

37,895 

3,712 

10,462 

144,933 
130,766 



Oct. 



,670,793 

3,041 

59,399 

32,749 

10,955 

7,037 

7,047 

144,778 

91,206 

15,999 

455 

67,081 

9,193 

30,366 

18,830 

107,973 

2, 

38,232 
11,203 
14,516 
7, 

2,373 

4,526 
242 
505 

4,332 
439 

2,782 

3,064 

4,505 

426,425 

430,350 

57,711 

360 

31,238 

28,123 

209,773 

6,309 
1,630 
9,187 

13,977 

77, 

182,086 

702 

71,378 

136,595 
14,113 



147,274 

17,707 

8,839 

1,084 

13,098 
4,401 

40,414 
8,603 

15,421 
1,922 

1,752 
3,634 
4,842 
2,031 
10,591 
18,744 
112,913 
47,546 
5,654 

12,708 

154,431 
128,511 



Nov. Dec. 



1,160,863 

5,792 

72,368 

30,338 

2,942 

8,434 

7,153 

155,185 

104,479 

16,957 

303 

42.905 

1,634 

29.963 

12,546 

95,375 

3,031 

34,925 
6.612 

19,803 
7,967 

- 2,393 

3,772 
763 
613 

2,471 

569 

2,347 

2,693 

7,392 

458,900 

406,823 

71,593 

90 

30,844 

22,579 

127,553 

3,896 
1,757 
3,621 
14.616 



185. 190 

1,545 

79,356 

120,448 
18,053 



112,366 

23 405 

8,222 

1,033 

13,389 
4,174 

12,618 
4.631 

12,566 
1.143 

1,739 
4,099 
3,802 
1,471 
9,619 

25.063 
117,770 

54,326 
5,758 

12,239 

151,470 
131.085 



752,536 

5,786 

39,533 

31,011 

7,228 

5,339 

6,082 

87,733 

59,411 

17,637 

169 

14,965 

900 

19,304 

8,104 

50,345 

2,011 
21,526 

2,266 
18,194 

7,783 

2.-971 

4,113 

5,475 
646 

1,816 
348 

2,32ft 

2,450 

3,201 

417,916 

333,358 

80,918 

74 

22,267 

17,541 

29,174 

2,281 
1,453 
1,552 
8,631 
34,600 

193,999 

583 

63,458 

87,468 
24,464 



85,508 

16,820 

4,139 

684 

7,094 
4,376 
6,624 
4,695 
8,164 
571 

1,280 

3,084 

2,067 

1,248 

11,099 

21,048 

100,299 

34,307 

6,712 

8,259 

113,722 

95,668 



18 



MONTHLY REVIEW OF BUSINESS STATISTICS 



Table 12. Indexes of Employment by Industries, Year 1926 = 100 



Industries— First of Month 



Indexes of Employment Un- 
adjusted- 
All Industries 

Manufacturing 

Animal products — edible 

Fur and products 

Leather and products 

Lumber and products 

Rough and dressed lumber. 

Furniture 

Other lumber products 

Musical instruments 

Plant products— edible 

Pulp and paper products 

Pulp and paper 

Paper products 

Printing and publishing 

Rubber products 

Textile products 

Thread, yarn and cloth 

Hosiery and knit goods 

Garments and personal fur- 
nishings 

Other textile products 

Plant products (n.e.s.) 

Tobacco 

Distilled.and malt liquors.. 
Wood distillates and extracts . 
Chemicals and allied products 
Clay, glass and stone products 

Electric current 

Electrical apparatus 

Iron and steel products 

Crude, rolled and forged 

products 

Machinery (other than ve- 
hicles) 

Agricultural implements 

Land vehicles 

Automobiles and parts... . 
Steel shipbuilding and re- 
pairing 

Heating appliances 

Iron and steel fabrication 

(n.e.s.) 

Foundry and machine shop 

products 

Other iron and steel pro- 
ducts 

Non-ferrous metal products.. . 

Mineral products. 

Miscellaneous 

Logging 

Mining 

Coal 

Metallic ores 

Non-metallic minerals (ex- 
cept coal) 

Communications 

Telegraphs 

Telephones 

Transportation 

Street railways and cartage.. . 

Steam railways 

Shipping and stevedoring 

Construction and Maintenance. 

Building 

Highway 

Railway 

Services 

Hotels and restaurants 

Professional 

Personal (chiefly laundries)... 

Tra de 

Retail 

Wholesale 



1932 



Mar. April May June July Aug. Sept. Oct. Nov. Dec 



2 

2 77 

2 73 



87 

72 

96 

h 104 

85 

100 

108 

111 

93 

83 
120 
120 
120 

91 
113 

77 
114 
116 

70 

65 

81 
27 

73 
81 

65 
73 

71 

71 

76 
83 
119 
102 
32 
97 
80 
131 

73 
94 
96 

93 
84 
112 
77 
82 
83 
58 
130 
65 
114 
107 
130 
121 

m 

123 
101 



89-1 
86-0 

106 
860 
90-5 
64 

51-3 
77-4 
93 
31 

96-9 
88-3 
72-8 
99-1 

105-3 
86-4 
98-9 

107-0 

108-6 



1141 
83-1 
117-4 
109-9 
69-4 

58-8 

78-6 
27-4 
73-8 
86-3 

65.4 
76-5 

680 

74-3 

75-3 

78-4 
123-3 
97-5 
37-9 
96-8 
86-5 
133-0 

74-4 
941 
98-0 
931 
85-5 
1131 
77-1 
9F-4 
92-9 
P2-9 
147-7 
74-0 
116-8 
111-1 
129-4 
121-9 
116-1 
1221 
102-4 



7 
7 
2 
87-0 



81 



54-7 
40-9 
75-8 
80-4 
480 
111-7 
88-0 
73 8 
101,4 
102-3 
82-0 
99-2 
106-2 
115-2 



75-9 
109-6 
103-0 
118-9 
117-7 
108-1 

61-1 
111-6 
108-0 

57-6 

61-2 

62-4 
21-9 
55-3 
47-5 

64-3 
82-4 

52-6 



67-9 

82-9 
119-0 
1010 

37-9 
101-2 

93-9 
134-9 

70-7 
89-6 
89-5 
89-G 
84-5 
119-1 
74-5 
87-8 
77-9 
42-4 
131-9 
63-6 
106-5 
98-7 
126-5 
113-2 
115-4 
121-2 
102-5 



1933 



Jan. Feb. Mar 



76 8 

75 

88-1 
65-8 
82 

44 
31 



22 

89 

83 

67-7 

94-5 

100-4 
72-3 
89-2 
99-3 

102-4 

77-9 
72-0 
114-5 
116-6 
110-6 
112-5 
103-6 
48-6 
106-7 
90-2 
58-2 

46-4 

62-3 
30-3 
66-9 
64-4 

52-5 
51-7 

44-5 

52-9 

57-0 
76-8 

116-0 
92-4 
67-3 
94-0 
85-8 

132-8 

57-3 



112-4 
68-5 
53-6 
54-8 
28-7 
88-9 
51-0 
104-2 
97-7 
125-1 
108-9 
109-4 
114-9 
96-5 



Electrical Energy Available for Consumption, Million K.W.H. 1 













1932 












1933 


Area 


Feb. 


Mar. 


April 


May 


June 1 July 


Aug. 


Sept. 


Oct. 


Nov. 


Dec. 


Jan. 

55-2 
604-9 
451-5 
101-6 


Feb. 


Maritime Province: 

Quebeo 

Ontario 

British Columbia 


55-0 
546-3 
440-9 

96-5 


52-2 
584-6 
468-8 
109-5 


59-7 
576-7 
433 1 

92-7 


62-2 
522-6 
433-6 

92-8 


56-3 47-4 
492-9 467-7 
402-4 399-1 

85-. ll 87-9 


53-5 
509-9 
412-5 

89-1 


57-3 
527-2 
427-6 

90-5 


61-0 
600-2 
462-5 

94-0 


64-5 
654-6 
468-0 

95-0 


63-9 
632-0 
455-8 
102-1 


42-4 
549-4 
447-4 

92-6 



1 Production plus provincial imports leas provincial exports. 



MONTHLY REVIEW OF BUSINESS STATISTICS 



19 



Table 13. Indexes of Employment with Seasonal Adjustment, Indexes of Retail Sales 

Automobile Financing. 



Classification 



Seasonally Adjusted Indexes of 
Employment— All Industries. 

Manufacturing 

Leather and products 

Rough and dressed lumber 

Furniture 

Musical Instruments 

Pulp and paper 

Paper products 

Printing and publishing 

Rubber products 

Textile products 

Thread, yarn and cloth 

Hosiery and knit goods 

Clay, glass and stone products. . 

Electric current 

Electric apparatus 

Iron and steel products 

Crude, rolled and forged pro- 
ducts 

Machinery other than vehicles. . 

Agricultural implements 

Automobiles and parts 

Logging 

Mining 

Metallic ores 

Non metallic minerals except 
coal 

Telephones 

Transportation 

Street railways and cartage 

Steam railways 

Shipping and stevedoring 

Construction and Maintenance. 

Building 

Highway 

Railway 

Hotels and Restaurants 

Trade 

Retail 

Wholesale 

Economic areas and cities— 

Maritime Provinces 

Quebec 

Ontario 

Prairie Provinces 

British Columbia 

Montreal 

Quebec 

Toronto 

Ottawa 

Hamilton 

Windsor 

Winnipeg 

Vancouver 



Indexes of Retail Sales, January, 

1929 = 100 — 

Boots and shoes (6) 

Candy (6) 

Clothing (9) 

Drugs (7) 

Dyers and cleaners (4) 

Furniture (4) 

General and departmental, 25 

stores and 4 chains 

Groceries and meats (23) 

Hardware (5) 

Music and radio (4) 

Restaurants (11) 

General index 

Automobile Financing— 

Total new and used cars — 

Number 

Percentage change, 1932 to 1931. 

Financing in dollars $000 

Percentage change, 1932 to 1931. 



1932 



Mar. I April I May I June I July Aug. I Sept. I Oct. Nov. Dec 



1933 



Jan. I Feb. I Mar. 



First of Month 



91-7 


93-2 


93-7 


89 6 


86-8 


84-9 


82-3 


82-4 


83-4 


820 


82-4 


84-i 


89-1 


88-6 


88-3 


851 


83-4 


83-0 


80 


1 


81-0 


81-8 


80-9 


81-4 


810 


84-7 


87-0 


88-6 


92-3 


92-9 


88-3 


90 


9 


92-5 


901 


87-9 


84-5 


79-5 


57-5 


56-3 


54-2 


47-6 


43-4 


42-9 


39 


8 


39-8 


38-9 


39-7 


43-6 


43-2 


90-9 


83-6 


79-7 


75-5 


76-8 


71-2 


63 


2 


69-2 


72-2 


74-0 


71-7 


70-4 


60-7 


49-2 


41-0 


34-6 


32-9 


30-9 


36 


9 


51-2 


46-4 


43-7 


39-9 


22-8 


76-7 


74-1 


77-1 


72-8 


70-1 


71-3 


69 


9 


72-8 


71-7 


73-2 


71-6 


71-2 


94-5 


96-1 


94-3 


95-9 


S8-9 


97-6 


95 


5 


98-2 


96-9 


93-6 


95-4 


95-7 


106-2 


105-0 


106-5 


104-8 


105-6 


104-3 


102 





104-0 


102-6 


102-2 


102-4 


98-4 


88-7 


88-2 


87-1 


84-2 


84-3 


85-0 


80 


7 


82-8 


83-2 


83 -C 


85-6 


81-6 


95-5 


93-1 


98-4 


98-4 


98-8 


97-7 


94 


1 


96-0 


98-3 


97-4 


95-6 


92-4 


103-5 


106-6 


109-0 


107-5 


107-0 


105-3 


102 


7 


105-1 


105-1 


105-1 


103-8 


100-7 


105-8 


108-3 


109-8 


110-0 


108-6 


109-2 


106 


2 


106-9 


109-7 


111 3 


110-3 


109-3 


87-1 


85-8 


81-0 


77-7 


78-8 


72-7 


65 





64-8 


66-6 


58-5 


53-2 


56-4 


122-4 


123-1 


122-0 


117-7 


115-9 


113-1 


110 


5 


110-9 


109-4 


108-7 


110-7 


112-7 


125-2 


122-5 


121-0 


1170 


110-8 


110-3 


110 


1 


102-0 


103-6 


104-7 


98-4 


96-7 


74-9 


72-6 


74-1 


68-7 


66-7 


67-3 


63 


9 


62-6 


61-7 


58-2 


60-6 


61-4 


71-4 


65-4 


68-7 


61-5 


55-5 


61-2 


53 


8 


62-0 


601 


62-1 


64-9 


51-9 


82-0 


81-7 


82-0 


79-8 


79-2 


77-2 


71 


4 


70-8 


68-4 


62-8 


68-2 


66-3 


29-1 


30-7 


27-1 


260 


26-2 


27-0 


23 


4 


24-8 


23-9 


22-7 


241 


24-1 


73-3 


66-0 


64-7 


661 


72-4 


83-4 


82 


6 


59-1 


47-8 


52-5 


60-3 


82-7 


45-9 


44-1 


40-0 


42-9 


46-3 


51-5 


49 


4 


38-5 


33-6 


32-8 


38-9 


53-1 


101-1 


102-3 


104-0 


100-5 


98-8 


96-1 


95 


7 


96-5 


96-6 


98-' 


97-4 


94-9 


137-4 


139-0 


140-0 


133-8 


132-1 


130-2 


128 


3 


126-6 


128-6 


131-2 


132-7 


133-4 


75-5 


80-5 


79-6 


74-7 


70-9 


69-9 


67 


1 


66-2 


67-1 


66-4 


64-6 


66-4 


100-1 


96-9 


95-5 


93-9 


92-9 


91-6 


90 


7 


90-1 


89-5 


89-3 


90-2 


89-3 


88-3 


87-6 


86-9 


87-5 


84-7 


83-8 


82 


7 


83-3 


82-8 


80-2 


80-8 


811 


115-2 


116-2 


117-4 


114-4 


1120 


111-9 


110 


5 


114-6 


115-1 


114-4 


1151 


117-9 


82-0 


81-4 


81-3 


811 


78-0 


76-5 


74 


9 


74-9 


74-8 


71-6 


71-2 


72-0 


SO -3 


90-9 


83-6 


89-5 


78-5 


79-6 


80 


1 


80-0 


78-5 


76-1 


83-2 


82-3 


133-9 


126-0 


119-3 


99-9 


87-1 


73-6 


65 


9 


63-3 


66-2 


6S-1 


69-9 


82-6 


77-1 


74-7 


65-8 


66-0 


62-2 


53-1 


46 


9 


42-4 


40-1 


36-1 


36-0 


37-0 


387-4 


416-2 


394-4 


269-4 


163-2 


97-5 


81 


8 


77-5 


87-2 


100-7 


120-9 


161-0 


83-6 


84-3 


811 


70-3 


60-8 


58 1 


54 


6 


59-6 


64-4 


60-6 


66-8 


73-2 


106-7 


121-9 


118-9 


117-6 


109-0 


103-5 


97 


2 


102-3 


97-3 


102-9 


102-8 


104-4 


119-5 


117-5 


117-3 


117-8 


117-4 


115-9 


115 


3 


114-0 


114-3 


113-7 


111-6 


113-4 


124-9 


123-8 


123-0 


124-8 


124-1 


123-7 


120 


7 


120-6 


120-9 


120-2 


115-2 


117-8 


104-6 


103-0 


103-5 


102-8 


103-5 


100-9 


101-2 


100-9 


100-4 


99-6 


99-2 


99-6 


96-9 


921 


89-6 


95-3 


91-1 


85-3 


83-7 


81-8 


87-0 


861 


83-2 


80-3 


91-1 


90-6 


8$ 9 


85-2 


83-9 


80-1 


81-4 


81-3 


79-6 


81-3 


84-9 


80-7 


94-6 


951 


911 


88-4 


83-9 


84-6 


82-5 


82-7 


80-3 


82-6 


84-3 


81-5 


95-1 


95-2 


92-8 


88-9 


86-2 


84-6 


87-0 


90-4 


86-0 


83-3 


88-1 


85-1 


84-1 


84-6 


82-9 


81-7 


80-2 


761 


77-4 


77-7 


75-2 


74-2 


77-4 


74-2 


96-7 


955 


92-3 


88-9 


85-4 


82-1 


82-7 


83-9 


81-1 


82-5 


82-9 


82-9 


110-9 


105-9 


107-4 


109-8 


102-4 


97-2 


101-4 


94-2 


92-7 


93-4 


94-8 


94-2 


102-2 


100-2 


97-9 


96-7 


94-3 


91-8 


90-0 


90-8 


89-7 


87-8 


87-6 


88-4 


106-0 


109 9 


103-1 


95-9 


92-9 


91-5 


92-6 


88-2 


91-9 


94-4 


91-7 


93-9 


93-8 


89-0 


86-6 


83-9 


82-9 


78-9 


75-8 


75-9 


76-1 


75-3 


73-0 


73-9 


74-'/ 


94-1 


80-3 


81-8 


87-8 


78-0 


69-3 


50-3 


66-0 


65-5 


85-5 


65-9 


92-8 


91-3 


89-2 


86-7 


870 


85-1 


82-5 


82-2 


81-0 


78-5 


79-6 


81-1 


92-1 


89-7 


87-3 


89-7 


87-3 


84-2 


84-8 


85 1 


86-2 


84-5 


86-1 


87-1 



77-2 
81-6 
41-9 
63-2 
20-7 
70-9 
97-4 

100-1 
74-2 
89-2 
96-0 

101-9 
54-4 

113-3 
87-7 
57-5 

38-6 
63-2 
31-3 
61-1 
41-5 
95-7 
139-2 

64-0 
88-2 
79-3 
118-4 
70-7 
76-6 
85-5 
34-4 
291-3 
69-9 
105-5 
110-9 
116-1 



79-9 
78-0 
82-3 
86-3 
72-3 



81- 



93-9 
73-4 
65-5 
81-8 
84-5 













1932 












Jan. 


Feb. 


Mar. 


April 


May 


June 


July 


Aug. 


Sept. 


Oct. 


Nov. 


Dec. 


64-5 


481 


62-5 


87-3 


88-2 


107-5 


83-1 


57-3 


71-6 


76-5 


77-3 


95-9 


66-9 


69-8 


103-0 


72-3 


75-3 


63-7 


70-9 


69-2 


62-7 


68-3 


57-0 


127-9 


60-7 


52-1 


85-8 


98-4 


91-7 


110-8 


68-7 


51-6 


80-7 


87-2 


85-6 


120-4 


85-7 


87-4 


90-8 


87-4 


79-3 


84-4 


79-0 


79-3 


76-8 


81-2 


79-3 


92-9 


76-4 


75-4 


88-3 


127-8 


119-6 


119-2 


93-2 


92-2 


123-5 


108-8 


92-2 


77-4 


48-3 


64-5 


49-5 


53-6 


52-9 


43-7 


32-7 


44-9 


54-9 


58-4 


55-6 


59-3 


79-5 


78-7 


89-3 


103-1 


103-9 


102-3 


88-0 


81-6 


94-0 


109-9 


97-7 


161-7 


82-5 


80-8 


88-2 


84-5 


82-9 


80-7 


78-8 


75-0 


78-9 


80-0 


78-0 


85-6 


56-8 


54-1 


65-6 


93-9 


120- 1 


109-5 


89-2 


94-0 


104-5 


102-7 


79-4 


99-3 


42-0 


34-9 


31-9 


28-6 


26-6 


20-9 


15-9 


22-1 


38-8 


39-0 


40-7 


41-6 


66-7 


65-0 


67-3 


68-0 


64-5 


62-6 


63-9 


65-6 


64-7 


61-5 


56-1 


62-4 


76-4 


74-4 


85-3 


92-1 


91-0 


91-8 


79-6 


73-7 


84-0 


91-6 


85-0 


119-7 


4,052 


4,170 


4,950 


7,345 


9,615 


9,151 


6,632 


6,065 


5,018 


4,361 


4,286 


3,641 


-19-6 


-22-3 


-38-2 


-49-5 


-33-9 


-20-7 


-35-8 


-10-9 


-15-8 


-32-2 


-17-0 


-26-2 


1,445 


1.529 


2,025 


3,000 


3,788 


3,472 


2,475 


2,185 


1,897 


1,583 


1,334 


1,132 


-34-2 


-35-2 


-43-0 


-52-5 


-40-1 


-29-4 


-41-0 


-24-8 


-27-4 


-40-5 


-37-8 


-38-4 



1933 

Jan. 

50-8 
53-2 
52-0 
74-4 
66-8 
27-4 



70-0 
43-2 
20-7 
54-0 
63-9 



2,916 

-28-0 

962 

-33-4 



20 



MONTHLY REVIEW OF BUSINESS STATISTICS 
Table 14. Trend of Business in the Five Economic Areas 1 



Areas and Items 



Business in Five Economic 

Areas— 

Canada— 

Contracts awarded $000 

Building Permits tOOO 

Employment. Average 1926-100 

Bank Debits $000,000 

Sales of Insurance $000 

Commercial Failures... Number 

Maritime Provinces— 

Contract* Awarded $000 

Building Permits $000 

Emplovment.Average 1926=100 

Bank Debits $000,000 

Sales of Insurance $000 

Commercial Failures... Number 

Quebec— 

Contracts Awarded $000 

Building Permits $ 

Emolovment. Average 1926-100 

Bank Debits $000,000 

Sales of Insurance $000 

Commercial Failures... Number 

Ontario— 

Contracts Awarded $000 

Building Permits $000 

Emplovment.Average 1926-100 

Bank Debits $000,000 

Sales of Insurance $000 

Commercial Failures... Number 

Prairie Provinces— 

Contracts Awarded $000 

Building Permits $000 

Employment. Average 1926—100 

Bank Debits $000,000 

Sales of Insurance $000 

Commercial Failures... Number 

British Columbia — 

Contracts Awarded $000 

Building Permits $000 

Employment. Average 1926-100 

Bank Debits $000,000 

Sales of Insurance $000 

Commercial Failures... Number 



1932 



Feb. Mar. April May June July Aug. Sept. Oct. Nov. Dec 



14,803 

2,579 

88-7 

1,990 

37,857 

221 

3,023 

80 

93-1 

39-6 

2,275 

12 

7,0*0 

797 

86-5 

576 

12,157 

92 

3,956 
1,174 
pl-8 

922 

16,390 

79 

243 
281 
88-2 
329 
4,92? 
30 

501 

24" 

7S-7 

123-3 

2,112 



10.767 
3,324 

87-5 

2,024 

37,206 



312 

72 

88-3 

41-2 

2,395 

13 

3,297 

950 

85-0 

638 

11,354 



4,579 

1,698 

91-1 

861 

16,035 

68 

2,006 

345 

86-1 

353 

5,031 

40 

572 

259 

80-9 

130-4 

2,391 

9 



10.113 
4,237 
87 5 
2,074 
33,425 
190 

585 

473 

87 8 

42-5 

1,781 

13 

2,948 

830 

86 

596 

9,845 

75 

4,018 

1.820 

89-5 

925 

14,851 

79 

1,724 

825 

87-6 

379 

4,702 

17 

838 

288 

82-7 

131 1 

2,246 



14,186 

5,290 

89-1 

2,175 
30,779 

204 

338 

147 

96-4 

49-2 

1,939 

14 

7,390 

1,467 

87 

676 

8,913 

£0 

4,168 

1,511 

89-9 

967 

13.660 



1,417 

1,904 

89-3 

358 

4,! 

20 

874 

262 

83-7 

124-9 

1,978 

11 



12,155 
4,388 
88-7 
2,203 
40,744 
176 

1.333 
131 

96-4 

43-6 

2,242 

18 

4.16« 

1,535 

S6-6 

693 

13,116 

61 

4,321 

2,064 

89-2 

944 

17,258 

70 

1,852 

470 

90-5 

397 

5,750 

17 

474 

188 

83-7 

124-1 

2,378 

10 



12.540 

4.227 

86-3 

2,176 

34,226 

175 



207 

90-1 

46-2 

2,381 



3,444 

2,120 

84-4 

647 

9,924 

72 

6,793 

1,115 

86-9 

975 

14,587 

65 

1,023 

480 

90-1 

388 

5,323 

21 

651 

304 

81-4 

118-3 

2,011 



12,689 

3,331 

86-0 

2,116 

28,124 



961 

IIP 

87 8 

41-8 
1,797 



6,858 

1.145 

85-3 

641 

8,533 

86 



977 

851 

895 

11,608 

72 

830 
367 
91 6 
406 
4,370 
15 

679 

724 

82-8 

131-8 

1,816 

6 



8,876 
2,204 3,056 
86-7 84-7 



2,098 

25,023 

192 

344 

71 

84-9 

43-3 

1,532 



3,475 

455 

85-8 

623 

7,757 



4,691 

901 

86-1 

917 

10,433 

64 

644 

337 

94-6 

402 

3.633 

21 

493 

439 

82-1 

112-1 

1,668 



2,367 
29,657 



508 

139 

86-8 

43-2 

1,749 

15 

4,859 

1.289 

83-6 

692 

8,928 



2,722 

1,154 

84-2 

927 

12,498 

73 

628 

222 

91-6 

580 

4,680 

26 

159 

253 

77-8 

124-6 

1,802 

5 



10,170 

2,505 

83-2 

2,466 

33,739 

229 

348 

134 

83-8 

40-6 

2,068 

15 

4,938 

609 

82-9 

710 

9,895 



2,861 
1,522 
84-1 
1,158 
14,461 
£0 

828 
104 
86-7 
435 
5,291 
35 

1,196 

136 

73-8 

122-2 

2,024 

10 



4,190 

1,481 

78-5 

2,085 

33,249 

196 

542 

72 

801 

39-4 

2,042 

10 

1,248 

261 

77-8 

606 

9,793 

80 

1,476 

939 

78 

904 

14,290 



48 

137 

84-4 

410 

5,083 

31 

875 

72 

69-7 

125-3 

2,041 

6 



1933 



Jan. Feb 



3,362 

1,164 

76-8 

1,969 

29,171 

216 

124 

43 

76-5 

38-2 

1,914 

11 

1,523 

328 

75-7 

607 

8,879 

90 

950 
316 
78-5 
853 
12,013 



101 

308 

80-4 

354 

4,377 

27 

665 

168 

68-0 

117-4 

1,988 

9 



3,149 

907 

76-9 

1,830 

26,089 



193 

44 

76-8 

34-5 

1,600 



1,210 
215 
74-1 
562 

8,315 



349 

79-8 

863 

11,148 



191 

52 

80-0 

267 

3,409 



590 

247 

67-7 

103-8 

1.617 



'Employment indexes apply to first of following month. 





i 


Table 15. 


Mineral Production by Months 












Minerals 


1932 


1933 


Jan. 


Feb. 


Mar. 


Apr. 


May 


June 


July 


Aug. 


Sept. 


Oct. 


Nov. 


Dec. 


Jan. 


Mineral Production 






























Metals— 
Gold 


000 oz. 

000 ojs. 
tons 
tone 
tons 
tons 


233-8 
1,773 
1,594 
9,838 
10,734 
7,555 


225-9 
1,601 
1,787 
11,214 
10,077 
7,112 


255-7 
1,460 
1,877 
11,831 
10.666 
7,583 


246-4 
1,645 
1,692 
11,039 
10,812 
7,325 


268-5 
1,418 
1,736 
10,678 
10,075 
7,624 


270-5 
1,311 
1,581 
10,335 
11,228 
7,333 


247-9 
1,825 
1,480 
9.045 
10,027 
7,603 


262-6 
1,447 

420 
8.802 
10,899 
6,866 


260-5 
1,172 
339 
9,406 
9,947 
6,651 


253-1 

1,511 
1,071 
11,293 
9,930 
6,852 


252-5 
1,515 
614 
8,858 
13,180 
6,653 


266-7 
1,299 
684 
11,105 
9,972 
6.9S4 


233-4 






Nickel 

Copper 

Lead 

Zinc 


10, '391 


Fuels— 
Coal 


000 tons 

000 bbls. 

000 M cu. ft. 


1,188 

96-9 

3,220 


1,230 

90-8 

3,044 


1,049 

97 5 

3,010 


739 

95-6 

2,354 


697 
95-2 
1,760 


752 
89-5 
1,131 


653 

86-9 

982 


720 
85-2 
912 


929 
79-8 
1,158 


1,229 
78-8 
1,712 


1,263 

771 

2,182 


1,160 
80-8 
2,699 


1,023 


Petroleum 

Natural Gas 


82-8 
2,945 


Non-metals— 

Asbestos 

Gypsum 

Feldspar 

Salt 


tons 

000 tons 

tons 

tons 


10,190 
6-41 

700 
9,723 


7,706 

6-10 

945 

10,332 


8,937 

5-86 

1.160 

13,093 


8,830 

15-55 

415 

15,326 


9,942 

32-24 

423 

15,406 


7,977 

70-71 

479 

15,409 


7,164 

80-14 

635 

13,869 


9.918 

69-46 

360 

14,331 


11,001 

52-53 

375 

15,218 


13,232 

52-34 

482 

16,683 


11.616 

27-60 

433 

18,640 


14,478 

19-61 

493 

9,833 


5,950 


Structural Materials— 

Cement 000 bbls. 

Clay products.... $000 
Lime. tons 


271 

335 

23,685 


236 

296 

23,632 


276 

311 

29,108 


427 

362 
26,744 


531 

404 

30,014 


567 

428 

27,290 


457 

375 

27,185 


510 

386 

27,733 


509 

356 

28,550 


411 

323 

34,822 


193 

249 

29,211 


83 

133 

18,295 


65 
111 





MONTHLY REVIEW OF BUSINESS STATISTICS 



21 



Table 16. Weekly Indicators of Economic Activity in Canada, 1932-3 



Items 



Statistics of Grain Trade— 

Receipts Country Elevators — 

Wheat 000 bushels 

Oats 000 bushels 

Barley 000 bushels 

Flax 000 bushels 

Rye 000 bushels 

Visible Supply — 

Wheat 000,000 bushels 

Oats 000 bushels 

Barley 000 bushels 

Flax 000 bushels 

Rye 000 bushels 

Aver. Cash Price Ft. William and Pt. 
Arthur — 

Wheat No. 1 Nor % per bush . 

Oats No. 2C.W 

Barley No. 3 C.W 

Flax No. 1 N.W.C 

Rye No. 1 C.W 

Sales and Prices of Live Stock— 

Sales on Stock Yards — 

Cattle No . 

Calves " 

Hogs " 

Sheep " 

Prices at Toronto — 
Steers, 1,000-1,200 lbs percwt. $ 



Calves, good veal. 

Hogs, thick smooth " 

Lambs, good handy weight " 

Carload in gs, Totals— 

Grain and grain products 

Live Stock 

Coal 

Coke 

Lumber 

Pulpwood 

Pulp and paper 

Other forest products 

Ore 

MdseL.C.L 

Miscellaneous t 

Total cars loaded 

Total cars received from connections. 
Indexes of Carloadings, 1926=100 — 

Grain and grain products 

Live Stock 

Coal 

Coke 

Lumber 

Pulpwood 

Pulp and paper 

Other forest products 

Ore 

Merchandise 

Miscellaneous 

Total for Canada 

Eastern Division 

Western Division 

Indexes of Common Stock Prices— 
Industrials — 

Total (96) 

Iron and steel(19) 

Pulp and paper (9) 

Milling (5) 

Oils (4) 

Textiles and clothing (9) 

Food and allied products (21) 

Beverages (8) 

Miscellaneous (21) 

Utilities— 

Total (18) 

Transportation (2) 

Telephone and telegraph (2) 

Power and traction (14) 

Companies Abroad — 

Total (8) 

Industrial (1) 

Utility (7) 

Grand total (122) 



Mining Stocks — 

Gold (11) 

Copper (4) , 

Silver and miscellaneous (5) . 
Total Index (20) , 



Dec. 



1,897 

178 

161 

14 

17 

237-4 

9,233 
6,772 
1,436 
4, 



5,234 
1,746 
16,553 
1,692 

3-93 
6-65 
4-00 
5-00 

2,684 
845 

3,725 
542 
377 
478 
889 

1,321 
725 

9,097 

4 

25,071 
14,271 

34-98 
70-95 
59-36 
118-34 
18-02 
26-23 
43-24 
66-99 
56-38 
70-98 
41-20 
54-68 
57-42 
50-20 



January 



2,365 

183 

136 

20 

14 

236-9 
9,205 
6,755 
1,451 
5,002 



6,003 
2,514 
10,813 
4,185 

3-45 
6-24 
3-75 
5-79 



52 
41 
1 
38 
83 
31 

76-0 
35-2 
63-4 



40-5 
32 

60-2 
45-1 

43-6 
59-7 
30-1 
46-4 



63-1 
68-0 
22-0 
62-7 



38 



59 



854 



14 



2,423 

213 

104 

11 

22 

231-2 
9,090 
6,740 
1,458 
5,009 



12,019 
3,783 

27,532 
6,425 

3-64 
6-04 
3 
6-02 



53-5 
44-4 
1-4 
380 
85-8 
30-6 
75-8 
35-1 
65-4 

41-4 
33-4 
61-2 
46-1 

44-7 
61-7 
30-5 
47-6 



65 

72-3 
24-6 
65-5 



21 28 



2,236 

226 

77 

10 

13 

229-5 
9,225 
0,770 
1,474 
5, 



12,000 
3,430 

24,613 
5,000 

3-72 
6-00 
3-82 
6-13 



2,412 

290 

118 

12 

18 

229-2 

9,345 

6, 

1, 

5,020 



10,709 
3,409 

25,760 
5,167 

3-58 
6-25 
3-75 
5 



54-7 
45-5 
1-3 
38-6 
89-4 
29-9 
75-9 
35-0 
66-2 

41-6 
33-4 
62-0 



44 



5 

61-7 
30-2 
48-1 



65-4 
73-5 
25-8 
65-8 



53-7 



40-6 
31-5 
62-3 



43-4 



28-9 
47 



64-9 
72-0 
26-0 
65 



February 



3,233 

427 

123 

14 

20 

230-1 

9,389 

6,776 

1, 

5,020 



9,504 
4,013 

22,217 
3 

3-53 
6-29 
3-65 
5-69 



53-5 
45-4 
1-1 
37-2 
86-6 
30-5 
76-0 
33- 
65-1 

40-0 
30- 

64- 
45- 

43-4 
60- 

28- 
46- 



67 
76 
28-3 



,715 
,164 
,325 
886 
592 
980 
,221 
,471 
541 
,610 
,906 
,911 
,119 



1,941 

297 

113 

7 

12 

229-5 
9,244 
6,768 
1,454 
5,044 



4,085 
17,401 
2,625 

3-59 
6-54 
3-68 
5 



52-0 
43-0 
1-7 
35-9 
83-3 
28-5 
75-2 
33-5 
63-6 

37-1 

26-8 
59-3 
43 

41-4 
57-4 
27-9 
44-5 



70-6 
79-0 
27-6 
70-9 



10 



1,814 

262 

74 

3 

12 

226-5 
9,297 
6,700 
1,463 
5,090 



•477 
•232 
•274 
•780 
•322 



9,280 
3,692 
20,470 
4,013 

3-75 
6-85 
4-20 
6-00 

4,009 

1,375 

6,559 

1,274 

853 

1,002 

1,297 

1,547 

690 

379 

894 



23 



3,636 

577 

137 

12 

21 

225-0 
9,265 
6,696 
1,459 
5,085 



•482 
•230 
•275 
•779 
•321 



10,244 
4,778 

24,913 
3,577 

3-52 
6-75 
3-85 
6-43 



879 33 
17 



51-5 
40-5 
1-8 
34-6 
80-5 
28-1 
74-8 
32-9 
65-8 



36-3 
25-7 
58-1 
43-5 



41-5 

58-4 
27-1 
44-0 



77-5 
86-9 
29-7 

77 



52-4 
41-5 
1-6 
34-2 
84-3 
27-5 
75- 
33-9 
64-8 

35-9 
24-4 
59-0 
43- 

43- 
63- 
27-1 
44-6 



76-8 
86-5 
28-5 

77 



March 



3,774 

806 

185 

13 

32 

224-0 
9,513 
6,729 
1,459 
5,110 



•491 
•240 
•275 
•777 
•320 



9, 
3,920 
20,002 
3,937 

3-27 
6-72 
4-05 
6-07 



,743 
807 
,167 
,361 
,211 
.0-10 



50-0 
39 
1 
34 

80-0 
25-9 
73-6 
32-5 
61-8 

33-3 
20-8 
54-9 
42-8 

41-5 

60-4 
25-4 
42-1 



75-1 
84-5 
27 
75-5 



49-0 
38-9 
1-4 
33-1 
79-9 
26-0 
70-8 
32-3 
59-2 

32 
20 

55-0 
41-7 

40-4 
58-8 
24- 
41-3 



69- 
80-9 
26-2 
70-5 



223-4 
9,858 
6,674 
1,438 

5,108 



•501 
•248 
•285 
•794 
•337 



8,462 
4,691 
19,689 
3,209 

3-59 
7-21 
4-55 



5,290 

1,136 

3,676 

850 

691 

1,065 

1,369 

1,654 

727 

11,495 

6,418 

34,371 

15,769 

70-51 
55-28 
68-58 
209-88 
20 -4& 
24-30 
53-04 
42-27 
49-83 
71-87 
55-19 
58-40 
54-73 
65-81 



50-2 
39-2 
1-1 
32-3 
81-5 
27-2 
69-9 
33-2 
61-8 

34-1 

22-4 
56-6 
42-6 

40-3 
57-7 
25-7 
42-3 



66-2 
77-8 
26-3 
67-2 



22 



MONTHLY REVIEW OF BUSINESS STATISTICS 



Table 17. Bank Debits to Individual Accounts in the Clearing House Centres of Canada in 
Millions of Dollars, with Annual Totals for Leading Cities and Economic Areas 



Year 


Canada 


Halifax 


Saint 
John 


Montreal 


Toronto 


Winnipeg 


Vancou- 
ver 


Maritime 
Provinces 


Quebec 


Ontario 


Prairie 
Provinces 


British 
Columbia 


1924 


27,157 


249 


262 


7,502 


7,659 


3,793 


1,410 


585 


8,133 


11,209 


5,505 


1,725 


1925 


28,126 


292 


208 


7,766 


7,588 


4,183 


1,475 


572 


8,475 


11,236 


6,000 


1,842 


1926 


30,358 


310 


215 


9,133 


8,210 


3,877 


1,553 


605 


9,909 


11,998 


5,886 


1,960 


1927 


36,094 


325 


219 


11,780 


10.537 


4,005 


1,596 


628 


12,744 


14,642 


6,127 


2,053 


1928 


43,477 


405 


249 


13,962 


12,673 


5,188 


1.982 


745 


14,913 


17,312 


8,005 


2,499 


1929 


46,670 


425 


273 


15,558 


13,714 


4.789 


2,366 


798 


16,488 


18,543 


7,923 


2,923 


1930 


37,491 


362 


246 


12,271 


10,655 


3,712 


1,813 


708 


13.137 


15,044 


6,279 


2,322 


1931 


31,536 


330 


235 


9,757 


9,512 


3,280 


1,416 


653 


10,550 


13,377 


5,201 


1,806 


1932 


25,844 


258 


214 


7,136 


8,066 


3,138 


1,190 


519 


7,766 


11,259 


4,797 


1,503 



Clearing House 
Centres 


1932 


1933 


Feb. 


Mar. 


April 


May 


June 


July 


Aug. 


Sept. 


Oct. 


Nov. 


Dec. 


Jan. 


Feb. 


Bank Debits 

Maritime Provinces 
Halifax 


? 

17-7 

6-3 
15-6 


s 

19-7 
5-7 
15-9 


$ 

211 
6-3 
15-2 


$ 

26-3 
6-0 
16-9 


% 

21-4 
6-4 
15-7 


$ 

24-1 
6-2 
15-9 


$ 

20-3 
5-6 
15-9 


22-e 

5-6 
15-1 


s 

21-7 
5-7 
15-8 


S 

21-1 

6-0 

13.5 


$ 

19-9 
6-2 
13-3 


S 

19-4 
6-5 
12-4 


16-9 




5-1 


Saint John 


12-6 


Totals 


39-6 


41-2 


42-5 


49-2 


43-6 


46-2 


41-8 

592-6 

43-1 

5-8 


43-3 


43-2 


40-6 


39-4 


38-2 


34-5 






Quebec— 


530-7 

39-5 

6-1 


587-9 
45-0 
5-4 


548-9 

41-0 

6-0 


612-0 

58-2 

60 


639-7 

47-4 

6-3 


587-6 
54-3 
5-5 


576-6 
40-9 
5-8 


631-1 

55-4 

5-7 


654-1 

49-9 

5-7 


556-8 

43-5 

5-8 


546-4 

55-4 

5-1 


520-8 




36-5 


Sherbrooke 


4-7 


Totals 


576-2 


638-3 


595-9 


676-2 


693-4 


647-4 


641-4 


623-3 


692-2 


709-7 


606-1 


607-0 


562-0 






Ontario — 


6-3 
5-1 
4-3 

43-2 
3-6 
7-5 

24-9 

127-4 

4-6 

7-7 

3-1 

666-0 

17-6 


6-5 
5-1 
3-4 

45-9 
3-9 
7-3 

25-7 
122-6 
4-6 
6-4 
3-5 
607-8 

18-6 


7-4 

5-« 

4-4 

46-8 

4-5 

8-2 

25-6 

141-2 

4-7 

6 9 

3-7 

646-2 

20-3 


6-9 
60 
4-6 

481 
4-8 
7-9 

28-0 
174-6 
4-4 
8-5 
3-4 
650-8 

18-9 


7-7 
5-2 
5-1 

45-4 
5-0 
8-8 

32-1 

159-0 

4-7 

8-8 

4-3 

639-7 

18-5 


8-5 
4-3 
5-4 

40-1 
5-4 
8-1 

28-8 
132-6 
4-8 
8-8 
3-1 
708-8 

17-0 


6-2 
4-8 
4-6 

43-2 
4-2 
6-9 

23-3 

124-4 

3-9 

6-8 

2-9 

644-6 

18-4 


6-6 
11-0 

4-4 
45-4 

5-3 

7-6 
22-7 
83-8 

4-4 
11-8 

3-2 

692-7 

18-1 


7-5 
4-4 
4-2 

41-5 
4-8 
8-2 

26-3 

89-5 

4-0 

9-2 

3-2 

707-2 

17-3 


6-9 
6-8 
5-6 

43-4 
4-3 
8-6 

24-9 

203-1 

4-3 

6-6 

3-3 

823-4 

17-3 


7-7 
7-7 
5-4 

39-0 
4-7 
8-0 

26-6 

99-2 

5-4 

8-1 

3-1 

672-1 

16-7 


6-4 
5-3 
3-6 

32-5 
3-9 
7-7 

24-5 

86-8 

3-9 

6-7 

2-6 

655-3 

13-3 


5-1 


Chatham 

Fort William 


3-8 
4-6 
29-2 




3-6 


Kitchener 


6-6 




21-9 




80-6 


Peterborough 

Sarnia 


2-9 

4-2 


Sudbury 


2-5 


Toronto 


683-6 


Windsor 


14-3 






Totals 


921-5 


861-3 


925-3 


966-9 


944-2 


975-9 


894-2 


917-0 


927-4 


1,158-5 


903-8 


852-5 


863-0 






Prairie Provinces- 


2-4 

40-7 

29-5 

2-6 

1-6 

4-4 

1-7 

27-5 

8-1 

210-8 


2-8 

40-2 

410 

2-4 

1-7 

4-6 

1-7 

441 

9-0 

205-2 


2-5 

40-5 

35-7 

2-9 

1-7 

4-4 

20 

45-3 

9-9 

234-1 


3-0 

42-0 

31-2 

2-9 

1-5 

5-0 

1-8 

39-3 

9-8 

221-4 


2-8 

48-9 

32-3 

3-1 

1-6 

5-2 

1-8 

34-2 

9-3 

258-3 


2-7 

34-6 

28-9 

3-0 

1-7 

5-6 

1-7 

35-9 

8-8 

264-7 


2-7 

37-3 

30-6 

3-3 

1-5 

4-4 

1-6 

36-7 

9-7 

278-8 


3-1 

43-4 

28-2 

3-6 

1-7 

5-1 

1-6 

41-0 

10-0 

264-6 


3-5 

51-0 

34-0 

3-7 

2-4 

6-1 

1-8 

61-6 

11-5 

404-2 


2-8 

48-6 

26-8 

3-5 

2-0 

5-2 

1-8 

34-1 

9-8 

300-8 


2-6 

43-9 

30-4 

3-3 

1-8 

5-3 

1-9 

29-8 

9-2 

281-7] 


2-2 

43-9 

37-6 

2-6 

1-5 

4-5 

1-4 

27-2 

7-7 

225-2 


1-7 


Calgary 

Edmonton 

Lethbridge 

Medicine Hat 

Moose Jaw 

Prince Albert 

Regina 


31-6 
22-0 
1-9 
1-3 
2-9 
1-0 
21-9 




6-0 


Winnipeg 


176-7 


Totals 


329-4 


352-8 


379-1 


357-9 


397-5 


387-8 


406-5 


402-2 


579-7 


435-3 


410-0] 


353-8 


266-9 






British Columbia— 
New Westminster 
Vancouver 


4-0 
101-6 
17-7 


4-2 

100-6 
25-6 


4-6 
105-6 
21-C 


4-4 

97-9 
22-5 


4-2 
961 
23-8 


4-6 
91-7 
22-OJ 


4-2 
105-1 
22-5 


4-2 
89-1 
18-9 


4-2 

102-1 

18-4 


3-6 
97-9 
20-6 


4-1 
98-1 
23 -0| 


3-5 
91-3 
22-5 


3-1 
82-8 
18-0 








Totals 


123-3 


130-4 


131-1 


124-9 


1241 


118-3| 131-8 


112-1 


124-6 


122-2 


125-3J 


117-4 


103-8 






Totals Canada. 


1,990-0 


2,024-0 


2,073-9 


2,175-2 


2.202-8 


2.175-6 


2,115-7 


2,097- 


2,367-2 


2,466-3 


2,084-6 


1,968-9 


1,830-3 



Table 18. Indexes of Employment by Cities, 1926 = 100 



1st of Month 


1931 
Dec. 


1932 


1933 




Jan. 


Feb. 


Mar. 


Apr. 


May 


June 


July 


Aug 


Sept. 


Oct. 


Nov. 


Dec. 


Jan. 


Feb. 


Mar. 


Employ- 
ment- 
Montreal 

Quebec 

Toronto 

Ottawa 

Hamilton 

Windsor 

Winnipeg 

Vancouver... 


96-7 
108-7 
104-8 
112-7 
94-0 
72-3 
93-2 
98-3 


88-0 
100-8 
99-6 
108-9 
91-3 
83-5 
92-5 
91-1 


87-4 
100-9 
97-8 
104-5 
90-2 
81-4 
89-6 
90-1 


89-8 
101-9 
97-8 
96-6 
90-4 
80-4 
88-5 
87-8 


91-2 

102-0 
97-8 

101-7 
87-4 
89-8 
86-8 
87-8 


911 
104-0 
97-5 
102-5 
86-9 
88-3 
86-1 
87-P 


91-7 
105-6 
96-8 
100-9 
84-9 
91-0 
85-2 
89-4 


88-6 
104-8 
94-6 
99-3 
84-4 
89-6 
87-0 
8S-7 


85-5 
101-0 
92-3 
97-6 
80-6 
80 -tf 
86-0 
87-9 


86-3 
105-8 
91-6 
98-0 
77-1 
71-8 
85-1 
89-0 


88-0 
100-2 
93-5 
94-4 
77-6 
68-7 
85-6 
88-5 


84-8 
98-5 
92-5 
94-1 
77-8 
62-5 
84-3 
87-9 


85-1 
95-9 
91-2 
92-6 
76-6 
63-7 
82-2 
85-8 


77-5 
92-6 
86-5 
85-8 
70-7 
63-9 
80-8 
82-5 


76-1 
88-9 
84-7 
85-7 
70-4 
67-2 
77-8 
81-2 


75-8 
92-3 
84-4 
85-5 
70-8 
70-5 
78-0 
80-5 



MONTHLY REVIEW OF BUSINESS STATISTICS 



23 



Table 19. Building Permits Issued by Sixty- 


one Cities in Canada in 


Thousands of Dollars 


City 


1932 


1933 


Feb. 


Mar. 


April 


May 


June 


July 


Aug. 


Sept. 


Oct. 


Nov. 


Dec. 


Jan. 


Feb. 


Building Permits— 

Nova Scotia 


66 


56 


213 


106 


92 


120 


67 


51 


102 


109 


49 


37 


30 


Halifax 


66 


51 
1 
5 


108 
26 
79 


95 
2 

9 


89 

1 
3 


105 

1 

14 


67 


40 


92 

2 
8 


108 


49 


37 


28 




2 








10 






















New Brunswick . . . 


14 


16 


260 


40 


39 


88 


51 


49 


36 


25 


23 


6 


15 






2 
2 
13 


3 

32 
225 


4 

12 
24 


•3 

6 

31 


5 

58 
24 


1 
23 
27 


29 

20 


2 
5 
29 












12 

2 


C 
19 








Saint John 


22 


6 


15 




797 


950 


830 


1,467 


1,536 


2,116 


1,151 


530 


1.290 


609 


261 


328 


215 






Montreal and Mai- 
sonneuve 


728 

34 

5 

26 

1 

4 


839 
72 

1 
14 
24 

1 


661 

70 

7 

18 
32 
42 


1,311 

115 

2 

20 
13 
5 


1,420 
52 

4 
28 

8 
23 


1,810 

241 

46 

8 
12 


973 
99 

C 
32 

8 
33 


338 
61 
77 
11 
1 
43 


1,149 
68 

1 
12 

1 
59 


248 

320 

4 
4 

33 


216 
12 


308 

12 


194 
14 


Shawinigan 

Sherbrooke 

Three Rivers 

Westraount 


1 


2 

30 


4 
4 


2 

1 
3 




1,174 


1,689 


1,820 


1,512 


2,067 


1,116 


977 


901 


1,175 


1,522 


939 


316 


349 










2 
20 

7 
11 
19 
15 
114 
13 

5 
79 

1 

351 


17 
35 

9 
41 
13 
11 
98 
89 
138 
87 
36 

9 
145 

5 
11 
18 

4 

12 
14 

5 

9 
817 

157 
21 
11 


19 

8 

9 

63 

12 

17 

111 

108 

19 

63 

10 

6 

132 

2 

16 

156 

7 

14 

4 

15 

13 

514 

171 
4 
3 
1 


14 

10 
23 
10 
38 

149 
28 
37 
49 

106 
6 

261 

U 

12 
7 

18 
1 
8 

34 
376 

126 

8 

699 

2 


6 

13 
2 

28 
8 
8 
187 
8 
2 

35 
2 
1 
115 
6 
8 

31 
4 

50 
2 
4 

13 
394 

115 
3 
66 


.... 

2 

12 
14 
13 
72 
30 
25 
27 
1 
1 

76 

1 

100 

5 



22 

4 

29 

381 

119 
9 
13 
1 


8 
9 
6 

76 
3 

14 
105 

22 

13 

35 
2 
5 

68 
1 
1 

14 
3 
9 

14 
5 

11 
317 

129 
1 

8 

8 


29 
5 
6 
8 
3 

15 

348 

19 

33 

31 

2 

4 

91 

3 

8 

12 
12 
8 
1 
3 
9 
383 

111 
11 

6 


2 

22 

3 

10 

45 

7 

37 

38 

2 

7 

38 

1 

6 

25 

2 

18 
4 
5 

1,197 

46 
i 
2 


3 
2 
3 

2 

12 
8 

8 
22 


1 

i 

3 

1 

39 
1 
1 

30 
4 






2 

2 

2 

6 

105 

3 

31 

32 

5 


1 




2 


Fort William...... 

Gait 


17 
3 


Guelph 


10 




6 




3 




4 




35 


Niagara Falls 


*2 




140 


4« 

"i 

2 

2 

.... 

2 
805 

9 
2 
2 


11 

2 
2 
I 
1 
1 
10 
3 

134 

53 
6 
11 


43 




1 


Peterborough 


11 


12 

3 

1 
5 

'"8 
12 

589 

386 

6 

13 

1 


i9 


Stratford 




3 


St. Catharines 

St. Thomas 


42 

3 

2 

8 

605 

97 

2 

14 

33 


1 
2 


Sault Ste. Marie. . 


5 
153 


York and East 

Townships 

Welland 


34 
5 




3 






















5 
4 
7 


6 
3 


3 
11 








1 

1 

11 














1 
17 


i 

4 


3 
12 


1 
10 










Woodstock 


3 


3 


2 


1 


1 


Manitoba 


64 


41 


199 


1,108 


135 


202 


171 


132 


79 


30 


115 


17 


9 






Brandon 


1 


5 
36 


5 
54 
139 


7 

28 
1,073 


2 

4 
128 


6 

3 

192 


! 

10 

161 


7 

6 

118 


1 

6 

72 


30 


2 

100 

13 








1 

16 


1 




63 


8 






Saskatchewan 


218 


249 


179 


486 


155 


207 


163 


137 


90 


39 


73 


257 


8 


Moose Jaw 

Regina 


35 
20 
163 


40 
95 
114 


61 

18 

100 


52 

26 

409 


24 
22 
108 


112 

7 
88 


15 
19 
129 


6 
18 
113 


5 

9 

76 


i2 

26 


1 

1 

71 


""256 
2 


2 
6 


Saskatoon 




Alberta 


179 


85 


431 


431 


249 


191 


159 


154 


118 


51 


20 


34 


36 


Calgary 


142 
30 

7 


50 

31 

2 

2 


250 

160 

13 

8 


74 

347 

9 

1 


74 

171 

2 


68 

112 

9 

1 


55 
76 
22 
5 


71 

74 

8 

1 


61 
48 

8 

1 


16 
13 

2i 


13 
6 


15 

6 

13 


26 


Edmonton 

Lethbridge 


9 
1 












British Columbia.. 


247 


269 


298 


272 


198 


314 


734 


449 


253 


136 


72 


168 


247 


Kamloops 


5 
17 

10 

194 

3 

17 


1 
8 
13 
13 
187 
11 
36 


4 

8 

1 

212 

5 

66 


11 

'"is 

4 

203 

2 

36 


8 

4 
'10 

5 
127 

1 
44 


1 

3 

17 

10 

233 

5 

45 


3 
4 

16 

2 

634 

37 

39 


9 

5 
14 

2 
384 

4 
31 


8 
19 
9 
2 
176 
4 
35 


2 
3 
9 

""ii2 
'"io 


1 




9 
1 


Nanaimo 


New Westminster. 

Prince Rupert 

Vancouver 

North Vancouver. 


3 

2 
54 

1 
12 


2 
145 


6 

2 

196 


Victoria 


20 


34 




Total 61 cities... 


2,845 


3,395 


4,371 


5,483 


4,749 


4,410 


3,523 


2,450 


3,171 


2,553 


1,569 


1,164 


907 



24 



MONTHLY REVIEW OF BUSINESS STATISTICS 
Table 20. Index Numbers of Wholesale Prices: 1926 = 100 



Classification 


1932 


1933 


Fet 


. Mai 


'. April 


May 


Jun 


e July 


Aug 


Sep 


t. Oct 


. Nov. 


Dec. 


Jan. 


Feb. 


Totals 


69 

56 
62 
71 
74 
87 
63 
87 
84 

73 

63 
66 
91 
63 

79 
60 

58 
71 
43 
68 
56 
65 
61 
62 
43 
66 
52 
67 
71 
70 
74 
75 
74 
79 
84 
82 

80 
43 
59 
48 
77 
50 
70 
56 
41 
87 

93 
65 
55 
59 
72 
44 
78 
80 
36 
64 

35 
66 
72 
72 
78 
86 
92 
43 
96 
56 

51 
97 
56 
44 

100 
95 

100 
72 
91 

103 

71 
72 


•2 63 

•4 56 
•4 63 
•6 71 
•8 74 
•0 86 
•1 60 
•2 86 
•2 83 

•1 72 
•1 63 

4 G5 
•1 90 
7 63 

4 79 
2 59 

5 57 

2 71 

3 42 

5 69 
9 56 
3 64 

1 63 
9 63 

7 43 

2 65 
1 51 

6 70 

3 71 

3 71 

4 73 
3 75 
9 74 

8 77 

8 84 
6 81 

9 82 
1 43 
1 60 

8 51 
75 
3 50 
3 71 

56 

6 41 

1 84 

7 93 

9 65 
7 55 
3 64 

7 67 
G 44 

5 78 

80 

8 30 

9 64 

1 35 

6 66 

2 72 

3 71 

7 77 
9 86 
2 91 
5 43 

8 94 

2 52 

3 47 

5 97 
53 

6 43 

4 100 
3 92 
8 100 

7 72 

8 91 

5 103 

2 71 
72 


1 68 4 

•7 57-1 
5 60-2 

5 71-1 

4 74-0 
3 86-5 
3 58-5 

2 800 

3 83-3 

9 71-8 

8 62-1 

9 65-6 

8 90-7 
1 62-8 

1 78-9 

6 59-2 

5 56-5 

9 71-6 

7 42-8 

1 69-1 
9 57-0 

3 61-0 

4 62-0 

8 61-6 
7 44-5 

2 62-1 
7 51-1 
1 58-3 

5 69-2 

1 66-2 
5 72-8 

3 75-2 
5 74-1 
7 77-2 
3 84-4 

3 81-2 

5 83-2 

4 44-0 

2 60-8 

51-9 

4 73-8 

3 50-3 

1 66-3 
50-6 

6 37-7 

2 82-8 

7 90-2 

7 64-7 
6 54-0 
62-6 
47-9 
39-5 

5 78-5 

80-0 

8 26-0 

9 64-9 

1 32-9 

6 67-7 

2 72-2 

8 71-3 
5 76-2 

9 86-9 

91-1 

5 45-0 

6 94-2 

1 50-6 

8 44-9 
5 97-5 

7 50-8 

3 41-2 

4 100-8 

7 91-7 

8 100-8 

7 72-7 

8 91-8 
8 105-9 

2 71-2 
71-4 


67 7 

56-7 
58-1 
70-3 
73-4 
86-5 
57-2 
85-9 
83-2 

71-5 
60-6 
64-7 
88-2 
62-1 

78-0 
58-6 

55-4 
70-8 
42-7 
68-3 
56-5 
58-2 
59-4 
58-9 
44-6 
58-7 
49-9 
59-0 
69-8 
66-9 
71-5 
75-2 
73-5 
75-9 
85-3 
811 

83-4 
44-1 

59-7 
52-5 
72-2 
50-3 
66-9 
50-6 
27-5 
80-2 

90-2 
64-9 
54-4 
56-7 
44-9 
37-2 
78 6 
80-0 
24-2 
64-9 

30-4 
67-7 
72-2 
69-6 
75-8 
86-9 
91-2 
45-0 
95-7 
48-1 

41-5 

97-5 
50-8 
40-4 

100-8 
88-8 

100-8 
76-0 
91-8 

105-9 

71-2 

70-5 


66 

54 
57 
69 
72 
86 
56 
86 
82 

71 
59 
63 
88 
60 

76 

56 

53 
69 
39 
66 
54 
58 
58 
58 
40 
59 
47 
55 
68 
64 
68 
75 
72 
75 
85 
81 

82 
39 
55 
52 
72 
50 
64 
50 
26 
77 

90 
66 
53 
55 
49 
34 
78 
80 
24 
64 

27 
67 
72 
68 
70 
86 
91 
45 
97 
47 

39 
97 
51 
39 

100 
88 

100 
76 
91 

105 

71 
72 


6 66-6 

•3 55-2 

6 57-9 
•3 69-0 
•1 69-7 
•6 86-4 
•6 56-1 

85-7 
•6 82-7 

71-5 
•7 60-9 

2 62-8 

1 88-1 

4 60-0 

9 75-9 

7 56-5 

9 54-3 
9 70-0 

8 41-8 
8 66-7 

3 55-2 
7 57-8 
3 59-0 

5 58-5 

6 41-8 
3 58-3 
6 48-0 

50-7 

1 68-6 

6 63-8 

7 66-9 
1 75-1 
1 71-3 

8 75-6 
3 850 

1 80-8 

6 85-0 
5 39-2 
8 54-8 
5 52-5 

2 73-8 

3 50-3 

5 63-8 

6 46-9 

4 29-0 

5 73-7 

2 90-2 

7 66-9 

8 55-7 
4 54-7 
7 510 

9 38-3 

6 77-2 
80-( 
2 24-1 
9 64-9 

4 23-2 

7 68-2 

2 72-2 
66-2 

3 68-6 
9 86-9 
3 91 -C 

45-0 

6 97-2 

3 47-2 

4 38-6 

5 97-5 

1 49-5 
5 38-1 

8 99-8 

7 88-7 

8 100-8 

1 75-5 

8 91-8 

9 105-9 

2 71-2 
72-0 


66 

55 

58 
69 
69 
86 
57 
85 
82 

71 
61 
63 

88 
60 

75 
57 

54 
70 
42 
66 
55 
58 
61 
59 
41 
59 
48 
49 
66 
61 
66 
75 
71 
76 
85 
81 

83 
39 
55 
52 
73 
50 
61 
46 
38 
73 

90 
65 
55 
56 
54 
48 
79 
80 
30 
63 

31 

68 
72 
65 
68 
86 
90 
41 
96 
48 

40 
97 
51 
40 
99 
89 

100 
75 
91 

105 

71 
72 


8 66 

•1 53 

•9 60 
•3 70 
•5 69 
•1 85 
3 58 

9 86 
•9 82 

6 72 

1 61 

2 62 
•1 88 
•4 59 

•7 76 
55 

7 53 

6 71 
2 39 
9 66 
5 54 

59 

2 63 

8 61 

7 38 

3 60 

3 46 
5 50 

5 65 

9 61 

6 67 

1 75 
1 71 

4 76 

1 85 

2 81 

1 82 
9 36 

6 53 

5 52 

7 73 

3 50 
9 61 
9 49 
9 48 

73 

2 88 

5 60 

6 54 

5 60 
9 65 

6 48 

1 80 
80 

6 31 

7 63 

31 

2 68 

2 72 

8 67 

3 67 

9 86 

8 90 

9 41 
8 93 
3 52 

3 43 

5 97 

6 48 

4 43 
8 100 

4 90 
8 100 

5 75 

8 91 

9 105 

2 71 

4 72- 


9 65 

5 52 

8 59 

69 

9 64 
9 85 
9 57 

1 85 
8 83 

1 71 

8 60 

5 60 

1 86 

6 57 

5 77 

9 53 

9 52 

69 

7 37 

6 65 

2 53 

3 57 

4 62 

6 60 
9 36 
2 58 
9 44 

8 56 

2 62 

3 60 

4 67 

1 65 

5 66 

4 75 

1 85 

2 80 

9 81 
9 34 

5 51 

5 52 

7 73 

3 50 
3 60 

7 49 

8 43 

7 73 

8 88 

3 52 
7 50 

6 60 
66 

6 41 

5 80 

80 
2 30 

7 63 

6 31 

8 67 
2 60 
5 68 

1 65 

9 86 
5 90 
5 43 
9 92 

1 50 

5 40 

5 97 

2 48 
1 41 

6 100 

1 89 
8 100 

4 75 

8 91 

9 105 

2 71 
72 


•0 64-8 

■2 52-2 

3 57-5 

1 68-6 

5 64-6 
•8 86-0 

7 58-2 
•9 85-7 
•4 83-9 

•4 71-0 

•7 60-1 
•3 59-9 
•8 86-0 
•4 57-0 

•1 77-1 
•0 52-5 

6 52-3 

2 68-7 
9 37-7 
9 66-1 

53-0 
5 56-3 

8 60-5 
5 58-7 

8 36-6 

4 56-9 

9 44-2 
2 54-2 

4 62-4 

7 60-2 

5 67-6 

1 65-1 

2 66-3 

8 76-3 
84-7 

9 80-9 

6 80-8 

4 33-9 

7 51-9 

5 52-5 
5 73-5 

3 50-3 

8 60-2 
7 49-7 

5 33-4 

7 73-1 

8 88-8 
7 47-7 

6 48-0 
2 58-7 

7 69-5 
2 40-6 

5 80-5 
800 
30-2 
7 63-7 

6 31-6 

7 67-7 

4 60-4 
4 68-2 

4 66-3 

9 86-9 

90-2 

7 44-3 

8 97-2 
6 49-1 

9 42-2 

5 97-5 

1 49-5 

6 43-5 
6 100-6 
8 89-7 

8 94-8 

4 75-4 

5 91-5 

9 105-9 

2 71-2 

3 72-3 


640 

50-2 
57-2 
68-6 
64-0 
86-2 
57-5 
86-1 
83-G 

70-6 
59-3 
58-6 
87-7 
55-4 

76-2 
50-8 

51-1 

68-1 
34-5 
65-3 
51-1 
57-4 
59-7 
58-7 
33-6 
57-8 
42-7 
54-9 
61-0 
59-3 
66 -f 
65-1 
65-8 
77-1 
84-6 
81-2 

75-4 
30-3 
50-7 
52-5 
70-5 
50-3 
59-3 
48 5 
27-9 
71-8 

88-8 
46-5 
46-3 
60-5 
69-7 
39-5 
80-5 
80-0 
29-5 
63-7 

30-4 
67-7 
60-4 
66-6 
66-3 
86-9 
90-7 
44-3 
97-6 
47-6 

42-3 
97-5 
46-6 
45-0 

100-6 
91-3 
94-8 
75-2 
91-5 

105-9 

71-2 
72-3 


63-9 

50-9 
57-1 

63-0 
63-6 
85-4 
56-9 
86-0 
82-5 

69-8 
59-5 
58-8 
87-7 
55-6 

75-8 
511 

51-2 
67-5 
35-4 
65-2 
515 
57-5 
59-2 
53-5 
35-1 
57-9 
43-6 
54-9 
61-9 
60-0 
66-1 
61-9 
63-9 
75-8 
84-3 
80-5 

80-7 
31-9 
50-9 
52-5 
70-3 
50-3 
600 
47-2 
311 
71-8 

88-8 
47-7 
46-9 
60-4 
65-0 
40-6 
79-1 
77-8 
24-2 
63-7 

30-8 
67-7 
60-4 
66-4 
65-3 
86-9 
90-3 
391 
96-8 
47-0 

40-9 
97-5 
46-8 
44-5 
99-3 
91-4 
94-6 
75-2 
91 2 
105-9 

71 2 
72-3 


63 6 


Component Material- 


50-8 




55-8 


Textiles 


67-9 




63-2 




85-2 




58-3 




85-0 




82-4 


Purpose— Consumers goods 

Foods, beverages and tobacco. . 


69-0 
58-3 
58-9 




87-2 




55-8 


Building and construction ma- 


74-7 


Manufacturers' materials 

Origin — Raw and partly manu- 


51-6 
50-8 


Fully and chiefly manufact'd 


66-9 
36-1 




64-4 


Totals 


51-3 


Animal origin— Raw 

Manufactured 

Totals 


550 
58-8 
57-2 


Canadian farm PRODucxs-Field 


36-0 
54-7 


Totals 


43-0 


Marine origin — Raw. 

Manufactured 

Totals 


53-1 
62-1 
60-0 


Forest origin — Raw 


65-2 




61-8 


Totals 


63-4 


Mineral origin— Raw 


75-7 
83-4 


Totah 


800 


Commodity Groups- 
Fruits 


79-4 




33-1 


Flour and milled products 

Rubber and its products 

Sugar and its products 


50-9 
52-5 
68-8 


Tobacco 


50-3 


Fishery products 


59-7 


Furs 


52-4 




27-7 


Leather, unmanufactured 

Boots and shoes 


69-7 
88-8 




46-4 




45-8 




59-5 


Eggs 


55-7 


Cotton, raw 

Cotton yarn and thread 


41-2 
79-1 
77-8 


Silk, raw 

Artificial silk and its products. . 

Wool, raw 


22-7 
63-7 

31-0 


Wool yarns 


67-7 




60-3 




64-8 


Pulp 


66-2 


Pig iron and steel billets 


84-2 
90-4 




38-0 




101-3 


Brass, copper and products 


47-6 
42-5 




97-5 


Silver 


50-3 


Zinc and its products 


45-2 
99-3 


Coal 


91-4 


Coke 


94-6 


Petroleum and products 


71-6 
91-2 




105-9 




71-2 




72-3 




- 



MONTHLY REVIEW OF BUSINESS STATISTICS 



25 



Table 21. Prices of Representative Commodities, and Wholesale Prices in Other Countries. 3 



Description* 



yds to lb. 
Silk, raw, grand double 



1932 



Feb. 



Wholesale Prices of Important 
Commodities— 

Oats, No. 2 C.W bush 

Wheat, No. 1 Man. Northern " 
Flour, First Patent 2-98'e 

jute 

Sugar, raw 96° Centrifugal 

N.Y cwt. 

8ugar, granulated, Montreal " 
Rubber, ribbed, smoked 

sheets, N.Y lb. 

Rubber, Para, upriver, fine, 

N.Y " 

Cattle, steers, good 1,000- 

1,200 lbs cwt. 

Hogs, bacon, Toronto " 

Beef hides, packer hides, 

native steers lb. 

Sole leather, mfr's. green 
hide crops " 

Box sides B. mill ft. 

Butter, creamery, finest, 
Montreal lb. 

Cheese, Canadian, old large, 
Montreal M 

Eggs, fresh extras, Montreal doz. 

Cotton, raw 1-1 1/16', Ham- 
ilton lb. 

Cotton yarns, 10's white 
single " 

Saxony, 4-50 yds to lb " 

Gingham, dress, 6-50-7-75 

£ 

eitra, N.Y 
Wool, eastern bright } blood " 
Wool, western range, semi- 
bright, § blood M 

Pulp, groundwood No. 1 ton 

Pig iron, basic mill " 

Steel merchant bars, mill. 100 lb 
Copper, electrolytic domes- 
tic cwt. 

Lead, domestic, Montreal. . " 
Tin ingots, Straits, Toronto lb. 
8pelter, domestic, Montreal cwt. 
Coal, anthracite, Toronto. . ton 
Coal, bituminous, N.S. run- 

of-mine " 

Gasoline, Toronto gal. 

Sulphuric acid. 66° Benume net ton 
Indexes of Wholesale Prices In 
Other Countries—' 
United States- 
Fisher, 200: 1926 

Bureau of Labour, 550: 1926 

Annalist, 72: 1913 

United Kingdom- 
Board of Trade, 150: 1913... 

Economist, 58: 1927 

France, Statistique General, 45 

1914 

Germany, Federal Statistical 

Office, 400:1913... 
Belgium, Ministry of Labour, 

130:1914 

Netherlands, Central Bureau 

Statistics, 48: 1913 

Norway, Official, 95: 1913 

Sweden, Commerce Dept., 160. 

1913 

Italy, Bachi, 100:1913 

Finland, Official, 139: 19*26 

India, Bcpt. of Statistics, 75: 

1914 

Japan, Bank of Japan, 56: 1913. 
Australia, Commonwealth Sta- 
tistician, 92: 1911 

New Zealand, Official, 180: 1913 
EEvpt, Dept. of Statistics, 
Cfliro.23: 1913-1914... 



5-100 



1-146 

4-560 



5-959 
4-940 



■055- 
•065 



-214 



•203 
•506 

•923 

2-579 
•125 

•090 

23-990 
18-000 
2-250 

8-450 

4-148 

•298 

3-936 

13-810 

6-000 

•175 

16-000 



Mar. 
t 

•301 
•631 

5-085 

•851 
4-465 

•037 

•057 

5-840 
4 '900 

•055 
•065 

•33 

•200 

-272 



66 3 
92-3 

105-3 
67-0 

421 

99-8 

554 

83 
123 

110 
314 
93 

97 
122-0 

133-2 

132-1 

91 



• 203 
-506 

•923 

•18: 
•12 

-090 

23-200 
18-000 
2-250 

7-63: 
3-85 

•28! 
3-82 

12-750 

6-000 
•175 

16-000 



63-1 
66-0 
91-1 

104-6 
65-3 

427 

99-8 

548 

82 
122 

109 

315 

92 

94 
119-8 

132-2 
131-6 



Apr. 


May 


$ 


S 


•323 
■626 


•355 
•029 


5 039 


5-100 


•725 
4-370 


•053 
4-275 


•034 


•035 


•058 


•C63 


5-880 
4-540 


5-840 
4-510 


•050- 
■060 


•'33- 

•043 


•320 
•200 


•310 
•200 


•231 


•197 



■082 



923 



1-784 
•110 



22-429 
18-0(0 
2-250 

7-467 
3-609 
•255 
3-634 
12-342 

8-000 

•175 

16-000 



62-2 
(5-5 
90-7 

102-4 
62-7 

425 

98-4 

39 



120 

109 

311 

89 

92 
116-5 

131-5 
130-7 



90 



■ 180 

•209 



•076 



1-688 
•100 

•080 
•0S5 
22-160 
18-000 

2-250 



3-320 

•280 

3-564 

12-510 

6-OCO 

•185 

16-000 



610 
64-4 



100-7 
60-5 

421 

97-2 

526 



89 
1136 



129-4 
130-4 



June 
t 



•338 
•551 



4-275 

•031 

•063 

6-160 
4-580 

•030- 
•040 

•290 
•190 

•191 

•160 
•241 

•072 

•205 
•495 

•923 

1-678 



July 



21-690 
18-000 
2-250 

6-791 
3-145 
•270 
3-480 
12-510 

6-000 

•185 

16-000 



59-6 
63-9 



98-1 
58-8 



•352 
•547 



4-800 



1-304 
4-370 



6-140 
5-030 



•038- 

•048 



•079 



•100 
•495 



•923 



Aug. 
$ 



•299 
•563 



1-323 
4-370 



96-2 

514 

78 
120 

108 
297 
87 

86 
110-6 

127-8 
129-9 

81 



1-638 
•090 

•085 

21-145 
18-000 
2-250 

6-850 
3-083 
•285 
3-355 
12-510 

6-000 

•180 

16-000 



60-4 
64-5 
92-1 

97-7 

60-1 

404 
95-9 
512 

76 

122 

108 
296 



128 4 
129-9 



•042 

•068 

6-050 
5-210 

•055- 
•065 

•280 
•180 

•212 

•160 
•281 

•096 

•210 
•495 

•923 

2-059 
•095 

•100 

20-968 
18-000 
2-250 

7-030 
3-217 
•300 
3-561 
12-757 

000 

180 

16-000 



Sept. 



78 



61-8 
65-2 
94-2 

99-5 
61-9 

394 

95-4 

524 

75 
123 

108 

296 

89 

91 
117-7 

130-1 

130-2 



261 
519 

600 

197 
370 

043 

080 

360 
110 

075 
085 

280 
190 

245 

180 

330 

092 

225 
500 

023 

107 

095 

105 

472 
000 
250 

016 
482 
318 
SO: 1 
981 

000 
180 
000 



Oct. 



4-500 



1-277 
4-370 



62-7 
65-3 
95-2 

102-1 
64-0 

397 

95-1 

533 

76 
123 

110 
300 



126-5 



132-4 
129-5 



78 



•038 

•083 

4-700 
4-500 

•070- 
•080 

•280 
•190 

•240 

•180 
•394 

•082 

•225 
•484 

•923 

2-024 
•095 

•105 

19-573 
18-000 
2-250 

7-310 
3-264 
•315 
3-667 
13-328 

5-250 

•180 

16-000 



Nov. 

$ 



•240 
■407 



4-500 



1-254 
4-370 



61-1 
64-4 
91-0 

101 
62-0 

392 

94-3 

529 

77 
123 

110 

298 



91 
127-8 



129-0 
127-7 



80 



■040 



4-220 
3-920 

•055- 
•065 

•270 
•190 

•235 

•180 
•490 

•086 

•225 

•484 

•959 

2-006 
•095 

•105 

19-795 
18-000 
2-250 

7-305 
3-373 
•315 
3-834 
13-328 

5-250 

•180 
16-000 



Dec. 

$ 

•210 
•424 

4-400 

•943 
4-180 

•038 

•077 

4 -10C 
3-970 

•043 
•053 

•260 
•190 



•406 



60-3 
63-9 
88-4 

101-1 
62-3 

391 

93-9 

525 

77 
124 

109 

298 

91 

90 
134-4 

127-0 



79 



•C5! 



•10? 

19-763 
18-000 
2-250 

7-021 
3-386 
•305 
3-971 
13-328 

5-250 

•180 

16-000 



1933 



58-5 
62-6 
85-7 

101-1 
61-1 

390 

92-4 

522 

76 
123 



Jan. 
$ 

•225 
•442 

4 500 

•795 
4-180 

•036 

•070 

411C 

3-760 

•055 
•055 

•260 
•190 

•235 

-180 
-318 



•210 
•484 

•959 

1-623 
•090 

-105 

19-190 
18-000 
2-250 

6-905 
3-262 
•300 
3-924 
13-328 

5-250 

•180 

16-000 



56-4 
61-0 
82-4 

100-3 
61-2 

390 

910 

521 

75 
122 



290 
90 



139-5 



Feb. 

$ 

233 
458 

500 

835 
C85 

035 

072 



000 
810 



045- 
055 



250 
180 



239 



210 
484 

959 

538 
090 

105 

450 
COO 
250 

050 
400 
320 
983 
339 

250 
165 
000 



'For full description see the report on Prices and Price Indexes published by the Dominion Bureau of Statistics- 
Application for this publication should be made to the Dominion Statistician. 

2 The description includes the authority, the number of commodities aad the base year. 



26 



MONTHLY REVIEW OF BUSINESS STATISTICS 



Table 22 


Total Value of Imports and Exports, by Groups, in Thousands 


of Dollars 








Imports of Merchandise 


for Consumption in 


Canada 






Month 


Total 
Imports 


Vege- 
table 
Products 


Animal 
Pro- 
ducts 


Textiles 


Wood 
and 
Paper 


Iron and 
its Pro- 
ducts 


N on- 
Ferrous 
Metals 


Non- 
Metallic 
Minerals 


Chemic- 
als and 
Allied 

Products 


Miscel- 
laneous 
Com- 
modities 


1930 


$000 

77,906 
87,900 
78,358 
76,325 
60,338 

50,414 
50,994 
75,348 
51,189 
73.457 
52.508 
48.379 
47,308 
45,379 
45,933 
46,911 
40,290 

34,115 
35,586 
57,437 
29,794 
44,361 
40,743 
35,711 
36.527 
34.504 
37.095 
37,769 
28.961 

24,441 
23,514 


$000 

13,650 
16.587 
15,231 
15,146 
13,535 

9.181 
9,014 
15,739 
11,367 
17,839 
9.966 
10,411 
0,371 
8.870 
9,927 
12,074 
10.676 

6.094 
7,538 
14,489 
5,283 
9.416 
8.702 
7,462 
7,098 
6,814 
8,225 
8,639 
7.830 

5,148 
4,919 


$000 

3,784 
4,579 
3,867 
3,324 
2,451 

2.665 
2,540 
4,187 
2,240 
3,344 
2,362 
2,287 
2,206 
2,150 
1,796 
1,544 
1,309 

1,482 
1,640 
2,204 
1 096 
1.756 
1,611 
1,330 
1,251 
1,265 
1,425 
1,427 
977 

942 

980 


$000 

11,977 
12,947 
10,756 
12,738 
9,036 

8,025 
8,711 
11,825 
6.987 
8,717 
7.251 
7,152 
7,372 
6,530 
6,344 
5,985 
5,254 

6,285 
6,602 
9,401 
4.601 
6.074 
5.310 
4,552 
5.587 
4,935 
5,428 
5,450 
4,725 

4.739 
4,390 


$000 

3.796 
3.951 
4,198 
3,693 
3.059 

2,808 
2,815 
3,951 
2,798 
3,530 
3,146 
2,790 
2,743 
2,696 
2,862 
2,505 
2,279 

1,968 
2,032 
2,660 
1.553 
2,078 
1,922 
1,778 
1,745 
1.754 
1,907 
1.R59 
1.566 

1.304 
1,409 


$000 

16,269 
15.415 
13.563 
12,839 
10.837 

10,051 
11,353 
17,282 
11,925 
14,807 
9.989 
8,108 
7,377 
6,883 
6,285 
6,479 
5,881 

5,085 
6,009 
9,983 
5.820 
7,169 
6.710 
5,130 
4,394 
4,233 
4,288 
5,262 
3,624 

3,655 
3.643 


$000 

5,494 
5,504 
6,452 
5,914 
4,394 

3.202 
3,363 
4,620 
3,018 
3,953 
3,157 
2.984 
2,958 
2,958 
3,055 
2,849 
2,335 

2,256 
2,091 
2,688 
1.688 
2,085 
1,733 
1,513 
1,402 
1.496 
1.655 
1,908 
1,129 

914 
971 


$000 

14,517 
19,244 
15,871 
13,304 
10,127 

8,246 
7,834 
9,691 
6,969 
12,152 
9.838 
8,382 
8,139 
8,614 
9,432 
9,626 
7,209 

6,656 
5,438 
9.691 
5.567 
9,476 
9,229 
9,367 
9,143 
8,501 
8,626 
8,138 
5.509 

4,504 

4,405 


$000 

2,525 
3,241 
3,151 
3.384 
2.549 

1,935 
2,094 
3.372 
2,375 
3,898 
2,530 
2,290 
2,666 
2,537 
2.422 
2,721 
2.497 

1.950 
1,874 
2.971 
1,998 
2,942 
2,556 
2,081 
2,217 
2,336 
2,770 
2,577 
1,588 

1,292 
1,196 


$000 

5,895 
0,433 




October 


6,269 


November 


5,374 
i 349 


1931 


4,300 




3,271 


March 


4.881 




3,512 


May 


5,217 
4 270 


July 


3,975 




4,477 


September 


4,142 




3,809 




3,127 




2.S51 


1932 


2,338 


February 


2,362 


March 


3,351 


April 


2,188 


May , 


3,366 


June 


2,969 


July 


2,499 




3,691 


September 

October 


3.169 
2,771 




2,509 




2,012 


1933 


1,943 


February 


1,601 



Month 



1930 

August 

September 

October 

November 

December 

1931 

January 

February 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September 

October 

November 

December 

1932 

January 

February 

March..." 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September 

October 

November 

December 

1933 

January , 

February 



Exports of Merchandise from Canada 



Total 
Exports 

of 
Mdee 



$000 

70, 61? 
82.190 
84.298 
71,592 
68.053 

45.634 
44,914 
56.296 
34,674 
60,845 
55,3!>0 
50,671 
49,894 
49,909 
56,53? 
58,43" 
54,218 



39.063 
37.010 
41.019 
27 455 
41.402 
41,701 
43,032 
41,855 
42.665 
57,160 
46,621 
43, 109 



32,000 
26,814 



Domestic Produce 



Total 
Exports 
of Can- 
adian 
Produce 



$000 

69, 290 
81.046 
82.781 
73.060 
68,820 

44.683 
43,873 
65.048 
33.935 
59.833 
54,348 
49,675 
48,764 
4". 991 
55,538 
57,4*7 
53,255 

38,367 
36.431 
39,749 
26 976 
40,594 
40,945 
42,321 
41,314 
42,187 
56,626 
45.945 
42,6161 

31.562 
26,3981 



Vege- 
table 
Pro- 
ducts 



$000 

25,729 
33.911 
37.358 
34.542 
24,647 

11,638 
13.541 
15,982 
7,625 
26.502 
21.394 
14,496 
14,611 
13,958 
19,337 
27,820 
22,945 

11,079 
12.363 
12,291 
8.722 
16.920 
15,042 
17,302 
15,664 
20,382 
31,638 
21.978 
21 676 

12,042 
9,571 



Animal 
Pro- 
ducts 



$000 

7,289 
9.084 
8,320 
7,765 
6.322 

6.211 
5.059 
5. 78? 
3,851 
3,778 
5.194 
7,008 
6.604 
7,842 
8,336 
5,820 
5,453 

5,693 
4,989 
4,231 
2.434 
3,412 
4,232 
6,212 
6,252 
4.645 
4.888 
3.773 
4,797 

5,191 

4,075 







Iron 




Non- 
Metallic 
Miner- 


Chem: 


Tex- 
tiles 


Wood 
and 
Paper 


and 
its 
Pro- 


N on- 
Ferrous 
Metals 


cal and 
Allied 
Pro- 






ducts 






ducts 
$000 


$000 


$000 


$000 


$000 


$000 


751 


19.274 


3.895 


7,559 


2,057 


1,061 


467 


21,159 


3.663 


8,110 


1.918 


1,071 


501 


20,964 


3,372 


7.737 


1.840 


1,072 


369 


17,584 


2.483 


5,882 


1.823 


1,096 


343 


19.724 


3.322 


8,458 


1.804 


845 


240 


14,281 


2.459 


6,996 


1.118 


664 


233 


14.274 


1.786 


5,615 


1.212 


889 


383 


19.120 


2.297 


7.215 


1.449 


1,400 


258 


13,409 


1.608 


4.192 


855 


997 


757 


16,424 


1.947 


8.251 


1,456 


1,175 


670 


17,105 


1.674 


4.726 


1,281 


958 


642 


15,365 


1.559 


6,922 


1,319 


859 


590 


15,851 


1,253 


6.546 


1.292 


800 


357 


15,192 


1,422 


7.298 


1.084 


673 


419 


15,705 


1,297 


6.97*- 


1,36^ 


872 


517 


14. »n 


877 


4.259 


1.329 


805 


328 


13,956 


907 


6.846 


1,229 


666 


234 


12,91c 


867 


5.446 


807 


736 


304 


11,165 


879 


4,631 


629 


836 


436 


13,83* 


1,173 


4.9°0 


823 


1,067 


218 


9.675 


958 


2.687 


464 


971 


462 


11,210 


1 , 253 


4 004 


778 


1.472 


781 


12,678 


1 , 203 


3,970 


940 


1,184 


5% 


10.333 


2,016 


3,450 


730 


711 


384 


11,521 


1,611 


3,422 


785 


749 


422 


9,392 


1.505 


3,286 


788 


816 


471 


11,399 


2,239 


3,890 


1,064 


915 


328 


10,685 


1,557 


4,770 


1,074 


1,078 


269 


9,167 


1,065 


3 585 


768 


761 


230 


8,234 


1,021 


2,634 


698 


1,014 


339 


7,284 


842 


2,651 


437 


701 



Miscel- 
laneous 
Com- 
modi- 
ties 

$000 

1,674 
1,663 
1,616 
1.517 
1.355 

1.07(1 
1.265 
1.418 
1.140 
1.543 
1.347 
1.506 
1.217 
1,164 
1 , 236 
1.150 
034 

586 
635 
911 
817 

1.054 
917 

1,043 
025 
951 

1,122 
701 
528 

499 

404 



MONTHLY REVIEW OF BUSINESS STATISTICS 



27 



Table 23. Canada's Domestic Exports in Thousands of Dollars, and Indexes of the Cost 

of Living 



Classification 












1932 












| 1933 


Feb. 


Mar. 


April 


May 


June 


July 


Aug. 


Sept. 


Oct. 


Nov. 


Dec. 


Jan. 


Feb. 


Exports of Canadian Produce— 

Agricultural and Vegetable 
Products— 
Alcoholic beverages (chiefly 


1,475 
732 

6,623 
147 

5,881 

450 

181 

497 

1,184 

69 

85 

1,715 

1,836 

44 

237 

528 

15 
91 
18 
11 

7,192 

1,093 

201 

139 

230 
1,747 

167 
47 

165 
55 

200 
96 
49 

78 

1,772 
194 
421 
944 
400 

207 
129 
82 
76 

216 

189 
217 

154 
141 

162 

84-5 
66-5 
93-8 
99-3 
76-4 
97-1 

7-34 
3-10 
6-77 
17-25 


816 
328 

6,779 
149 

6,134 

614 

135 

414 

1,469 

137 
119 
1,457 
982 
80 
270 
646 

2 
128 
15 
21 

8,521 

1,474 

269 

266 

225 

2,249 

221 

35 
200 

84 
351 

86 

60 

127 

1,878 
260 
355 
831 
507 

279 
132 
93 
110 

144 
377 
261 

138 
399 
212 

83-9 
66-0 
93-6 
99-3 
74-5 
96-8 

7-27 
3-08 
6-77 
17-16 


616 

77 

5,534 

267 

4,537 

414 
45 
171 
895 

146 
52 
649 
713 
36 
163 
357 

9 

72 
12 

10 

6,938 
825 
118 
152 
105 

1,258 

178 
41 

170 
86 

262 
49 
73 

106 

856 
149 
195 
542 
290 

170 
68 
77 
65 

81 
364 
293 

143 
381 
175 

83-7 
65-4 
92-8 
99-3 
74-5 
97-0 

7-22 

3-07 

6-77 

17-09 


1,195 

120 

11,852 

775 

9,627 

528 

323 

182 

1,648 

298 
167 
1,174 
404 
35 
195 
694 

148 

82 
10 
4 

7,507 

1,175 

231 

206 

121 

1,328 

195 
69 

120 
83 

491 
55 
63 

227 

1,339 
255 
256 
725 
406 

290 
102 
167 
109 

144 

643 
241 

143 

409 
300 

81-8 
62-9 
91-0 
93-9 
74-5 
97-1 

6-90 
3-04 
6-47 
16-45 


444 

58 

11,159 

470 

9,655 

539 

74 

80 

1,963 

348 
473 
1,911 
352 
16 
165 
571 

438 

107 

7 

16 

7,668 

2,170 

478 

245 

123 

1,295 

315 
34 

174 
98 

330 

101 
47 

169 

1,831 
302 
181 
521 
376 

232 

75 

299 

221 

98 
426 
277 

132 
338 
272 

81-0 
62-1 
90-9 
93-9 
71-9 
97-1 

6-79 
3-02 
6-35 
16-20 


580 
111 

13,464 
781 

11,210 

555 

139 

119 

1,443 

411 
1,591 
1,823 

758 
18 

152 

742 

187 
94 
16 
17 

6,515 
773 
718 
166 
214 

1,340 

653 
736 
143 
68 
464 
69 
58 

89 

1,017 
385 

270 
550 
420 

197 
148 
93 
178 

58 
115 
191 

167 
308 
344 

80-8 
61-4 
90-7 
93-9 
71-9 
96-8 

6-78 
3-06 
6-34 
16-21 


384 

72 

12,212 

678 
10,642 

684 

110 

280 

1,094 

332 
1,659 
1,807 

879 
21 

194 

739 

27 

101 

10 

42 

7,546 
971 
580 
224 
113 

1,487 

627 
125 
132 
65 
403 
61 
39 

1,025 

478 
441 
276 
252 
427 

223 

135 

46 

229 

87 
219 
184 

149 
265 
300 

81-5 
63-5 
91-9 
93-9 
71-9 
96-8 

7-01 
3-04 
6-33 
16-42 


469 

571 

16,176 

392 

4,166 

590 

75 

293 

1,290 

90 

1,468 

1,270 

507 

28 

167 

456 

45 
98 
17 
43 

5,633 
628 
739 
249 
30 

1,373 

666 
136 
76 
50 
270 
41 
40 

158 

716 
447 
284 
377 
504 

277 
95 
154 
143 

170 
182 
179 

172 
179 
434 

81-0 
63-0 
91-7 
93-9 

70-7 
96-6 


1,572 

2,095 

22,636 

277 

21,471 

692 

98 

403 

1,690 

74 

1,589 

1,423 

424 

32 

244 

487 

122 

19 

67 

7,037 

980 

558 

334 

76 

1,791 

979 

536 

76 

114 

230 

61 

63 

107 

1,065 
449 
459 
600 
525 

373 

84 

172 

200 

255 
155 
204 

185 
386 
348 

80-4 
63-6 
90-7 
90-0 
70-7 
96-6 


1,581 

1,565 

15,024 

314 

13,959 

547 

66 

268 

1,799 

74 

1,185 

1,261 

101 

50 

228 

327 

1 
99 
11 

22 

6,858 

837 

363 

239 

93 

1,814 

634 
273 
72 
72 
197 
102 
44 

1,186 

1,532 
285 
244 
754 
327 

298 

162 

36 

360 

169 
224 
299 

133 
169 
263 

80-4 

63-9 
90-4 
900 
70-7 
96-6 

7-09 
2-93 
6-04 
16-10 


1,698 
1,389 

15,074 
91 

14,505 

478 

52 

247 

1,535 

41 

432 

1,550 

1,592 

57 

78 

605 

78 
16 
35 

5,952 

1,592 

171 

137 

113 

1,365 

405 
71 
77 
61 

216 
86 
36 

537 

9,668 
444 
256 
473 
261 

353 
130 
30 
147 

210 
196 
150 

91 
109 
189 

80-4 
64-0 
89-6 
90-0 
70-7 
96-6 

7-04 
2 94 
5-99 
1601 


397 
925 

7,109 
62 

6,912 

419 

69 

236 

1,162 

60 
47 
1,391 
2,210 
81 
274 
632 

68 
15 

18 

5,423 

583 

90 

156 

82 

1,457 

238 
130 
74 
71 
216 
102 
46 

69 

779 
192 
197 
796 
159 

272 
181 
52 

87 

236 
292 
228 

100 
129 
152 

79-7 
62-8 
89-3 
90-0 
69-2 
96-4 

6-94 
2-93 
5-98 
15-89 


669 




754 


Grains (Total) 


5,577 




72 


Wheat 


5,241 


Rubber (chiefly tires and 


514 




28 




143 


Wheat flour 

Animals and Animal Pro- 
ducts — 
Cattle 


1,009 
235 




39 


Fish 


1,083 




1,670 




80 


Leather, unmanufactured 


231 

429 


Fibres, Textiles and Pro- 
ducts— 


1 


Cotton 


90 


Rags 


19 


Raw wool 


81 


Wood, Wood Products and 
Paper— 

Paper (chiefly newsprint) 

Planks and boards 


4,472 
553 




85 




126 




99 


Wood-pulp 


1,411 


Iron and Its Products — 
Automobiles 


171 


Automobile parts 


76 


Farm implements 


69 


Hardware and cutlery 

Machinery 


48 
268 


Pips and ingots 


72 


Tubes and pipes 


56 


Non-Ferrous Metal Pro- 
ducts— 


55 


Copper, (chiefly ore and 
blister) 


578 




225 


Lead 


274 


Nickel 


747 


Silver 


263 


Non-Metallic Nineral Pro- 
ducts— 

Asbestos, (chiefly raw) 

Coal 


146 
95 


Petroleum and products 

Stone and products 


34 
70 


Chemicals and Allied Pro- 
ducts— 


146 


Fertilizers 


169 


Soda and compounds 


228 


Miscellaneous Commodities — 
Electrical energy 


116 




149 


Settlers' effects 


116 


Indexes of Retail Prices, Rents 
and Costs of Services- 
Total, 1926 = 100 


79-0 


Food 


60-6 


Fuel • 


89-3 


Rent 


90-0 


Clothing 


69-2 


Sundries 


96-2 


Cost per Week of a Family 
Budget- 
All foods $ 


6-98 70-7 


6-70 


Fuel and light $ 

Totals $ 


3-01 

6-32 
16-34 


2-98 
6-30 
16-40 


2-91 
5-97 
15-61 



28 MONTHLY REVIEW OF BUSINESS STATISTICS 

Table 24. Summary of Canada's Imports, in Thousands of Dollars 



Classification 


1932 


19u3 




Feb. 


Mar. 


April [ 


May 


June 


July 


Aug. 


Sept 


Oct. 


Nov. 


Dec. 


Jan. 


Feb. 


Imports of Principal Commodi- 
ties- 
Ac ricultural AND VEGETABLE 
Products— 


1,155 
141 
391 

1,044 
120 
231 
392 
104 
657 

1,468 
419 

110 
547 
196 
208 
254 

35^ 
569 
218 
1.030 
516 
132 
154 
679 
231 
94 
125 
302 
213 
554 
487 

796 
621 

300 
209 

47 
47 

113 

1,435 

124 

591 

14" 

l c 3 

1,512 

26 

487 

303 

79 

71 

72 

79 

330 

216 

63 

84 

807 

87 

93 

41 « 

1,?45 
208 
370 

1.3 6 
485 
155 

262 
2-3 
16 
60 
61 
173 


3,505 
159 
554 

1,741 
177 
360 
538 
323 

2,143 

1,380 
866 

156 
589 
297 
233 
313 

453 
833 
335 
1,432 
757 
180 
129 
852 
299 
151 
42"? 
662 
274 
613 
592 

1,019 
838 

360 

274 

53 

96 

255 

2,175 

238 

981 

495 

226 

2,462 

39 

976 

499 

140 

89 

126 

154 

423 
287 
106 
108 
905 
141 
137 

583 
3,852 
525 
518 
2,145 
859 
222 

390 
396 

94 
101 

79 
291 


521 
53 
195 
1,071 
147 
163 
300 
173 
613 
199 
687 

70 
253 
109 
167 
158 

224 
493 
166 
856 
392 
57 
113 
405 
196 
75 
83 
140 
163 
304 
297 

555 
473 

204 
157 
24 
134 

147 
971 
131 

622 
92 

K'S 

1.758 

17 

690 

29? 

96 

60 

77 

89 

283 
179 
63 
75 
561 
89 
80 

344 
2,035 
170 
402 
1,142 
554 
141 

217 
246 
144 
49 
58 
134 


831 
191 
463 

1,908 

97 

261 

315 

301 

2,017 
143 

1,057 

83 
323 
248 
198 
292 

211 
918 
222 
1,032 
573 

93 
175 
381 
219 

67 
203 
194 
221 
340 
392 

744 
707 

300 

210 

31 

57 

163 

1,112 

126 

697 

202 

195 

1,689 

61 

1,275 

403 

144 

01 

117 

60 

236 
236 
102 
106 
831 
105 
63 

578 

2,663 

157 

492 

3,436 

876 

254 

295 
311 
344 

72 
58 
246 


1,328 

95 

316 

2,216 
104 
210 
402 
121 

1,233 
170 
955 

90 
369 

83 
150 
288 

240 
234 
190 
1,108 
587 

64 
102 
314 
244 

54 
131 
146 
144 
340 
472 

786 
576 

309 

173 
19 
38 

74 

1,270 

156 

646 

152 

175 

1,544 

40 

1,216 

346 

134 

80 

99 

92 

176 
187 
114 
70 
626 
96 
83 

566 
2,249 

163 

488 
3,511 
1,022 

198 

2 "2 
266 
132 
86 
71 
249 


890 

95 

315 

1,903 

103 

133 

288 

18 

1,816 
228 
330 

130 
223 

68 
177 

59 

193 
287 
178 
781 
451 

54 
320 
252 
133 

25 

70 
154 
194 

53 
600 

861 

481 

247 
113 
25 
25 

68 
778 
108 
468 
176 
159 
1,127 

31 
923 
272 
132 

67 
104 

76 

187 
185 
72 
4') 
529 
89 
60 

481 
2,612 
213 
322 
3,557 
901 
185 

234 

335 

7 

49 

53 

178 


1,122 

60 

206 

1,746 

77 

108 

219 

19 

2,042 

261 

95 

98 
211 

95 
220 
109 

198 
472 
201 
812 
510 
122 
140 
460 
193 
90 
96 
174 
171 
284 
433 

828 
496 

247 
101 

26 
47 

63 

553 

102 

369 

286 

125 

949 

14 

784 

227 

107 

62 

58 

38 

144 
170 
70 
35 
493 
118 
31 

479 
2.744 
216 
273 
3,304 
953 
148 

157 
331 
240 
54 
166 
179 


1,053 

113 

175 

1,505 

97 

111 

435 

21 

1,562 

287 

81 

126 
246 
96 
197 
147 

199 
441 
232 
747 
425 
101 
159 
584 
225 
98 
83 
230 
143 
228 
441 

874 
517 

213 
93 
23 
10 

60 

632 

103 

306 

220 

129 

909 

11 

740 

247 

96 

45 

85 

43 

281 
140 
73 
49 
49" 
68 
78 

393 

2,600 

176 

303 

2.C74 

1,064 

191 

155 
2S2 
285 
51 
190 
254 


1,358 
135 
276 

1,651 

107 

274 

231 

28 

1,872 

502 

91 

174 

201 
233 
190 
117 

200 
656 
336 
758 
589 

50 
227 
548 
211 

92 
116 
255 
222 
154 
387 

907 
567 

215 

140 
39 
33 

38 

469 

157 

248 

96 

132 

1,086 

8 

784 

311 

90 

51 

82 

42 

287 
15< 
93 
39 
572 
92 
76 

404 
3,134 
316 
312 
2.657 
738 
137 

244 
337 
229 
61 
117 
234 


1,537 
136 
352 

1,338 

110 

521 

266 

43 

1,479 
377 
200 

147 
180 
240 
156 
91 

165 

1,181 

140 

728 

603 

25 

221 

471 

97 

76 

157 

346 

221 

138 

347 

871 
536 

232 

147 

17 

43 

33 

557 

150 

342 

71 

197 

1,031 

23 

1,603 

294 

102 

48 

69 

74 

552 
157 
98 
47 
508 
129 
77 

445 
2,90? 
214 
467 
2,122 
845 
245 

215 
369 
349 
64 
56 
278 


2,305 
147 
389 

1,567 
61 
183 
185 
109 
897 
339 
211 

116 
176 
118 
135 
77 

168 

1,122 

149 

552 

491 

13 

242 

327 

70 

57 

191 

296 

185 

138 

282 

744 
421 

201 

116 
11 
73 

14 

658 

80 

268 

135 

141 

1.086 

6 

417 

144 

82 

40 

47 

29 

123 
119 
98 
33 
399 
72 
40 

331 

2,318 

252 

216 

1.100 
457 
112 

171 

276 
161 
36 
25 
16C 


894 
85 
454 
786 
109 
160 
201 
95 
384 
366 
261 

71 
273 
123 
102 

49 

182 
706 
186 
725 
422 
32 
162 
415 
89 
60 
138 
374 
199 
188 
378 

618 
401 

173 

64 

9 

39 

104 

868 

97 

328 

100 

134 

9*3 

21 

232 

167 

59 

42 

37 

29 

98 
94 
42 
22 
350 
54 
49 

291 
1,836 
315 
262 
1,045 
164 
102 

175 

250 

14 

25 

11 

194 


798 




95 




296 


Fruits 


669 




88 




116 




216 


Seeds 


113 


Sugar, chiefly for refining 

Tea 


397 
759 




231 


Animal Products — 
Fish 


61 




281 


Hides 


116 


Leather, unmanufactured 


127 
94 


Textr,e Products— 


216 




498 




143 




784 




396 




84 




87 


Si' V— Haw 


285 




84 




62 




105 




262 




146 




247 




450 


Wood and Paper— 


605 
493 


Wood — Furniture and other 
manufactured wood 


174 
64 


Veneers 

Other unmanufactured wood. 
Iron and Stefl — 


15 
34 

59 


Automobile parts 


747 
65 




365 




144 




136 




945 




55 




268 


Other rolling mill products 

Stamped and coated products.. 
Tools 


153 
41 
53 
40 


Wire 


41 


Non-Ferrous Metals — 


111 


Brass 


89 
47 




32 




302 




32 


Tin 


103 


Nont-Metat,mc Products — 


285 


Coal 


1,999 


Coke 


197 




248 




1,084 




119 




91 


Chemicals — 


163 


Dyeine and tanning materials... 


233 

fc 




24 


Soap 


20 
125 







MONTHLY REVIEW OF BUSINESS STATISTICS 



29 



Table 25. 


Banking and Currency, in Million Dollars Unless Otherwise Stated 




Classification 


1932 


| 1933 


Jan. | Feb. | Mar. | Apr. | May j June | July | Aug. | Sept. | Oct. | Nov.) Dec. 


Jan. 



Banking— 

Readily Available Assets— 

Specie 

Dominion notes 

In Central gold reserves. . . 
In United Kingdom banks 

In foreign banks 

Foreign currency 

Government securities. . . . 

Call loans abroad 

Total quick assets.. . 
Loans and Sehtrities except 
Canadian Governments- 

Public securities 

Railway securities 

Canadian call loans 

Current loans 

Current loans abroad 

Provincial loans 

Municipal loans 

Total loans, etc 

Other Assets— 

Non-current loans 

Real estate 

Mortgages 

Premises 

Letters of credit 

Loans to companies 

Other assets 

Note circulation deposits 

Inter-hank balances, notes of 

other banks 

Cheques of other banks. 
Balances due by other banks 

Grand total assets 

Liabilities to the Public — 

Note circulation 

Dominion Government 

Provincial Government 

Government advances 

Deposits by public — 

Savings deposits 

Demand deposits 

Total deposits 

Foreign deposits 

Due banks abroad, etc. — 

V nited Kingdom 

Foreign 

Bills payable 

Letters of credit 

Other liabilities 

Total public liabilities. . 

Due between banks 

Liabilities to Shareholders— 

Dividends $000 

Reserve 

Capital 

Grand total liabilities. . 
Surplus of notice deposits over 

current loans 

Percentaee of current loans to 

notice denosits.. p.c 

Gold included in C.G.R 

All notes in hands of public 1 

Index Numbers— 

(With seasonal adjustment 
1926 - 100) 

Demand deposits 

Notice deposits 

Current loans 

Investment holdings 

Call loans, Canada 

Call loans elsewhere. . ., 

Total issue Dom. notes 

Gold held by Finance Dept 

against notes 

Notes in hands of public 

Currency- 
Net issues of Dominion notes 

per,— Chapter 4, 1915 

R.S. 1927, chap. 70 

R.S. 1927, chap. 41 

Total 

Gold held against notes 



End of Month 



64-91 

131-11 

21-58 

5-63 

02-30 

13-64 

467 

65-92 

863 



144-87 

61-29 
131-17 

1,071 
189-73 

43-44 
132-86 

1,774 

10-69 
6-58 
6 

79 

51-35 

12-75 
1*80 
6-82 

11-07 

73-10 
3-73 
2,901 

133-67 
04-65 
20-58 
43-00 

1,36« 

506-94 

1,875 

296-18 



41-86 
3-11 
51-35 

2-79 
2,566 
9-95 

1,344 

162-00 
144-50 
2,884 

+298 

78-2 

10-7 

151-0 



91-5 
102-0 
116-6 
127-2 
93-3 
26-3 



86-3 



Feb. 



26 
36-5 
99-4 
161-9 
64-6 



62-59 
123-81 

20-0° 
7 

71-47 

13-21 

460-03 

98-95 

85? 



142-74 

60 
129-77 

1.063 
190-65 

56-24 
139-29 

1,783 

10-86 
6-65 
6-26 
79-99 
49-73 
12-47 
1-66 
6-82 

12-71 

81-03 

3-07 

2,912 

134-29 

70-76 
20-06 
35-50 



406-49 
886 
305-82 

4-70 
52-02 

2-57 
49-73 

2-77 
2,574 

9-84 

2,767 
162-00 
144-50 

2,893 

+327 



76-5 

10-7 

150-3 



91-5 
103-5 
115-8 
124-6 
92-5 
38-4 
86-0 

60-5 
84-4 



Mar 



26-0 
32-0 
99-4 
157-4 



58-70 
116-93 
23 63 
10-40 
85-47 
14-38 
466-40 
83 13 
859 



144-77 

60-39 
130-71 

1,071 
188-76 

43-99 
149-15 

1, 

10-96 

6-78 

6-27 

79-83 

5116 

13 03 

1-49 

6-83 

11-08 

82-56 

3-54 

2,926 

132-57 
86-11 
20-97 
32-00 

1,1 

500-48 

1.1 
308-12 

5-82 
56-60 

1-85 
51-16 

2-91 
2.587 
10-13 

820 
162-00 
144-50 
2,905 

+312 

77-4 

10-7 

149-0 



91-3 
103-1 
114-9 
126-5 
93-4 
33-8 
85-2 

60-4 

82-2 



55-91 
111-86 
23-03 
10-95 
97-72 
15-33 
469-97 
73-15 
858 



138-52 

57-76 
122-36 

1,070 
184-58 

39-43 
154-01 

1,766 

11-21 

6-86 

6-27 
79-99 
51-94 
13-00 

1 

6-83 

11-91 

83-05 

3-3 

2,900 

137-35 
65-76 
24-05 
27-50 

1,393 

494-64 

1,888 

304-81 

5-11 

54-36 
1-61 

51-94 
2-43 

2,562 
9-48 

1,370 
162-00 
144-50 

2,880 

+323 

76-8 

10-7 

154-1 



89-7 
103-5 
112-4 
124-8 
88-4 
30-0 
82-5 



39-8 



Apr. May 



26-0 
27-5 
99-4 
152-9 
63-9 



26-0 
29-6 
99-3 
154-9 
64-3 



55-49 
115-42 

22-58 
8-75 

99-44 

15-25 
465 48 

65-29 



140-81 

57-13 
113-83 

1,057 
187-08 

36-67 
153-52 

1,746 

11-94 



79-95 

48-90 

12-85 

1-64 

6-83 

11-87 

83-11 

3-44 



131-07 
50-38 
19-31 
29-60 

1,387 
497-99 

1,885 
308-94 

4-94 
51-35 

1-25 
48-90 

2-22 
2,533 
10-86 

3,532 
162-00 
144-50 

2,854 

+330 

76-2 

111 

147-2 



59-7 
83-4 



June 



26-0 
40-5 
101-8 
168-3 
64-8 



54-97 
127-39 
22 

7-69 

95-42 

15-57 

462-31 

73-67 

860 



152-04 

54-98 
109-87 

1,037 
174-90 

34-34 
139-22 

1,703 

12-51 
7-19 
6-01 
79-90 
48-49 
13-01 
1-42 
6-95 

10-51 

96-87 

2-78 

2, 

136-30 
36-42 

20-67 
40-50 

1,373 

488-94 

1,862 

308-22 

5-73 

51-36 

1-19 

48-49 

2-18 

2,513 

11-04 

817 
162-00 
144-50 
2,832 

+336 

75-6 

11-1 

154-9 



88-2 
102-5 
110-4 
123-9 
79-0 
29-0 
92-2 

60-1 
86-5 



July 



26-0 
38-5 
101-7 
166-2 
65-4 



54-85 

123-10 

24-78 

8-82 

96-75 

16-48 

466-93 

75-65 

867 



153-44 

53-69 
111-93 

1,028 
164-34 

20-19 
130-65 

1,663 

12-91 

7-26 

6-02 

79-95 

48-32 

12-92 

1-32 

6-59 

11-90 
69-44 
314 

2,790 

134-57 
15-54 
33-06 
38-50 

1,363 
462-09 

1,825 
299-38 

5 

51-78 
1-71 

48-32 
2-22 

2,456 
8-09 

1,194 

162-00 
144-50 
2,772 

+335 

75-5 

111 

152-1 



85-7 
101-6 
110-3 
125-5 
82-2 
30-8 
91-7 

60-4 
87-2 



Aug. 



26-0 
29-0 
99-2 
154-2 
P.6-2 



55 

115-28 

21-83 

8 81 

98-14 

16-56 

494-57 

96-39 

907 



155-15 

53-39 
114-07 

1,004 
159-04 

19-41 
123-67 

1, 

13-15 

7-37 

6-01 

80-06 

48-44 

12-89 

1-40 

6-59 

10-42 

76-16 

3-36 

2,802 

127-77 
19-04 
32-31 
29-00 

1,367 

475-36 

1,842 

306-55 

4-50 

49-60 
1-47 

48-44 
2-14 

2.463 

10-85 

3,008 
162-00 
144-50 

2,783 

+ 363 

73-5 

111 

145-5 



89-1 
101-8 
108-2 
131-7 
83-1 
38-6 
85-3 

61-2 

82-5 



Sept. 



26-0 
23-0 
10M 
153-1 
67-5 



55-48 
112 40 
23 
13-94 
87-13 
16-90 
494-20 
95-19 



152-17 

52-87 
114-95 

1,003 
158-98 

22-19 
116-62 

1,621 

13-46 
7-51 
6-28 

79 

48-27 

13-15 
1-48 
6-59 

9-52 
90-12 
3-57 

2,799 

132-24 
15-90 
31-87 
23-00 

1,359 
480-66 

1,840 
307-14 

4-85 
48-91 

1-55 
48-27 

2-17 
2,457 
14-21 

720 
162-00 
144-50 

2,778 

+ 358 

73-8 

111 

152-5 



87-4 
101-7 
107-2 
131-1 
82-9 
39-3 
83-5 

61-6 

83-7 



Oct. 



26-0 
27-5 
107-8 
161-3 
71-2 



55-031 76-13 
122-51 163-50 
21-38 18 



13-51 
100-60 

18-26 
515-54 

87-53 
934 



159-63 

51-76 
117-21 

1,018 
159-04 

34-25 
109-21 

1,649 

13 

7 

6-55 
79-59 
47-28 
13-04 

1-56 

6-60 

13-14 

99-27 

3-87 

2,875 

133-03 
44-76 
40-70 
27-50 

1,371 
493-28 

1,864 
324-51 

4-54 

46-52 
1-22 

47-28 
2-13 

2,536 

11-29 

1,157 

162-00 
144-50 
2,855 

+353 

74-3 

111 

143-4 



86-4 
102-7 
107-1 
135-4 
79-3 
26-5 
84-0 

63-5 

77-8 



Nov. 



26-0 
65-1 
107-7 
198-9 
73-0 



8-44 
146-65 
18-75 
551-16 
99-37 
1,083 



159-60 
48-71 

107-61 
999 

153-56 
34-20 

107-04 
1,610 

13-36 

7-45 

6-39 

78-78 

47-54 

13-36 

1-54 



8-71 

80-28 

3-35 

2,960 

125-05 
105-75 
31-33 
65-14 

1,379 

472-17 

1,851 

349-12 

4-51 

51-05 

•80 

47-54 

2-45 
2,634 
10-27 

2,988 
162-00 
144-50 

2,953 

+380 

72.5 
11-1 
139-5 



81-6 
102-8 
106-4 
145-0 
76-3 
37-6 
91-1 

63-6 

73-8 



53-26 
153 1 

19-88 

7-79 

104-90 

17-94 
562-36 

91-49 

1,011 



165-96 
48-93 

103-20 
964 

151-66 
28-2 

111-57 
1,775 

13-31 
7-48 
6-39 

78-70 

42 

13-17 
1-49 
6-60 

12-15 
80-41 
4-32 

2,852 

127-07 
53-11 
18-93 
56-99 

1,378 
466-21 

1,844 
328-73 

7-43 

41-37 

-63 

42-63 

2-61 
2,523 
12-32 

706 
162-00 
144-50 
2,843 

+ 413 

70-0 
11-1 

144-1 



81-6 
103-1 
104-0 
147-8i 

71-8| 
35-9 
89 

61-6 

79-0 



54-26 
146-34 
18-88 
10-49 
83-29 
17-94 
568-20 
83-77 
983 



168-05 
47-97 

100-00 
946 

151-03 
23-04 

114-65 
1,550 

13-53 

7-58 

6-46 

79-23 

40-24 

13-06 

1-52 

6-61 

9-23 
68-82 
3-88 

2,784 

116-87 
37-51 
20-64 
46-74 

13-83 

445-99 

1,829 

316-23 

4-90 

40-72 

• 52 

40-24 

2-5*3 
2,456 

9-87 

1,157 

162-00 
144-50 
2,773 

+ 437 

68-4 

11-1 

134-0 



SO -6 
103-0 
103-0 
147-7 
71-1 
33-4 
94-2 



56-5 
"6-6 



Dec. 


Jan. 


26-0 


26-0 


57-5 


46-7 


107-7 


107-7 


191-2 


180-5 


70-8 


70-9 



Feb. 



26-0 
41-9 

107-8 
175-7 
70-3 



1 Includes smaller Dominion Notes in hands of .public together with Bank Notes in circulation, except those in the 
hands of banks other than the bank of issue. 



30 



MONTHLY REVIEW OF BUSINESS STATISTICS 






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MONTHLY REVIEW OF BUSINESS STATISTICS 31 

Table 26. Index Numbers of Security Prices, Foreign Exchange, and other Financial Factors. 



Classification 










1932 












1933 


Feb. 


Mar. 


Apr. 


May 


June 


July 


Aug. 


Sept. 


Oct. 


Nov. 


Dec. 


Jan. 


Feb. 


Security Prices— 

Common Stock Prices — 
Total (130) 


63-5 
71-1 
76-5 
9-9 
64-9 

106-3 
39-6 
89-6 
40-6 
81-7 
59-1 
43-3 
82-0 
75-3 
54-5 
65-2 
44-8 
86-1 

400-8 

57-3 
57-5 
61-2 
22-2 

58-8 
115-9 

5-55 

136, 

387 

21-27 

25-57 

1-165 
1-129 
1-145 
1-131 

4-000 
3-920 
3-960 
3-945 


64-1 
71-5 

79-2 
10-1 

65-5 
106-8 
38-3 
87-8 
40-3 
82-4 
59-8 
46-2 
81-1 
73-6 
55-8 
67-0 
45-7 
86-0 
413-6 

57-8 
57-6 
63-4 
21-4 

58-0 
110-6 

5-30 

180, 

070 

35-72 

22-76 

1-131 
1-106 
1-118 
1-109 

4-230 
3-915 
4-064 
4-230 


54-0 
58-2 
62-5 
9-2 
63-7 
87-7 
32-5 
83-2 
36-1 
62-2 
48-9 
34-4 
68-8 
63-7 
47-4 
59-1 
37-1 
85-8 
304-2 

52-4 
52-6 
56-5 
18-3 

55-4 
111-8 

5-33 

187, 

313 

12-07 

18-92 

1-128 
1-105 
1-112 
1-120 

4-215 
4-070 
4-173 
4-100 


45-8 
51-4 
44-9 
8-6 
63-1 
90-1 
29-1 
76-5 
26-3 
47-1 
36-9 
26-0 
63-8 
45-0 
49-4 
66-3 
34-9 
65-7 
261-2 

48-4 
50-2 
47-9 
15-5 

48-4 
113-2 

5-42 

204, 

522 

25-68 

15-14 

1-154 
1-116 
1-131 
1-140 

4-245 
4-095 
4-157 
4-203 


43-2 
48-8 
40-5 
8-4 
62-6 
84-8 
28-3 
73-0 
30-2 
43-3 
34-9 
24-7 
59-6 
42-7 
46-5 
59-6 
35-1 
60-5 
251-0 

48-3 

49-9 
47-8 
16-8 

45-2 
114-4 

5-48 

176, 

041 

20-82 

13-87 

1-163 
1-140 
1-153 
1-146 

4-280 
4-120 
4-205 
4-120 


49-6 
56-6 
51-1 
7-9 
38-3 
97-0 
28-9 
81-2 
35-6 
55-2 
41-8 
31-5 
59-9 
51-6 
49-9 
65-6 
36-4 
67-1 
306-6 

55-6 
57-2 
55-6 
21-0 

49-5 
110-6 

5-30 

283, 

953 

27-32 

13-02 

1-161 
1-135 
1-148 
1-148 

4-123 
4-028 
4-076 
4-028 


59-0 
69-9 
63-5 
8-8 
47-4 

110-0 
38-5 
89-7 
44-1 
78-2 
51-9 
42-7 
71-6 
60-4 
52-7 
72-8 
35-7 
73-9 

408-0 

59-7 
58-1 
69-7 
26-3 

52-9 
103-3 

4-95 
544, 
528 
9-42 
13-77 

1-152 
1-119 
1-142 
1-119 

4-045 
3-885 
3-975 
3-885 


63-0 
73-8 
69-1 
4-4 
53-0 

113-0 
42-3 
90-8 
44-1 
89-2 
56-9 
47-6 
76-3 
65-9 
56-5 
77-6 
38-7 
76-1 

470-6 

60-9 
56-4 
81-0 
28-4 

53-4 

101-9 

4-88 
506, 
926 
73-19 
14-12 

1-118 
1-101 
1-108 
1-105 

3-880 
3-805 
3-847 
3-820 


54-8 
63-1 
55-9 
3-5 
49-8 
97-4 
38-0 
86-5 
40-7 
73-9 
49-1 
39-0 
73-4 
57-7 
47-4 
64-3 
33-1 
74-4 
393-6 

57-5 

55-0 
71-0 
24-4 

52-9 
98-1 

4-70 
206, 

902 
101-64 
13-99 

1-110 

1-080 
1-096 
1-106 

3-815 
3-615 
3-723 
3-635 


53-4 
62-5 
51-3 
31 
48-3 
95-9 
38-7 
85-9 
43-3 
74-2 
46-6 
38-2 
70-8 
53-1 
48-3 
67-9 
31-8 
69-6 
377-9 

60-9 
58-1 
76-5 
23-6 

52-2 
102-3 

4-90 
193, 
093 
1-09 
13-82 

1-191 
1-104 
1-148 
1-179 

3-810 
3-648 
3-760 
3-770 


51-3 
58-4 
45-5 
2-5 
43-3 
90-8 
37-6 
83-0 
37-1 
70-1 
45-1 
37-4 
68-3 
50-8 
48-9 
69-1 
32-0 
67-5 
359-5 

63-1 
62-7 
70-9 
21-9 

50-2 
102-7 

4-92 

149, 

733 

•14 

13-80 

1-183 
1-130 
1-154 
1-130 

3-845 
3-750 
3-787 
3-760 


51-6 
59-6 
49-5 
3-3 
41 1 
93-6 
36-8 
82-9 
34 
71 2 
44-6 
35-6 
70-5 
51-2 
48-9 
69-7 
31-4 
67-5 
366-2 

67-1 
66-8 
74-7 
26-5 

49-6 
99-2 

4-75 
201, 

133 
19-26 
13-61 

1-185 
1-124 
1-143 
1-185 

4-025 
3-760 
3-847 
4-025 


47-6 


Industrials, total (96) 


56-3 


Iron and Steel (19) 


44-4 




3-6 


Milling (5) 


39-7 


Oils (4) 


86-5 


Textiles and Clothing (9) 

Food and Allied products (21) 


33-6 
80-2 
32-6 




69-7 


Utilities total (18) 


38-6 




26-8 


Telephone and telegraph (2) . . 

Power and traction (14) 

Companies abroad total (8) . . . 


63-6 
48-3 
46-6 
67-8 


Utility (7) 


28-7 


Banks (8) 


65-5 




340-0 


Mining Stock Prices — 
Total (20) 


75-3 


Gold (11) 


74-7 




84-7 


Silver ancl miscellanoues (5). . 
Financial Factors- 


28-1 
49-6 




98-7 


Yield on Ontario Government 

Shares traded. Montreal 

New Issues of Bonds $000,000. 

Brokers* loans* $000, 000 

Foreign Exchange— 
New York Funds in Montreal 
High 


4-73 

281. 

197 

i3-43 
1-209 




1-185 




1-197 




1-197 


London Sterling in Montreal- 
High 


4-145 




4-020 




4-099 


Close 


4-095 







•First Thursday of following month. 

Table 27 — Tonnage of Vessels Entered and Cleared from Six Canadian Ports. 



Month 


Saint John 


Halifax 


Quebec 


Montreal 


Toronto 


Vancouver 


Entered 


Cleared 


Entered 


Cleared 


Entered 


Cleared 


Entered 


Cleared 


Entered 


Cleared 


Entered 


Cleared 


1931 

Mar 


232,910 
156,726 
117,953 
134,577 
157,804 
159,173 
143,789 
123,283 
111.908 
245.265 

212.902 
217,548 
225,255 
154,213 
134,036 
117,838 
167,357 
163,457 
133,519 
134,442 
122,838 
299,479 

274,181 
250,517 


220,986 
190.913 
112,438 
133,917 
153,857 
152,128 
149,604 
115,918 
97.835 
239,022 

215.925 
210.751 
216.788 
179,015 
116,228 
127,282 
151,103 
168,431 
138,231 
129,967 
118.719 
267,733 

248.029 
265,391 


425,210 
336,792 
292,850 
265,680 
382,400 
491,816 
383,252 
313,163 
315.144 
509,661 

817,890 
701.478 
745,359 
556,999 
480,041 
401.282 
611,795 
650,575 
580,821 
471,867 
411,317 
799,358 

759,453 
838,600 


448,568 
356,915 
275,776 
267,278 
368,024 
509,859 
382.838 
314,250 
293,338 
518,954 

799,072 
697,095 
728.678 
546.060 
477,700 
389,421 
603,205 
652,078 
573,970 
463,161 
398,628 
795,357 

763,140 
838.266 


1,468 
189,333 
659,269 
719,307 
654,543 
829,425 
607,711 
734,401 
584,215 
23,220 












912,598 

999,253 

1,073,385 

1,174,789 

1,249,577 

1,138,081 

1,035,018 

925,023 

897,484 

876,423 

942,575 
800,842 
898,393 
904,904 
938,589 
938,402 
1,003,648 
999,488 
936,323 
951,217 
862.305 
905,946 

839,737 
794,827 


952,401 


April 

May 

June 

July 


142,533 
542,131 
641,197 
549,199 
717,468 
569,752 
641,713 
510,256 
6,447 


328,102 
1,302,740 
1.111,508 
1,122,190 
1,103,291 
1,004.220 
944,352 
884.283 
39,488 


230,080 
1,238,649 
1,128,082 
1.100,798 
1,088,734 
1,041,495 
934,061 
959,323 
39,154 


56.651 
193,046 
434,706 
444,811 
460,602 
399,690 
228,223 
280,352 

55,468 


83,70i 
199,626 
434,223 
476,416 
459,728 
399,687 
221.966 
262.808 

21,944 


979,146 
1,077,685 
1,324,125 
1,249,972 
1,127,397 


Sept 

Oct 


1,004,453 
925,653 


Nov 

Dec 

1032 


884,263 
914,688 

933,039 
849,787 


Feb 














Mar 

April 

May 

June 

July 

Aug 

Sept 

Oct 

Xov 

Dec 

1933 
■Tan 


341 
140.727 
327,682 
414,030 
422,444 
453,409 
410,428 
312,412 
311,553 
67,500 


341 
133.203 
334.859 
378.322 
458,433 
468,762 
387,713 
314,965 
316.413 
74.495 










904,000 


330. 035 
1,089.169 
1,158,746 
1,107,539 
1,190,652 
1,093,061 
1,108,660 

891,773 
43,699 


237,399 
1,018,084 
1,151,805 
1,176,390 
1,145,509 
1,141,267 
1,052,666 

975,932 
93.924 


73,238 
251.098 
397.299 
506,002 
492,502 
384,804 
236,730 
284,356 

52,102 


122,927 
244,621 
401,962 
517,252 
490,108 
382,034 
240,744 
266,217 
17,608 


879,000 
930,000 
950,000 

1,002,000 
999,000 
916,327 

1,045,718 
856,233 
906,728 

856,514 


Feb 














799,131 



















32 



MONTHLY REVIEW OF BUSINESS STATISTICS 



Table 28.— Indexes of World Stocks of Commodities, 1923-1925 = 100. 
Source: — Survey of Current Business. 



— 


Jan. 


Feb. 


Mar. 


April 


'May 


June 


July 


Aug. 


Sept. 


Oct. 


Nov . 


Dec. 


General Index of 

World Stocks— 

1920 


112-3 
117-4 
108-7 
98-1 
96-9 
105-5 
115-9 
136-3 
142-7 
163-8 
195-4 
240-0 
268-0 

168-8 
87-0 
69-9 
94-3 

102-3 
99-3 
98-7 
80-2 
82-8 
75-7 
68-4 
40-8 
300 

91-9 
86-6 
90-3 
115-0 
140-0 
139-6 
160-3 
202-8 
241-8 
302-3 
303-0 

82 

68 

76 

99 

104 

96 

100 

119 

134 

182 

195 

211 

226 

152 
108 

92 
110 
106 

98 
103 

83 

79 
120 
145 


119-4 
118-9 
109-4 
94-3 
97-7 
106-5 
116-3 
139-2 
143-6 
162-2 
196-4 
243-3 
264-0 

155-8 
84-7 
72-2 
101-3 
108-2 
99-7 
94-4 
79-9 
79-1 
77-4 
64-0 
40-8 
29-2 

100-5 
84-9 
88-3 
114-9 
139-6 
152-2 
169-0 
203-0 
236-8 
304-6 
305-0 

75 

69 

75 

95 

108 

100 

98 

120 

134 

179 

194 

220 

213 

155 

106 

92 

106 

108 

100 

104 

82 

76 

127 

144 


117-2 
120- 1 
102-9 
91-0 
961 
106-2 
116-9 
140-1 
145-3 
163-7 
202-7 
248-8 
276-0 

164-7 
81-6 
72-0 

109-4 
94-8 
99-1 
89-1 
80-3 
80-7 
79-6 
63-1 
39-9 
28-4 

77-9 
83-2 
850 
1101 
152- 1 
160-2 
170-5 
193-1 
235-4 
298-0 
307-0 

75 

63 

75 

90 

112 

102 

93 

121 

139 

187 

199 

235 

238 

156 

101 

90 

98 

109 

99 

101 

80 

76 

133 

141 


124-6 

127-5 
106-4 
87-6 
96-9 
104-6 
117-9 
141-4 
148-1 
161-5 
206-6 
247-3 
273-0 

189-4 
80-9 
72-9 

106-0 
95-0 
93-7 
87-9 
80-7 
80-4 
75-7 
62-5 
39-0 
27-1 

76-0 
81-5 
94-6 
115-6 
152-7 
163-8 
163-6 
186-0 
240-7 
305-0 
322-0 

87 

69 

81 

95 

115 

98 

93 

119 

144 

195 

203 

231 

231 

157 
99 
92 
97 

106 
99 
95 
76 
79 

145 

145 


122-0 
131-7 
104-5 
84-5 
98-3 
105-8 
121-8 
144-3 
151-8 
168-5 
216-2 
260-1 
286-0 

202-9 
78-9 
76-7 

103-1 
91-5 
99-3 
87-4 
83-1 
81-6 
72-3 
58-5 
37-3 
25-9 

73-3 
78-5 
97-4 
120-8 
155-2 
175-6 
169-3 
213-4 
241-0 
306-0 
330-0 

95 

75 

80 

90 

110 

98 

95 

117 

145 

203 

211 

249 

250 

152 

101 

94 

100 

103 

102 

94 

75 

85 

146 

152 


117-9 
134-0 
102-7 
84-4 
99-9 
101-9 
121-6 
145-7 
154-2 
168-3 
228-4 
262-3 
285-0 

190-7 
70-4 
78-7 

102-6 
87-8 

100-9 
85-2 
81-3 
79-4 
70-9 
54-0 
36-7 
24-8 

72-8 
85-0 
100-8 
119-3 
160-6 
172-1 
174-5 
210-7 
260-4 
315-0 
341-0 

85 

68 

78 

80 

109 

96 

86 

112 

151 

211 

218 

248 

240 

149 

100 

97 

101 

100 

102 

95 

75 

87 

145 

156 


116-5 

141-1 

97-2 

86-4 

98-6 

98-0 

129-6 

151-5 

150-0 

169-0 

227-9 

263-2 

274-0 

178-5 
66-8 
82-1 
96-3 
930 

106-7 
84-6 
80-9 
78-1 
75-1 
50-4 
36-9 
26-6 

61-4 
95-3 
94-9 
118-8 
170-1 
169-9 
170-9 
217-2 
266-6 
318-8 
327-0 

82 

79 

75 

91 

110 

91 

100 

117 

141 

210 

222 

240 

204 

143 

95 

101 

105 

98 

101 

94 

76 

88 

143 

161 


114-8 

144-7 

93-4 

87-9 

99-1 

99-0 

129-9 

154-5 

146-1 

172-3 

233-6 

261-9 

268-0 

156-5 
67-9 
80-3 
91-2 
96-6 

103-3 
84-4 
83-4 
74-0 
750 
48-0 
33-3 
30-5 

640 
95-6 
84-7 
125-5 
168-1 
169-5 
171-1 
212-9 
275-5 
325-9 
314-0 

71 

88 

73 

91 

121 

82 

113 

121 

132 

217 

224 

233 

189 

136 

90 

102 

106 

95 

96 

92 

76 

90 

147 

165 


112-2 

137-1 

94-8 

93-6 

93-4 

109-6 

131-4 

147-8 

151-3 

176-2 

237-2 

251-4 

262-0 

128-2 
73-3 
78-9 

100-3 
94-8 

103-6 
84-2 
85-2 
72-8 
75-5 
44-3 
32-0 
32-6 

71-6 
101-2 

68-8 
129-3 
172-0 
171-3 
175-3 
220-7 
278-7 
321-5 
311-0 

74 

89 

80 

95 

104 

100 

110 

110 

145 

217 

225 

203 

198 

130 

94 

107 

104 

95 

96 

88 

75 

90 

151 

173 


112-6 
127-8 
101-3 
95-4 
101-6 
110-8 
129-3 
143-7 
154-3 
186-3 
229-0 
259-7 
257-0 

111-6 
70- 1 

86-4 
102-5 
98-6 
100-6 
81-5 
84-4 
74-2 
74-1 
44-2 
320 
30-1 

75-2 
96-4 
91-0 
134-5 
150-7 
171-6 
182-1 
224-0 
275-8 
317-7 
3100 

72 

83 

89 

101 

110 

92 

105 

118 

168 

220 

204 

207 

207 

124 
91 

106 

104 
96 
96 
86 
74 
88 

153 


113-8 
117-3 
98-6 
93-1 
104-9 
110-2 
128-5 
147-5 
156-2 
187-9 
231-5 
264-9 
261-0 

99-5 

68-3 

90-9 

105-9 

100-4 

102-5 

80-5 

84-0 

74-4 

68-2 

44-0 

321 

27-8 

80-9 
91-6 
106-3 
138-5 
139-8 
177-6 
183-7 
233-1 
278-7 
315-0 
306-0 

72 

81 

92 

104 

110 

90 

107 

127 

171 

211 

208 

210 

204 

115 
93 

105 

105 
95 
99 
88 
76 
98 

150 


115-7 


1921 


111-7 


1922 


98-4 


1923 


95-7 


1924. . . 


105-6 


1925 


116-5 


1926 


133-5 


1927 


143-6 


1928 


161-4 


1929 

1930 


191-7 
234-9 


1931 


264-4 


1932 


263-0 


General Index of 
World Prices — 

1920 


85-2 


1921 


70-3 


1922 


92-8 


1923 


107-0 


1924 


99-0 


1925 


102-8 


1926 


80-8 


1927 


84-5 


1928 


74-8 


1929 


69-0 


1930 


43-4 


1931 


29-6 


1932 


25-7 


World Stocks of Sugar- 

1922 


83-6 


1923 


86-8 


1924 


115-4 


1925 


143-8 


1926 


139-8 


1927 


177-0 


1928 


186-3 


1929 


240-7 


1930 


298-8 


1931 


309-0 


1932 


3140 


World Stocks of 
Wheat— 

1920 


74 


1921 


80 


1922 


94 


1923 


102 


1924 


97 


1925 


102 


1926 


117 


1927 


125 


1928 


185 


1929 


197 


1930 


205 


1931 


220 


1932 

World Stocks of 
Copper— 

1921 


217 
112 


1922 

1923 

1924 

1925 

1926 

1927 

1928 

1929 

1930 

1931 


94 
110 
105 

96 
101 

88 

80 
112 
148 



MONTHLY REVIEW OF BUSINESS STATISTICS 



33 



Table 29. Significant Statistics of the United Kingdom 



Classification 










1932 














1933 




















Feb. 


Mar. 


April 


May 


June 


July 


Aug. 


Sept. 


Oct. 


Nov. 


Dec. 


Jan. 


Feb. 


Production— 




























Iron 000 metric tons 


329 


341 


322 


320 


316 


297 


264 


265 


280 


272 


289 


291 




Steel 000 metric tons 


488 


470 


440 


424 


467 


437 


367 


437 


445 


480 


437 


451 




Coal 000 metric tons 


18,815 


19,091 


18,663 


17,275 


17,028 


15,275 


15,542 


16,360 


17,829 


18,594 


19,157 


17,796 




Electricity 




Generated mill, k.w.h. 


1,133 


1,090 


987 


895 


822 


806 


815 


922 


1,098 


1,228 


1,266 


1,336 




New orders received. . 1 920 = 100 


58 


57 


59 


62 


58 


52 


54 


56 


55 


53 


60 


60 




Copper Available 000 tons 


120 


7-4 


8-2 


9-7 


10-8 


10-8 


14-8 


10-7 


101 


12-0 


11-0 


11-4 




Raw Cotton Delivered to 




























Mill mill. lb. 


111 


118 


120 


103 


101 


94 


79 


73 


101 


103 


112 


117 




Production, Artificial Silk 




























Yarn and Waste mill. lb. 


6-52 


6-32 


6-45 


6-09 


6-23 


5-71 


4-62 


5-70 


6-32 


6-59 


5-52 


5-93 




Natural SilkDeliveriesOOO lb. 


245 


267 


290 


309 


318 


333 


274 


298 


304 


321 


254 


326 




Crude Rubber 




























Available 000 tons 


5-50 


4-14 


7-28 


7-02 


8-28 


7-58 


8-90 


7-20 


7-30 


9-12 


7-16 


6-81 




Building Plans 




























Approved 1924 = 100 


103-3 


121-8 


125 8 


132-2 


159-5 


1150 


78-0 


123-9 


155-8 


155-5 


134-9 


136-2 




Other 1924 = 100 


86-2 


93-3 


93-8 


108-5 


88-0 


108-8 


50-0 


93-9 


94-5 


85-2 


136-9 


108-3 




Empioyment— 




























Insured Workers in 






























9-40 


9-55 


9-48 


9-40 


9-39 


9-32 


9-28 


9-15 


9-40 


9-37 


9-46 


9-29 




Number Unemployed 000 


2,742 


2,595 


2,662 


2,754 


2,770 


2,839 


2,866 


2,849 


2,737 


2,774 


2,700 


2,877 




Percentage Unemployed 


220 


20-8 


21-4 


22-1 


22-3 


22-9 


23-1 


22-8 


21-9 


22-2 


21-7 


23-1 






18-5 
46-7 
28-1 
17-2 


18-8 
67-7 
27-2 
16-6 


18-4 
63-4 
27-4 
16-4 


20-6 
500 
28-6 
16-4 


21-0 
46-9 
27-8 
16-3 


21-5 

47-8 
28-8 
16-4 


22-6 
48-6 
28-8 
16-3 


22-9 
46-8 
30-8 
160 


22-9 
47-7 
30-2 
160 


231 
46-8 
301 
16 2 


22-8 
45-0 
29-2 
16-4 


22-4 
44-8 
30-1 
18-6 
















Shipbuilding and marine en- 






57-5 
25-6 
260 
16-3 
32-4 
37-8 


56-7 
24-8 
23-4 
14-7 
28-8 
37-5 


56-5 
25-6 
24-9 
17-0 

26-8 
37-4 


57-5 
26-3 
33-4 

24-0 
26-2 
37-2 


57-3 
270 
30-4 
24-8 
25-8 
38-8 


57-5 
28-5 
311 
25-1 
27-3 
42-8 


57-7 
26-2 
33-5 
25-4 
27-1 
43-4 


62-1 
27-3 
34-8 
20-3 
28-5 
42-1 


61-9 
26-6 
25-7 
16-5 
29-5 
42-8 


61-4 

25-6 
24-3 
16-7 
30-7 
43-8 


61-6 
24-1 
23-3 
17-9 
31-7 
44-2 


61-6 
25-0 
23-9 
20-1 
37-5 
46-2 




















Public works contracting 




Imports, Total £ mn. 


70-2 


611 


53-5 


55-7 


57-5 


51-9 


53-3 


54-3 


60-8 


61-6 


60-6 


54-1 


49-1 


Food, drink and tobacco £ mn. 


33-6 


30-9 


27 5 


29-9 


31-4 


29-3 


28-2 


30-6 


35-1 


34-4 


32-1 


27-2 


25-2 


Raw materials £ mn. 


15-4 


16-5 


13-4 


13-7 


13-5 


10-8 


11-7 


11-2 


11-9 


15-3 


15-6 


151 


13-2 


Manufactured £ mn. 


20-1 


130 


11-8 


11-6 


11-8 


11-4 


13-1 


12-1 


13-5 


28-7 


12-7 


11-5 


10-5 


Total, net imports £ mn. 


64-7 


55-7 


48-8 


51-3 


53-3 


48-6 


49-8 


51-4 


571 


57-5 


56-5 


49-9 


44-6 


Exports, Total £ mn. 


300 


31-2 


34-8 


30-2 


29-7 


29-3 


28-6 


26-2 


30-4 


31-1 


32-4 


29-2 


27-9 


Food, drink and tobacco£ mn. 


2-8 


2-7 


2-9 


2-6 


2-3 


2-3 


2-6 


2-5 


2-9 


3-4 


2-8 


2-5 


2-3 


Raw materials £ mn. 


3-5 


3-5 


4-0 


3-6 


3-6 


3-5 


3-4 


3-2 


3-9 


4-1 


3-9 


3-8 


3-4 


Manufactured £ mn. 


22-6 


24-2 


26-8 


23-2 


22-9 


22-4 


21-7 


19-8 


22-7 


22-9 


23-6 


22-1 


21-4 


Bank Clearings, Country 




























and Provincial Daily 




























Average £ mn. 


127 


13-2 


13-0 


12-6 


120 


13-3 


11-9 


11-4 


12-8 


12-5 


13-1 


13-7 




Provincial £ mn. 


980 


102 


95-0 


94-0 


90-0 


108-0 


92-0 


88-0 


105-9 


102-5 


103-0 


108-8 




Postal Receipts, Daily.. £000 


125 


128 


130 


128 


126 


129 


121 


131 


134 


135 


174 


129 




Transportation— 




























Shipping — 




























Entrances mill, net tons 


4-65 


4-13 


4-35 


4-77 


513 


5 03 


5-13 


4-91 


4-83 


4-35 


4-55 


4-40 




Clearances mill, net tons 


4-10 


4-28 


4-46 


4-25 


4-65 


4-81 


4-50 


4-77 


4-35 


4-41 


4-29 


4 40 




Index of shipping 




























freights 1924 = 100 


65-2 


690 


68-5 


65-6 


57-7 


56-3 


59-0 


64-3 


62-8 


64-5 


66-5 


63-6 




Railways — 




























Gross passenger 






























2-8 

6-9 

21-3 


3-8 
6-6 

20-8 


3-4 

6-4 

201 


40 
6-0 

18-6 


4-4 
61 

18-9 


6-4 
5-8 
17-5 


61 
5-5 

16-5 


4-4 
5-7 

17-2 














6-1 

18-8 










Freight traffic, total.mill. tons 


19-9 


20-9 






Merchandise mill, tons 


3-8 


3-7 


3-6 


3-4 


3-4 


3-4 


3-2 


3-3 


3-6 


3-7 


3-7 






Coal mill, tons 


14-1 


13-8 


13-2 


12-1 


12-2 


110 


10-7 


110 


12-4 


13-0 


13-9 






Minerals and other 




























merchandise mill, tons 


3-4 


3-3 


3-3 


3-2 


3-2 


31 


2-7 


2-8 


2-8 


3-1 


3-3 






Prices— 




























Wholesale Prices 1913 = 100— 






























105-3 

92-2 

102 

1000 

131 

147 


104-6 

89-9 

98-9 

97-4 

129 

146 


102-4 

86-3 

97-0 

96-7 

126 

144 


100-7 
83 3 

94-4 

93-9 

125 

143 


98-1 
80-9 
90-6 
90-3 
123 
142 


97-7 
82-7 
92-8 
93-2 
125 
143 


99-5 
85-2 
94-9 
96-0 
123 
141 


102-1 

88-1 

94-6 

97-7 

123 

141 


101 1 

85-3 

91-5 

96-5 

125 

143 


101-1 

85-7 

91-6 

95-3 

125 

143 


101-0 

84-1 

91-4 

94-3 

125 

143 


100-3 

84-2 

91-5 

94-7 

123 

142 








Statist 




Times 




Retail Foods 




Cost of living 




Banking— 




Bank of England — 






























102 


105 


108 


111 


122 


117 


123 


123 


119 


116 


136 


147 


133 


Bank and currency notes £ mn. 


345 


354 


358 


358 


357 


366 


366 


362 


361 


359 


371 


359 


356 




124-6 


124-6 


124-6 


132-4 


140-0 


141-5 


139-8 


140-3 


140-4 


139-4 


119-8 


119-8 


142-2 


Nine Clearing Banks— 






























1,621 


1,639 


1,643 


1,661 


1,727 


1,765 


1,813 


1,826 


1,853 


1,859 


1,944 


1,943 




Discounts £ mn. 


205 


215 


238 


245 


276 


316 


373 


390 


387 


389 


406 


429 




Advances £ mn. 


888 


88$ 


866 


858 


838 


822 


803 


789 


780 


770 


758 


750 






264 
574 


266 
576 


272 
612 


284 
617 


324 
628 


333 
750 


348 
791 


367 
854 


396 
872 


409 
860 


456 
897 


455 

926 




Treasury Bills £ mill. 




Money — 




























Day to Day Rate p.c. 


4-27 


2-48 


1-98 


1-38 


•94 


•67 


•71 


•65 


•71 


•75 


•75 


•75 


•81 


Three Months Rate p.c. 


5-11 


2-64 


2-36 


1-57 


1-06 


•98 


•72 


•69 


•84 


•81 


1-25 


1-81 


•91 


Security Values— 




























Fixed Interest 1921 = 100 


106-5 


111-6 


110-6 


111-4 


1110 


115-6 


116-1 


118-4 


120-3 


115-9 


116-1 


116-9 




Variable Dividend. .1921 = 10C 


91-7 


92-7 


84-5 


82-0 


78-S 


84-5 


92-5 


96-8 


96-3 


96-8 


95-8 


93-4 




Total 1921 = 10C 


101-7 


105-5 


102-1 


101-8 


100-6 


105-5 


108-4 


111-4 


112-5 


109-6 


109-4 


110-2 




Exchange, New York $ to £.. . . 


3-459 


3-634 


3-752 


3-676 


3-649 


3-552 


I 3-476 


3-471 


3-399 


3-277 


3-270 


U 3-365 





34 



MONTHLY REVIEW OF BUSINESS STATISTICS 



Table 30. Significant Statistics of the United States. 



Classification 



1932 



Feb. Mar. April May June July Aug. Sept. Oct. Nov. Dec 



1933 
Jan. Feb. 



United States Statistics— 

Wheat, Visible Supply. Mil. bush 
Receipts, principal 

markets 000 bush 

Shipments, principal 

markets 000 bush. 

Exports, including 
wheat flour 000 bus! 

Wheat Flour Produc- 
tion 000 bbl 

Sugar Meltings, 8 
Ports 000 long tons 

Tobacco Consumption, 

Cigars Millions 

Cigarettes Millions 

Cattle Receipts, Primary 
Markets 000 

Hog Receipts, Primary 
Markets 000 

Cotton Consumption. . .000 bales 

Newsprint Produc- 
tion 000 s. tons 

Newsprint Consump- 
tion 000 s. tons 

Pig Iron Production.. 000 1. tons 

Steel Ingot Produc- 
tion 000 1. tons 

Unfilled Orders U.S. 
Steel Co 000 1. tons 

Automobdle Produc- 
tion 000 cars and trucks 

Zinc Production s. tons 

Stocks s. tons 

Lead Production s. tons 

Petroleum Produc- 
tion 000 bbls 

Consumption (to 
stills) 000 bbls 

Gasoline Production ..000 bbls 
Consumption 000 bbls 

Contracts Awarded $000,000 

Carloadings 000 cars 

Electric Power Pro- 
duction mill, k.h 

Index Factory Employ- 
ment 1923-5 = 100 

Mail Order Sales, 2 cos $000 

Ten Cent Sales, 4 Chains. . .$000 

Imports $000,000 

Exports $000,000 

Manufacturing Pro- 
duction 1923-5 = 100 

Mineral Production.. 1923-5 = 100 

Industrial Produc- 
tion 1923-5 =»100 

F.R. Banks, Bills Dis- 
counted Mil. Dolls. 

Reserve Ratio p.c. 

Member Banks Loans 

and Discounts Mil. Dolls. 

Net Demand 
Deposits Mil. Dolls. 

Interest Rates, Time Loans.. p.c. 

Call loans renewal p.c. 

Prime commercial paper, 
4-6 months p.c. 

Bond Prices High Grade 

Rails (10) '. 

Forty bonds 

Prices Common Stocks 
(404) 1926=100 

(Copyright Standard Statistics Co.) 

Industrials (338) 

Railways (33) 

Utilities (34) 

Automobiles (13) 

Tires and rubber goods (17) 

Chain stores (17) 

Copper and brass (9) 

Oil (16) 

Railway equipment (9) 

Steel and iron (9) 

Textile (31) 

Amusement (7) 

Tobacco (10) 

Stock Sales, N.Y Mil Shares 

Bond Sales, N.Y Mil. Dolls. 

Brokers Loans Mil. Dolls. 

Bank Debits, N.Y... Mil. Dolls. 
Outside, 140 centres. Mil. Dolls. 



210 

25,000 

11,537 

7,852 

7,694 

267 

348 
7, 

1,281 

3,659 
450 

87-2 

142-9 
964 



2,546 

117-4 

21,474 
129,532 
28,081 

62,484 

63,814 
31,265 
25,344 
890 
2,245 

6,997 

67-8 

32,581 

35,638 

131-0 

153-9 

68-0 
78-0 

70-0 



68-6 

12,588 

11,003 
3-63 
2-50 



75-30 
57-23 

56-5 

52-9 
34-2 
92-8 
60-2 
22-8 
56-3 
32-1 
42-4 
30-7 
32-2 
30-6 
17-0 
99-1 
31-7 
217-4 
525 
14,381 
12,870 



202 
13,412 
9,562 
8,435 
8,483 

346 

355 
8,447 

1,377 

2,939 
489 

100-0 

156-2 
967 

1,411 

2,472 

119-0 
22,448 

129,477 
30,345 

67,189 

68,502 
31,789 
29,451 
112-2 
2,287 

7,321 

66-4 

33,959 

40,512 

131-3 

155-3 

65-0 
84-0 

68-0 

639 
70-7 

12,211 

10,941 
3-13 
2-50 

3-75 

79-28 
58-25 

56-8 

53-8 

32-1 

93-4 

54-5 

23-9 

57-9 

29-6 

45-0 

30-4 

32-3 

30-7 

16-8 

104-6 

33-1 

252-7 

533 

16,160 

13,729 



13,198 

13,221 

11,777 

8,196 

298 

350 
7,562 

1,376 

2,960 
367 

91-2 

148-4 
853 

1,240 

2,327 

148-3 
20,575 

132,020 
23,236 

67,717 

71,131 
33,093 
30 
121-7 
2,773 

6,781 

64-3 

39,745 

39,359 

126-7 

135-2 

61-0 
79-0 

64-0 

556 
67-1 

11,880 

11,144 
2-30 
2-50 

3-50 

73-23 
49-42 

43-9 

41-7 

22-2 

73-3 

34-3 

18-7 

49-2 

21-8 

38-0 

21-9 

23-1 

25-6 

11-0 

89-5 

31-4 

252-4 

379 

15,558 

14,366 



172 

15,344 

15,942 

8,764 

7,739 

306 

369 
8,685 

1,397 

3,050 
332 



152-3 
784 

1,107 

2,177 

184-3 
18,605 
132,575 
25,902 

68,523 

74,i 

34,599 

31,574 

146-2 

2,1 

6,635 

62-1 

38,718 

38,869 

112-0 

132-0 

59-0 
67-C 

60-0 

490 
62-1 

11,631 

11,102 
1-75 
2-50 



43-08 

39-8 

38-1 
17-4 

67-8 
30-1 
17-9 
41-7 
20-4 
38-6 
19-7 



19 
23 
9 
82 
23 
258 

300 
12,912 
12,498 



167 

13,473 

11,507 

8,001 

7,820 

382 

400 
10,560 

1,338 

2,545 
321 

854 

138-2 
628 



2,035 



16,423 
134,027 
26,068 

64,835 

72,327 

33,312 

38,766 

113-1 

1,966 

6,548 

60-0 

39,889 

36,864 

111-4 

114-3 

58-0 
63-0 

590 

440 
57-6 

11,263 

10,925 
1-50 
2-50 

2-75 

68-78 
41-39 

34-0 

33-5 

14-1 

55-0 

25-5 

15-1 

34-8 

22-0 

36-5 

17-3 

16-3 

20-0 

6-5 

70-3 

23-0 

257-2 

244 

14,202 

12,908 



178 
41,006 
17,294 
4,772 
7, 
355 

361 

9,534 

1,291 

2,159 
279 

74-5 

157-1 

572 

793 
1,966 

111-1 

14,716 
135,902 
15,819 

66,310 

71,455 
33,705 
31,317 

128 

2,422 

6,525 

58-3 
32,073 
34,361 

79-4 
106 

57-0 
64-0 

58-0 

538 
56-5 

10,996 

10,751 
1-38 
2-08 

2-50 

70-97 
42-98 

35-9 

44-4 
21-2 
55-4 
35-2 
20-6 
43-6 
29-6 
50-1 
26-4 
24-9 
27-2 
11-4 
93-0 
23-1 
240-7 
242 
12,728 
12,572 



18 

40,732 

19,648 

5,768 

9,005 

353 

401 
9,559 



2,405 
403 

79-5 

123-9 
531 

832 

1,970 

90-3 
13.611 
133,153 
17,118 

66,220 

67,271 
32,883 
35,207 
134-0 
2,345 

6,743 

58 

33,777 

34,538 

91-1 

109-2 

59-0 
65-0 

60-0 

433 
58-9 

10,796 

10,982 
1-38 
2-08 



79-32 
53-35 



53-3 



51 
29 
84 
44 
28 
49 

37-7 

54-6 

29-8 

33-0 

33-1 

15-8 

98-0 

82-6 

333-1 

332 

13,458 

12.188 



194 

38,410 

21,313 

4,226 

9,394 

395 

405 
9,311 



2,505 
492 

70-6 

127-4 
593 

975 

1,985 

84 
13,260 
125,775 
20,498 

65,036 

63,913 

30 

33,645 
127-5 
2,245 

6,735 



39,156 

36,632 

98-4 

132-0 

65-0 
700 

66-0 

332 
61-1 

10,706 

11,229 
1-38 
2-00 

2-13 

82-07 
55-01 

52-2 

55-8 

34-5 

91-4 

54-2 

32-9 

52-8 

47-0 

53-9 

31-8 

42-1 

38-7 

17-3 

101-4 

67-4 

250-3 

380 

14,163 

11,767 



190 
27,238 
17,541 
4,422 
9,383 



437 
8,351 



2,691 
502 



76-7 



145-0 
645 



1,997 

48-7 
15,217 
121,840 
21,092 

65,219 



33,212 

32,255 

107-5 

3,158 

7,053 



45,423 

41,605 

106-4 

153-5 

65-0 
74-0 

66-0 



62-1 

10,441 

11,461 

•88 

1-35 

2-00 

80-76 
49-86 

49-9 

47-7 
27-5 



23-9 

48-2 

34-4 

47-4 

26-4 

32-5 

32-5 

12-9 

90-5 

29-2 

178-6 

325 

12,944 

12,354 



177 

17,584 

23,464 

5,995 

8,723 

227 

419 
7,614 

1,543 

2,775 
504 

81-7 

145-9 
631 

1,015 

1,968 

59-6 
15,958 
121,798 
24,465 

63,384 

65,504 

32,072 

30,294 

105-3 

2,195 

6,937 

61-2 

41,281 

38,040 

104-5 

139-4 

630 
75 

65-0 



62-6 

10,413 

11,745 

•51 

1-04 

1-74 

78-19 
47-51 

47-5 

45-4 

25-5 

77-6 

39-5 

22-6 

47-1 

32-1 

47-1 

24-8 

27-7 

29-9 

11-1 

82-9 

23-0 

158-9 

338 

9,815 

10,935 



169 
13,859 
13,604 
3,549 
8.300 



158 
12,814 
8,375 
3,313 



254 
7,319 



3,121 
440 



132 
546 

845 

1,9 

107 

18,489 
124,705 
21,638 

58,044 

65,998 
31,254 
27,191 
81-2 
2,487 

7,127 



51,700 

66,307 

97-0 

131-2 

64-0 
76-0 

66-0 

235 
62 

10,297 

11,758 

•50 

1-00 

1-50 

77-88 
44-05 

47-4 

44 

25-7 
79-6 
40-4 
23-5 
4H-6 
26-1 
46-1 
24-2 
24-8 
27-6 
9-2 
•4 



297 
8,622 

1,318 

3,381 
471 

74-4 

127-4 



1,006 

1,899 

130- 1 
19,859 
129,524 
24,615 

63,998 

66,093 

30,508 

26,442 

83-4 

.910 



59-4 
i,958 
30,001 
960 
120-0 

630 
69-0 

640 

274 
65-5 

10 

11,89! 



442 



554 
1,065 

1,854 



1,958 



30,534 



582 
53-5 



9,627 
10,593 



1-00 

1-38 

82-49 
46-94 

49-1 

46-2 
27-6 
81-8 
41-9 
24-2 
46-3 
•4 



81-92 
45-22 



29 

46-4 

25-2 

27-2 

26-7 



81 

23-2 

241-9 

347 

13,967 

12,820 



85-7 

18-7 

260-0 

359 

12,413 

12,053 



19-3 

231-5 

360 

12,036 

10,079 



REVUE MENSUELLE DE LA SITUATION ECONOMIQUE 

Vol. VIII OTTAWA, MARS, 1933 N° 3 

Statistician du Dominion: R. H. Coats, B.A., F.S.S. (Hon.), F.R.S.C. 

Chef de la Section de la Statistic ue Generale: S. A. Cudmore, M.A., F.S.S. 

Adjoint (Statistiques Economiques): S. B. Smith, M.A. 

STATISTIQUE COURANTE DES AFFAIRES AU CANADA 

Les conditions economiques canadiennes n'ont guere change en fevrier comparativement 
au mois precedent. La principale influence constructive a ete la force continue des obligations 
du gouvernement federal, leurs cours moyen etant un peu plus fort qu'en Janvier. Le rendement 
des obligations de l'Ontario, a 4-73 p.c. en fevrier, se compare a 4-75 p.c. en Janvier, indiquant 
une legere avance. La force des obligations du gouvernement du Canada est partiellement 
un reflet de la politique de marche ouvert des banques. Les differentes valeurs dans le porte- 
feuille des banques ont monte a $784,200,000 a la fin de Janvier, un point sans precedent dans 
l'histoire bancaire canadienne. Tel a ete le resultat de la reduction des prets courants a la fin 
de Janvier; les avances donnaient une somme de $946,000,000 comparativement a $1,071,000,000 
a la meme date de l'an dernier. Dans cet intervalle de douze mois les depots a terme montrent 
un gain de $15,000,000. Le surplus de depots a terme qui etait de $298,000,000 en Janvier 1932 
a augmente a $437,000,000 a la derniere date sur laquelle les chiffres sont connus. 

Malgre la fluctuation du change etranger, qui a provoque une avance des denrees les plus 
sensibles, le niveau general des prix de gros a ete legerement plus bas. L'indice general marquait 
63-6 en fevrier comparativement a 63-9 en Janvier. 

Influences par la faiblesse de la bourse de New- York, les titres canadiens ont flechi en fevrier, 
l'indice restant a 47-6. En Janvier l'indice etait 51-6, et en juin 1932 le point le plus bas de ces- 
dernieres annees a ete enregistrc, 43-2. 

Operations commerciales 

Bien que les operations productives aient ete tranquilles en Janvier, le declin du mois prece- 
dent, apres rajustement saisonnier, a ete modere. L'indice du volume physique des affaires, 
compose de 45 facteurs rajustes pour tendances saisonnieres, etait a 67-0 en fevrier comparative- 
ment a 68-1 en Janvier. La production mincrale, basee sur neuf facteurs, fait meilleure figure, 
montrant des gains partout excepte dans 1'amiante. Les exportations de nickel donnent 3,469,- 
400 livres comparativement a 3,079,000 livres, et les exportations de cuivre par les mines donnent 
aussi un gain. Les exportations de zinc donnent 14,007,000 livres comparativement a 8,296,000 
livres. Les expeditions d'or a la Monnaie et aux marches d'exportation donnent 225,492 onces 
comparativement a 262,740, un gain modere apres rajustement saisonnier. L'argent a aussi 
ete exporte en plus fort volume. Les importations de bauxite pour la fabrication d'aluminium 
s'elevaient a 3,060,000 livres comparativement a 2,062,500 en Janvier. La production de char- 
bon de Janvier, a 1,036,400 tonnes comparativement a 1,023,000 tonnes en fevrier, donne un 
gain de pres de 18 p.c. apres rajustement saisonnier. 

L'indice de la production minerale a 94-2 se compare a 80-5 en Janvier. 

La fabrication des denrees alimentaires a ete moins active que le mois precedent. Les 
abatages inspectes donnent un gain apres rajustement saisonnier. Les exportations de fromage 
apres le rajustement ordinaire sont un peu plus grandes. Les minoteries ont ete moins actives 
le dernier mois sur lequel les statistiques sont etablies. L'indice des manufactures de denrees 
alimentaires marque 63-0 comparativement a 67-9. 

Les dedouanements de cigares a 4,675,000 comparativement a 3,966,000 en Janvier et les 
dedouanements de tabac en feuilles et de cigarettes donnent un declin. Le declin dans les impor- 
tations de caoutchouc brut a ete moins que normal pour la saison. La production de chaus- 
sures a ete legerement plus grande le dernier mois sur lequel les statistiques sont etablies. Le 
coton et la laine pour plus ample transformation ont ete importes en plus faible volume, l'indice 
des importations de cette classe etant a 56-1 comparativement a 60-0 en Janvier. 

La production de papier a journal montre une plus ample reduction, le total etant 125,610 
tonnes comparativement a 140,539. Les exportations de pulpe de bois donnent un gain apres 
rajustement saisonnier, tandis que les exportations de planches, madriers et bardeaux montrent 
un declin. L'indice de l'activite dans le bois et le papier est a 59-8 comparativement a 63-4 en 
Janvier. 



36 REVUE MENSUELLE DE LA SITUATION ECONOMIQUE 

Deux hauts fourneaux ont eteint leurs feux en fevrier, n'en laissant aucunn en activite a la 
du mois. La production de fonte et d'acier donne un violent declin. La production d'automobik 
a et6 moindre, alors que normalement il devrait y avoir un gain a cette saison. L'indice du U 
et de l'acier a baisse de 31 -9 a 19-6. Les importations de petrole brut sont a, 37,556,000 galloi 
comparativement a 35,085,000, les gains apres rajustement saisonnier etant d'environ 37 p.c. 

L'indice de la production manufacturiere est a 58-7 comparativement a 62-2 en Janvier. 

Les nouveaux contrats de construction sont a bas niveau en fevrier, $3,149,000 compart 
tivement a $3,362,000, et les permis de batir dans 61 villes n'atteignent que $907,000. 

La production electrique sur une base de moyenne quotidienne a ete de 46,413,000 k.w.h., 
comparativement a 45,053,000 k.w.h. en Janvier, un gain apres rajustement saisonnier de pres 
de 3-5 p.c. 

L'indice de la production industrielle, comprenant les mines, les manufactures, la construc- 
tion et l'energie electrique, est a 60-9 comparativement a 62-2. 

Les chargements de wagons sont au nombre de 133,147 comparativement a 134,432, soit 
un lcger gain apres rajustement saisonnier. L'emploiement montre un recul dans le commerce 
de gros et de detail, les importations et les exportations ont aussi flechi en volume. L'indice 
de la distribution, calcule sur le chargement des wagons, l'emploi dans le commerce, les expor- 
tations et les importations, marque 83-8 comparativement a 84-3 en Janvier. 

Les declins dans les arrivages de ble, avoine, orge et seigle a la tete des lacs et aux ports de 
l'Atlantique et du Pacifique ont ete moins que normaux pour la saison, l'indice montant par 
consequent de 52-5 en Janvier a 75-9 en fevrier. 

L'indice des arrivages de bestiaux aux grands pares est a 79-4 comparativement a 71-9. 
L'indice de l'ecoulement des produits agricoles a monte" de 56-1 en Janvier a 76-5 en fevrier. 
Les appro visionnements des entrepots frigorifiques etaient plus considerables le ler fevrier, 
apres deduction d'une marge pour tendances saisonnieres. 
Stocks et prix mondiaux 

Le graphique de la page 15 montre les stocks mondiaux de huit denrees, par mois, pendant 
la periode d'apres-guerre, et les prix de ces denrees aux Etats-Unis. Les indices generaux mon- 
trent une correlation inverse entre les stocks et les prix de neuf denrees identiques. Le gain 
des stocks pendant la depression primaire d'apres-guerre a ete relativement modere bien que le 
declin des prix en 1920 eut ete un des plus drastiques dans l'histoire. L'indice des prix a monte 
au commencement de 1923 et les deux indices ont ete en etroite parallele jusqu'en 1925. Vers 
la fin de l'annee l'indice des stocks mondiaux monte tandis que l'indice des prix commence a 
flechir pour en arriver a la grande disparite de la periode actuelle. 

Bien que l'on y constate une certaine variete de mouvement parmi les huit denrees illus- 
trees, elles suivent une orientation generale tres semblable specialement dans l'accumulation des 
stocks et la baisse des prix de ces dernieres ann6es. Le prix du caoutchouc etait eleve en 1925 
mais a baisse rapidement au commencement de 1926 alors que les stocks commencaient a s'accu- 
muler. Le gain dans les stocks de cafe a ete rapide de 1927 jusqu'au commencement de 1932. 
La divergence des stocks et des prix du coton commence a s'affermir en 1925. Le prix du cuivre 
s'est maintenu a un niveau eleve en 1929 mais a tombe rapidement le deuxieme trimestre de 1930. 
Les courbes des prix et des stocks d'etain dans la periode d'apres-guerre presentent un excellent 
echantillon de cette correlation inverse. Les stocks etaient relativement eleves en 1922 et bas 
en 1926-27. De 1929 a 1931 les stocks se sont accumules rapidement pendant que les prix ont 
atteint un bas niveau dans la periode d'apres-guerre. 

L'economiste anglais Henry Clay pretend qu'une mauvaise orientation de la production 
sans aucune alteration de la politique monetaire peut produire une baisse generale des prix. 
La depression dans une industrie quelconque due a une fausse orientation ou a une surproduction 
reagirait sur toutes les autres industries desquelles achetent les personnes engagees dans telle 
industrie. En consequence, un nombre suffisant d'erreurs de cette sorte, conduisant a une 
production excessive de certaines industries, aura pour resultat, par la perte du pouvoir d'achat 
des gens employes dans ces industries, une depression generale dans tout le domaine industriel. 
Les dix premieres annees d'apres-guerre semblent avoir ete une periode ou une fausse orienta- 
tion de l'industrie a ete l'influence la plus importante sur l'activite industrielle et l'agent respon- 
sable de la grande chute des prix. 

Avant la guerre l'industrie mondiale etait en equilibre; la guerre a detruit cet equilibre et 
les industries ne Font pas encore retrouve. A la suite de conditions creees par la guerre, le 






REVUE MENSUELLE DE LA SITUATION ECONOMIQUE 37 

Canada et les Etats-Unis augmenterent grandement leurs emblavures pour occuper la place 
laissee vacante par les exportations de la Russie. Les moulins du Japon et de l'lnde furent 
agraodis pour suppleer aux besoins que ceux du Lancashire ne pouvaient plus satisfaire. Mais 
la depression de ce commerce a entraine un doublement de capacite. Le doublement des appro- 
visionnements en plusieurs produits agricoles les plus importants et en plusieurs produits ouvres 
les plus communs a cree un probleme similaire d'excedent de capacite productive aussitot que 
disparurent les obstructions au commerce creees par la guerre. 

La situation de 1'or 

La plus faible production d'or d'apres-guerre est celle de 1922, quand elle n'a ete que de 
15,452,000 onces. Les prix de ces dernieres annees ont abaissc les frais de production et favorise 
l'exploitation des mines d'or et en 1932 la production s'est elevee a, 23,906,000 onces, ce qui 
depasse tous les precedents. Vu la remarquable activite des mines d'or en ces dernieres annees, 
les stocks mondiaux de metal jaune montrent un gain progressif. De plus, une proportion 
toujours grandissante des stocks mondiaux d'or a ete concentree dans les voutes des banques 
centrales et des gouvernements. En 1914, il n'y avait que 34-6 p.c. des stocks mondiaux dans 
les banques centrales et avec les gouvernements, mais depuis cette date, dans plusieurs pays 
l'or a disparu de la circulation generale et la proportion detenue par les banques centrales et les 
gouvernements a monte a, 51 -2 p.c. en 1932. Les reserves d'or ont fait un gain de pas moins de 
116 p.c. depuis 1914. 

II a ete demontre par plusieurs autorites financieres que sur de longues periodes on constate 
une tendance de correlation intime entre les prix de gros et les stocks relatifs d'or. Comme le 
niveau des prix de gros, tel que mesure par le nombre-indice de Sauerbeck, etait en 1850 exacte- 
ment egal a, celui de 1910, la periode de soixante annees a ete employee comme preuve statistique 
de cette theorie de l'argent. En prenant le stock mondial d'or de 1850 comme base de ce calcul, 
il est pretendu par le professeur Cassel qu'il faut une augmentation annuelle moyenne de 2-8 
p.c. des stocks d'or de l'annee precedente pour garder les stocks d'or au niveau auquel ils etaient 
en 1910. En consequence, il faudrait une augmentation cumulative de 2-8 p.c. repartie sur 
cette periode de soixante ans pour maintenir un niveau constant des prix. En allouant 0-2 p.c. 
pour l'usure annuelle et la perte de l'or monnaye, il s'ensuit que cette augmentation cumulative 
doit etre de 3 p.c. 

D'apres la theorie quantitative de l'argent, chaque fois que l'augmentation annuelle actuelle 
d'or depasse 3 p.c, le niveau general des prix devrait monter tandis que si cette augmentation 
annuelle est de moins de 3 p.c, le niveau general des prix devrait tomber. Par la comparaison 
actuelle on etablit une correlation etroite entre les prix de gros et la courbe representant le 
pourcentage des approvisionnements reels d'or comparativement a 1' appro visionnement normal 
d'or, tel que calcule en augmentant les stocks de 1850 a un taux cumulatif de 3 p.c par annee.* 
Cassel en a conclu qu'une augmentation annuelle de 3 p.c. dans les stocks mondiaux d'or serait 
necessaire pour garder les prix a un niveau stable. 

Les experts, se basant sur cette experience historique, pronostiquent que les prix mondiaux 
devraient tomber dans la decade actuelle parce que la production d'or n'a pas ete assez grande 
pour repondre aux besoins normaux. II avait ete estime que la production d'or serait de $402,- 
000,000 en 1931 et $410,000,000 en 1932. La production reelle, telle qu'estimee dans le rapport 
preliminaire de la production minerale du Canada en 1932, a ete de $458,252,000 en 1931 et 
$494,180,000 en 1932. De plus, depuis trois ou quatre ans, une plus large proportion de la pro- 
duction est convertie en monnaie et de grandes quantites d'or qui autrefois etaient cachees ou 
immobilisees ont ete acquises par les banques centrales au cours des deux dernieres annees. 

Comme resultat du retrait de l'or de la circulation en meme temps que du riot continu d'or 
nouveau, les reserves mondiales d'or monetaire, exclusion faite de celles de la Russie, se sont 
elevees, d'apres Kitchin, entre 1913 et 1929 a un taux qui correspond a une augmentation de 
5-9 p.c. par annee, un chifTre qui depasserait de beaucoup le taux moyen de 2-3 p.c. ou 1-7 p.c 
respectivement, montre par la Societe des Nations ou par la Federal Reserve Bank de New- 
York, comme representant la production de denrees basiques brutes (denrees alimentaires et 
matieres premieres) pour tout l'univers excepte la Russie. 

D'apres le bulletin de la Federal Reserve Bank les reserves d'or de 29 pays etaient a $11,800,- 
000,000 en decembre 1932 comparativement a $10,291,000,000 a la fin de 1919, soit un gain de 
15-4 p. c 

*Voir annexe au rapport interimaire de la Del6gation de l'Or du comite financier de la Ligue de la Soci6t6 des Nations. 



38 REVUE MENSUELLE DE LA SITUATION ECONOMIQUE 

Malgre une telle condition des stocks d'or, les prix ont decline rapidement de 1929 a 1333. 
A l'exception de la France, la Suisse, la Hollande et la Belgique, toutes les nations, qui il y a deux 
ans, reposaient leur devise et leur credit sur Tor, ne suivent plus l'etalon or dans ce sens que les 
restrictions ont 6te placees soit sur le rachat des billets de banque soit sur l'exportation du metal. 

En cherchant la cause du declin des prix de gros, il est pretendu qu'un appro visionnement 
mondial adequat d'or pour servir de reserve mon^taire n'est pas en lui-meme suffisant dans les 
conditions actuelles pour assurer un niveau stable des prix. Cet approvisionnement global 
doit aussi etre distribuc entre les differents systemes monetaires nationaux, de telle maniere 
que chaque pays important, ou groupe de pays, ait au moins des reserves assez stables pour 
etendre la base d'or a son numeraire, en conformite avec le developpement de ses industries et 
de son commerce. Si la distribution n'est pas equitable en ce sens, et si la concentration continue 
de For dans quelques pays cause un serrement progressif des reserves dans d'autres pays, et si 
ce serrement n'est pas arrete, la chute des prix dans ce dernier groupe, provoquee par les restric- 
tions du credit, se repandra dans tout l'univers. Les pays accumulant l'or trouveront que 
leurs amples reserves ne sont pas une sauvegarde contre la chute des prix et la depression conco- 
mitante du commerce. 

II est estime que la France et les Etats-Unis, a la fin de 1932, avaient pres de 60 p.c. de tous 
les stocks mondiaux d'or. L'orientation des reserves d'or de tous les pays, y compris les cinq 
nations accumulant l'or, montre une correlation etroite avec les prix de gros depuis quatre ans. 
Cette inegalite de distribution a nui a l'operation normale de l'etalon or, et en presumant une 
confiance normale dans les instruments de credit, la production et l'approvisionnement d'or, 
s'il est bien employe, sont suffisants pour supporter un niveau de prix beaucoup plus elevc que 
celui de nos jours. 

LA SITUATION AUX ETATS-UNIS 

La crise bancaire a retarde les operations productives en fevrier. Les chargements de 
wagons et la production automobile ont eu une influence deprimante sur les indices des opera- 
tions commerciales. Des gains dans la production de fer, d'acier, de charbon et de zinc sont 
contrebalances par des declins dans d'autres lignes. 

A la fin de fevrier, les retraits de numeraire et d'or ont augmente rapidement, et le 3 mars 
ils avaient pris des proportions si grandes que le lendemain les banques de reserve etait forcees 
de suspendre les paiements en or. Le 15 mars, la reprise des paiements en numeraire etait assuree 
normalement. Au point de vue des observateurs a longue distance, les evenements du mois 
dernier sont regardes par certaines autorites comme favorables, amcliorant les perspectives d'une 
reprise financiere. 

CONDITIONS ECONOMIQUES EN GRANDE-BRET AGNE 

La presente livraison donne un graphique des conditions economiques en Grande-Bretagne, 
couvrant la periode d'apres-guerre. Les principaux traits de l'indice general de cette periode 
sont la stabilite relative a un niveau modere de 1922 a 1930, une depression mineure en 1926, 
provoquee par la greve de cette annee. La recente depression a atteint son maximum dans 
l'automne de 1931, la situation generale montrant quelque amelioration l'an dernier. 

La production industrielle a vu des bas en 1921, 1926 et les deux dernieres annees. L'expan- 
sion de 1921 a 1929 a ete interrompue temporairement par la greve de 1926. La plus grande 
activite de la periode sous observation est constatee de 1927 a 1929. Le point le plus bas de la 
production industrielle jusqu'a date a ete touche le troisieme trimestre de 1932, le quatrieme 
trimestre montrant une amelioration distincte. 

Le maximum des prix de gros de la periode d'apres-guerre a ete atteint en 1920, alors que 
l'indice du Board of Trade, base sur 1926, marquait 219-8. En septembre 1922 se produisit 
un des declins les plus drastiques de l'histoire, laissant l'indice a 104-2, un declin de pres de 53 
p.c. Les premiers mois de 1922 virent une reprise moderee, partiellement a la suite du retour 
de l'etalon or a sa parite d'avant-guerre. Les prix declinerent considerablement entre 1925 et 
1929. L'indice marquait 89-5 en decembre 1929 et tombait a 67-0 en septembre 1931. Depuis 
lors le niveau des prix s'est bien maintenu, l'indice de fevrier etanfc a 66-8. 

Ottawa, Bureau federal de la Statistique, 24 mars 1933. 






PUBLICATIONS ISSUED BY THE DOMINION BUREAU OF STATISTICS 



1. ANNUAL OB SPECIAL REPOBTS ISSUED DURING THE MONTH ENDED 

MARCH 16, 1933 

Administration. — Canada's tourist trade in 1932. 

Population. — Unemployment among wage-earners, bulletin No. 3, Kitchener, Ontario; bulletin No. 4, 
Ottawa, Ontario. Population 1931, number of farm workers, weeks and cost of hired labour, 1930, 
by counties or census divisions. Bulletin XXI, population of Canada, 1931, by racial origins, number 
and percentage single, married, widowed or divorced of the total population, by sex, for provinces, 
1911, 1921 and 1931. 

Production. — Agricultural Products. — Fruit trees on farms by provinces, 1931 and 1921. Annual re- 
port on farm values. The wheat situation in the Argentine. Vegetables — area in 1931 and area, 
production and value in 1930. Forest Products. — Preliminary report on the printing and book- 
binding industry in Canada, 1931. Preliminary report on the box, basket and crate industry in Canada, 
1931. Animal Products. — The fur goods and fur dressing industries, Canada, 1931. Mineral Pro- 
duction. — Directory of chemical industries in Canada as of date July 1, 1932. The natural gas in- 
dustry in Canada, 1931. Preliminary report on the mineral production of Canada during the calendar 
year 1932. 

Manufactures. — Textiles and Allied Industries. — Report on the dyeing and finishing of textile goods 
in Canada, 1931. Report on the men's furnishing goods industry in Canada, 1931. Report on the 
dyeing, cleaning and laundry industry in Canada, 1931. Manufactures of Non-Ferrous Metals. — 
The electrical apparatus and supplies industry in Canada, 1931. The brass and copper products in- 
dustry in Canada, 1931. Manufactures of the non-ferrous metals, final statistics, 1931. Chemicals 
and Allied Products.— The adhesives industry in Canada, 1931. 

External Trade. — Quarterly report of the trade of Canada (imports for consumption and exports) months 
of October, November and December, 1932, and nine months ending December 31, and 1932. 

Internal Trade. — Retail trade in Saskatchewan, 1930 (preliminary provincial summary) . Retail trade 
in Saskatchewan, 1930, by census divisions, cities and towns (preliminary report). Statistics of the 
sale of new automotive vehicles in Canada, January 1932 to January 1933. * 

Transportation, Communications and Public Utilities. — Preliminary report central electric station 
industry in Canada, 1931. 

Education. — High school libraries in Canada. Libraries in sanatoria, homes, mental and penal institu- 
tions in Canada, 1931. 

General. — Canada 1933 (edition francaise) manuel officiel des conditions presentes et des progres recents. 
Annual review of building permits issued by 61 cities in Canada 1932 (with comparative data from 
1920-1930). 

2. PUBLICATIONS REGULARLY ISSUED BY THE WEEK, MONTH OR QUARTER 

Weekly Bulletins.— Canadian Grain Statistics, Carloadings of Revenue Freight. Investors' and Traders' 
Indexes of Security Prices. Index Number of 20 Mining Stocks. 

Monthly Bulletins. — Agricultural Statistics. The Wheat Situation: Review; statistical supplement. 
Cold Storage Holdings. Production of — (a) Flour, (b) Sugar, (c) Boots and Shoes, (d) Auto- 
mobiles, (e) Iron and Steel, (f) Coal and Coke, (g) Leading Mineral Products, (h) Asbestos, 
(i) Asphalt Roofing, (j) Cement, (k) Clay Products. (1) Copper, (m) Feldspar, (n) Gold, 
(o) Gypsum, (p) Lead, (q) Lime, (r) Natural Gas. (s) Nickel, (t) Petroleum, (u) Salt, 
(v) Silver, (w) Zinc, (x) Concentrated Milk Products, (y) Creamery Butter. Building Permits. 
Summary of the Trades of Canada current month and 12 months. Summary of Canada's domestic 
exports. Summary of Canada's Imports. Asbestos trade. Farm implements and machinery. 
Footwear trade. Exports: Grain and flour; Lumber; Meats, lard and sausage casings; Milk, milk 
products and eggs; Non-ferrous ores and smelter products; Paints and varnishes; Petroleum and its 
products; Pulpwood, wood pulp and paper; Rubber and insulated wire and cable; Vehicles (of iron). 
Imports: Coffee and tea; Lumber; Meats, lard and sausage casings; Milk and its products and eggs; 
Non-ferrous ores and smelter products; Paints and varnishes; Petroleum and its products; Rubber; 
Stoves, sheet metal products; Refrigerators; Vehicles (of iron). 
Railway Operating Statistics. Traffic of Canadian Railways. Canal Statistics. 
Prices and Price Indexes. Automobile Financing. Changes in the value of retail sales. 
The Employment Situation as reported by Employers. Commercial Failures. Bank Debits. 
Review of Business Statistics. — Price $1.00 per year. 
Vital Statistics, Births, Marriages and Deaths, by provinces. 

Quarterly Reports.— Trade of Canada— Price $2.00 per year. 



For the publications listed above application should be made to the Dominion Statistician, Dominion 
Bureau of Statistics, Ottawa. 




Volume VIII MeSks Numero 3 



CANADA 

BUREAU FEDERAL DE LA STATISTIQUE 
SECTION DE LA STATISTIQUE GENERALE 



REVUE DE LA SITUATION ECONOMIQUE 



MARS 1933 



Publie par ordre de l'Hon. H. H. Stevens, M.P. 
Ministre du Commerce 



OTTAWA: F. A. ACLAND 

Imprimeur de Sa Trea Excellente Majeste le Roi 
1933 



Prix: Un dollar par an. 



Volume VIII WSfc Number 4 

CANADA 

■ BOMINI SN BUREAU OF STATISTICS 
GENERAL STATISTICS BRANCH 



MONTHLY REVIEW OF BUSINESS STATISTICS 



APRIL. 1933 




Published by Authority of the Honourable H. H. Stevens, M.P., 
Minister of Trade and Commerce 



OTTAWA 

J. O. PATENAUDE, ACTING KING'S PRINTER 

1933 



Price: One Dollar per year. 



MONTHLY REVIEW OF BUSINESS STATISTICS 



SUMMARY OF CONTENTS 



Page 

Chart of Three Representative Factors 4 

General Review 3-7 

Table 1. Weighted Indices of the Physical Vol- 
ume of Business 8 

Table 2. Trend of Business Movements. 

Imports of raw materials Exports of lumber. 
Production of basic industries. Exports o? certain 
commodities. Operations of railways. Canal 
traffic. Strikes and lockouts. Reports of the em- 
ployment offices. Immigration. Bank clearings. 
Failures. 9 

Chart of Ratio of Prices to Volume of Business . 10 

Table 3. Receipts and Visible Supply of Canadian 
Grain 11 

Table 4. Exports and Cash Price of Canadian 
Grain 11 

Table 5. Consumption of Grain and Production 
by the Milling Industry 12 

Table 6. Receipts, Manufactures and Stocks of 
Sugar 12 

Table 7. Tobacco, Cigars and Cigarettes Entered 
for Consumption. 

Tobacco, cut. Tobacco, plug— Cigarettes. Cigar- 
ettes, ov>r-weight. Cigars. Foreign Raw Leaf 
Tobacco 13 

Table 8. Production of Boots and Shoes 13 

Table 9. Cold Storage Holdings, Sales and 
Slaughterings of Live Stock and Retail Food 
Prices 14 

Chart of Equation of Exchange 15 

Table 10. Output of Central Electric Stations In 
Canada 16 

Table 11. Railway Freight Leaded at Stations. . 17 

Table 12. Index Numbers of Employment by 
Industries 18 

Electrical Energy Available for Consumption — 18 

Table 13. Seasonally Adjusted Indexes of Em- 
ployment, Indexes of Retail Sales and Auto- 
mobile Financing 19 

Table 14. Trend of Business in the Five Economic 
Areas. 

Canada, Maritime Provinces, Quebec, Ontario, 
Prairie Provinces, British Columbia — Construction 
Contracts Awarded. Building Permits. Index of 
Employment. Bank Debits. Sales of Insurance. 
Commercial Failures 20 

Table 15. Mineral Production by Months. 

Metals— Gold, Silver, Nickel, Copper, Lead, 
Zinc, Fuels— Coal, Petroleum, Natural Gas, Non- 
Metals — Asbestos, Gypsum, Feldspar, Salt, Struc- 
tural Materials— Cement, Clay Products, Lime. . . 20 



Page 

Table 16. Weekly Factors of Economic Activity in 
Canada. 

Grain Receipts and Prices, Live Stock Sales and 
Prices, Carloadings, Security Prices, Mining Stock 
Prices 21 

Table 17. Bank Debits to Individual Accounts 
in the Clearing House Centres of Canada 22 

Table 18. Indexes of Employment by Cities 22 

Table 19. Building Permits Issued in Sixty-one 
Cities 23 



Table 20. Index Numbers of Wholesale Prices. 



24 



Table 21. Prices of Representative Commodities 
and Wholesale Prices in Other Countries. 

United States, United Kingdom, France, Ger- 
many, Belgium, Netherlands, Norway, Sweden, 
Italy, Finland, India, Japan, Australia, New 
Zealand, Egypt 25 

Table 22. Total Value of Imports and Exports, 
by Groups, in Thousands of Dollars 26 

Table 23. Canada'sDomestic Exports by Principal 
Commodities 27 

Indexes of Cost of Living and Cost per Week of a 

Family Budget 27 

Table 24. Summary of Canada's Imports by 
Principal Commodities 28 

Table 25. Banking and Currency 29 

Chart of World Trade 30 

Table 26. Index Numbers of Security Prices. 

(a) 1. Common Stocks— Industrials, Total, Iron 
and Steel, Pulp and Paper, Milling, Oils, Textiles 
and Clothing, Food and Allied Products, Beverages, 
Miscellaneous. Utilities, Total, Transportation, 
Telephone and Telegraph, Power and Traction. 

(b) Common Stocks, continued — Companies 
abroad, Total, Industrial, Utilities, Banks, General 
Index Number, Traders' Index, Preferred Stocks, 
Interest Rates, Yields on Bonds, Shares Traded, 
Montreal. Mining Stocks— Gold, Copper, Silver 

and Miscellaneous, Total Index 31 

Table 27. Tonnage of Vessels Entered and Cleared 
from Canadian Ports 31 

Table 28. World Stocks and Prices 32 

Table 29. Significant Statistics of the United 
Kingdom 33 

Table 30. Significant Statistics of the United 
States 34 

List of Current Publications of the Dominion 
Bureau of Statistics 39 

General Review (in French) 35 38 









MONTHLY REVIEW OF BUSINESS STATISTICS 

Vol. VIII OTTAWA, APRIL, 1933 No. 4 

Dominion Statistician: R. H. Coats, B.A., F.S.S. (Hon.), F.R.S.C. 

Chief, Branch of General Statistics: S. A. Cudmore, M.A., F.S.S. 

Assistant on Business Statistics: Sydney B. Smith, M.A. 

THE BUSINESS SITUATION IN CANADA 

The economic situation of Canada was fully maintained in March, the brightest feature be- 
ing the rise in wholesale prices. The index moved up from 63-6 in the preceding month to 
64-4, and the further advance in most speculative commodities during April has entirely 
altered the outlook for the immediate future. The index for Canadian farm products moved 
up from 43-0 in February to 44-7 in March and non-ferrous metals continued the advance of 
the preceding month. A widespread belief that a considerable advance in wholesale prices will 
be effected through economic and political action would facilitate a resumption of business ac- 
tivity in coming weeks. 

Government bonds, owing to unsettled financial conditions in the United States, were 
moderately lower in March than in the preceding month. The average yield on Ontario 
Government bonds was 4-79 p.c. compared with 4-73 and Dominion Government bonds were 
slightly lower. 

The average of common stock prices was nearly the same as in February, the index being 
47-3 compared with 47-6. Industrials showed a gain, while utilities were moderately lower. 
The average of New York funds in Montreal was $1-199 in March compared with SI -197 in 
February. 

Business Operations 

The volume of business was well maintained in March despite the banking crisis in the U.S. 
Mineral production measured by nine significant factors showed improvement in March after 
seasonal adjustment. Gold shipments were 274,925 ounces compared with 225,492 in February, 
and the movement of silver was 1,692,409 ounces compared with 997,579. Nickel exports 
were 5,073,000 pounds compared with 3,469,000, a moderate gain being shown after seasonal 
adjustment. Coal production was 812,393 tons compared with 1,036,400 in February, the bulk 
of the decline being contrary to seasonal tendencies. 

The index for the production of foodstuffs, based on ten factors, was 74 • 1 in March compared 
with 63-0 in February. Flour and oatmeal production showed gain after seasonal adjustment, 
while rolled oats was produced in lesser volume. The manufacture of sugar in the four-week 
period ended March 25 was 55,432,000 pounds compared with 20,347,000 in the preceding period. 
Hog and sheep slaughterings showed gains, while the gain in cattle slaughterings was less than 
normal for the season. Exports, of cheese and canned salmon were greater in March than in 
February. 

The release of raw leaf tobacco and cigars was considerably heavier, but the gain in cigar- 
ettes was less than normal for the season. The manufacture of pneumatic casings showed mod- 
erate decline in the latest month for which statistics are available. The activity of the boot 
and shoe factories was moderately greater, according to the most recent report. 

Production of newsprint was 137,078 tons compared with 125,610 tons, the gain being 
slightly greater than normal for March. Wood pulp, planks and boards were exported in greater 
volume, though the export of shingles declined after seasonal adjustment. The index of forestry 
production was 60-7 compared with 59-8 in February. 

The output of steel ingots was 11,212 tons compared with 12,374 in February and as blast 
furnaces were out of operation no pig iron was produced. Automobile production was 6,632 
compared with 3,298, the gain after seasonal adjustment being nearly 67 p.c. 

The gains in construction contracts and building permits were slight, contrasting with the 
marked increase normal for the season. A very low level is indicated for construction operations. 

Electric power production on an average daily basis was 44,227,000 k.w.h. in March com- 
pared with 46,413,000 in February, the decline being slightly greater than norma! for the season. 



MONTHLY REVIEW OF BUSINESS STATISTICS 




MONTHLY REVIEW OF BUSINESS STATISTICS 5 

Carloadings were 157,416 compared with 133,147 in the preceding month, the gain after 
seasonal adjustment being nearly 3 p.c. 

Exports at $36,579,000 compared with $26,398,000, showed moderate gain after seasonal 
adjustment, while the gain in imports was less than normal. 

Bank debits in March were $1,887,000,000 compared with $1,830,000,000, the decline after 
seasonal adjustment being 5-1 p.c. 

The index of agricultural marketings was 129-0 compared wiht 76-5, the gain being due to 
the speeding up in grain shipments to Head of the Lakes and Pacific coast ports. The index of 
grain marketings was 140-2 compared with 75-9, while the index of animal marketings was 77-8 
compared with 79-4. The index of cold storage holdings on April 1, was 112-7 compared with 
135-8 on March 1. 

Economic Changes 

The three representative factors chosen as a guide to the current economic position failed 
to show improvement during the first quarter of 1933. The trend of common stock prices was 
downward from September last to March, the index being 47-3 compared with 63-0, the average 
for September. The lowest point of the present depression was reached in June, 1932, when the 
index stoood at 43.2. After the elimination of the long-term trend, determined from the period 
from January, 1919. to June, 1932, the index was at a slightly lower point in March, 1933 than 
in June, 1932. The index was 2-90 times the standard deviation below the long-term trend 
compared with 2 • 89 times in June. 

The least favourable factor considered in this connection was the sharp decline in the 
physical volume of business. The decline of the last four years was continuous, resulting in 
a low level in March. The index has dropped from more than twice the standard deviation 
above the long-term trend in the early part of 1932 to nearly four times below in the latest 
month for which statistics are available. 

Bond yields during the first quarter of 1933 occupied a more constructive position than in 
the corresponding period of last year. Bond yields were low in the early months of 1928, indi- 
cating easy credit conditions. A rapid change took place during the next twelve months, result- 
ing in higher long-term interest rates. While improvement was shown by a decline in yields to a 
lower level during the fifteen months prior to September, 1931, external financial dislocation led 
to a sharp advance, culminating in January, 1933. The credit situation improved in the latter 
part of 1932 and was not greatly altered in the first quarter of 1933, although yields were 
moderately higher in March. 

The chart on page 4 shows the relationship of the three factors after adjustment according 
to recognized statistical methods. 

Relation of Prices and Business Operations 

The chart on page 10 shows the indexes of the physical volume of business and of whole 
prices from 1919 to the present time. These factors are among the most significant in deter- 
mining the trend of economic conditions. Profitable operation of productive enterprise depends 
on stable or rising prices. During periods of sharply declining prices, business is operated under 
a great handicap. The chief declines in the volume of business during the post-war period was 
shown in 1920-21 and from 1929 to the present, coinciding with a marked downward trend in 
wholesale prices. From January, 1922 to December, 1929, there occurred an eight-year period 
of relative stability in the price structure. This factor contributed to the pronounced industrial 
expension from 1922 to 1929. 

A simultaneous gain of the two factors as in 1919 constitutes the essence of an improvement 
in economic conditions. The gain in one factor and the maintenance of the other as in the 
period from 1922 to 1929 implies relatively prosperous conditions. The simultaneous decline of 
the two factors over a substantial period as during 1920-21 and 1929-33 is evidence of a major 
depression. 

During the first quarter of 1933, the decline in business operations continued at the rate more 
or less characteristic of the last four years. The decline of wholesale prices was rapid in 1930, 
but in the last 27 months the rate of the recession has not been so pronounced. The index 
moved up eight -tenths of a point in March, counterbalancing the decline of the three preceding 
months. 

62549—2 



6 MONTHLY REVIEW OF BUSINESS STATISTICS 

The Equation of Exchange 

The chart on page 15 shows a number of the factors entering into Canada's equation of 
exchange. The equation is of interest primarily through the light which it throws on the 
fluctuation in general prices. Changes in the general level of prices are of widespread interest, 
especially to the speculator and to the business executive entrusted with the determination of 
business policy. 

The equation of exchange was developed from the quantity theory of money. The essence 
of the theory is that one of the normal effects of variation in the amount of money in circulation 
is to produce direct changes in prices. In'other words, when the circulating media in the hands 
of the public is increased for any cause, there is a tendency for the general level of prices to 
advance proportionately, or in the case of a decline in the money in circulation, a proportionate 
decline in prices may be expected. 

The reconstruction of the quantity theory of money mainly through the investigations of 
Kemmerer and Fisher resulted in the equation of exchange. It was argued, for example, that it 
does not matter very much whether funds are actually held in the hands of the public or deposited 
with the banks. Deposits subject to cheque were in 1932 more than ten times the amount of 
the circulating media, including notes and coin in the hands of the public. 

Bank notes in the hands of the public are obtained by deducting the "notes held by other 
banks" from the total circulation of bank notes. Dominion notes in the possession of the banks 
and in the central gold reserves are deducted from the total issues of such notes. The amount 
of subsidiary coin is based on the figures supplied by the Mint. The sum of the coin, Dominion 
notes and bank notes, after the deductions noted above, give the total money actually in the 
hands of the public. 

The efficiency of the currency, however, is dependent on the frequency with which it is 
used in making payments. A large amount of currency with a slow turnover would be no more 
effective than a small amount of currency with a rapid turnover. 

The statistics of bank debits made available through the co-operation of the Canadian 
Bankers' Association from 1924 are of great value for the present study. By dividing the total 
of bank deposits into bank debits, the approximate rate of turnover of bank deposits from month 
to month during the post-war period was obtained, the results being plotted in the first section 
of the accompanying chart. (Bank debits for 1919 to 1923 were calculated from bank clearings.) 

Assuming that the velocity of money was about 125 p.c. of the turnover of deposits, the 
monthly velocity was obtained by interpolation according to the trend of the velocity of bank 
deposits. By taking the product of the money in actual circulation and its velocity, there was 
constructed a comparative monthly series of the total cash payments in the post-war period. 
And by adding this series to bank debits increased by 14-5lp.c. to cover the cheques cashed at 
bank branches outside of the 32 clearing centres, a total was obtained for all payments whether 
by cash or by cheque. 

We have now arrived at one side of the equation of exchange, which is perhaps the most 
effective medium of summing up the factors which influence the trend of prices. The equation 
asserts that the total amount of payments in cash and by cheque is equivalent to the product of 
the price and the total quantity of goods exchanged and services rendered during the period. 

The real object is an analysis of the relations of the different factors in the equation, obtaining 
in this way an understanding of the conditions determining the fluctuation in the price level. 
The equation takes the form of MV -f- MYVi=PT, where M and Mi represent money in the 
hands of the public and bank deposits subject to cheque, respectively, V and Vi represent the 
turnover or velocity of money and deposits, while P is equivalent to the general price level and 
T standing for trade, represents the sum of the commodities and services exchanged. 

The cyclical fluctuation of bank deposits is of a more moderate character than that of bank 
debits, the turnover of bank deposits being much greater in periods of prosperity. The ratio of 
debits to deposits reached a new low point for the post-war period in the first quarter of 1933. 
The present level of bank deposits is sufficient for considerable business and speculative expan- 
sion. In a period of depression, low prices and inactive business operations account for the low 
velocity of bank deposits. 

Provided that other factors in the equation had remained unchanged, the effect of the indus- 
trial contraction of the last four years would have been to raise the price level. What factors 
then showed sufficient fluctuation to counterbalance the constructive effect on prices exerted 
by the downward trend of business in recent years? A minor influence is found in the decline 
in the circulation of currency, but the major factor was the pronounced decline in the velocity 
of available deposit resources. 



MONTHLY REVIEW OF BUSINESS STATISTICS 7 

World Trade 

The value of imports and exports of the principal countries by continental areas from 
January 1929 to December 1932 is shown in the chart appearing on page 30. During 1932, 
greater resistance was shown to the reactionary tendencies subsequent to the marked decline 
characteristic of the two preceding years. The level during 1932 was lower than in 1930 or 
1931, but the month-to-month trend indicated greater stability. 

In 1930 the heavy fall in the prices of raw materials struck the agricultural countries, 
particularly those outside Europe, with special severity. Certain of them were able to increase 
the volume of their exports, but even so the fall in prices diminished the total value. As trade 
between the European countries themselves was not so badly affected in 1930, the total trade 
of European countries did not decline greatly till 1931. In the later stages of the depression, 
however, the reduced purchasing power of the agricultural countries in all parts of the world 
caused a fall in the exports of the industrial countries so that the decline in trade became general. 
It was evident in 1932 that the depression had disorganized world markets to an extraordinary 
degree. 

For the world as a whole, according to J. B. Condliffe in the World Economic Survey 1931-2, 
published by the League of Nations, the shrinkage of world trade clearly means impoverishment. 
It is already reflected in increased unemployment, lowered standards of living and disorganized 
industry and commerce. 

CONDITIONS IN UNITED STATES 

Despite the bank crisis in March, industrial activity in the United States showed substantial 
recovery during the latter part of the month and weekly statistics indicate that gains were 
recorded in some important lines during the first part of April. 

An outstanding economic development was the introduction on April 20 of an amendment 
to the farm relief bill giving the President power to take action toward the raising of the price 
level of the United States. The plan includes an arrangement with the Federal Reserve System 
to purchase up to $3,000,000,000 of government obligations in the open market. If this does not 
meet the requirements of the situation, three alternatives are provided: (1) Treasury notes may 
be issued up to $3,000,000,000 to meet maturing Federal obligations and for purchase of U.S. 
bonds; (2) The gold content of the dollar may be reduced, not in excess of 50 p.c. of the present 
content; (3) Acceptance of $100,000,000 on war debt payments in silver at 50 cents per ounce. 

Discussions of economic questions with representatives of other countries in preparation 
for the world monetary and economic conference commenced on April 20 with the arrival of the 
Prime Minister of the United Kingdom. 

CONDITIONS IN THE UNITED KINGDOM 

The national accounts for the fiscal year ended Mar. 31, 1933, show a not unsatisfactory 
state of affairs, considering general world conditions. Total ordinary revenue, exclusive of that 
from self-supporting services like the Post Office, amounted to £744,791,000, and total expendi- 
ture on the same basis to £777,070,000. The latter figure, however, included £17,239,000 paid 
to the new sinking fund for reducing the principal of the debt, and £28,956,000 paid to the U.S. 
Government, so that when the sinking fund payment is deducted the deficit on the current year's 
business amounted to the comparatively moderate figure of £15,040,000, which would have been 
a substantial surplus had it not been for the payment to the U.S., duly made although the United 
Kingdom did not receive any payment from France and others of its debtors on war debt account. 

Wholesale prices continued to decline, the March index number being 81-7 p.c. of the 1930 
base as compared with 82-8 p.c. and 83-9 p.c. in February and January respectively. 

British merchandise trade in the first quarter of 1933, with corresponding figures for the 
same period in 1932 given in parenthesis, was as follows: imports £159,241,000 (£193,441,000); 
exports of U.K. produce £89,706,000 (£93,331,000); re-exports £12,621,000 (£16,115,000); 
excess of imports £56,914,000 (£84,995,000). The reduction of the "unfavourable" balance 
for the quarter by some £28,000,000, or at the rate of over £100,000,000 per annum, is the 
salient feature. 

Unemployment is showing a decline; the unemployed numbered 2,776,184 on March 20— 
a reduction of 80,454 in the month. 

Dominion Bureau of Statistics, Ottawa, April 21, 1933. 

62549— 2h 



MONTHLY REVIEW OF BUSINESS STATISTICS 



Table 1. Weighted Indexes of the Physical Volume of Business and Agricultural Factors in 
Canada, Based on the Monthly average for 1926 and Corrected where Necessary for Seasonal 
Variation. 



Physical Volume of Business. 

INDUSTRIAL PRODUC- 
TION 



Mineral Production 

Copper exports 

Nickel exports 

Lead production 

Zinc exports 

Gold shipments 

Silver shipments 

Asbestos exports 

Bauxite imports 

Coal production 

Manufacturing 

Foodstuffs 

Flour production 

Oatmeal production . . . 

Sugar manufactured . . . 

Cheese exports 

Salmon exports 

Tobacco 

Cigars 

Cigarettes 

Rubber imports 

Boots and shoes production. 
Textiles 

Raw cotton imports. . . 

Cotton yarn imports.., 

Wool , raw and yarn.. . . 
Forestry 

Newsprint 

Wood pulp exports 

Planks and boards exports 

Shingles exported 

Iron and steel 

Steel production 

Pig iron production 

Iron and steel imports. . 

Automobileproduction . 

Coke production 

Crude petroleum imports . 

Construction * 

Contracts awarded 

Building permits 

Cost of construction 

Electric Power 



DISTRIBUTION 

Trade employment. 

Carload ings 

Imports 

Exports 



Agricultural Factors— 

AGRICULTURAL MARKET 

INGS 

Grain Marketings 

Wheat 

Oats 

Barley 

Flax 

Rye 

Live Stock Marketings... 

Cattle 

Calves 

Hogs 

Sheep 



ANIMAL PRODUCTS- 
Inspected Slaughterings— 

Cattle 

Sheep 

Hogs 

Cold Storage Holdings 

Eggs 

Butter 

Cheese 

Beef 

pork .; 

Mutton 

Poultry 

Lard 

Veal 



1932 



Mar 


April 


May 


June 


July 


Aug. 


Sept. 


Oct. 


81-8 


75 3 


79 9 


81 4 


78 3 


78 1 


771 


75 3 


76-9 


68-2 


74-6 


76-9 


74-2 


73-6 


71-9 


70-4 


89-9 


105 


94-4 


92-3 


83-4 


84-8 


89-5 


99-3 


56-7 


60-0 


56-6 


67-9 


103-2 


7-6 


17-2 


38-5 


72-8 


92-2 


68-2 


361 


32-4 


160 


26-3 


401 


83-8 


88-2 


86-9 


92-8 


89-3 


98-2 


88-7 


84-2 


129-0 


157-8 


143-9 


51-6 


74-3 


640 


90-8 


135-2 


136-5 


213-2 


182-7 


211-3 


163-0 


186-5 


185-0 


185-1 


73-2 


73-2 


87-0 


82-0 


74-5 


73-9 


88-9 


101-2 


26-9 


25-0 


28-7 


17-7 


20-6 


24-3 


30-8 


41-6 


93-0 


85-6 


49-3 


23-5 


19-3 


16-4 


67-6 


92-8 


77-9 


64-6 


59-4 


61-2 


54-5 


56-8 


68-5 


75-5 


76-6 


66-5 


77-4 


82-1 


76-9 


75-5 


74-3 


70-6 


78-2 


68-3 


77-9 


94-0 


93-3 


97-6 


94-5 


88-9 


65-0 


54-0 


68-1 


85-9 


96-6 


103-7 


85-6 


78-0 


102-1 


99-8 


50-5 


62-4 


46-6 


70-1 


60-4 


55-1 


58-1 


45-6 


61-2 


70-1 


84-0 


93-2 


98-7 


131-1 


46-1 


39-3 


44-7 


55-5 


68-9 


77-0 


54-1 


56-0 


124-7 


74-2 


65-6 


223-6 


155-4 


99-4 


35-8 


34-8 


116-3 


101-1 


102-2 


120-0 


96-7 


102-7 


102-7 


78-7 


83-8 


88-9 


70-4 


78-9 


72-8 


71-4 


69-0 


68-6 


128-7 


106-0 


113-9 


134-4 


105-5 


114-3 


114-8 


82-8 


100-7 


97-1 


79-9 


169-9 


89-6 


61-2 


201-5 


74-0 


94-3 


90-7 


96-5 


93-3 


84-3 


93-0 


95-0 


83-3 


82-3 


61-3 


120-9 


53-9 


42-4 


73-2 


67-4 


71-7 


76-8 


66-5 


129-6 


50-4 


41-7 


73-3 


66-0 


68-3 


121-0 


83-0 


96-5 


79-5 


87-5 


98-2 


116-8 


141-2 


97-1 


25-1 


83-3 


63-2 


28-8 


63-3 


60-1 


63-9 


74-4 


74-1 


71-4 


74-5 


55-9 


59-6 


60-5 


64-7 


104-6 


111-6 


107-9 


102-6 


89-5 


91-4 


99-2 


97-3 


52-7 


49-0 


46-3 


35-0 


39-7 


38-3 


33-2 


50-2 


42-0 


34-5 


33-3 


51-8 


17-6 


25-0 


18-0 


25-7 


60-5 


56-0 


40-5 


50-1 


37-2 


46-2 


53-6 


61-2 


42-6 


33-2 


34-1 


32-9 


41-1 


27-3 


20-4 


22-4 


59-5 


52-3 


40-3 


25-6 


45-7 


43-2 


41-0 


27-1 


27-5 


27-5 


19-4 


12-7 


11-7 


9-3 


9-9 


10-9 


46-7 


36-0 


360 


38-1 


31-1 


26-5 


27-9 


30-1 


39-9 


29-0 


34-4 


36-7 


47-0 


26-4 


15-3 


21-2 


92-8 


89-1 


78-6 


75-3 


83-2 


72-7 


82-8 


81-3 


146-2 


129-0 


230-1 


176-8 


192-9 


172-7 


136-4 


140-0 


53-5 


27-9 


31-8 


28-1 


39-4 


37-1 


31-5 


30-7 


62-2 


28-5 


32-2 


28-3 


42-6 


40-1 


36-1 


32-6 


31-9 


26-5 


30-9 


27-6 


31-4 


28-4 


20-0 


26-2 


89-8 


89-6 


89-1 


88-5 


88-0 


87-8 


88-3 


88-6 


136-5 


1390 


131-2 


130-5 


129-0 


137-1 


1280 


127-8 


95-4 


95-0 


94-5 


93-7 


89-6 


90-4 


91-3 


88-8 


117-5 


117-3 


117-8 


117-4 


115-9 


115-3 


114-3 


113-7 


73-0 


77-2 


71-2 


70-3 


60-5 


64-3 


68-1 


59-8 


81-5 


61-6 


72-9 


69-7 


63-2 


63-8 


64-7 


67-5 


53-5 


61-9 


58-4 


59-3 


62-9 


630 


64-6 


66-4 


103-5 


102-3 


84-4 


221 4 


135-9 


196-6 


189-0 


83-8 


105-9 


105-7 


82-8 


250-8 


147-9 


222-6 


213-9 


87-4 


115-4 


113-5 


89-9 


279-9 


158-5 


242-8 


239-1 


97-0 


90-3 


67-2 


230 


29-2 


112-5 


53-1 


140-9 


70-9 


38-8 


47-4 


36-4 


48-2 


66-5 


121-0 


34-2 


9-7 


61 


23-3 


28-6 


77-4 


32-7 


66-2 


12-1 


110 


51-0 


138-8 


106-3 


218-4 


170-7 


177-8 


21-3 


13-4 


92-6 


87-2 


91-5 


89-4 


821 


79-9 


77-1 


67-4 


73-0 


61-4 


67-8 


66-8 


64-9 


59-4 


55-9 


47-4 


94-6 


79-6 


78-4 


92-8 


87-1 


83-9 


92-8 


84-1 


113-6 


120-8 


125 1 


116-5 


105-5 


111-8 


110-4 


953 


195-0 


188-8 


172-3 


186-4 


131-3 


112-2 


94-2 


108-2 


107-5 


91-2 


87-1 


91-9 


85-7 


86-7 


79-3 


66-4 


230-5 


237-4 


175-8 


233-4 


178-5 


143-6 


115-4 


107-4 


106-1 


108-2 


121-7 


128-8 


122-8 


119-4 


100-5 


89-9 


150-2 


144-1 


120-9 


116-9 


112-2 


106-4 


104-9 


96-7 


329-3 


313-5 


134-0 


113-0 


103-6 


98-6 


103-7 


108-4 


157-8 


143-7 


178-0 


167-8 


143-1 


114-8 


112-8 


1191 


54-8 


64-9 


54-4 


62-0 


73-5 


62-7 


59-3 


58-4 


721 


73-3 


77-1 


81-2 


82-4 


94-5 


92-5 


82-9 


110-3 


103-1 


101-9 


107-7 


103-8 


114-5 


115-1 


102-7 


171-4 


174-9 


210-6 


205-4 


292-9 


337-6 


351-9 


207-9 


384-5 


343-1 


297-8 


245-9 


199-9 


170-9 


123-0 


73-9 


69-4 


71-5 


73-1 


74-2 


80-3 


64-4 


62-9 


36-9 


•»3-8 


121-2 


94-3 


104-2 


100-0 


103 1 


111-4 


102-1 



75-8 



71-8 

86-4 
21-3 
46-4 

119-1 
58-3 

164-1 
69-6 
23-7 

202-3 
75-3 

72-3 
86-7 
93-5 
48-4 

125-4 
57-7 
27-1 

126-5 
70-3 

148-1 
96-5 
81-0 

104-1 

110-9 
65 
81-9 
65 

101 
51-6 
23-3 
50-2 
28 

57-6 
24-5 
39-7 
18-9 
90-2 

102-0 
39-4 
44-7 
26-0 



134- 

86-9 
111-6 
60-1 
70-6 
47-3 



120-3 



67-8 
115 

99 



121 

126 
62 
64-6 

108-5 

114-61 
38-5 
81-9 
81-2 



72 6 



67-7 

90-5 
45-8 



38- 
82- 
91- 
198- 
61- 
43- 
25- 
73- 

70-2 
94-4 
61-7 
23-8 

127-7 
39-4 
56-1 

106-2 
60-0 

124-1 
59-3 
63-7 
96. 
94. 
66-4 

115-3 
60- 
92-7 
40-6 
23 

42-6 
29-7 
51-4 
48-6 
29-4 
21-6 
931 
71-0 

19-5 
20-5 
17-1 
88- 

131- 

86-1 
113-4 
58-4 
59 
47-5 



59-1 
56-6 
61-0 
49 
27-3 
18 
5 

70-3 
55-8 
81-4 
93-8 
76-2 



73-6 
118-3 
105-3 

98-3 
130 
139-8 

52 

54 

101-3 
111-2 

47-0 

64-9 

67-5 



1933 



Jan. 


Feb. 


Mar. 


68-1 


670 


68 4 


62-2 


60-9 


62-5 


80-5 


94-2 


91-4 


15-3 


50-0 


29-0 


67-1 


99-5 


101-6 


90-8 


83-8 




73-0 


103-6 


121-7 


161-6 


164-1 


177-9 


39-4 


62-3 


104-8 


57-3 


241 


30-7 


16-3 


26-7 


21-5 


66-5 


78-5 


61-8 


62-2 


58-7 


62-7 


67-9 


63-0 


74-1 


520 


57-8 




15 9 


23-1 




51-5 


28-1 


62-2 


11-3 


14-3 


22-4 


49-8 


40-3 


47-6 


125-7 


113-1 


110-0 


44-5 


49-6 


55-6 


155-3 


136-4 


129-1 


70-2 


73-3 


43-4 


65-1 


77-0 




60-0 


56-1 


55-3 


57-5 


53-8 


47-9 


76-3 


63-4 


77-8 


67-4 


65-8 


85-9 


63-4 


59-8 


60-7 


90-9 


85-9 


85-9 


45-3 


47-8 


48-1 


32-3 


29-4 


32-7 


64-2 


49-8 


38-7 


31-9 


19 6 


25-4 


65- fi 


19-8 


15-3 


51-0 


10-8 




21-0 


27-4 


25-7 


23-4 


19-0 


31-8 


90-6 


68-8 




86-0 


"117-6 


106-6 


25-2 


20-3 


16-1 


29-0 


22-7 


18-9 


24-5 


14-3 


9-2 


87-9 


87-3 


87-5 


131-6 


136- 1 


134-4 


84-3 


83-8 


84-8 


111-5 


110-9 


110-5 


56-1 


57-9 


61-8 


52-4 


50-8 


50-0 


56-6 


49-6 


51-1 


56-1 


76-5 


1290 


52-5 


75-9 


140-2 


58-4 


85-0 


155-7 


22-2 


29-6 


71-5 


12-7 


18-7 


36-3 


17-8 


8-6 


16-6 


6-6 


11-8 


57-1 


71-9 


79-4 


77-8 


63-5 


71-3 


71-3 


107-2 


113-3 


66-6 


74-5 


79-9 


77-2 


118-4 


149-0 


183-1 


110-1 


116-3 


109-4 


186-0 


221-2 


258-5 


92-6 


100-9 


114-2 


112-0 


127-6 


135-8 


163-2 


256-4 


315-4 


148-9 


148-9 


146-6 


57-2 


65-9 


72-9 


50-5 


61-3 


65-0 


112-3 


96-4 


93-7 


108-1 


90-0 


78-2 


131-7 


235-4 


213-0 


82-1 


75-9 


71-7 


51-7 


47-4 


46-5 



Due to receipt of later information regarding wage rates, indexes of construction were revised for 1932. 



MONTHLY REVIEW OF BUSINESS STATISTICS 
Table 2. Trend of Business Movements 



Items 



Trend of Business Movements— 



1932 



Mar. April May June July Aug. Sept. Oct. Nov. Dec 



5,797 
10,212 
1,829 



77-55 
110-2 
166-76 
163-81 
63-55 
17-99 
1,295 

43-57 

6,617 
1,701 
8,318 

567 

257 

67-64 

1,045 

3,713 

27,693 



Rubber, Crude Imports. 000 lbs. 

Cotton, Raw Imports 000 lbs. 

Wool, Raw Imports 000 lbs. 

Planks and Boards 
Exports Mil. bd. ft. 

Timber Scaled in B.C. Mil. bd. ft. 

Newsprint Production.. 000 tons 

Shipments 000 tons 

Stocks 000 tons 

Pig Iron Production. .000 1. tons 

Ferro-alloys Production. . .tons 

Steel Ingots and 
Castings 000 1. tons 

Passenger Automobile Pro- 
duction No. 

Truck Production No. 

Total Cars and Trucks No. 

Exports— Auto Complete or 
Chassis No. 

Exports— Automobiles and 
Parts $000 

Petroleum, Crude Imports 

000,000 gal. 

Condensed Mn,K Output 000 lbs. 

Evaporated Milk Output 000 lbs. 

Fish Exports 000 lbs . 

Fish Exports $000 1 . 568 

Canned Salmon Exports 

000 cases 124-58 



Railways — 
Canadian National — 

Operating Revenues $000 

Operating Expenses $000 

Operating Income $000 

Freight carried one mile 

000,000 tons 
Passengers carried one mile 
000,000 pass. 
Canadian Pacific — 

Operating Revenues $000 

Operating Expenses $000 

Operating Income $000 

Freight carried one 

mile 000,000 tons 

Passengers carried 

one mile 000,000 pass. 

All Railways- 
Operating Revenues $000 

Operating Expenses $000 

Operating Income $000 

Freight carried 

one mile 000,000 tons 

Passengers carried 

one mile 000,000 pass. 

Carloadings 000 cars 

Canal Cargo Traffic — 

Sault Ste. Marie 000 s. tons 

Welland 000 s. tons 

St. Lawrence 000 s. tons 

Coal Available 000 s. tons 

Coke Production 000 tons 

Strikes and Lockouts — 

Disputes in existence No. 

Number of employees No. 

Time loss in working days 

Percentage of unemploy- 
ment in Trade Unions.. P.C. 
Employment Office Reports — 

Applications No. 

Vacancies No. 

Placements No. 

Immigration— Total No. 

From TJ. Kingdom No. 

From U. States No. 

From other Countries No. 

Returned Canadians No . 

Bank Clearings $000, 000 

Failures No 

Liabilities $000 



12,219 

11, £82 

87 

907 

55 

10,237 
8,742 
1,171 

736 

58 

25,027 

22,550 

1,612 

1,814 

125 
186-01 



1,708 
156 

11 

1,501 

26,410 

20-4 

55,271 

35,275 

34,275 

1,438 

270 

903 

265 

1.035 

1,036 

208 



3,585 

6,230 

347 

42-52 
165-5 
176-66 
186-44 
53-90 
16-90 
2,185 

36-03 

5,660 
1,150 
6,810 

321 



38-57 
1,102 
4,872 
10,575 



32-51 



,658 

. 935 
457 

822 

51 

,492 
,237 
918 

663 

50 

,851 
,052 

,932 

.653 

113 

3-18 



465 
279 
,264 
143 

11 

,413 
,556 



580 



1,274 



3,171 
12,463 
1,096 

62-95 
184-3 
175-89 
172-95 
57-01 
13-34 
1,132 

29-24 

7,269 

952 

8,221 

333 

264 

109-52 
913 

6,271 
15,313 

1,214 

34-30 



11,410 

10,932 

185 

815 

49 

9,537 

8,425 

737 

673 

50 

23,400 

21,245 

1,191 

1,632 

110 
182-73 

1,568 
1,037 

884 
1,694 

129 

13 

1,521 

31,905 



6,349 

4,486 

816 

110-69 
178-5 
161-37 
164-31 
50-03 
8-16 
893 

18-12 

6,308 

804 

7,112 

768 

349 

113-95 

979 
6,947 
17,228 
1,933 



12,026 

11,273 

533 

963 

53 

10,484 
8,558 
1.579 

933 

63 

24,813 
21,654 
2,328 

2,257 

129 
185-15 



1,065 
905 

1,694 
119 

17 
3,011 
38,147 

21-9 

50,547 

29,404 

28,532 

2,562 

387 

1,794 

381 

1,944 

1,081 

176 

3,794 



3,425 

3,590 

344 

37-85 
129-0 
142-49 
145-43 

47-02 
7-31 



27-51 

6,773 

699 

7,472 

740 

1,089 

104-21 
1,495 
5,307 

18,123 
1,831 

69-33 



11,219 

10,876 

51 



778 



9,685 
8,460 



670 

71 

22,970 

21,053 

1,027 

1,790 

147 

157-37 

2,638 
1,030 

822 
1,679 

127 



6,121 

50,397 

21- 

46,692 

25,917 

25,191 

1,974 

298 

1,299 

377 

1,807 

1,105 

175 

2,987 



2,173 

5,995 

670 

53-61 
121-1 
157-92 
154-88 
50-03 
5-99 
871 

26-71 

3,166 

901 

4,067 

1,523 

752 

89-78 
1,666 
5,173 
23,167 
1,859 

66-20 



10,866 

11.215 

644 1 

766 

62 

10,172 

9,119 

697 

690 

65 

23,099 
21,922 

2G8 

1,813 



6.204 

4,553 

535 

35-46 
97-2 
150-69 
152-62 
48-06 
5-71 
732 

23-14 

1,741 

601 

2,342 

1,654 

802 

76-91 
1,419 
3,959 
23,813 
1,390 

48-13 



13,601 
11,350 
1,985 

1,493 

53 

13,256 
9,271 
3,723 

1.416 

55 

23,958 
22,254 
5,949 

3,043 



138 122 
175-62:215-65 



3,095 
1,162 

938 
1,894 

121 

16 

4,972 
62,492 

21-4 

48.815 

28,397 

27,355 

1,944 

270 

1,338 

336 

1,611 

1,058 

188 

2,825 



3,807 
1,292 
1,061 
2,092 
127 

16 
4,251 
10,995 

20-4 

53.437 

32,111 

29,944 

1,871 

357 

1,279 

235 

1,378 

1,087 

192 

3,926 



2,704 

7,029 

857 

55-26 
110-1 
157-51 
157-57 

48-41 
6-73 

1,599 

17-10 

2,361 

562 

2,923 

2,416 

1,515 

83-45 
1,351 
2,990 
27,166 
1,477 

57-72 



13,641 
11,109 
2,194 



12,290 
8,005 
3,924 

1,193 

42 

28,190 

20,839 

6,385 

2,607 

96 
211-53 

3,924 
1,252 
1,014 
2,543 
131 

15 
2,225 
14,470 

22-0 



3,568 
15,376 
1,070 

46-37 
99-8 
161-33 
164-33 
45-46 
14-15 
1,544 

37-09 



535 
2,204 

1,438 



51-71 
134-8 
261-9 
38,583 
1,304 

42-39 



11,463 
10, 



1,025 

41 

10.726 
7,053 
3,324 

1,023 

40 

24.276 
19,308 
4,057 



181 



192-58 

2,87' 
1,087 

751 
2,738 

143 

12 
1,130 
3,653 



,165 
,683 
,383 
,258 
188 
817 
253 
,026 
,130 
229 
,343 



2,109 
13,819 
1,283 

37-54 
80-5 
138-68 
140-77 
42-34 
27-03 



30-76 

1,561 

578 

2,139 



476 

32-81 
1,385 
2,872 
27,189 
1,581 

69-53 



10,301 
10,589 

528 

852 

64 

9,483 
7,091 
2,311 

753 

54 

21,902 
19,434 
1,904 

1,740 

130 
152-56 

215 

147 

51 

2,023 

150 

12 

2,375 
10,378 

25-5 

49,736 

30,885 

29,192 

938 

110 

617 

211 

2,632 

1,063 

196 

7,836 



1933 



Jan. Feb. Mar 



2,663 
8,765 



39-18 
49-1 
140-54 
133-06 
49-84 
29-21 
1,217 

40-77 

2,921 

437 

3,358 

475 

368 

35-09 

852 

2,025 

26,740 

1,439 

51-26 



8,003 
10.008 
2.323 1 

629 

45 

7,659 

7,005 

323 

627 

40 

17,643 
18,528 
1,813 



95 
134-43 



,471 
150 



622 
5,936 

25-5 

56,873 
28,602 
27,304 



978 

216 

4,050 



2,632 

6,026 

819 



37-71 



125-61 
120-92 

54-52 
6-14 

1,076 

12-37 

3,025 

273 

3,298 

256 

247 

37-56 

976 

1,845 

24,032 

1,120 

35-05 



7,834 
9,754 
2.238 1 

593 

40 

7,117 

6,637 
97 

787 

39 

16,788 
17,881 
2.073 1 

1,302 

88 
133-15 



106 

5 

4,450 
58,500 



45,919 
23,714 
22,733 



214 
3,947 



2,496 
6,374 
1,617 

60-46 



137-08 
140-69 
50-87 



927 

11-21 

5,927 

705 

6,632 

1,601 

824 

49-34 

960 

2,704 

20,692 

1,343 

47-48 



9,834 



157-42 



1,288 



46,534 
22,613 
21,604 



946 



i Deficit. 



10 



MONTHLY REVIEW OF BUSINESS STATISTICS 




MONTHLY REVIEW OF BUSINESS STATISTICS 



11 



Table 3. Receipts and Visible Supply of Canadian Grain 



Year 

and 

Month 



1930 

September. 
October. . . . 
November. 
December. . 

1931 

January. . . . 
February. . 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August , — 
September 
October ..., 
November. 
December. 

1932 

January.... 
February.., 

March 

April 

May 

June , 

July 

August 

September. 

October 

November. 
December. , 



1933 

January... 
February. 
March .... 



Receipts at Country Elevators and Platform Loadings 



Wheat | Oats | Barley I Flax | Rye 



Visible Supply of Canadian Grain 



Wheat | Oats | Barley ! Flax I Rye 



Thousand Bushels 



105,065 
53,800 
52,445 
17,320 



9.256 

9,843 

9,589 

8,418 

6,145 

8,205 

5,437 

11,862 

47,443 

74,086 

43,056 

19,613 



10,851 

12,245 

12.746 

5.982 

8,197 

15,050 

3,780 

17,633 

120,538 

79.564 

36.457 

18,486 



11,300 
11,543 

20,850 



5,080 


7.735 


1,185 


3,223 


152,211 


3,967 


2,440 


1,223 


1,291 


188,673 


3,992 


1,123 


1,271 


839 


207,386 


2,055 


639 


182 


233 


217,843 


1,681 


516 


65 


153 


202,283 


2,304 


404 


48 


97 


190,202 


3,733 


614 


74 


362 


180,540 


2,097 


688 


60 


268 


162,041 


1,334 


803 


42 


287 


132.593 


2,049 


1,412 


79 


418 


115,672 


1,970 


892 


60 


247 


110,731 


2,784 


1,047 


49 


252 


101,733 


2,893 


4,569 


167 


349 


126,462 


5,270 


1,023 


900 


315 


183,133 


6.495 


1,586 


399 


522 


185,811 


3,350 


1,380 


99 


209 


192,305 


1,909 


801 


26 


128 


195.510 


4.013 


943 


36 


130 


186.120 


4,788 


1.194 


68 


245 


183,956 


1.834 


543 


70 


153 


164,562 


2,353 


454 


24 


67 


149.251 


2,094 


514 


44 


67 


138,572 


1,091 


402 


48 


57 


121,474 


. 1,184 


929 


53 


448 


113,036 


3.441 


2,599 


282 


540 


198,240 


4,082 


1,125 


693 


270 


239,435 


3,031 


1,338 


179 


131 


237.194 


1,612 


1,219 


88 


98 


237,391 


1,095 


474 


57 


74 


229,186 


1,753 


479 


35 


71 


223,535 


4,988 


944 


67 


160 


225,529 



9,129 


27,892 


1,003 


11,206 


31,879 


1,904 


13,847 


31.608 


2,405 


15,022 


31,339 


2,074 


14,207 


30,436 


2,080 


13,802 


29.527 


2,104 


14,887 


27,551 


2.059 


13,242 


24,081 


1,856 


10,840 


15,447 


1,254 


9.624 


11.944 


1,127 


8,886 


10,260 


742 


8,847 


8,471 


758 


9,568 


11,338 


883 


10,864 


11,274 


1,588 


13,609 


10,282 


1,549 


15,614 


11,494 


11,473 


4,626 


11,402 


1,396 


14,279 


11.183 


1,363 


14,801 


11,100 


1,383 


11,055 


9,220 


1.267 


6.443 


6,706 


1.424 


5.659 


4.401 


1,347 


6.201 


3.627 


1.283 


5.857 


3.056 


1,208 


7,273 


5.813 


1,400 


8,316 


5,874 


1.497 


9,115 


6.024 


1,582 


9,233 


6,772 


1,436 


9,345 


6,806 


1,480 


9,767 


6,679 


1,461 


12,152 


6,802 


1,286 



9,445 
12,224 
12,924 
13,158 



13,458 
13,391 
13,275 
13,448 
12,970 
12,549 
12,600 
12,163 
12,358 
12,309 
13,024 
12,572 



12,355 
12,864 
12,323 
11,122 
10,242 
7.563 
5,541 
5,129 
5.359 
5,258 
4,770 
4,990 



5,020 
5,122 
5,131 



Table 4. Exports and Cash Price of Canadian Grain 



Year 

and 
Month 



1930 
September. , 

October 

November. 
December.. 

1931 

January. ... 
February. . . 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September . 
October .... 
November., 
December.. 

1932 

January 

February... 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September.. 

October 

November. . 
December.. 

1933 

January 

February... 
March 



Exports of Grain 



Wheat 



Oats 



Barley 



Flax 



Rye 



Bushels 



27,817,053 
?9. 784, 275 
?1, 217, 624 
?2,230,397 



f. 603. 852 
10,296.603 
12,995.567 

4,680,769 
29, 521, 899 
20,783.219 
12.004.817 
11.909,108 
14.335.637 
18.925,303 
27,452,063 
22,355,975 



9,472,346 
9,898.363 
9,920,634 
7.513,289 
15,543.013 
15,857,427 
19.620,224 
18,289,832 
26,874,237 
40,192,415 
27,301,976 
27.735.999 



14,706.801 
10,922,337 
14,815.705 



220,519 
345.661 
381.088 
886.166 



260,342 

127.170 

308.087 

158.382 

1.646,844 

2.291.951 

1,257,248 

753,105 

694,908 

1.082,074 

1,364,700 

1,232,261 



1,184,647 
1,139.568 
1.035.612 
1,748,438 
1,622.815 
1,239.599 
513,384 
800,804 
1,050,470 
2,139,232 
1,528,634 
1.433,8b5 



354,614 
824,704 

567,884 



146,107 

524.849 

1.129,144 

734,683 



244,953 

120,034 

458. 125 

755.247 

6,281,068 

6,199.012 

2,655,725 

3,287,465 

757,930 

220.752 

1.129,468 

2,205,976 



231,707 

323,221 

346.107 

613,805 

1,711,716 

1,021,578 

1,688,500 

1,547,340 

769,088 

718,213 

748,801 

272,667 



191,524 
223,139 
356,683 



172,338 
102,496 
421,428 
502,899 



150 

2,700 

168 



483,290 
49,049 

263,500 
61,500 



184,263 



1,200 
3,672 



362,578 



1,400 

2,458 
5,002 



11,305 
425.398 

24.226 
623,614 



20,000 
49,340 
10,642 



109,036 
669.380 
122.094 
145.273 
483.039 
71,978 
742,391 
1,249,981 



218,504 

302,33'/ 

245,800 

299.906 

1,691.542 

1,115,445 

2.480,942 

1.194,386 

425,911 

403,802 

504.71R 

17,143 



17,143 
43,314 
17.082 



Average Cash Price 
(Bain's in store Fort William and Port Arthur^ 



Wheat 


Oats 


Barley 


No.l 


No. 2 


No. 3 


Nor. 


c.w. 


C.W. 



Flax 
No. 1 
N.W.C. 



Kye 
No. 1 
C.W. 



Dollars per Bushel 



•600 
•632 
•631 
•626 
•628 
•551 
•547 
•563 
•518 
•482 
•467 
• 423 



331 


•316 


1-435 


328 


• 282 


1-292 


282 


•233 


1-052 


267 


•250 


•978 


261 


•221 


•950 


276 


•221 


•968 


277 


•251 


1033 


281 


•282 


1-040 


291 


•310 


1-061 


296 


•328 


1070 


293 


•322 


1-1R2 


282 


•317 


1-037 


273 


• 306 


• 973 


312 


•331 


•945 


336 


•425 


1-056 


300 


•383 


•990 


293 


•377 


•985 


295 


•383 


1-015 


300 


•398 


1-016 


323 


•410 


•985 


355 


•402 


•137 


338 


•377 


•717 


351 


•365 


•682 


300 


•344 


•715 


261 


•288 


•785 


235 


• 257 


•708 


240 


•302 


•696 


210 


•277 


•701 


225 


•276 


•770 


233 


•275 


•777 


248 


•288 


•792 



425 
•373 
•306 
•300 



•171 
•286 
•312 
•319 
•341 
•355 
•327 
-293 
-325 
•370 
•487 
• 427 



•426 
•441 

•478 
•457 
•412 
•337 
•331 
•334 
•318 
•292 
•295 
•297 



•310 

■318 



12 MONTHLY REVIEW OF BUSINESS STATISTICS 

Table 5. Consumption of Grain and Production by the Milling TnHnctry 



Year 

and 

month 



1930 

November . 
December.. 

1931 

January 

February... 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September. 

October 

November. 
December. 

1933 

January 

February... 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August . . . 
September. 
October.... 
November. 
December . 

1933 

January 

February.. 



Mill grindings 



Wheat 



Bushels 

7,788,827 
5,225,805 

4,833,535 
4,607,154 
5,158,112 
4,718,805 
5.304.076 
5,033,072 
5,932,146 
5.992,090 
5,772,319 
7,565.330 
S, 101,645 
5,275,097 

3,798,168 
3,751,268 
4.685.646 
4.446,506 
4.643,15? 
5,173,525 
5,379,486 
5,716,002 
6,151.877 
7,670,545 
8,638,600 
4.493,143 



Oats 



Bushels 

1,085,491 
1.125,885 

997.080 

940,355 

843,761 

822.047 

785.196 

769,942 

937,695 

836.410 

1,166,178 

1,506.473 

1,761,877 

1.151,246 

902,969 

7F9.941 

882.368 

666,203 

616,418 

650,403 

695,557 

939.418 

1,081,749 

1,346,592 

1,453.153 

909,581 



Corn 



Bushels 

176,074 
148,866 

160,976 
170,167 
141,271 
176,096 
157,539 
167,195 
175,921 
149.814 
170,265 
172,015 
209,089 
158,509 

145,738 
153,989 
175.321 
178,754 
129,879 
135,783 
183,623 
187.020 
147,992 
129,236 
209,499 
151,518 



.3,815,453 791,596 110,039 55,257 1,643,156 
.13,744,957 698,851 125,805 55,880 1,275.855 



Barley 



Bushels 

128,156 
136,065 

125,357 
129,777 
134,297 
116.171 
84,809 
73,578 
81,527 
107,612 
126.363 
126,710 
129,541 
106,230 

89,204 
68,471 
85.835 
73,738 
53,386 
44,464 
40,894 
74,088 
72,056 
77,779 
102,769 
60,0 C 2 



Mixed 
grain 



Bushels 

1,872,862 
1.886.""" 



915,710 

657.462 

660,573 

565.891 

189,023 

962, 

938,413 

029,935 

272,527 

705.240 

791,642 

123,600 

788,297 

701, 

818.416 

416,128 

045,021 

873,889 

716,067 

895.616 

174,201 

447,920 

941,340 

829,953 



Mill production 



Wheat flour 



Percent- 
age of 
operation 



62- 1 
38-7 

36-6 
37-3 
38-9 
36-3 
411 
43-7 
47-1 
47-8 
56-7 
60-5 
70-0 
40-9 

31-3 
31-3 

37-2 
35-9 
38-6 
430 
41-3 
42-7 
50-9 
62-4 
70 5 
35 1 



Quan- 
tity 



Barrels 

1,739,375 
1,170,025 



086.272 
035,383 
168,408 
058.311 
183,280 
121,115 
319,008 
333,287 
515,613 
693,925 
812.457 
175,152 



851, 
842, 
1,053 
993, 
1,040 
1,151 
1.201 
1.272 
1,384 
1,721 
1,942 
1,909 



102 
123 

770 
385 
.693 
,286 
,965 
.009 
.500 
,598 
,844 
,799 



Oatmeal 



Pounds 



1.278,662 
3,636,850 



449,163 
461,180 
568,252 
925,422 
865,362 
569,155 
690.259 
408,475 
,439,682 
589,165 
520,322 
659,093 

799,72c 
788,903 
653,557 
551.310 
888,497 
880,560 
402,937 
658 480 
777,966 
387,585 
,193,036 
499,733 



30-9 859,107 401,299 9,015,044 1,363,972 
32-1 844,899 527,676 7.613,656 1,951,278 



Rolled 
oats 



Pounds 



13.326,255 
10,723.499 



870,397 
434,204 
674,493 
945.416 
659,185 
528,397 
272,542 
530,679 
520,597 
498,451 
901,593 
513,316 



9,534,327 
8,218,910 
9.454.423 
6.594.244 
6,315.048 
8,027,410 
8,940,843 
12.301,642 
14,124.180 
16.683,629 
17,871,610 
10,532,277 



Corn 

flour and 
meal 



Pounds 



1,499,621 
1,070,225 



155,518 
894,492 
158,556 
612.040 
130,887 
072.918 
612,240 
,277,749 
039.254 
288,754 
588,950 
714,434 

802,005 
309, 16^ 
233,622 
591,116 
908,770 
099,028 
628,909 
738.376 
,226.154 
776,832 
,466,753 
,£98,580 



Wheat 

flour 
exported 



Barrels 

792,271 
601.894 

392,256 
414,773 
560,553 
326,117 
481.265 
490,294 
466,967 
522,178 
556,565 
558,459 
476,487 
451,310 

331,806 
357,513 
414,779 
255,390 
461,867 
570.861 
446,379 
330,382 
385,113 
528.794 
576,864 
492,033 



397,304 
333,114 



Table 6. Receipts. Manufactures and Stocks of Sugar in Thousand Pounds 



Year and 
4-week period 



1930 

November 1 
November 29 
December 31, 

1931 

January 31 
February 28 
March 28 

April 25 

May 23 

June 20 

July 18 

August 15, 

September 12 
October 10 
November 7, 
December 5 
December 31, 

1932 

January 30 

February 27, 

March 26 

April 23 

May 21 

June 18. 

July 16 

August 13, 

September 10, 

October 8. 

November 5, 

December 3. 

December 31 

1933 

January 28 . . , 
February 25... 
March 



Raw Sugar 



Stock 
on hand 
at be- 
ginning 
of period 



53,544 
60,779 
104,507 



108,269 
115.726 
91,476 
71.255 
74.881 
117,363 
123,541 
110,325 
76,658 
96,149 
66,512 
91.033 
96,785 



98,423 
102,650 
83,834 
67,702 
60,295 
122,205 
122,425 
110,656 
38.489 
77,116 
60,036 
106,861 
109,097 



109,232 
101,898 
112,182 



Re- 
ceipts 



75,781 
115,341 
49,803 



34,506 
18.680 
34,275 
49,907 

123.518 
79.112 
77,162 
66,006 

107.722 
54,318 

110,354 
90,828 
50,737 



32,199 

8,639 

36.780 

27.237 

126,477 
75,224 
85,435 
35,112 

120.743 
75.160 

123,367 
80,943 
37.886 



11,432 
29,326 
26.839 



Melt- 
ings 
and 
ship- 
ments 



68,547 
71,613 
46,040 



27,050 
42. 93^ 
54,497 
46.282 
81.036 
72,933 
90,378 
99.674 
88.230 
83,955 
85,833 
85,076 
49,099 



27,973 
27,454 
52,912 
34,644 
64,567 
75,005 
97,204 
107,288 
82.116 
92.239 
76,543 
78,707 
37.750 



18,767 
19,041 
57.891 



Refined Sugar 



Stock 
m hand 

at be- 
ginning 
if period 



89,321 
102, 122 
131,418 



136,260 
111,178 
98,886 
96,086 
71.354 
79,818 
77.289 
74,075 
76.046 
82,326 
88,407 
130,392 
162,469 



174, 9°5 
155,110 
131,044 
129.590 
109,901 
111.503 
123,942 
108,248 
124.079 
174,905 
174,985 
155,411 
183,834 



194,558 
173,161 
143,345 



Manu- 
factured 
granu- 
lated 



91,957 
97,293 
57.875 



23,643 
35.380 
47,504 
37,025 
66.180 
63,254 
78,414 
84.879 
82,700 
86,397 
109,523 
110,785 
51,744 



24,211 

22,640 
44,332 
30,275 
53,212 

63.996 
84,990 
91,620 
73.687 
97,775 
108,298 
109,777 
54,028 



24,239 
16,803 
48,749 



Manu- 
factured 
yellow 

and 
brown 



7,731 
11,265 
9,202 



3.540 
5.029 
8,085 
5.331 
10,476 
6,106 
6,881 
6.993 
6,706 
9,789 
12,267 
13,635 
9,868 



3,6 f 
3.041 
7,544 
5,605 
5,540 
9,725 
7.593 

10,080 
8 230 
8,238 
7.576 

12,679 
7,317 



3,064 
3,544 

6,683 



Total 
manu- 
factured 



108,558 
67.077 



27,184 
40.408 
55.589 
42.356 
76.655 
69,360 
85,295 
91,871 
89,406 
96,185 
121,791 
124,420 
61.613 



27.891 
25,681 
51.876 
35,879 
58.751 
73,722 
92,583 
101,700 
81.917 
1^6,613 
115,874 
122,457 
61,345 



27,303 
20,347 
55.432 



Total 
domes- 
tic 
shin- 
ments 



84.386 
77,119 
52,812 



51,595 
52,161 
57,641 
66.091 
66.933 
70,882 
87,386 
88.342 
82,097 
87,601 
77.662 
90,849 
48,712 



47,270 
49.221 
52,838 
55.229 
56,256 
60,354 

107,377 
84,478 
79.741 

101,052 
84 813 
87,675 
55.183 



48,263 
49,749 
12'. 586 



Ship- 
ments 
granu- 
lated 



77,202 
67,650 
46,364 



46,867 
46.216 
51,188 
60,250 
80.766 
65,395 
81,810 
84,192 
75.001 
80.321 
69.411 
76,969 
42,927 



42,439 
43.691 

47,136 
47. 723 
51,129 
55.403 
100.986 
79,862 
74.845 
95,456 
76.537 
77,1«5 
49.016 



43,449 
43,715 
117.650 



Ship- 
ments 
yellow 

and 
brown 



9,685 
11,612 
7,494 



5,399 
6.485 
7,200 
6.839 
7.425 
6,494 
6,699 
5,708 
8,125 
9,783 
10,395 
15,374 
6,170 



5,327 
6,055 
6,195 
7.846 
6,020 
5,880 
7.291 
6,007 
7,262 
9,451 
9.521 
11,848 
6,604 



5.251 
6,448 
11,635 



Total 
ship- 
ments 



86,887 
79,262 
53.858 



52.266 
52.700 
58,388 
67.088 
68,191 
71.889 
88,510 
89,900 
83,126 
90,104 
79,806 
92,342 
49,097 



47,766 
49,747 
53,330 
55.569 
57,149 
61.283 

108,277 
85,869 
82.107 

104.908 
86,058 
89,033 
55.621 



48,700 
50,163 
129.149 






MONTHLY REVIEW OF BUSINESS STATISTICS 
Table 7. Tobacco, Cigars and Cigarettes Entered for Consumption. 



13 



Year and Month 



1930 

August 

September 

October 

November 

December 

1931 

January 

February 

March 

April 

May 

June , 

July 

August , 

September 

October 

November 

December 

1932 

January 

February 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September 

October 

November 

December 

1933 

January 

February 

March 



Tobacco, 
cut 



Pound 

1,322,441 
1,4(16,258 
1,381,943 
1,224,840 
1,312,938 



057,507 
163,399 
372.596 
250,655 
487,028 
480.478 
468,877 
449,103 
457,61» 
452,«65 
451,340 



1.144.298 
1.272,469 
1.414,941 
1.659.842 
1.436,417 
1,493.496 
1.488,431 
1,559,663 
1,662,365 
1,551,042 
1.427,688 
1,209,81? 



1,065.534 
1,429,012 
1.537.535 



Tobacco, 
plug 



Pound 

552,148 
476,020 
452,670 
455,503 
471,292 



366,785 
430.463 
459. 155 
439.364 
514,005 
503.867 
453 989 
469.703 
417,050 
439,268 
410,253 
426,968 



382,000 
343, 8S7 
3S9.797 
425.577 
421.248 
425,890 
391,668 
419,483 
368.601 
379,960 
358,572 
340,791 



300,491 
304.290 
374,473 



Cigarettes 



Number 

477.205.140 
483.960.240 
438,497.550 
401,175.589 
328,147.670 



319,555.340 
327,255,230 
349.681,715 
382,303,130 
382,951,155 
430.179.170 
474,415,620 
425,138,580 
371,311,090 
344,056,140 
355,716,768 
369,235,870 



278,416.630 
281,496,910 
304,243,772 
269 309 750 
312,790,432 
376,779.975 
338,874,828 
329,466,364 
313,709,922 
214,301,678 
388,625.140 
304.613,955 



310.144,850 
264,524,935 
305,107,720 



Cigarettes, 
over- 
weight 



Number 

51,800 

167.700 

17,900 

38,200 

144,300 



78 300 

68.500 

117 800 

500 

31,820 
184,250 
227,450 
200,400 

76,600 
135,450 
115.200 
148,210 



57,200 
56.700 
50,150 
49.050 
37.350 
66,300 
40,300 
43.700 
39.400 
57,100 
148,400 
39.260 



28,420 
17,800 
15,370 



Cigars 



Number 

17,944,831 
19.333,469 
22,515.666 
17,418,328 
11,408,452 



7,259,572 
7,650,784 
9.984 215 
11.116,740 
14,734,327 
14,380,513 
14,091,692 
12,860,616 
15,270,873 
17,316.957 
15.753.87S 
11,329,243 



7,595,920 

8,154.663 

9.657,775 

10 208.636 

10.552,455 

12,754.263 

11,492,868 

12,298,501 

12,799.348 

14.424,229 

14,071,178 

9,014.869 



3,965 735 
4,675,418 
6,407,352 



Foreign 
raw leaf 
tobacco 



Pound 

1.482,179 
1.514,2«3 
1,505,683 
1,139,124 
1.064,833 



1.288.600 
1.072.285 
1.115 135 
1,284,691 
1,434,154 
1,382 348 
1,328,831 
1.283.479 
1,076.864 
1.177,265 
1.144.401 
994.476 



1,063,412 

889,417 

942.999 

1.120 066 

1,108.312 

1,320,001 

1.149,197 

1,083,602 

1.042.140 

938.889 

1,027,873 

744,579 



832,534 
74 \ 408 
852,367 



Table 8. — Production of Boots and Shoes. 



1930 

July 

August 

September 
October... 
November 
December. 

1931 

January 

February- 
March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September. 
October. . . . 
November 
December. 

1932 

January 

February. . 
March...... 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September 
October. . . . 
November 
December . 

ir33 

January 

February... 

62549-3 



Boots and shoes with leather or fabric uppers 



Welts 



335,729 
306,544 
310,184 
200.812 
204.928 
193,340 

231,498 
278,200 
326,112 
332,306 
293.408 
252,037 
281,175 
274.644 
275,150 
235.904 
181. 4'4 
171,294 

212.534 

272.581 
281 244 
243.435 
241.653 
235.079 
247.387 
273.591 
267.515 
213.345 
196.801 
167,762 

185,162 
207,516 



McKays 
and 
all 

imitation 
welts 



548,897 
722,749 
740,557 
663,654 
422,543 
406,884 

426,112 
600,694 
880,851 
810.653 
892, 177 
782,256 
683.700 
816.379 
824, 8 '7 
723,099 
404.143 
433,536 

532,297 
774.827 
907,035 
781.111 
821.112 
746.474 
610.920 
828. 07o 
807.126 
679.722 
450,418 
306,383 

398.195 
814,061 



Nailed 
pegged, 
screw 
or wire 
fastened 



115,584 
144,308 
160,270 
161.697 
113,951 
113,786 

111.106 
123,809 
152,328 
134.025 
146,830 
119,495 
121,877 
164,848 
195.406 
182.548 
150,854 
132,822 

123,365 

158,460 
150,132 
120,920 
125.907 
118.518 
129. 5^5 
180,350 
185.458 
189.725 
166, 0?4 
114,304 

88,256 
112.162 



Stich- 
downs 



168,963 
129,710 
125,639 
123,372 
114,824 
128,353 

126,310 
138,121 
177,142 
207,343 
233,114 
234,244 
174,632 
148,542 
124.722 
139,528 
138.910 
148.777 

132,897 
171.322 
212,237 
216.884 
264.754 
243.324 
169.801 
148.305 
136.672 
151. 908 
135.217 
124,894 



Total 



1,232,993 
1,368,883 
1,406,149 
1,305.315 
000,345 
877,041 



921,878 
,184,316 
,596,409 
.546.111 
,622.637 
,442,330 
,316,349 
,487,600 
,482,835 
,337,126 
.013,879 

919,847 

1,029,556 
1,414,816 
1,807,280 
1,413.214 
1.507.574 
1.400,508 
1.202,968 
1,484,042 
1,470.476 
1.301.011 
1.H7.153 
753,573 



114,919 808,671 
149,983 1,126,000 



Total footwear 



Mens' 



439,235 
465.095 
483.554 
494,271 
350,806 
339,476 

296,301 
368.102 
472.669 
443,797 
445,079 
403,207 
421,682 
434,443 
454,133 
431,115 
363,011 
348,86° 

300,352 
420.882 
411,320 
370,801 
422.104 
436.647 
409,588 
469.002 
471,961 
449,281 
403,061 
311,351 

267,310 

302,984 



Boys' 
and 

youths' 



63,899 
81,408 
100.482 
97,210 
77,582 
85,163 

72,959 

68,363 

97,515 

92,829 

85,643 

79,458 

74,836 

85,615 

104,041 

119.592 

107,503 

104,43" 

79,681 
91.177 
87 098 
68,822 
75.047 
65,144 
54,778 
91.741 
109.625 
108.139 
110,661 
67,645 

45,171 

60.423 



Women's 



634,137 
719,083 
754,204 
670,401 
430, 139 
384,526 

386, 168 
554,616 
790,849 
756.981 
817,519 
766,049 
674,325 
804,318 
839,989 
711,900 
513,384 
418,306 

491.2S1 

731.280 
807,022 
742,845 
803.803 
746.658 
665,684 
863,149 
858,238 
748.048 
568,263 
404,451 

426,723 
596,200 



Misses' 

and 

childrens 



171,396 
182,347 
176,812 
183.661 
175,803 
159,008 

144,793 
188,776 
244,120 
252,635 
260, 635 
210,498 
187,098 
196,504 
184,536 
197,983 
178,872 
174,731 

163,531 
214.295 
284,903 
232,427 
248.460 
214,127 
160,086 
183,565 
187,436 
202, 130 
187,757 
134,308 

129,475 
161,377 



Babies 
and 

infants' 



106.205 
04,753 
100,807 
106,846 
90.468 
96,019 

84,703 
97,108 
124,77' 
123.675 
131.016 
117.239 
98,881 
106,036 
89.738 
93,554 
91,926 
87,192 

77.337 
100.779 
119,865 
108.597 
106,674 
96,616 
88,768 
100,902 
95.942 
91,592 
90,992 
60,309 



Total 



1,414,872 
1.542,688 
1,615,850 
1.552.302 
1,124.798 
1,064,192 



984,924 
,278,965 
,729.930 
669,917 
740.792 
,576,449 
,456.822 
,627,006 
,072,437 
554,144 
254,698 
133,534 

112,191 
558,413 
720,208 
523,492 
656.088 
559,192 
379,484 
708,359 
723,202 
599, 190 
361.334 
978,064 



53.219 921,898 
79,292 1,200,276 



14 MONTHLY REVIEW OF BUSINESS STATISTICS 

Table 9. — Sales and Slaughterings of Live Stock, Retail Food Prices, and Cold Storage Holdings. 













1932 










1933 




Classification 


























Mnr. 


April 


May 


June 


July 


Aug. 


Sept. 


Oct. 


Nov. 


Dec. 


Jan. 


Feb 


Mar. 


Sales on Stock Yds: 




























(Current month 

■prelim.) 
Cattle 




























43,992 
29,112 
117,198 


38,244 
35,424 
112,178 


44,226 
38,482 
119,341 


38,833 
30,026 
104,127 


44,941 
25,356 
81,557 


64,884 
26,638 
83,187 


56,647 
24,305 
62,737 


58,195 
25,299 
76,081 


66,598 
26,072 
126,986 


31,800 
11,460 
101,857 


48,018 
16,405 
104,202 


37,336 
16,349 
82,708 


42,969 




20,480 


Hogs 


79,717 


Sheep 


15,157 


11,388 


11,867 


30,434 


38,457 


60,488 


60,044 


103,224 


75,412 


20,329 


24,396 


14,066 


14,229 


Inspected Slaugh- 




























terings: 




























Cattle.... 


44,505 
43,253 
2,801 
34,304 
232,875 


43,302 
46,612 
28,448 
1,426 
229,124 


44,156 

51,240 

16,685 

6,519 

254,836 


41,818 
43,171 
12,726 
37,472 
247,722 


41.228 
32.252 
11.369 
52.640 
191,577 


47,184 
31,598 
11,983 
73,856 
189,253 


52,174 
29,450 
11,286 
89,869 
166,352 


50,408 
27,248 
8,216 
137,368 
189,222 


56,03« 
23,722 
8,982 
109,900 
249,858 


45,075 

14,919 

5,369 

44,019 

268,300 


50,521 
20,255 
5,054 
43,522 
247,081 


42,412 
22,247 
3,614 
32,416 
220,419 


50,959 




38,379 




3,351 




38,307 


Swine 


250,468 


Ay. Retail Prices, In 




























cents, of Food In 




























Canada: 




























Beef chuck lb. 


13-7 


13-4 


13-3 


13-3 


13-4 


13-1 


12-7 


12-4 


11-9 


10-9 


110 


10-9 


10-9 


Veal roast " 


15-7 


14-6 


13-6 


13-5 


13-4 


13-2 


13-1 


13-2 


12-7 


12-2 


12-0 


12-2 


12-4 


Mutton roast..." 


22-5 


22-2 


22-9 


22-7 


21-8 


21-4 


20-4 


19-3 


17-9 


16-6 


16-7 


17-5 


17-9 


Pork fresh .... " 


15-6 


15-3 


15-2 


15-0 


15-0 


15-6 


15-9 


15-7 


14-5 


12-9 


12-7 


12-2 


12-3 


Bacon break- 




























fast " 


18-4 


17-8 


17-2 


16-8 


16-8 


17-6 


18-8 


19-6 


19-2 


18-6 


181 


17-4 


17-7 


Lard pure " 


11-8 


11-5 


11-5 


11-3 


11-3 


11-4 


12-1 


12-6 


13-3 


12-9 


12-3 


11-7 


11-5 


Eggs fresh... .doz. 


82-8 


24-8 


19-5 


19-2 


21-5 


24-1 


25-6 


30-3 


38-6 


45-2 


39-1 


28-8 


27-8 


Milk qt 


10-2 


10-1 


10-0 


9-8 


9-6 


9-6 


9-6 


9-5 


9-6 


9-8 


9-7 


9-7 


9-7 


Butter cream- 




























ery lb. 


24-1 


31-2 


24-5 


22-6 


21-6 


22-1 


25-0 


26-9 


26-4 


25-9 


26-1 


25-7 


26-9 


Cheese " 


21-3 


21-2 


21-0 


20-7 


20-1 


20-2 


19-8 


20-0 


19-9 


19-8 


19 6 


19-4 


19-2 


Bread " 


6-3 


6-2 


6-2 


6-2 


5-7 


5-6 


5-6 


5-6 


5-6 


5-8 


5-7 


5-7 


5-6 


Flour " 


3-0 


3-0 


3-0 


3-0 


2-9 


2-9 


2-9 


2-9 


2-8 


2-7 


2-6 


2-6 


2-6 


Rolled oats... " 


4-7 


4-7 


4-7 


4-7 


4-8 


4-8 


4-8 


4-8 


4-7 


4-6 


4-6 


4-6 


4-5 


Rice " 


8-7 


8-5 


8-6 


8-5 


8-6 


8-5 


8-5 


8-4 


8-3 


8-2 


8-2 


8-0 


8-0 


Beans " 


4-4 


4-3 


4-3 


4-3 


4-3 


4-2 


4-3 


4-3 


4-2 


4-0 


3-9 


3-8 


3-8 


Apples evapor- 




























ated " 


16-4 


15-8 


15-9 


15-5 


15-7 


15-9 


16-1 


15-7 


15-8 


15-5 


15-4 


14-9 


14-7 


Prunes " 


11-4 


11-0 


10-8 


11-0 


10-9 


11-0 


11-2 


10-8 


10-7 


10 6 


10-8 


10-6 


10-8 


Sugar granul- 




























ated " 


61 


6-0 


60 


5-9 


5-9 


5-8 


5-9 


5-8 


5-8 


5-8 


5-8 


5-7 


5-6 


Tea " 


50-6 


50-3 


45-2 


45-5 


45-0 


44-6 


45-2 


44-5 


43-8 


43-7 


43-2 


42-2 


41-2 


Coffee " 


43-5 


43-7 


42-6 


42-4 


421 


41-6 


42-4 


41-3 


41-2 


41-0 


40-9 


40-1 


39-4 


Potatoes peck 


15-8 


15-3 


15-2 


14-7 


14-9 


26-4 


18-4 


17-3 


17-3 


18-1 


19-0 


19-2 


19-2 





























Cold Storage 


1932 




1933 


Holdings 


April 


May 


June 


July 


Aug. 


Sept. 


Oct. 


Nov. 


Dec. 


Jan. 


Feb. 


Mar. 


April 


Cold Storage Holdings as at 
First of Month: 

{000 lbs. or doz.) 
Butter — 


4,433 

63 

4,496 

7,661 

246 

422 
3,298 

21,862 
3,822 
378 
5,97 
8,214 

40.251 
2,845 

3,931 

4,419 

353 

210 

8,914 

367 

639 

1,006 

4,846 

176 

5,022 

9,458 

9,247 

65 

4,974 

1,118 


2,816 

32 

2,848 

5,934 

3,416 

534 

3,458 

22,455 

2,840 

702 

57,695 
7,784 

41,476 
3,286 

3,416 

4,299 

233 

198 

8,146 

484 
447 
930 

3,946 

161 

4,107 

7,701 

8,569 

48 

4,544 

1,014 


4,292 

93 

4,385 

7,535 

8,870 

584 

4,312 

21,593 
3,080 
1,048 
5,991 
10,580 
42,293 
3,743 

2,975 

8,992 

458 

175 

7,600 

648 

508 

1,156 

2,172 

140 

2,312 

6,368 

9,288 

151 

3,830 

1,624 


16,472 

334 

16,806 

16,022 

10,879 

829 

5,081 

18,458 
3,122 
982 
5,848 
8,999 

37,409 
4,257 

2,329 

3,583 

327 

162 

6,401 

716 

453 

1,169 

1,506 

214 

1,747 

5,257 

10,173 

51 

5,218 

2,451 


25,283 

259 

25,542 

19,355 

11,211 

820 

5,158 

13,862 
2,695 
394 
6,422 
11,180 
34,553 
3,566 

2,668 

4,094 

302 

224 

7,288 

802 

414 

1,215 

1,001 

277 

1,277 

4,414 

14,086 

56 

5,522 

6,073 


30,943 

338 

31,281 

22,119 

11,896 

995 

5,023 

10,255 

3,118 

710 

6.083 

9.788 

29.954 

2,707 

2,792 

4,596 

287 

177 

7,852 

893 

323 

1,216 

872 

366 

1,239 

3,374 

16,734 

83 

6,228 

3,986 


33,318 

257 

33,575 

21,764 

11,056 
1,205 
4,848 

6,466 
2,463 
369 
5,051 
8,053 
22,402 
1,183 

2,813 

4,989 

239 

72 

8,113 

889 

471 

1,360 

1,020 

449 

1,469 

2,404 

19,512 

46 

6,825 

3,912 


31,181 

136 

31,316 

20,423 

8.229 

519 

4,506 

5,236 
2,573 
267 
4,451 
9,624 
22,152 
1,913 

3,294 

5,002 

110 

88 

8,493 

958 

416 

1,374 

3,070 

383 

3,453 

2,057 

21,706 

52 

7,177 

4,107 


26,361 

109 

26,470 

13,229 

4,123 

271 

3,988 

6,649 
3,830 
409 
4,912 
7,767 
23,567 
1,539 

4,642 

4,850 

79 

93 

9,665 

894 

359 

1,253 

4,856 

439 

5,295 

3,540 

19,953 

89 

7,173 

2 740 


20,328 

69 

20,397 

12,944 

1,254 

273 

3.773 

11,765 
4,281 
461 
6,219 
6,827 

29,552 
2,327 

5,113 

3,421 

222 

184 

8,940 

702 
180 

882 

5,043 

274 

5,291 

8,341 

17,121 

40 

6,734 

1,680 


15,476 

45 

15,521 

11,511 

433 

650 

3,524 

14,148 
3,770 
514 
5,032 
7,874 

31,338 
2,653 

4,639 

4,655 

229 

113 

9,636 

335 
247 

582 

3,733 

276 

4,009 

7,230 

14,046 

113 

5,960 

840 


9,605 

19 

9,624 

10,567 

88 

267 

3,270 

15,688 
3,707 
661 
5,134 
9,164 

34,354 
2,831 

3,88« 

4,275 

303 

189 

8,655 

178 
258 
437 

2,556 

288 

2,845 

6,463 

10,600 

99 

4,792 

760 


3,386 




9 


Totals 


3,395 


Cn EE8E 


8,439 


Eg re- 


278 


Fresh 


455 


Frozen 

Pork — 


2,920 
14,320 




3,277 




872 




5,792 




10,633 


Totals 


34,894 


Lard 


2,527 


Beef — 


3,679 




4,674 


Cured 


156 


In process of cure 


173 


Totals 


8,683 


Veal— 
Fresh frozen 


173 


Fresh not frozen 


444 


Totals 


617 


Mutton and Lamb— 
Frozen 


1,988 




184 


Totals 


2,172 


Poultry 


5,272 


Fish— 
Fresh frozen 


7,324 


Freeh not frozen 


64 


Smoked, etc 


3,784 


Fresh froze» daring preceding 
month , 


1,149 



MONTHLY REVIEW OF BUSINESS STATISTICS 



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13 



MONTHLY REVIEW OF BUSINESS STATISTICS 



Tabic 10. Output of Central Electric Stations in Canada. (A) Monthly Output. 
(Thousands of Kilowatt Hours) 





Totals for Canada 


Generated by Water-Power 


Generated by Fue 




Month 








Mari- 






Prairie 


British 


Prairie 


Other 


Total 




Water 


Fuel 


Total 


Pro- 
vinces 


Quebeo 


Ontario 


Pro- 


Colurn 


Pro- 


Pro- 


Exports 














vinces 


bia 


vinces 


vinces 




1930-April 


1,480,953 


21,385 


1,502,338 


42,968 


744,881 


509,615 


92,601 


90,908 


16,437 


4.948 


117. 5M 


May. 


1.523,521 


21.106 


1,544,627 


44,139 


761,327 


524,679 


100,116 


93,260 


16,466 


4.640 


129,138 


June 


1,414,236 


20.375 


1.434,611 


42,632 


709.245 


485,791 


87.683 


88,885 


15.801 


4.57' 


13R.016 


July 


1,404,009 


21,681 


1,425,690 


40,667 


722,335 


460,611 


89,169 


91,227 


16,522 


5.159 


131,817 


August 


1,391,054 


20,806 


1,411,860 


41,788 


710,842 


457,424 


84,925 


96,075 


14,898 


5,908 


142,571 


September. 


1.419.051 


23,910 


1,442,961 


38,662 


704,123 


485,151 


92.060 


99.055 


14,882 


9.028 


153.657 


October 


1,549.846 


24,714 


1,574,560 


39,480 


781,996 


521,991 


95.005 


111,374 


18.874 


7.840 


161,323 


November. 


1.488.175 


27,228 


1,515,403 


41,264 


764,490 


480.131 


92,292 


109,998 


19.506 


7.722 


141,587 


December . 


1,513.152 


29,156 


1,542.308 


44,295 


764,612 


480,442 


111,443 


112,360 


19,748 


9.408 


149,295 


1931- January 


1.456.326 


32,395 


1,488,721 


44,394 


735,385 


469,438 


104,099 


103,010 


20,187 


12.208 


162.443 


February.... 


1,311,136 


27,851 


1,338.987 


31,097 


674,560 


422,213 


88,481 


94,785 


17,298 


10.553 


145.461 


March 


1,391,982 


25.576 


1,417,558 


34,338 


703,708 


451,912 


95,991 


106,033 


15,992 


9.584 


127,940 


April 


1,388.034 


23,056 


1,411,090 


52,154 


717,900 


415,482 


101,539 


100,959 


13,360 


9,696 


97.677 


May 


1,342.940 


22.846 


1,365,786 


53,433 


693,853 


394,243 


102,640 


98,771 


12,781 


10.065 


86,824 


Juno 


1,267,869 


21,959 


1,289,828 


52,675 


638,719 


379,568 


101.337 


95,570 


12,139 


9.820 


88,602 


July 


1,230.622 


20.70C 


1,251,322 


50,712 


620,634 


369,294 


100,480 


89,502 


12,297 


8.403 


95.085 


August 


1,234,266 


21,883 


1,256,149 


44,924 


644,446 


352,877 


98,119 


93,900 


12,905 


8,978 


99,780 


September. . 


1,263,412 


25,001 


1,288,413 


46,251 


662,400 


355,122 


102,835 


96.804 


13,436 


11,565 


93,288 


October 


1,400.704 


27.638 


1,428,342 


55.743 


736,381 


384,065 


123,087 


101,428 


15,332 


12.306 


95.423 


November.. 


1.385.378 


29,642 


1.415,02(1 


56.725 


731,014 


373,084 


125,867 


98,688 


18,810 


10,823 


73.357 


December . . 


1,397,876 


34,306 


1,432.182 


55.214 


722,508 


385,407 


130,407 


104,340 


20,908 


13,398 


69.362 


1932- January 


1.382,794 


31.124 


1,413,918 


49,584 


721.P27 


374,534 


129,050 


107,899 


20,382 


10,742 


61,767 


February 


1.297.892 


27.241 


1,325.133 


46.098 


682.589 


355,865 


115.390 


97,041 


18.125 


0,116 


52,422 


March 


1,363,912 


24,784 


1,388,696 


44 292 


713,227 


394,206 


110.943 


101.244 


15.410 


9,374 


55 414 


April 


1,306.753 


22,736 


1,329,489 


50.445 


700,575 


363,099 


99,544 


93,090 


12,413 


10.323 


54,982 


May 


1.249.226 


21,78<] 


1,271,015 


53.807 


661,740 


344.635 


95,863 


03.001 


12,204 


9,495 


51,354 


June 


1.176.673 


21.559 


1,198,232 


47.894 


633.614 


325,476 


83,542 


86.147 


11,996 


9.563 


64.864 


July 


1,133,555 


22.026 


1,155,581 


38.583 


606.872 


317,815 


81,519 


88,766 


11,986 


10,040 


59.015 


August 


1 , 206. 682 


23.538 


1,230,220 


44,786 


663.911 


326,021 


82,120 


89,835 


13,530 


10.008 


60,192 


September. 


1.254.644 


24.496 


1,279,140 


48,069 


687.536 


337.472 


90.082 


91.485 


13.976 


10.520 


71,500 


October 


1,362.670 


27,474 


1,390,144 


50,980 


763.577 


348,530 


104,78° 


94.794 


16.072 


11.402 


Bl,737 


November. . 


1.417.074 


31,153 


1,448,227 


53.110 


823.035 


333,565 


111,404 


95,960 


18,303 


12,760 


35,023 


December . . 


1,400,793 


32,398 


1,433,191 


52,587 


801,939 


326,173 


116,933 


103,161 


19.679 


12,719 


41,609 


1933-January .... 


1,366,336 


30,303 


1.396.639 


44.535 


7 5.142 


318.039 


116,099 


102,521 


18.230 


12.073 


48,018 


February. .. 


1,273.113 


26,453 


1.299.566 


33,143 


718,5?7 


323.816 


104,085 


93,542 


16.217 


10.236 


46,440 


March 


1.346 849 


24.198 


1 371,047 


40,464 


747.878 


350.959 


108 015 


99,533 


15 388 


8 810 


45.344 



CB> Average Daily Output 



1930-April 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September 
October. . . 
November 
December. 

1931 -January. .. 
February.. 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September 

October 

Kovomber, 
December 

1932- January..., 
February.., 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September. 

October 

November. 
December . 

1933-January 

February. . 
March 



49.365 


713 


50,078 


1,432 


24,829 


16.987 


3.087 


3,030 


548 


165 


49.14f 


681 


49,827 


1,424 


24,559 


18,925 


3,230 


3.008 


531 


l»n 


47,141 
45.291 
44.873 


679 
699 
671 


47.820 
45.990 
45,544 


1,422 
1,312 
1.348 


23,842 

23.301 
22,930 


16,193 
14.858 
14.756 


2,922 

2,877 
2,740 


2,962 
2,943 
3,099 


527 
533 

481 


15" 
16ft 
191 


47,301 


797 


48.098 


1,288 


23.47C 


16.172 


3,069 


3,302 


496 


301 


49,995 


797 


50,792 


1,273 


25.226 


16,838 


3,065 


3.593 


544 


253 


49,60f 


908 


50,514 


1,375 


25.48'' 


16,004 


3,077 


3,887 


650 


258 


48,811 


940 


49,751 


1,429 


24,665 


15.498 


3,595 


3,624 


637 


303 


46.978 


1,045 


48,023 


1,432 


23.722 


15.143 


3.358 


3,323 


651 


304 


46.826 


995 


47,821 


1,111 


24,091 


15,079 


3,160 


3,385 


618 


377 


44,903 


825 


45,72« 


1,108 


22,700 


14,578 


3,096 


3.421 


516 


300 


46,268 


76<5 


47,036 


1,738 


23,930 


13,849 


3,385 


3,366 


445 


323 


43,320 


737 


44,057 


1,723 


22.382 


12,718 


3,311 


3,186 


412 


325 


42,262 


732 


42.994 


1,758 


21,291 


12,652 


3,378 


3,185 


405 


327 


39,698 


667 


40,365 


1,636 


20.020 


11,913 


3.242 


2,887 


396 


271 


39,815 


706 


40,521 


1,449 


20,789 


11,383 


3,165 


3,029 


416 


290 


42,114 


833 


42,947 


1,542 


22,080 


11.837 


3.42« 


3,227 


448 


385 


45,184 


891 


45,980 


1,798 


23,754 


12.380 


3,971 


3.272 


494 


397 


46.170 


988 


47,167 


1,891 


24,367 


12.436 


4,195 


3,290 


627 


361 


45,093 


1.106 


46,199 


1,781 


23,307 


12.436 


4,207 


3,366 


674 


432 


44,606 


1.004 


45,610 


1.567 


23,285 


12,081 


4,192 


3,481 


657 


347 


44,754 


939 


45,693 


1,621 


23,537 


12,271 


3,079 


3,346 


625 


314 


43,997 


799 


44,796 


1,429 


23,007 


12,716 


3.579 


3.266 


497 


302 


43,558 


758 


44,316 


1,681 


23,353 


12,103 


3,318 


3,103 


414 


344 


40,298 
39,222 


702 
719 


41,000 
39,941 


1,739 

1,597 


21,346 
21,120 


11.117 
10.849 


3,092 
2,785 


3,003 
2.872 


396 
400 


306 
319 


36.566 


711 


37,277 


1.214 


19.577 


10,252 


2,630 


2.863 


387 


324 


38,925 


759 


39,684 


1.445 


21,416 


10,517 


2.649 


2,898 


436 


323 


41.821 


817 


42,638 


1,602 


22,918 


11.249 


3,003 


3,049 


466 


351 


43.957 


886 


44,843 


1,642 


24,632 


11,243 


3,380 


3,058 


518 


368 


47.236 


1,038 


48,274 


1,770 


27,435 


11,119 


3,713 


3,199 


613 


425 


45,186 


1,045 


46,231 


1,696 


25,868 


10,522 


3,772 


3,328 


635 


410 


44,075 


978 


45,053 


1.437 


25,327 


10,259 


3.745 


3,307 


589 


389 


45,468 


945 


46,413 


1,184 


25,662 


11,564 


3,717 


3,341 


579 


366 


43,447 


780 


44,227 


1,305 


24,125 


11 321 


3,485 


3,211 


496 


284 



MONTHLY REVIEW OF BUSINESS STATISTICS 



17 



Table 11 — Railway Revenue Freight Loaded at Stations in Canada in Tons. 



Commodities 


1932 








1933 


Jan. 


Apr. 


May 


June 


July 


Aug. 


Sept. 


Oct. 


Nov. 


Dec 


Jan. 


Hallway Freight Loaded— 

Agricultural Products— 
Wheat 


409,261 

4,882 

61,375 

25,544 

6,657 

1,420 

3,170 

73,978 

67,304 

41,876 

424 

20,644 

729 

17,320 

11,262 

19,540 

2,838 
26,457 

1,959 
23,662 

8,829 

1,526 

3,966 
474 
867 

2,194 
308 

3,725 

2,816 

976 

435,626 

345,671 

69,338 

95 

69,845 

24,072 

69,632 

8,118 

1,934 

2,290 

10,948 

54,056 

140,082 

865 

139,123 

150,791 
10, 693 

84,837 

11,548 

6,863 

1,553 

23,815 
6,616 

35, 783 
8,532 

13,907 
4,644 

1,623 

6,289 
1,542 
2,632 
9.804 
12,235 
153,039 
37,839 
6,802 

9,762 

156,708 
117,297 


571,574 

10.548 

113, 19S 

34,215 

10,778 

6.881 

3.866 

87,781 

81,516 

40,593 

405 

3,890 

940 

28,336 

7.313 

20,024 

8.064 
27.905 

1,342 
18,981 

6,322 

3.148 

4,089 
265 

2,159 

2,213 
280 

2,588 

2,661 

317 

357,117 

97,088 

46,589 

825 
64,586 
29,300 

174,647 

8,582 
2,332 
2,748 
15,325 
50,512 

189,524 

3,600 

130,010 

181,851 
12,116 

126, 604 
15,468 
6,698 
8,852 

22,259 
7.630 

50,260 
9,655 

18,208 
3,796 

4,196 
11,304 

7,167 

1,834 
11,154 
75,682 
121,966 
42,477 

2,514 

10,905 

166,607 
169,161 


572,287 

9,434 

123,969 

37,540 

13,702 

7,819 

4.036 

95,952 

75,025 

21,640 

545 

1,478 

959 

28,437 

3,058 

16,709 

2,688 

24,479 

596 

19.908 

6,588 

4,335 

4,366 
148 

3,280 

3,670 
331 

2,028 

2.630 

860 
429,206 
51,665 
19,168 
1.010 
51,428 
23,193 

252,232 

11.618 

1,879 

8,126 

15,326 

62,587 

127,518 

5,154 

93,734 

187,905 
11,047 

174,806 
11.097 
4,835 
2,055 

26,511 
6.573 
60.179 
11,181 
18,267 
2,485 

2,567 
10,835 

5,114 

1,409 

10,887 

88,803 

133,501 

40,254 

2,363 

8,177 

168.976 
149", 078 


1,170,526 

7.922 

41,235 

21.337 

12,947 

5.548 

1,718 

103,031 

84,255 

12,353 

187 

183 

1,429 

16,127 

2,193 

9,276 

2.871 
25,889 

1,480 
20,934 

5,700 

4,499 

5,139 
42 
1,765 
7,153 
460 
2,332 

2.613 

946 
429,465 
33,191 
19,111 
942 
45.778 
25,924 

292.715 

10,342 
708 
18,936 
15,615 
68,111 

98,556 

6,120 

58,434 

199,350 
22. 644 

157.460 
15.712 
3.713 
2,924 

25,117 
5.372 
60, 099 
11.889 
16.260 
2,254 

3,345 
10.697 

4.109 

1,194 
10.580 
20,485 
115,217 
35,061 

2.657 

8,836 

169,566 
138.492 


588,611 

6.229 

73,725 

30,709 

10,826 

7,163 

2,963 

105,914 

83,363 

7,353 

479 

257 

3,554 

5.233 

3,801 

8,168 

3,017 
31,219 

1,902 
14,944 

5,882 

3.643 

6,873 
159 
1,241 
8,347 
1,937 
2,054 

2,093 

1,558 
409,383 
33,841 
22,265 
818 
45,649 
23,909 

177, 172 

5,802 
733 
17,396 
14,577 
72,116 

69,996 

3,159 

63,977 

135,208 
15,993 

177,601 

23,058 

4,514 

9,156 

20,059 
5,601 
57,693 
11,739 
16,888 
1,936 

4,934 
8,941 
3,592 
1,620 

10,913 

9,709 

106,001 

33,399 
2,872 

9,054 

187,213 
121,859 


811,770 

2,144 

24,543 

25,836 

10,456 

2,780 

2,819 

103,048 

79,984 

9,499 

626 

4,521 

7,513 

1,417 

8,959 

8,575 

2,471 
34,139 

2,610 
13,106 

7,048 

3,249 

4,747 
167 

1,328 

6,415 
485 

2,031 

2,416 

1,667 

414,123 

83,943 

23,853 

1,032 
21,354 
23,185 

292,224 

9,050 

1,106 

16,311 

13,481 

55,814 

70,067 

2.694 

47,763 

125,939 
13,093 

208,541 
17,138 
6,905 
1,376 

17,789 
5,659 

57,194 
9.393 

15.639 
3,277 

7,214 
5,242 
2,603 
1,374 
11,435 
13,373 
102,453 
37,939 
3,559 

9,877 

160,890 
133,121 


2,318,995 

1,686 

43,973 

64,765 

9,814 

1,495 

2,121 

109,753 

76,883 

10,868 

488 

34,478 

17,704 

9,405 

20,002 

40,362 

1,973 
41,505 

4,170 
12,325 

6,459 

2,943 

5,133 

191 
772 

4,895 
743 

2,612 

2.997 

2,725 

443,921 

199,236 

35,818 

542 

25,848 
28,949 

215,154 

6,587 

1,752 

12,221 

12,729 

66,725 

110,374 

1,537 

63,795 

128,157 
11,378 

185,461 

19,816 

4,193 

826 

20,232 
5,630 
53,426 
12,466 
14,281 
1,694 

3,639 

3,047 

2,644 

1,611 

10,132 

18,216 

102,204 

37,895 

3,712 

10,462 

144,933 
130,766 


1,670,793 

3,041 

59,399 

32,749 

10,955 

7,037 

7,047 

144,778 

91,206 

15,999 

455 

67,081 

9,193 

30,366 

18,830 

107,973 

2,369 
38,232 
11,203 
14,516 

7,496 

2,373 

4,526 
242 
505 

4,332 
439 

2,782 

3,064 

4,505 

426,425 

430,350 

57,711 

360 

31.238 

28,123 

209,773 

6,309 

1,630 

9,187 

13,977 

77,499 

182,086 

702 

71,378 

136,595 
14,113 

147,274 

17,707 

8,839 

1,084 

13,098 
4,401 

40,414 
8,603 

15,421 
1,922 

1,752 
3,634 
4,842 
2,031 
10,591 
18,744 
112,913 
47,546 
5,654 

12,708 

154,431 
128,511 


1,160,863 

5,792 

72,368 

30,338 

2,942 

8,434 

7,153 

155, 185 

104,479 

16,957 

303 

42,905 

1,634 

29,963 

12,546 

96,375 

3,031 
34,925 

6 612 
19,803 

7,967 

2,393 

3,772 
763 
613 

2,471 
569 

2,347 

2,693 

7,392 

453,900 

406,823 

71,593 

90 

30,844 

22,579 

127,553 

3.896 
1,757 
3,621 
14,616 
68,008 

185. 190 

1,545 

79.356 

120,448 
18,053 

112,366 

23 405 

8,222 

1,033 

13.389 
4,174 

12,618 
4,631 

12,566 
1.143 

1,739 
4,099 
3,802 
1,471 
9,619 

25,063 
117,770 

54,326 
5,753 

12,239 

151,470 
131,085 


752,536 

5,786 

39,533 

31,011 

7,228 

5,339 

6,082 

87,733 

59,411 

17,637 

169 

14,965 

900 

19,304 

8,104 

50,345 

2,011 
21,526 

2,266 
18,194 

7,783 

2,971 

4,113 
5,475 

646 
1,816 

348 
2,329 

2,450 

3,201 

417,916 

333,358 

80,918 

74 

22,267 

17,541 

29,174 

2,281 
1,453 
1,552 
8,631 
34,600 

193,999 

5S3 

63,458 

87,468 
24,464 

85,508 

16,820 

4,139 

684 

7,094 
4,376 
6,624 
4,695 
8,164 
571 

1,280 

3,084 

2,067 

1,248 

11,099 

21,048 

100,299 

34,307 

6,712 

8,259 

113,722 
95.668 


468,915 
9, 772 


Oats 

Barley 

Rye 


24,374 
8,410 
1,287 


Flaxseed 


1,300 
3,646 


Flour 


75,521 




52,739 




18,506 




390 




22,701 


Other fruit (fresh) 


841 




20,445 


Other fresh vegetables 

Other agricultural products. . . 
Animal Products — 


7,482 
11.146 

1,106 




25,526 




1,954 


Hogs 

Dressed meats (fresh) 

Dressed meats (cured, salted, 


20,713 
8,127 

2,395 


Other packing house products 
(edible) 


4,105 




319 




466 




1,661 


Wool 

Hides and leather 

Other animal products (non- 
edible) 

Mixe Products — 


330 
3,681 

2,950 

441 




334,268 




316,281 




70,091 




- 


Other ores and concentrates. . 

Base bullion and matte 

Clay, gravel, sand, stone 
(crushed) 

stone 


26,214 
21,353 

21,183 

1,251 


Crude petroleum 

Asphalt 

Salt 


933 

630 

9,417 


Other mine products 

Forest Products— 

Logs, posts, poles, cordwood. 

Ties 

Pulpwood 

Lumber— Timber— Box shooke 
—Staves heading 

Other forest products 

Manufactures and Miscellan- 
eous— 

Refined Petroleum and its pro- 
ducts 


25,772 

150,795 

323 

82,416 

75, 607 
12,035 

76, 793 


Sugar 


14,735 


Iron, pig and bloom 


3,835 


Rails and fastenings 


816 


Bar and sheet iron— Structural 


7,588 


Castings, machinery & boilers 
Cement 


3,722 
4,669 


Brick and artificial stone. . 
Lime and plaster 


3,584 
9,257 


Sewer pipe and drain tile 

Agricultural implements and 
vehicles other than autos.... 
Automobiles and auto trucks. . 
Household goods 


714 

1,203 
5,069 
1,575 


Furniture 


1,890 




6,767 


Fertilizers, all kinds 

Paper, printed matter, books . 
Wood-pulp 


19,586 
117,166 
32,519 


Fish (fresh, frozen cured, etc.) 

Canned goods (all canned food 

products) 


6,993 
6,972 


Other manufactures and mis- 
cellaneous 


109,298 


Merchandise 


86, 760 



18 



MONTHLY REVIEW OF BUSINESS STATISTICS 



Table 12. Indexes of Employment by Industries, Year 1926 = 100 



Industries— First of Month 



Indexes of Employment Un- 
adjusted— 

All Industries 

Manufacturing 

Animal products — edible 

Fur and products 

Leather and products 

Lumber and products 

Rough and dressed lumber . 

Furniture 

Other lumber products 

Musical instruments 

Plant products — edible 

Pulp and paper products 

Pulp and paper 

Paper products 

Printing and publishing 

Rubber products 

Textile products 

Thread, yarn and cloth 

Hosiery and knit goods.. . . 
Garments and personal fur- 
nishings 

Other textile products 

Plant products (n.e.s.) 

Tobacco 

Distilled and malt liquors.. 
Wood distillates and extracts. 
Chemicals and allied products 
Clay, glass and stone products 

Electric current 

Electrical apparatus 

Iron and steel products 

Crude, rolled and forged 

products 

Machinery (other than ve- 
hicles) 

Agricultural implements 

Land vehicles 

Automobiles and parts... . 
Steel shipbuilding and re- 
pairing 

Heating appliances 

Iron and steel fabrication 

(n.e.s.) 

Foundry and machine shop 

products , 

Other iron and steel pro 

ducts 

Non-ferrous metal products . 

Mineral products 

Miscellaneous , 

I-0GG1NQ 

Mining 

Coal 

Metallic ores 

Non-metallic minerals (ex 

cept coal) 

Communications 

Telegraphs 

Telephones 

Transportation 

Street railways and cartage.. 

Steam railways 

Shipping and stevedoring 

Construction and Maintenance 

Building , 

Highway 

Railway 

Services 

Hotels and restaurants 

Professional 

Personal (chiefly laundries)... 

Trade 

Retail 

Wholesale 



1932 



April May June July Aug. Sept. Oct. Nov. Dec 



87-5 

87 3 

92-7 

76-9 

90-6 

58-8 

43-0 

81-2 

89 

40 

93 



2 

88-6 
74-4 
94-7 
105-6 
89-7 
101-0 
109-2 
110-9 

93-5 

83-2 
116-8 
115-2 
118-6 

93-1 
112-7 

75-8 
115-6 
119-9 

75-6 

71-3 

S2-9 
29-1 
81-7 
75-6 

67-9 
76-4 



73-6 

77 

92-8 
116-3 
l'!2-3 

31-1 
101-0 

93-8 
135-1 

70-3 
93-9 
94-4 
93-8 
81-9 
110-9 
77-6 
67-5 
79-9 
51-7 
134-9 
59-4 
113-9 
107-7 
127-9 
119-4 
114-3 
120-2 
100-8 



89-1 
i6-0 

1C6-3 
860 
90-5 
64-2 
51-3 
77-4 
93-3 
31-3 
96-9 
88-3 
72-8 
99-1 

105-3 
86-4 
98-9 

107-0 

1C8-6 



81-0 
112-4 
107-1 
119-7 

78-8 
1141 

83-1 
117-4 
109-9 

69-4 

58-8 

78-6 
27-4 

73-8 
86-3 

65.4 
76-5 

68-0 

74-3 

75-3 
78-4 

123-3 
97-5 
37-9 
96-8 
86-5 

133-0 

74-4 

941 

98-0 

931 

85-5 

113-1 

77-1 

91 4 

92-9 

P2-9 

147 7 

74-0 

116-8 

111-1 

129-4 

121-9 

118-1 

1221 

102-4 



86 



52 



83-2 
80-3 
950 
81-0 
86-7 
50-6 
36-2 
73-9 
76-2 
43 9 

102-9 
861 
70-2 
99-3 

102-9 
86-1 
96-3 

105-4 

115-1 

85 

73-5 
121-7 
125-4 
115 
105-2 
106-9 

53 

110-6 
101-5 

60-5 



67-7 
24-2 
62-1 
50-9 

54-5 
72-0 

46- 

62- 

65 
79 
118- 

98-4 
56-2 
99 
93-4 
134-0 

65 3 

89 

84 

90-5 

83 
116 

72 

94 

67 

37-4 
115-4 

56-3 
103-7 

94-8 
125-3 
111 8 
117-8 
124 
101-3 



1933 



Jan. 



Feb. Mar. Apr, 



Electrical Energy Available for Consumption, Million K.W.H. 1 



Economic 
Area 



Maritime Provinces- 

Quebec 

Ontario 

British Columbia 











1932 










1933 


Mar. 


April 


May 


June 


July 


Aug. 


Sept. 


Oct. 


Nov. 


Dec. 


Jan. 


Feb. 


Mar. 


52-2 
584-6 
468-8 
W)-5 


59-7 
576-7 
433-1 

92-7 


62-2 
522-6 
433-6 

92-6 


56-3 
492-9 
402-4 

85-1 


47-4 
467-7 
399-1 

87-9 


53-5 
509-9 
412-5 

89-1 


57-3 
527-2 
427-6 

90-5 


61-0 
600-2 
462-5 

94-0 


64-5 
654-6 
468-0 

95-0 


63-9 
632-0 
455-8 
102-1 


55-2 
604-9 
451-5 
101-6 


42-4 
549-4 
447-4 

92-6 


48-1 
575-3 
479-3 

98-5 



' Production plus provincial imports less provincial exports. 



MONTHLY REVIEW OF BUSINESS STATISTICS 



19 



Table 13. Indexes of Employment with Seasonal Adjustment, Indexes of Retail Sales 

Automobile Financing. 



Classification 



Seasonally Adjusted Indexes of 
Employment— All Industries 

Manufacturing 

Leather and products 

Rough and dressed lumber 

Furniture 

Musical Instruments 

Pulp and paper 

Paper products 

Printing and publishing 

Rubber products 

Textile products 

Thread, yarn and cloth 

Hosiery and knit goods 

Clay, glass and stone products. 

Electric current 

Electric apparatus 

Iron and steel products 

Crude, rolled and forged pro- 
ducts 

Machinery other than vehicles. . 

Agricultural implements 

Automobiles and parts 

Logging 

Mining 

Metallic ores 

Non metallic minerals except 
coal 

Telephones 

Transportation 

Street railways and cartage... 

Steam railways 

Shipping and stevedoring 

Construction and Maintenance. 

Building 

Highway 

Railway 

Hotels and Restaurants 

Trade 

Retail 

Wholesale 

Economic areas and cities— 

Maritime Provinces 

Quebec 

Ontario 

Prairie Provinces 

British Columbia 

Montreal 

Quebec 

Toronto 

Ottawa 

Hamilton 

Windsor 

Winnipeg 

Vancouver 



Indexes of Retail Sales, January 
1929 = 100 — 

Boots and shoes (6) 

Candy (6) 

Clothing (9) 

Drugs (7) 

Dyers and cleaners (4) 

Furniture (4) 

General and departmental, 25 

stores and 4 chains 

Groceries and meats (23) 

Hardware (5) 

Music and radio (4) , 

Restaurants (11) 

General index , 

Automobile Financing— 

Total new and used cars— 

Number 

Percentage change, 1932 to 1931 

Financing in dollars $000 

Percentage change, 1932 to 1931 



1932 



April I May I June I July I Aug. I Sept. I Oct. I Nov. 



Dec. 



1933 



Jan. [ Feb. 1 Mar. I Apr. 



First of Month 



93-2 



921 
90-6 
951 
95-2 



95-5 
105-9 
100-2 
109 9 
89-0 
941 
91-3 
89-7 



92-7 


89 6 


86-8 


84-8 


82-3 


82-4 


83-4 


83-0 


82-4 


84 i 


89-8 


88 


3 


85 1 


83-4 


83-0 


80-1 


81-0 


81-8 


80-9 


81-4 


81-0 


77-2 


88 


6 


92-3 


92-9 


88-3 


90-9 


92-5 


90-1 


87-9 


84-5 


79-5 


81-6 


54 


2 


47-6 


43-4 


42-9 


39-8 


39-8 


38-9 


39-7 


43-6 


43-2 


41-9 


79 


7 


75-5 


76-8 


71-2 


63-2 


69-2 


72-2 


74-0 


71-7 


70-4 


63-2 


41 





34-6 


32-9 


30-9 


36-9 


51-2 


46-4 


43-7 


39-9 


22-8 


20-7 


77 


1 


72-8 


70-1 


71-3 


69-9 


72-8 


71-7 


73-2 


71-6 


71-2 


70-9 


94 


3 


95-9 


98-9 


97-6 


95-5 


98-2 


96-9 


98-6 


95-4 


95-7 


97-4 


106 


5 


104-8 


105-6 


104-3 


102-6 


104-0 


102-6 


102-2 


102-4 


98-4 


100-1 


87 


1 


84-2 


84-3 


85-0 


80-7 


82-8 


83-2 


83-6 


85-6 


81-6 


74-2 


98 


4 


98-4 


98-8 


97-7 


94-1 


96-0 


98-3 


97-4 


95-6 


92-4 


89-2 


109 





107-5 


107-0 


105-3 


102-7 


105-1 


105-1 


105-1 


103-8 


100-7 


96-0 


109 


8 


110-0 


108-6 


109-2 


106-2 


106-9 


109-7 


111-3 


110-3 


109-3 


101-9 


81 





77-7 


78-8 


72-7 


65-0 


64-8 


66-6 


58-5 


53-2 


56-4 


54-4 


122 





117-7 


115-9 


113-1 


110-5 


110-9 


109-4 


108-7 


110-7 


112-7 


113-3 


121 





1170 


110-8 


110-3 


110-1 


102-0 


103-6 


104-7 


98-4 


96-7 


87-7 


74 


1 


68-7 


66-7 


67-3 


63-9 


62-6 


61-7 


58-2 


60-6 


61-4 


57-5 


68 


7 


61-5 


55-5 


61-2 


53-8 


62-0 


60-1 


62-1 


64-9 


51-9 


38-6 


82 





79-8 


79-2 


77-2 


71-4 


70-8 


68-4 


62-8 


68-2 


66-3 


63-2 


27 


1 


260 


26-2 


27-0 


23-4 


24-8 


23-9 


22-7 


241 


24-1 


31-3 


64 


7 


661 


72-4 


83-4 


82-6 


59-1 


47-8 


52-5 


60-3 


82-7 


61-1 


40 





42-9 


45-3 


51-5 


49-4 


38-5 


33-6 


32-8 


38-9 


53-1 


41-5 


104 





100-5 


98-8 


96-1 


95-7 


96-5 


96-6 


98-' 


97-4 


94-9 


95-7 


140 





133-8 


132-1 


130-2 


128-3 


126-6 


128-6 


131-2 


132-7 


133-4 


139-2 


79 


6 


74-7 


70-9 


69-9 


67-1 


66-2 


67-1 


66-4 


64-6 


66-4 


640 


95 


s 


93-9 


92-9 


91-6 


90-7 


90-1 


89-5 


89-3 


90-2 


89-3 


88-2 


86 


9 


87-5 


84-7 


83-8 


82-7 


83-3 


82-8 


80-2 


80-8 


81-1 


79-3 


117 


4 


114-4 


1120 


111-9 


110-5 


114-6 


115-1 


114-4 


115-1 


117-9 


118-4 


81 


3 


811 


78-0 


76-5 


74-9 


74-9 


74-8 


71-6 


71-2 


72-0 


70-7 


S3 


fi 


89-5 


78-5 


79-6 


80-1 


80-0 


78-5 


76-1 


83-2 


82-3 


76-6 


119 


3 


99-9 


87-1 


73-6 


65-9 


63-3 


66-2 


661 


69-9 


82-6 


85-5 


65 


8 


66-0 


62-2 


53-1 


46-9 


42-4 


40-1 


36-1 


36-0 


37-0 


34-4 


394 


4 


269-4 


163-2 


97-5 


81-8 


77-5 


87-2 


100-7 


120-9 


161-0 


291-3 


81 


1 


70-3 


60-8 


58-1 


54-6 


59-6 


64-4 


60-6 


66-8 


73-2 


69-9 


118 


9 


117-6 


109-0 


103-5 


97-2 


102-3 


97-3 


102 9 


102-8 


104-4 


105-5 


117 


3 


117-8 


117-4 


115-9 


115-3 


114-0 


114-3 


113-7 


111-6 


113-4 


110-9 


123 





124-8 


124 1 


123-7 


120-7 


120-6 


120-9 


120-2 


115-2 


117-8 


116-1 


103-5 


102-8 


103-5 


100-9 


101-2 


100-9 


100-4 


99-6 


99-2 


99-6 


98-9 


89-6 


95-3 


91-1 


85-3 


83-7 


81-8 


87-n 


80-1 


83-2 


80-3 


79-9 


8S S 


85-2 


83-9 


80-1 


81-4 


81-3 


79-6 


81-3 


84-9 


80-7 


78-0 


911 


88-4 


83-9 


84-6 


82-5 


82-7 


80-3 


82-6 


84-3 


81 5 


82-3 


92-8 


88-9 


86-2 


84-6 


87-0 


90-4 


86-0 


83-3 


88-1 


851 


86-3 


82-9 


81-7 


80-2 


76 1 


77-4 


77-7 


75-2 


74-2 


77-4 


74-2 


72-3 


92-3 


88-9 


85-4 


82-1 


82-7 


83-9 


811 


82-5 


82-9 


82 9 


81-6 


107-4 


109-8 


102-4 


97-2 


101-4 


94-2 


92-7 


93-4 


94-8 


94-2 


99-5 


97-9 


96-7 


94-3 


91-8 


90-0 


90-8 


89-7 


87-8 


87-6 


88-4 


88-2 


103-1 


95-9 


92-9 


91-5 


92-6 


88-2 


91-9 


94-4 


91-7 


93-9 


93-9 


86-6 


83-9 


82-9 


78-9 


75 8 


75-9 


76-1 


75-3 


73-0 


73-9 


73-4 


80-3 


81-8 


87-8 


78-0 


69-3 


50-3 


66-0 


65-5 


85-5 


65-9 


65-5 


89-2 


86-7 


87 


85-1 


82-5 


82-2 


81-0 


78-5 


79-6 


81-1 


81-8 


87 


3 


89-7 


87-3 


84-2 


84-8 


85-1 


86-2 


84-5 


86-1 


87-1 


84-5 



1932 



Feb. 



69-8 
52-1 
87-4 
75-4 
64-5 

78-7 
80-8 
54-1 
34-9 
650 
74-4 



4.170 
-22-3 

1,529 
-35-2 



Mar. 



62-5 
103-0 
85-8 
90-8 
88-3 
49 5 

89-3 
88-2 
65-6 
31-9 
67-3 
85-3 



4,950 
-38-2 

2,025 
-43 



April 



87-3 
72-3 

98-4 
87-4 
127-8 
53-6 

103-1 
84-5 
93-9 
28-6 
680 
92-1 



7,345 
-49-5 
3,000 
-52-5 



May 



75-3 
91-7 
79-3 
119-6 
52-9 

103-9 
82-9 

120-1 
26-6 
64-5 
91-0 



9,615 
-33-9 
3,788 
-40 



June 



107-5 
63-7 

110-8 
84-4 

119-2 
43-7 



9,151 
-20-7 

3,472 
-29-4 



July 



83-1 
70-9 
68-7 
79-0 
93-2 
32-7 

88-0 
78-8 
89-2 
15-9 
63-9 
79-6 



6,632 
-35-8 

2,475 
-41-0 



Aug. 



57-3 

69-2 
51-6 
79-3 
92-2 
44-9 

81-6 

75 
94-0 
22-1 
65-6 
73-7 



6,065 
-10 

2.185 
-24 



Sept. 



71-6 
62-7 
80-7 
76-8 
123-5 
54-9 

94-0 
78-9 
104-5 
38 8 
64-7 
84-0 



5,018 
-15-8 
1,897 
-27-4 



Oct. 



76-5 
68-3 
87-2 
81-2 
108-8 
58-4 

109-9 
80-0 

102-7 
39-0 
61-5 
91-6 



4,361 
-32-2 
1,583 
-40-5 



Nov 



77-3 
57-0 
85-6 
79-3 
92-2 
55-6 

97-7 
78-0 
79-4 
40-7 
56-1 
85-0 



4,2 
-17-0 

1,31 
-37 



Dec. 



95 

127-9 
120-4 
92-9 
77-4 



161-7 
85-6 
99-3 
41 6 
62-4 

119-7 



3,641 
-26-2 

1,132 
-38-4 



1933 



Jan. 



50-8 
53-2 
52-0 
74-4 
66-8 
27-4 

60S 

70-0 
43-2 
20-7 
54-0 
63-9 



3,013 
-25-6 
1,001 
-30-8 



Feb. 



20 



MONTHLY REVIEW OF BUSINESS STATISTICS 
Table 14. Trend of Business in the Five Economic Areas 1 



Areas and Items 



Business in Five Economic 
Areas— 

Canada— 

Contracts awarded $000 

Building Permit* $000 

Employment. Average 1926-100 

Bank Debits $000,000 

8ales of Insurance $000 

Commercial Failures... Number 

Maritime Provinces — 

Contracts Awarded $000 

Building Permits $000 

Employment.Average 1928-100 

Bank Debits $000,000 

Sales of Insurance $000 

Commercial Failures . . . Number 

Quebec — 

Contracts Awarded $000 

Building Permits $000 

Emolovmont. Average 1926—100 

Bank Debits $000,000 

Sales of Insurance $000 

Commercial Failures... Number 

Ontario— 

Contracts Awarded $000 

Building Permits $000 

Employment.Average 1926-100 

Bank Debits $000,000 

Sales of Insurance $000 

Commercial Failures... Number 

Prairie Provinces— 

Contracts Awarded $000 

Building Permits $000 

Employment.Average 1926-100 

Bank Debits $000,000 

Sales of Insurance $000 

Commercial Failures... Number 

British Columbia— 

Contracts Awarded $000 

Building Permits $000 

Employment.Average 1926 — 100 

Bank Debits $000,000 

Sales of Insurance $000 

Commercial Failures... Number 



1932 



Mar. April May June July Aug. Sept. Oct. Nov. Dec 



10,767 

3,324 

87-5 

2,024 

37,206 



312 

72 

88-3 

41-2 

2,395 

13 

3,297 

950 

85-0 

638 

11,354 



4,579 

1,698 

91-1 

861 

16,035 

68 



345 

86-1 

353 

5,031 

40 

572 

259 

80-9 

130-4 

2,391 



10.113 
4,237 
87 5 
2,074 
33,425 
190 

585 

473 

87 8 

42-5 

1,781 

13 

2,948 

830 

86 

596 

9,845 

75 

4,018 

1.820 

89-5 

925 

14,851 

79 

1.724 

825 

87-6 

379 

4,702 

17 



288 

82-7 

131 1 

2,246 



14.186 
5,290 
891 
2,175 
30, 779 
204 

338 

147 

96-4 

49-2 

1,939 

14 

7,390 

1,467 

87-8 

676 

8.913 

£0 

4,168 

1,511 

89-9 

967 

13.660 

79 

1,417 

1,904 

89-3 

358 

4,289 

20 

874 

262 

83-7 

124-9 

1,978 

11 



12,155 
4,388 
88-7 
2,203 
40,744 
176 



131 

96-4 

43-6 

2,242 

18 

4.16* 

1,535 

86-6 

693 

13,116 

61 

4,321 

2,064 

89-2 

944 

17,258 

70 

1,852 

470 

90-5 

397 

5,750 

17 

474 

188 

83-7 

124-1 

2,378 

10 



12,540 

4,227 

86-3 

2,176 

34,226 

175 



207 

90-1 

46-2 

2,381 

8 

3,444 

2,120 

84 

647 

9,924 

72 

6,793 

1,115 

86-9 

975 

14,587 

65 

1,023 

480 

90-1 

388 

5,323 

21 

651 

304 

81-4 

118-3 

2,011 



12,689 

3,331 

86-0 

2,116 

28,124 



961 

118 

87 8 

41-8 



6,858 
1,145 
85-3 
641 
8,533 



3,360 

977 

851 

895 

11,608 

72 

830 
367 
91-6 
406 
4,370 
15 

679 

724 

82-8 

131-8 

1,816 



9,647 
2,204 
86-7 
2,098 
25,023 
192 

344 

71 

84-9 

43-3 

1,532 



3,475 

455 

85-8 

623 

7,757 



4,691 
901 
86-1 
917 

10,433 



644 

337 

94-6 

402 

3.633 

21 

493 

439 

82-1 

112-1 

1.668 



8,876 
3,056 
84-7 
2,367 
29,657 
199 

5C8 

139 

86-8 

43-2 

1,749 

15 

4,859 

1.289 

83-6 

692 

8,92^ 



2,722 

1,154 

84-2 

927 

12,498 

73 

628 

222 

91-6 



26 

159 

253 

77-8 

124-6 

1,802 

5 



10,170 

2,505 

83-2 

2,466 

33,739 

229 

348 

134 

83-8 

40-6 

2,068 

15 

4,938 



710 
9,895 



2,861 
1,522 
84-1 
1,158 
14,461 
80 

828 

104 

86-7 

435 

5,291 

35 

1,196 

136 

73 8 

122-2 

2,024 
10 



4,190 

1,481 

78-5 

2,085 

33,249 



542 

72 

801 

39-4 

2,042 

10 

1,248 

261 

77-8 

606 

9,793 



1,476 

939 

78-8 

904 

14,290 



48 

137 

84 

410 

5,083 

31 

875 

72 

69-7 

125-3 

2,041 



1933 



Jan Feb. Mar 



3,362 

1,164 

76-8 

1,969 

29,171 

216 

124 

43 

76-5 

38-2 

1,914 

11 

1,523 

328 

75-7 

607 



950 
316 
78-5 
853 
12,013 
79 

101 

308 

80-4 

354 

4,377 

27 

665 

168 

68-0 

117-4 

1,988 

9 



5,149 

907 

76-9 

1,830 

26,089 

214 

193 

44 

76-8 

34-5 

1,600 

14 

1,210 
215 
74-1 

562 

8,315 

85 



349 

79-8 

863 

11,148 



191 
52 
80-0 
267 
3.4C9 
29 

590 

247 

67-7 

103-8 

1,617 



3,192 

935 

760 

1,887 

29,601 



156 

102 

78-3 

33-3 

2,087 



973 
221 
731 

534 
9,222 



1,325 

386 

78-3 

786 

12,461 



220 

87 

78-3 

430 
J, 766 



518 
138 



104-5 
2,065 



'Employment indexes apply to first of following month. 







Table 15. 


Mineral Production by Months 












Minerals 


1932 


1933 


Feb. 


Mar. 


Apr. 


May 


June 


July 


Aug. 


Sept. 


Oct. 


Nov. 


Dec 


Jan. 


Feb. 


Mineral Froduction 

Metals — 
Gold 


000 oz. 
000 oz. 

tons 

tone 

tons 

tons 

000 tons 

000 bbls. 

000 M cu. ft 

tons 

000 tone 

tons 

tons 

ALS— 

OCO bbls. 
$000 
tone 


225-9 
1,601 
1,787 
11,214 
10,077 
7,112 

1,230 

90-8 

3,044 

7,706 

6-10 

945 

10,332 

236 

296 

23,632 


255-7 
1,460 
1,877 
11,831 
10.666 
7,583 

1.049 

97 5 

3,010 

8.937 

5-86 

1.160 

13,093 

276 

311 

29,108 


246-4 
1,645 
1,692 
11,039 
10.812 
7,325 

739 

95-6 

2,354 

8,830 

15-55 

415 

15,326 

427 

362 

26.744 


268-5 
1,418 
1,736 
10,678 

10,075 
7,624 

697 
95-2 
1,760 

9,942 

32-24 

423 

15,406 

531 

404 
30,014 


270-5 
1,311 
1,581 
10,335 
11,228 
7,333 

752 
89-5 
1,131 

7,977 

70-71 

479 

15,409 

567 

428 
27.290 


247-9 
1,825 
1,480 
9,045 
10,027 
7,603 

653 

86-9 

982 

7,164 

80-14 

635 

13,869 

457 

375 
27,185 


262-6 
1,447 
420 
8,802 
10,899 
6,866 

720 

85-2 

912 

9.918 

69-46 

360 

14,331 

510 

386 

27,733 


260-5 
1,172 
339 
9,406 
9,947 
6.651 

929 
79-8 
1,158 

11.001 

52-53 

375 

15,218 

509 

356 

28,550 


253-1 
1,511 
1,071 
11,293 
9,930 
6,852 

1,229 
78-8 
1,712 

13,232 

52-34 

482 

16,683 

411 

323 

34,822 


252-5 
1,515 
614 
8,858 
13,180 
6,653 

1.263 

77-1 

2,182 

11.616 

27-60 

433 

18,640 

193 

249 

29,211 


266-7 
1,299 
684 
11,105 
9,972 
6,984 

1,160 
80-8 
2,699 

14,478 

19-61 

493 

9,833 

83 

133 

18,295 


233-4 
1,384 
890 
11,475 
10,391 
6,946 

1,023 
82-8 
2,945 

5,950 
2-73 


228-2 






Nickel 

Copper 

Lead 

Zinc 

Fuels— 

Coal 

Petroleum 

Natural Gas 

Non-metals— 


6,325 

812 

73-1 

2,827 

5,482 


Gypsum 

Feldspar 

Salt 

Structural Mater 

Cement 

Clay products.... 
Lime 




9,884 

65 
111 

18,224 





MONTHLY REVIEW OF BUSINESS STATISTICS 



21 



Table 16. Weekly Indicators of Economic Activity in Canada, 1932 



Items 


Jan. 


February 


March 


April 


28 


4 


11 


18 


5 


4 


11 


18 


25 


1 


8 


Statistics of Grain Trade— 

Receipts Country Elevators — 

Wheat 000 bushels 

Oats 000 bushels 

Barley 000 bushels 

Flax 000 bushels 

Rye 000 bushels 

Visible Supply— 
Wheat 000,000 bushels 


2,412 

290 

118 

12 

18 

229-2 
9,345 
6,806 
1,480 
5,020 

•452 
•229 
•280 
•773 
•310 

10,709 
3,409 

25,760 
5,167 

3-58 
6-25 
3-75 
5-69 

4,119 

1,221 

4,387 

661 

523 

922 

1,258 

1,444 

500 

11,006 

5,396 


3,233 

427 

123 

14 

20 

230-1 
9.389 
6,776 
1,483 
5,020 

•457 
•226 
•275 
•772 
•314 

9,504 
4,013 
22,217 
3,696 

3-53 

6-29 
3-65 
5-69 

3,715 

1,164 

4,825 

886 

592 

980 

1,221 

1,471 

541 

10,610 

5,906 

31,911 

17,119 

48-20 
59-36 
75-95 
179-72 
20-07 
21-26 
49-06 
39-07 
39-23 
72-47 
55-14 
55-93 
54-87 
57-96 

52-0 
43-0 
1-7 
35-9 
83-3 
28-5 
75-2 
33-5 
63-6 

37-1 

26-8 
59-3 
43-8 

41-4 

57-4 
27-9 
44-5 

70-6 
79-0 
27-6 
70-9 


1,941 

297 

113 

7 

12 

229-5 
9,244 
6.768 
1,454 
5,044 

•471 
•230 
•275 
•777 
•319 

8,691 
4,085 
17,401 
2,625 

3-59 
6-54 
3-68 
5-66 

2,619 

819 

5,507 

1,389 

575 

928 

1,425 

1,293 

613 

10,411 

5,112 

30,691 

16,211 

33-27 
43 11 
93-15 
294-90 
19-12 
19-18 
56-12 
33-75 
43-23 
70-00 
46-49 
53-22 
53-41 
52-80 

51-5 
40-5 
1-8 
34-6 
80-5 
28-1 
74-8 
32-9 
65-8 

36-3 
25-7 
58-1 
43-5 

41-5 
58-4 
27-1 
44-0 

77-5 
86-9 
29-7 
77-9 


1,814 

262 

74 

3 

12 

226-5 
9,297 
6,700 
1,403 
5,090 

•477 
•232 
•274 
•780 
•322 

9,280 
3,692 
20,470 
4,013 

3-75 
6-85 
4-20 
6-00 

4,009 

1,375 

6,559 

1,274 

853 

1,002 

1,297 

1,547 

690 

11,379 

5,894 

35,879 

18,899 

51-37 

74-61 
112-33 
236-36 
27-29 
20-42 
49-17 
39-57 
47-26 
74-95 
52-41 
61-31 
57-97 
67-97 

52-4 
41-5 
1-6 
34-2 
84-3 
27-5 
75-8 
33-9 
64-8 

35-9 

24-4 
59-0 
43-8 

43-9 
63-6 
27-1 
44-6 

76-8 
86-5 
28-5 
77-2 


3,636 

577 

137 

12 

21 

225-0 
9,265 
6,696 
1,459 
5,085 

•482 
•239 
•275 
•779 
•321 

10,244 
4,778 

24,913 
3,577 

3-52 
6-75 
3-85 
6-43 

5,315 

1,139 

4,113 

807 

876 

1,102 

1,315 

1,658 

819 

11,114 

5,681 

33,939 

17,668 

73-73 
64-57 
70-55 
159-80 
26-92 
22-90 
52-54 
41-54 
55-71 
75-04 
50-97 
59-25 
54-53 
68-71 

50-0 
39-8 
1-6 
34-9 
80-0 
25-9 
73-6 
32-5 
61-8 

33-3 

20-8 
54-9 
42-8 

41-5 
60-4 
25-4 
42-1 

75-1 
84-5 
27-9 
75-5 


3,774 

806 

185 

13 

32 

224-0 
9,513 
6,729 
1,459 
5,110 

•491 
•240 
•275 

•777 
•320 

9,098 
3,920 
20,002 
3,937 

3-27 
6-72 
4-05 
6-07 

5,900 

1,132 

3,151 

834 

759 

1,068 

1,289 

1,743 

807 

11,167 

6,361 

34,211 

18,049 

75-16 
58-23 
53-75 
177-83 
23-21 
21-99 
50-04 
43-18 
54-27 
71-99 
54-62 
57-46 
53-64 
65-16 

49-0 
38-9 
1-4 
33-1 
79-9 
26-0 
70-8 
32-3 
59-2 

32-8 
20-8 
55-0 
41-7 

40-4 
58-8 
24-8 
41-3 

69-6 
80-9 
26-2 


3, £83 

758 

167 

12 

26 

223-4 
9,858 
6,674 
1,438 
5,10' 

•501 
•248 
•285 
•794 
•337 

8,462 
4,691 
19.689 
3,209 

3-59 
7-21 
4-55 
6-26 

5,290 

1,136 

3,676 

850 

691 

1,065 

1,369 

1,654 

727 

11,495 

6,418 

34,371 

15,769 

70-51 
55-28 
68-58 
209-88 
20-46 
24-30 
53-04 
42-27 
49-83 
71-87 
55-19 
58-40 
54-73 
65-81 

50-2 
39-2 
1-1 
32-3 
81-5 
27-2 
69-9 
33-2 
61-8 

34-1 
22-4 
56-6 
42-6 

40-3 

57-7 
25-7 
42-3 

66-2 

77-8 
26-3 


5,169 

1,217 

241 

14 

38 

224-6 
10,784 
6,795 
1,445 
5,130 

•506 
•252 
•297 
•801 
•351 

9,718 
5,461 
21,445 
3,942 

3-88 
7-02 
5-04 
6-35 

6,285 

1,479 

3,335 

972 

715 

907 

1,439 

1,642 

636 

11,594 

6,882 

35,886 

16,581 

81-79 
71-07 
62-92 
251-17 
19-92 
20-30 
56-08 
42-47 
43-44 
72-16 
56-01 
60-06 
54-37 
71-93 

53-0 
42-7 
•9 
35-1 
82-4 
26-0 
72-4 
36-8 
68-8 

34-9 
22-6 
58-3 
44-0 

41-6 
59-7 
26-4 
44-0 

67-4 
83-9 
26-8 
69-5 


4,784 

1,459 

224 

18 

49 

225-2 
11,629 
6,732 
1,358 
5,138 

•486 
•242 
•291 
•793 
•339 

9,933 

6-630 

21.567 

3,994 

4-04 
6-42 
5-29 
6-42 

6,740 

1,437 

2,955 

764 

774 

1,050 

1,280 

1,565 

664 

11,776 

6,527 

35,532 

16,418 

93-78 
65-26 
60-94 
215-82 
21-20 
24-68 
51-65 
41-92 
45-02 
70-68 
50-25 
59-28 
53-13 
72-41 

52-0 
41-5 
•8 
35-7 
79-7 
25-0 
72-9 
36-8 
68-6 

34-0 
21-1 
57-8 
43-6 

40-7 
58-6 
25-7 
43-1 

66-5 
83-2 
26-6 

68-7 


3,708 

1,151 

219 

17 

30 

226-7 
11,864 
6,790 
1,359 
5,178 

•489 
•241 
•293 
•791 
•344 

9,460 

6,502 

22,094 

2,760 

4-02 
5-84 
6-07 
6-87 

5,362 

1,545 

2,593 

692 

873 

1,220 

1,219 

1,568 

73.3 

11,891 

6,888 

34,584 

18,016 

81-51 
66-91 
55-78 
190-11 
23-89 
32-17 
49-37 
45-12 
49-93 
70-20 
53-97 
59-11 
55-09 
67-64 

50-7 

39-5 

•8 

35-2 

78-7 
24-9 
72-8 
36-1 
65-8 

32-8 
20-0 
55-7 
42-3 

39-8 
57-5 
24-9 
41-9 

66-5 
81-1 
26-5 
68-2 


2,384 

594 

103 

15 

22 

225-9 


Oats 000 bushels 


12,238 


Barley 000 bushels 

Flax 000 bushels 

Rye 000 bushels 

Aver. Cash Price Ft. William and Pt. 
Arthur — 

Wheat No. 1 Nor $ per bush 

Oats No. 2C.W 


6,742 

1,320 

5,141 

M 

•507 
•240 


Barley No. 3 C.W " 


•299 


Flax No. 1 N.W.C 

Rye No. 1 C.W 


•800 
•362 


Sales on Stock Yards — 
Cattle No . 


10,333 
6,661 


Hogs " 

Sheep " 

Steers, 1,000-1,200 lbs per cwt. $ 


23,476 
2,531 

4-19 


Hogs, thick smooth " $ 

Lambs, good handy weight " % 

Carloadings, Totals- 


611 
5-85 
7-43 

4,200 




1,451 




2,558 


Coke 


517 




787 




869 




1,474 




1,097 




770 


Mdse L.C.L 


12,315 
6,290 




31,437 
17,474 

53-77 
60-06 
68-35 
136 01 
19-13 
22-36 
50-77 
44-06 
36-58 
76-29 
53-45 
56-60 
55-07 
59-47 

53-5 

45-4 
1-1 
37-2 
86-6 
30-5 
76-0 
33-9 
651 

40-0 
30-2 
64-1 
45-8 

43-4 
60-6 
28-9 
46-8 

67-6 
76-8 
28-3 
68-3 


32,328 


Total cars received from connections 

Indexes of Carloadings. 1926=100 — 


17,882 
68-21 




65-87 


Coal 


58-98 


Coke 


136-05 




21-82 




28-21 




59-99 




34-04 


Ore 


51-64 


Merchandise 


71-59 




49-38 


Total for Canada 


56-55 




54-39 




60-98 


Industrials — 


50-6 


Iron and steel(19) 


38-7 




•8 


Milling (5) 


36-3 


Oils (4) 


78-4 


Textiles and clothing (9) 


24-9 


Food and allied products (21) 


71-2 


Beverages (8) 


34-8 


Miscellaneous (21) 


66-5 


Utilities— 
Total (18) 


31-3 


Transportation (2) 


18-7 


Telephone and telegraph (2) 


53-3 


Power and traction (14) 


40-7 


Companies Abroad — 
Total (8) 


39-6 


Industrial (1) 


57-5 


Utility (7) 


24-6 


Grand total (122) 


41-2 


Gold (11) 


68-4 




78-9 


Silver and miscellaneous (5) 


25-8 


Total Index (20) . . . 


70-51 67-3 


69-0 



22 



MONTHLY REVIEW OF BUSINESS STATISTICS 



Table 17. Bank Debits to Individual Accounts in the Clearing House Centres of Canada in 
Millions of Dollars, with Annual Totals for Leading Cities and Economic Areas 



Year 


Canada 


Halifax 


Saint 
John 


Montreal 


Toronto 


Winnipeg 


Vancou- 
ver 


Maritime 
Provinces 


Quebec 


Ontario 


Prairie 
Provinces 


British 
Columbia 


1924 


27,157 


249 


282 


7,502 


7,659 


3,793 


1.410 


585 


8,133 


11,209 


5,505 


1,725 


1925 


28,126 


292 


208 


7,766 


7,588 


4,183 


1,475 


572 


8,475 


11,236 


6,000 


1.842 


1926 


30,358 


310 


215 


9,133 


8.210 


3,877 


1,553 


605 


9,909 


11,998 


5,886 


1,960 


1927 


36,094 


325 


219 


11,780 


10,537 


4,005 


1,596 


628 


12,744 


14,642 


6,127 


2,053 


1928 


43,477 


405 


249 


13,962 


12,673 


5,188 


1,982 


745 


14,913 


17,312 


8,005 


2,499 


1929 


46,670 


425 


273 


15,558 


13,714 


4.789 


2,366 


798 


16,483 


18.543 


7,923 


2,923 


1930 


37,491 


362 


246 


12,271 


10,655 


3,712 


1.813 


708 


13.137 


15,044 


6,279 


2,322 


1931 


31,536 


330 


235 


9,757 


9,512 


3,280 


1,416 


653 


10,550 


13,377 


5,201 


1,806 


1932 


25,844 


258 


214 


7,136 


8,066 


3,138 


1,190 


519 


7,766 


11,259 


4,797 


1,503 



Clearing House 
Centres 


1932 




1933 




Mar. 


April 


May 


June 


July 


Aug. 


Sept. 


Oct. 


Nov. 


Dec. 


Jan. 


Feb. 


Mar. 


Bank Debits 

Maritime Provinces 
Halifax 


$ 

19-7 

5-7 
15-9 


S 

211 
6-3 
15-2 


f 

26-3 
60 
16-9 


% 

21-4 
6-4 
15-7 


S 

24-1 
6-2 
15-9 


% 

20-3 
5-6 
15-9 


$ 

22-6 
5-6 
15-1 


S 

21-7 
5-7 
15-8 


1 

21-1 
6-0 
13.5 


S 

19-9 
6-2 
13-3 


S 

19-4 
6-5 
12-4 


1 

16-9 
5-1 
12-6 


16-8 




4-9 


Saint John 


11-6 


Totals 


41-2 


42-5 


49-2 


43-6 


46-2 


41-8 


43-3 


43-2 


40-6 


39-4 


38-2 


34-5 


33-3 






Quebec — 


587-9 
45-0 
5-4 


548-9 

41-0 

6-0 


612-0 

58-2 

6-0 


639-7 

47-4 

6-3 


587-6 

54-3 

5-5 


592-6 

43-1 

5-8 


576-6 

40-9 

5-8 


631-1 

55-4 

5-7 


654-1 

49-9 

5-7 


556-8 

43-5 

5-8 


546-4 
55-4 
5-1 


520-8 
36-5 
4-7 


493-4 




36-4 


Sherbrooke 


4-6 


Totals 


638-3 


595-9 


676-2 


693-4 


647-4 


641-4 


623-3 


692-2 


709-7 


606-1 


607-0 


562-0 


534-4 






Ontario — 


6-5 

5-1 

3-4 

45-9 

3-9 

7-3 

25-7 

122-6 

4-6 

6-4 

3-5 

607-8 

18-6 


7-4 

5-6 

4-4 

46-8 

4-5 

8-2 

25-6 

141-2 

4-7 

6 9 

3-7 

646-2 

20-3 


6-9 

60 

4-6 

481 

4-8 

7-9 

28-0 

174-6 

4-4 

8-5 

3-4 

650-8 

18-9 


7-7 

5-2 

51 

45-4 

5-0 

8-8 

32-1 

159-0 

4-7 

8-8 

4-3 

639-7 

18-5 


8-5 

4-3 

5-4 

40-1 

5-4 

8-1 

28-8 

132-6 

4-8 

8-8 

3-1 

708-8 

17-0 


6-2 

4-8 

4-6 

43-2 

4-2 

6-9 

23-3 

124-4 

3-9 

6-8 

2-9 

644-6 

18-4 


6-6 
110 

4.4 

45-4 
5-3 
7-6 

22-7 

83-8 
4-4 

11-8 

3-2 

692-7 

18-1 


7-5 
4-4 
4-2 

41-5 
4-8 
8-2 

26-3 

89-5 

4-0 

9-2 

3-2 

707-2 

17-3 


6-9 
6-8 
5-6 
43-4 
4-3 
8-6 
24-9 

203-1 
4-3 
6-6 
3-3 

823-4 
17-3 


7-7 
7-7 
5-4 

39-0 
4-7 
8-0 

26-6 

99-2 

5-4 

8-1 

3-1 

672-1 

16-7 


6-4 
5-3 
3-6 

32-5 
3-9 
7-7 

24-5 

86-8 

3-9 

6-7 

2-6 

655-3 

13-3 


5-1 
3-8 

4-6 

29-2 

3-6 

6-6 

21-9 

80-6 

2-9 

4-2 

2-5 

683-6 

14-3 


5-5 




4-0 


Fort William 


2-9 
31-7 




3-7 




6-5 




22-8 




81-3 


Peterborough 


3-6 

6-4 




3-0 




594-6 




19-5 






Totals 


861-3 


925-3 


966-9 


944-2 


975-9 


894-2 


917-0 


927-4 


1,158-5 


903-8 


852-5 


863-0 


785-5 






Prairie Provinces- 


2-8 

40-2 

410 

2-4 

1-7 

4-6 

1-7 

44 1 

9-0 

205-2 


2-5 

40-5 

35-7 

2-9 

1-7 

4 4 

20 

45 3 

9-9 

234- 1 


30 

42-0 

31 2 

2-9 

1-5 

5-0 

1-8 

39-3 

9-8 

221-4 


2-8 

48-9 

32-3 

3-1 

1-6 

5-2 

1-8 

34-2 

9-3 

258-3 


2-7 

34-6 

28-9 

3-0 

1-7 

5-6 

1-7 

35 9 

8-8 

264-7 


2-7 

37-3 

30-6 

3-3 

1-5 

4-4 

1-6 

36-7 

9-7 

278-8 


3-1 
43-4 

28-2 

3-6 

1-7 

51 

1-6 

41-0 

100 

264-6 


3-5 

51-0 

340 

3-7 

2-4 

6-1 

1-8 

61-6 

11-5 

404-2 


2-8 

48-6 

26-8 

3-5 

2-0 

5-2 

1-8 

34-1 

9-8 

300-8 


2 6 

43-9 

30-4 

3-3 

1-8 

5-3 

1-9 

29-8 

9-2 

281-7 


2-2 

43-9 

37-6 

2-6 

1-5 

4-5 

1-4 

27-2 

7-7 

225-2 


1-7 

31-6 

22-0 

1-9 

1-3 

2-9 

1-0 

21-9 

6-0 

176-7 


2-0 




38-9 


Edmonton 

Let.hbridsre 

Medicine Hat 

Moose Jaw 

Prince Albert 


30-0 
2-5 
1-5 
3-0 

1-5 
33-6 




7-1 




310-6 






Totals 


352-8 


379-1 


357-9 


397-5 


387-8 


406-5 


402-2 


579-7 


435-3 


410-0 


353-8 


266-9 


429-6 






British Columbia— 
New Westminster. 
Vancouver 


4-2 

100-6 
25-6 


4-6 
105-6 
21-0 


4-4 
97-9 
22-5 


4-2 
961 
23-8 


4-6 
91-7 
22-0 


4-2 
105-1 
22-5 


4-2 
89-1 
18-9 


4-2 
102-1 
18-4 


3-6 
97-9 
20-6 


4-1 
98-1 
23-0 


3-5 
91-3 
22-5 


3-1 
82-8 
18-0 


3-5 
84-7 
16-3 






Totals 


130-4 


131-1 


124-9 


124-1 


118-3 


131-8 


1121 


124-6 


122-2 


125-3 


117-4 


103-8 


104-5 






Totals Canada. 


2,024-0 


2,073-9 


2,175-2 


2.202-8 


2.175-6 


2,115-7 


2,097- 


2,367-2 


2,466-3 


2,084-6 


1,968-9 


1,830-3 


1,887-3 






Table 18. Indexes of Employment by Cities, 1926 = 100 



1st of Month 


1932 


1933 


Jan. 


Feb. 


Mar. 


Apr. 


May 


June 


July 


Aug 


Sept. 


Oct. 


Nov. 


Dec. 


Jan. 


Feb. 


Mar. 




Employ- 
ment- 
Montreal...,. 

Quebec 

Toronto 

Ottawa 

Hamilton.... 

Windsor 

Winnipeg 

Vancouver. . . 


88-0 
100-8 
99-6 
108-9 
91-3 
83-5 
92-5 
91-1 


87-4 
100-9 
97-8 
104-5 
90-2 
81-4 
89-6 
90-1 


89-8 
101-9 
97-8 
96-6 
90-4 
80-4 
88-5 
87-8 


91-2 

102-0 
97-8 

101-7 
87-4 
89-8 
86-8 
87-8 


911 
104-0 
97-5 
102-5 
86-9 
88-3 
861 

87-e 


91-7 
105-6 
96-8 
100-9 
84-9 
91-0 
85-2 
89-4 


88-6 
104-8 
94-6 
99-3 
84-4 
89-6 
87-0 
88-7 


85-5 
101-0 
92-3 
97-6 
80-6 
80-0 
86-0 
87-9 


86-3 
105-8 
91-6 
98-0 
77-1 
71-8 
85-1 
89-0 


88-0 
100-2 
93-5 
94-4 
77-6 
58-7 
85-6 
88-5 


84-8 
98-5 
92-5 
94-1 
77-8 
62-5 
84-3 
87-9 


85-1 
95-9 
91-2 
92-6 
76-6 
63-7 
82-2 
85-8 


77-5 
92-6 
86-5 
85-8 
70-7 
63-9 
80-8 
82-5 


76-1 
88-9 
84-7 
85-7 
70-4 
67-2 
77-8 
81-2 


75-8 
92-3 
84-4 
85-5 
70-8 
70-5 
78-0 
80-5 


76-4 
92-7 
85-0 
85-3 
70-9 
79-0 
78-0 
79-0 






MONTHLY REVIEW OF BUSINESS STATISTICS 23 

Table 19. Building Permits Issued by Sixty-one Cities in Canada in Thousands of Dollars 



City 










1932 














1933 




Mar. 


April 


May 


June 


July 


Aug. 


Sept. 


Oct. 


Nov. 


Dec. 


Jan. 


Feb. 


Mar. 


Funding Permits— 

Nova Scotia 


56 


213 


106 


92 


120 


67 


51 


102 


109 


49 


37 


30 


75 


Halifax 


51 

1 
5 


108 
26 
79 


95 
2 
9 


89 
1 
3 


105 

1 

14 


67 


40 


92 
2 
8 


108 


49 


37 


28 
2 


75 


New Glasgow 






10 






















New Brunswick. . . 


16 


260 


40 


39 


88 


51 


49 


36 


25 


23 


6 


15 


27 


Fredericton 


2 
2 
13 


3 

32 
225 


4 

12 
24 


3 

6 

31 


5 

5S 
24 


1 
23 
27 


29 

20 


2 
5 

29 










5 


6 
19 








6 


Saint John 


22 


6 


15 


17 




950 


830 


1,467 


1,536 


2,116 


1,151 


530 


1,290 


609 


261 


328 


215 


221 






Montreal and Mai- 
sonneuve 


839 
72 

1 
14 
24 

1 


661 
70 
7 
18 
32 
42 


1,311 

115 

2 

20 

13 

5 


1,420 
52 

4 
28 

8 
23 


1,810 
241 

46 

8 
12 


973 
99 

6 
32 

8 
33 


338 
61 
77 
11 

43 


1,149 
68 

1 
12 

1 
59 


248 

320 

4 

4 

33 


216 
12 


308 
12 


194 

14 

1 

2 

1 
3 


184 
16 


Shawinigan 

Sherbrooke 

Three Rivers 

Westmount 




2 
1 

30 


4 
4 


2 
2 
18 




1,689 


1,820 


1,512 


2,067 


1,116 


977 


901 


1,175 


1,522 


939 


316 


349 


386 






Belleville 


2 
20 

7 
11 
19 
15 
114 
13 

5 
79 

1 
351 


17 
35 

9 
41 
13 
11 
98 
89 
138 
87 
36 

9 
145 

5 
11 
18 

4 

12 
14 

5 

9 
817 

157 
21 
11 


19 
8 
9 

63 

12 

17 

111 

108 

19 

63 

10 

6 

132 

2 

16 
156 
7 
14 
4 

15 

13 

514 

171 

4 
3 
1 


14 
7 

10 
23 
10 
38 

149 
28 
37 
49 

106 
6 

261 

"14 

12 
7 

18 
1 
8 

34 
376 

126 

8 

699 

2 


6 

13 
2 

28 

8 

8 

187 

8 

2 

35 

2 

1 

115 

6 

8 

31 

4 

50 

2 

4 

13 
394 

115 
3 
66 


i 

2 

12 
14 
13 

72 

30 

25 

27 

1 

1 

76 

1 

100 

5 

6 

22 

1 

4 

29 
381 

119 

9 

13 

1 


8 
9 
6 

70 
3 

14 
105 

22 

13 

35 
2 
5 

68 
1 
1 

14 
3 
9 

14 
5 

11 
317 

129 
1 
8 

8 


29 

5 

6 

8 

3 

15 

348 

19 

33 

31 

2 

4 

91 

3 

8 

12 

12 

8 

1 

3 

9 

383 

111 
11 

6 


2 

22 

3 

10 

45 

7 

37 

38 

2 

7 

38 

1 

6 

25 
2 

18 

4 

5 

1 

1,197 

46 
1 
2 


3 
2 
3 


1 
.... 








1 

2 
17 
3 

10 
6 
3 
4 

35 

"*2 

43 

1 

i9 

3 
1 


3 




9 


Fort William 

Gait 


33 


2 

12 
8 
8 

22 


3 
1 

39 
1 
1 

30 
4 


2 




2 




29 




3 




6 




44 


Niagara Falls 


2 




48 

i 

3 
2 

2 

2 
805 

c 
2 
2 


11 
2 
2 
1 
1 
1 

10 
3 

""i34 

53 
6 
11 


35 




7 


Peterborough 

Port Arthur 


12 
3 

5 


5 

8 


St. Catharines 


3 




8 

12 

589 

386 
6 
13 

1 


2 

5 

153 

34 
5 
3 


3 


Sault Ste. Marie.. 


1 
168 


York and East 

Townships 

Welland 


16 
2 




3 






















5 
4 

7 


6 
3 


1 

3 
11 








1 
1 
11 














1 
17 


1 
4 


3 
12 


1 

10 












Woodstock 


3 


2 


1 


1 


1 




41 


199 


1,108 


135 


202 


171 


132 


79 


30 


115 


17 


9 


32 








1 

5 

36 


5 

54 
139 


7 

28 
1,073 


2 

4 
128 


6 

3 

192 


1 

10 

161 


7 

6 

118 


6 
72 


30 


2 

100 

13 








St. Boniface 


1 
16 


1 
8 


3i 






Saskatchewan 


249 


179 


486 


155 


207 


163 


137 


90 


39 


73 


257 


8 


17 


Moose Jaw 


40 
95 
114 


61 
18 
100 


52 

26 

409 


24 
22 
108 


112 

7 

88 


15 

19 

129 


6 

18 
113 


5 

9 
76 


12 

26 


1 

1 

71 


'"256 

2 


2 

6 


10 


Saskatoon 


6 




85 


431 


431 


249 


191 


159 


154 


118 


51 


20 


34 


36 


39 








50 

31 

2 

2 


250 

160 

13 

8 


74 

347 

9 

1 


74 

171 

2 

1 


68 

112 

9 


55 
76 
22 

5 


71 

74 

8 

1 


61 

48 

8 


16 
13 

"'21 


13 

6 


15 
6 
13 


26 

9 
1 


24 


Edmonton 

Lethbridge 


12 

2 












British Columbia.. 


269 


298 


272 


198 


314 


734 


449 


253 


136 


72 


168 


247 


138 




1 
8 

13 
13 
187 
11 
36 


4 
1 
8 
1 
212 
5 
66 


11 

"i5 

4 

203 

2 

36 


8 

4 
10 

5 
127 

1 
44 


1 

3 

17 

10 

233 

5 

45 


3 
4 

16 

2 

634 

37 

39 


9 

5 
14 

2 
384 

4 
31 


8 
19 

9 

2 
176 

4 
35 


2 
3 



""m 
'"it 


1 




9 

f 

2 

196 


10 




1 


New Westminster. 

Prince Rupert 

Vancouver 


3 
2 

54 
1 

12 


2 
""i45 


5 
3 
98 

2 




20 


34 


20 






Total 61 cities... 


3,395 


4,371 


5,483 


4,749 


4,410 


3,523 


2,450 


3,171 


2,553 


1,569 


1,164 


907 


935 



24 



MONTHLY REVIEW OF BUSINESS STATISTICS 
Table 20. Index Numbers of Wholesale Prices: 1926 = 100 



Classification 



Totals 

Component Material- 
Vegetable products 

Animal products 

Textiles 

Wood and paper 

Iron and its products 

Non-ferrous metals 

Non-metallic minerals 

Chemicals 

Purpose— Consumers goods 

Foods, beverages and tobacco. . 

Producers' goods 

Producers' equipment 

Producers' materials 

Building and construction ma- 
terials 

Manufacturers' materials 

Origin — Raw and partly manu- 
factured 

Fully and chiefly manufact'd 
Fikld origin— raw 

Manufactured 

Totals 

Animal origin— Raw 

Manufactured 

Totals 

Canadian farm PRODUCTS-Field 

Animal 

Totals 

Marine origin— Raw. 

Manufactured 

Totals 

Forest origin— Raw 

Manufactured 

Totals 

Mineral origin— Raw 

Manufactured 

Totals 

Commodity Groups- 
Fruits 

Grains 

Flour and milled products 

Rubber and its products 

Sugar and its products 

Tobacco 

Fishery products 

Furs 

Hides and skins 

Leather, unmanufactured 

Boots and shoes 

Live stock 

Meats and poultry 

Milk and its products 

Eggs 

Cotton, raw 

Cotton yarn and thread 

Knit goods 

Silk, raw 

Artificial silk and its products. . 

Wool, raw 

Wool yarns 

Newsprint 

Lumber and timber 

Pulp 

Pig iron and steel billets 

Rolling mill products 

Scrap 

Aluminium 

Brass, copper and products 

Lead and its products 

Metallic nickel 

Silver 

Zinc and its products 

Bricks 

Coal 

Coke 

Petroleum and products 

Lime 

Cement 

Asbestos 

Fertilizers 



1932 



Mar. April May June July Aug. Sept. Oct. Nov. Dec 



631 



72 



63 4 

57- 
60- 
71- 
74' 

86- 
58- 
86- 

83- 



90- 
64- 

54- 
62- 
47- 
39- 
78- 
80- 
26- 
64- 

32- 
67- 
72- 
71- 
76- 
86- 
91- 
45- 
94- 
50- 

44. 
97- 
50- 
41- 

100- 
91- 

100- 
72- 
91- 

105- 



67 7 



• 1 


56- 


•2 


58- 


•1 


70- 


•0 


73- 


•5 


86- 


•5 


57- 


•0 


85- 


•3 


83- 


•8 


71- 


•1 


60- 


•6 


64- 


•7 


88- 


■8 


62- 


-9 


78- 


•2 


58- 


•5 


B5- 


•6 


70- 


■8 


42- 


•1 


68- 


•0 


56- 


•0 


58- 





59- 


•6 


58- 


•5 


44- 


•1 


58- 


•1 


49- 


•3 


fi9- 


•2 


69- 


2 


66- 


•8 


71- 


•2 


75- 


•1 


73- 


2 


75- 


4 


85- 


2 


81- 


2 


83- 





44. 


8 


59- 


9 


52- 


8 


72- 


3 


50- 


3 


66- 


6 


50- 


7 


27- 


8 


80- 


2 


BO- 


7 


64- 





54- 


6 


56- 


9 


44- 


5 


37- 


5 


78- 





80- 





24- 


9 


64- 


9 


30- 


7 


67- 


2 


72- 


3 


69- 


2 


75- 


9 


86- 


1 


91- 





45- 


2 


95- 


6 


48- 


9 


41- 


5 


97- 


8 


50- 


2 


40- 


8 


100- 


7 


88 


8 


100- 


7 


76- 


8 


91- 


9 


105 


2 


71- 


•4 


70- 



66 6 

54 
57 
69 
72 
86 
56 
86 
82 

71 

59 
63 



76 



53 



66 
54 
58 
58 
58 
40 
59 
47 
55 
68 
64 
68 
75 
72 
75 
85 
81 

82 
39 
55 
52 
72 
50 
64 
50 
26 
77 

90 
66 
53 
55 
49 
34 
78 
80 
24 
64 

27 
67 
72 
68 
70 
86 
91 
45 
97 
47 

39 

97 

51 

39 
100 

88 
100 

76 

91 
105 

71 

720 



66 6 



71-2 
72-0 



71-2 
72-4 



66 9 

53 

00 
70 
09 
85 
58 



31 
63 

31 
68 
72 
67 
67 
86 
90 
41 
93 
52 

43 

97 

48 

43 
100 

90 
100 

75 

91 
105 

71-2 
72-0 



71-2 
72-3 



64 8 



71-2 

72-3 



640 

50-2 
57-2 
68-6 
64-0 
86-2 
57-5 
86-1 
83-6 

70-6 
59-3 
58-6 
87-7 
55-4 

76-2 
50-8 



46 



71-2 
72-3 



1933 
Jan. Feb. Mar. 



71-2 
72 3 



63 6 



71-2 
72-3 



MONTHLY REVIEW OF BUSINESS STATISTICS 



25 



Table 21. Prices of Representative Commodities, and Wholesale Prices in Other Countries. 



Description* 



Wholesale Prices of Important 

Commodities- 
Oats, No. 2 C.W bush 

Wheat, No. 1 Man. Northern " 
Flour, First Patent 2-98's 

jute 

Sugar, raw 96* Centrifugal 

N.Y cwt. 

Sugar, granulated, Montreal M 
Rubber, ribbed, smoked 

sheets.N.Y lb. 

Rubber, Para, upriver, fine, 

N.Y M 

Cattle, steers, good 1,000- 

1,200 lbs cwt. 

Hogs, bacon, Toronto " 

Beef hides, packer hides, 

native steers lb. 

Sole leather, mfr's. green 
hide crops " 

Box sides B. mill ft. 

Butter, creamery, finest, 
Montreal lb. 

Cheese, Canadian, old large, 
Montreal " 

Fees, fresh extras, Montreal doz. 

Cotton, raw 1-1 1/16', Ham- 
ilton lb. 

Cotton yarns, 10's white 
single " 

Saxony, 4-50 yds to lb " 

Gingham, dress, 6-50-7-75 
ydstolb M 

Silk, raw, grand double 
extra, N.Y " 

Wool, eastern bright | blood " 

Wool, western range, semi- 
bright, * blood «* 



Pulp, groundwood No. 1 ton 

Pig iron, basic mill " 

8teel merchant bars, mill. 100 lb 
Copper, electrolytic domes- 
tic cwt. 

Lead, domestic, Montreal. . " 
Tin ingots, Straits, Toronto lb. 
Spelter, domestic, Montreal cwt. 
Coal, anthracite, Toronto. . ton 
Coal, bituminous, N.S. run- 

of-mine " 

Gasoline, Toronto gal. 

Sulphuric acid. flfi'Bonume net ton 
Indexes of Wholesale Prices in 
Other Countries—' 
United States- 
Fisher, 200: 1926 

Bureau of Labour, 550: 1926 

Annalist, 72: 1913 

United Kingdom — 
Board of Trade, 150: 1913.. 

Economist, 58: 1927 

France, Statistique General, 45: 

1914 

Germany, Federal Statistical 

Office, 400: 1913 

Beleium, Ministry of Labour, 

130:1914 

Netherlands, Central Bureau 

Statistics, 48: 1913 

Norway, Official, 95: 1913 

Sweden, Commerce Dept., 160: 

1913 

/talv, Bachi, 100:1913 

Finland, Official, 139: 1926 

India, Dept. of Statistics, 75: 

1914 

Japan, Bank of Japan, 56: 1913. . 
Australia, Commonwealth Sta- 
tistician, 92: 1911 

^ew Zealand, Official, 180: 1913 

Eevpt, D.»nt. of Statistics, 

Cairo, 22: 1P13-1914 



1932 



Mar. 



•301 
•631 



5-085 



•851 
4-465 



•037 
•057 



5-840 
4-900 



•055- 
•065 



•330 
•200 



•272 
•180 



•203 
•506 

•923 

2-184 

• 120 

•090 

23-200 
18-000 
2-250 

7-63 
3-85 
•28 
3-82 
12-750 

6-000 
•175 

16-000 



Apr. 



63-1 
66-0 
91-1 

104-6 
65-3 

427 

99-8 

548 

82 
122 

109 

315 

92 

94 
119-8 

132-2 
131-6 



•725 
4-370 

•034 

•058 

5-880 
4-540 

•050- 
•060 

•320 
•200 

•231 

•180 
•214 

•082 

•203 
•495 



1-784 
•110 

•085- 

•090 

22-429 

18-0(0 

2-250 

7-467 
3-609 
•255 
3 634 
12-342 

6-000 

•175 

16000 



May 



5-100 



•653 
4-275 



5-840 
4-510 



• f 33- 
•043 



•310 
•200 



62-2 

65-5 
90-7 

102-4 
62-7 

425 

98-4 

539 

80 
120 

109 
311 



92 
116-5 



131-5 

130-7 



■197 



■180 
•209 



•076 



•923 



100 



085 
22-160 
18-000 
2-250 

6-968 
3 320 
•280 
3-564 
12-510 

6-000 

•185 

16-000 



61-0 
64-4 



100-7 
60-5 

421 

97-2 

526 



June 



•338 
•551 

4-896 

•868 
4-275 

•031 

•063 

6-160 
4-580 

•030- 
•040 

•290 
•190 

•191 

•160 
•241 



90 



89 
113-6 



129-4 
130-4 



•072 



•923 



1-678 
•090 



21-690 
18-000 
2-250 

6-791 
3 145 
•270 
3-480 
12-510 

6-000 

•185 

16 000 



59-6 



98-1 
58-8 



408 



July 



•352 
•547 



4-800 



1-304 
4-370 



110- 



127-8 
129-9 



81 



6-140 
5-030 



■038- 
•048 



•190 

•196 

•160 
•245 

•079 

•190 
•495 

•923 

1-638 
•090 

•085 

21- 145 
18-000 
2-250 

6-850 
3-083 
•285 
3-355 
12-510 

6-000 

•180 

16-000 



Aug. 



•563 
4-800 



1-323 
4-370 



60-4 
64-5 
92-1 

97-7 
60-1 

404 

95-9 

512 

76 
122 

108 
296 
89 

87 
111-6 

128-4 
129-9 

78 



6-050 
5-210 



•055- 
•065 



•280 



•212 

•1 
•281 



•210 
•495 

•923 

2-059 
•095 

•100 

20-968 
18-000 
2-250 

7-030 
3-217 
•300 
3-561 
12-757 

6-000 

•180 

16-000 



Sept. 



•261 
•519 



4-600 



1-197 
4-370 



•043 



5-360 
5-110 



•075- 
•085 



•280 
•190 



Oct. 



4-500 



•277 
•370 



•038 
•083 



4-700 
4-500 



•070- 



Nov. 



61-8 
65-2 
94-2 

99-5 
61-9 

394 

95-4 

524 

75 
123 

108 
296 



117-7 



130-1 
129-9 



77 



-245 



•ISO 
•330 



•092 

•225 
•506 

•923 

2-107 
•095 

•105 

20-472 
18-000 
2-250 

7- 
3- 

•318 
3-802 
12-981 

6-000 

•180 

16-000 



62-7 
65-3 
95-2 

102-1 
64-0 

397 

95-1 

533 

76 
123 

110 

300 
90 

91 
126-5 

132-4 
130-2 

78 



•240 



2-024 
•095 

•105 

19-573 
18-000 
2-250 

7-310 
3-264 
•315 
3-667 
13 

5-250 

•180 

16-000 



61 

64-4 

91-0 

101-1 
62-0 

392 

94-3 

529 

77 
123 

110 



91 
127 f 



29-0 
129 5 



4-500 



1-254 
4-370 



•040 
•085 



4-220 
3-920 



•055- 
•065 



•235 



•225 
•484 

•959 

2-006 
•095 

•105 

19-795 
18-000 
2-250 

7-305 
3-373 
•315 
3-834 
13-328 

5-250 

•180 

16-000 



60-3 
63-9 
88-4 

101-1 
62-3 

391 



525 

77 
124 

109 

298 

91 

90 
134-4 

1270 
127-7 

79 



Dec. 



•210 
•424 



4-400 
•943 



•077 



4-100 
3-970 



•043 
•053 



•260 
•190 



-23 
•180 



•21C 
•484 

•95<- 

1-967 
•09( 

•10c 

19-763 
18-000 
2-250 

7-021 
3-386 
•305 
3-971 
13-328 

5-250 

•180 

16-000 



58-5 
62-6 

85-7 

101-1 
61-1 

390 

92-4 

522 

76 
123 

108 

296 

90 

88 
139-5 

125-6 
126-4 



Jan. 



•225 
•442 



4-500 



•795 
4-180 



4110 
3-760 



•055- 
•065 



■235 



•180 
•318 



•210 
•484 

•959 

1-623 
•090 

•105 

19-190 
18-000 
2-250 

6-905 
3-262 
•300 
3-924 
13-328 

5-250 

•180 

16-000 



56-4 
61-0 
82-4 

100-3 
61-2 

390 

910 

521 

75 
122 

106 
?92 
90 

87 
135-8 

124-9 
73 



1933 

FebT 

$ 

•233 
•458 

4-500 

•835 
4-C85 

•035 

•072 

4-000 
3-810 

•045- 
•055 

•250 
•189 

•239 

•180 
•250 



•210 
•484 

■959 

•538 
•090 

•105 

•450 
18-C00 

2-250 

7-050 
3-400 
•320 
3-983 
13-339 

5-250 

•165 

16-000 



55-3 

59-8 
80-5 

98-9 
60-1 

390 

91-2 

512 

74 
121 

106 
96 
83 

86 
135-8 



Mar. 

$ 

•245 
•491 

4-600 

1-193 
4-085 

•036 

•072 

4-360 
5110 

•050- 
•060 

•250 
•180 

•271 

•180 
•235 

•C94 

•210 
•484 

•959 

1-598 
•090 



18-930 
18-000 
2-250 

7-180 
3-459 
•335 
4-152 
13-339 

5-250 

•165 

6-000 



'For full description see the report on Prices and Price Indexes published by the Dominion Bureau of Statistics 
Application for this publication should be made to the Dominion Statistician. 

The description include? the authority, the number of commodities and the base year. 



26 



MONTHLY REVIEW OF BUSINESS STATISTICS 



Table 22. 


Total Value of Import 


s and Exports, by Groups, in Thousands 


of Dollars 








Imports of Merchandise 


for Consumption in Canada 






Month 


Total 
Imports 


Vege- 
table 
Products 


Animal 
Pro- 
ducts 


Textiles 


Wood 
and 
Paper 


Iron and 
its Pro- 
ducts 


N on- 
Ferrous 
Metals 


Non- 
Metallic 
Minerals 


Chemic- 
als and 
Allied 

Products 


Miscel- 
laneous 
Com- 
modities 


1930 


$000 

87.900 
78,358 
76,325 
60,338 

50.414 
50,994 
75,348 
51,189 
73,457 
52.508 
48,379 
47,308 
45,379 
45,933 
46,911 
40,290 

34,115 
35,586 
57,437 
29.794 
44,361 
40,743 
35,711 
36.527 
34,504 
37,095 
37,769 
28,961 

24,441 
23,514 
32,851 


$000 

16,687 
15,231 
15,146 
13,535 

9.181 
9,014 
15,739 
11,367 
17,839 
9.966 
10.411 
9,371 
8,870 
9,927 
12,074 
10,676 

6,094 
7,538 
14,489 
5,283 
9.416 
8,702 
7,462 
7,098 
6.814 
8.225 
8,639 
7,830 

5,148 
4,919 
8,685 


$000 

4,679 
3,867 
3,324 
2,451 

2.665 
2,540 
4,187 
2,240 
3,344 
2,362 
2,287 
2,206 
2,150 
1,796 
1,544 
1,309 

1,482 
1,640 
2,204 
1 096 
1.756 
1,611 
1,330 
1,251 
1.265 
1,425 
1,427 
977 

942 

980 

1,379 


$000 

12,947 
10,756 
12,738 
0,036 

8.025 
8,711 
11,825 
6,987 
8.717 
7.251 
7,152 
7,372 
6,530 
6,344 
5,985 
5,254 

6,255 
6,602 
9.401 
4.601 
6,074 
5,310 
4,552 
5.587 
4,935 
5,428 
5,450 
4,725 

4,739 
4,390 
5,424 


$000 

3,951 
4,198 
3,693 
3,059 

2,808 
2,815 
3.951 
2,798 
3,630 
3.146 
2,790 
2,743 
2,696 
2,862 
2,505 
2,279 

1,968 
2,032 
2,660 
1,553 
2,078 
1,922 
1,778 
1,745 
1,754 
1,907 
1,859 
1,566 

1,304 
1,409 
1,614 


$000 

15,415 
13,563 
12,839 
10.837 

10,051 
11,353 
17.282 
11,925 
14,807 
9,989 
8,108 
7,377 
6,883 
6,285 
6,479 
5,881 

5,085 
6,009 
9,983 
5.820 
7,169 
6,710 
5,130 
4,394 
4,233 
4,288 
5,262 
3,624 

3,655 
3,643 
5,408 


$000 

6.504 
6,452 
5,914 
4,394 

3.202 
3,363 
4.620 
3,018 
3,953 
3.157 
2,984 
2,958 
2,958 
3,055 
2,849 
2,335 

2,256 
2,091 
2,688 
1.688 
2,085 
1,733 
1,513 
1,402 
1,496 
1,655 
1.908 
1,129 

914 

971 

1,192 


$000 

19.244 
15,871 
13,304 
10,127 

8.246 
7,834 
9,691 
6,969 
12,152 
9.838 
8,382 
8,139 
8,614 
9,432 
9,626 
7,209 

6,656 
5,438 
9.691 
5.567 
9.476 
9,220 
9,367 
9,143 
8.501 
8,626 
8,138 
5,509 

4,504 
4,405 
5,193 


$000 

3.241 
3,151 
3,384 
2,549 

1,935 
2,094 
3,372 
2,375 
3,898 
2.530 
2,290 
2,666 
2,537 
2,422 
2,721 
2,497 

1,950 
1,874 
2.971 
1.998 
2.942 
2,556 
2,081 
2,217 
2.336 
2.770 
2,577 
1.588 

1,292 
1,196 
1,901 


$000 
6,433 




6,269 


November 

December 

1931 


5,374 
4,349 

4,300 
3,271 
4.681 


February 


April 


3,512 
5,217 




4.270 


July 


3,975 




4,477 




4,142 




3,809 




3,127 




2,851 


1933 


2,338 


February 


2,362 


March 


3,351 




2,188 




3,366 




2,969 


July 


2,499 




3,691 




3.169 


October 

November 


2,771 

2,509 
2,012 


1933 


1,943 




1,601 


March 


2,054 





Exports of Merchandise from Canada 




Total 
Exports 

of 
Mdse. 


Domestic Produce 


Month 


Total 
Exports 
of Can- 
adian 
Produce 


Vege- 
table 
Pro- 
ducts 


Animal 
Pro- 
ducts 


Tex- 
tiles 


Wood 
and 
Paper 


Iron 
and 
its 
Pro- 
ducts 


Non- 
Ferrous 
Metals 


Non- 
Metallic 
Miner- 
als 


Chemi- 
cal and 
Allied 
Pro- 
ducts 


Miscel- 
laneous 
Com- 
modi- 
ties 


1930 


$000 

82,190 
84,298 
74,592 
68,053 

45,634 
44,914 
56.296 
34,674 
60,845 
55.320 
50,671 
49,894 
49,909 
56,534 
58,430 
54,218 

39,063 
37,019 
41,019 
27 455 
41,402 
41,701 
43,032 
41,855 
42,665 
57,160 
46,621 
43,109 

32,000 
26,814 
37.161 


$000 

81.046 
82.781 
73.060 
66,820 

44,683 
43,873 
55, 048 
33,935 
59,833 
54.348 
49,675 
48.764 
48.991 
55.538 
57.4«7 
53,255 

38,367 
36,431 
39,749 
26 976 
40,594 
40,945 
42,321 
41,314 
42,187 
56,626 
45.945 
42,616 

31.562 
26,398 
36,579 


$000 

33.911 
37,358 
34.542 
24,647 

11,638 
13,541 
15,982 
7,625 
26,502 
21,394 
14,496 
14,611 
13.958 
19,337 
27,82? 
22,945 

11,079 
12,363 
12.291 
8.722 
16.920 
15.042 
17.302 
15,664 
20,382 
30,638 
21.978 
21,676 

12.042 
9,571 
13,434 


$000 

9,084 
8,320 
7,765 
6,322 

6,211 
5,059 

5.783 
3,851 
3,778 
5,194 
7.008 
6.604 
7,842 
8,336 
5,820 
5,453 

5,693 

4,989 
4,231 
2.434 
3,412 
4,232 
6,212 
6,252 
4,645 
4.888 
3.773 
4,797 

5.191 
4,075 
4,392 


$000 

467 
501 
369 
343 

240 
233 
383 
258 
757 
670 
642 
590 
357 
419 
517 
328 

234 

304 
436 
218 
462 
781 
506 
384 
422 
471 
328 
269 

230 
339 
321 


$000 

21,159 
20.964 
17,581 
19,724 

14,281 
14.274 
19,120 
13,409 
16,424 
17.105 
15,365 
15.851 
15,192 
15,705 
14,813 
13,956 

12,919 
11,165 
13,838 

9,675 
11,210 
12,678 
10,333 
11,521 

9,392 
11,399 
10,685 

9,167 

8,234 
7,284 
9,309 


$000 

3.663 
3,372 
2.483 
3,322 

2,459 
1,786 
2,297 
1,608 
1,947 
1,674 
1,559 
1,253 
1,422 
1,297 
877 
907 

867 
879 
1,173 
958 
1,253 
1,203 
2,016 
1,611 
1,505 
2,239 
1,557 
1,065 

1,021 

842 

2,037 


$000 

8.110 
7,737 
5,882 
8,458 

6,996 
5,615 
7.215 
4,192 
6,251 
4,726 
6.922 
6,546 
7,298 
6,976 
4,259 
6,846 

5,446 
4,631 
4,980 
2,687 
4.004 
3,970 
3,459 
3,422 
3,286 
3,890 
4,770 
3.585 

2,634 
2,651 
4,284 


$000 

1.918 
1,840 
1,823 
1,804 

1,118 
1,212 
1.449 
855 
1,456 
1,281 
1,319 
1,292 
1.084 

l^eo 

1,329 
1,220 

807 
629 
823 
464 
778 
940 
739 
785 
788 
1,064 
1,074 
768 

698 
437 
682 


$000 

1.071 

1.072 

1,096 

845 

664 
889 

1.400 
997 

1,175 
958 
859 
800 
673 
872 
895 
666 

736 
836 

1,067 
971 

1,472 

1,184 
711 
749 
816 
915 

1,078 
761 

1,014 
701 

987 


$000 
1,663 




1,618 




1,517 




1,355 


1931 


1,076 


February 


1,265 
1,418 




1,140 


May 


1,543 
1.347 


July 


1,506 


August 


1,217 


September 


1,164 


October 


1,236 




1,150 


December 


934 


1933 

January 

February 


588 
635 




911 




847 




1,054 




917 


July 


1,043 


August 

September 


925 
951 


October 


1,122 


November 


701 


December 


528 


1933 
January 


499 


February 


494 


March 


1,162 






MONTHLY REVIEW OF BUSINESS STATISTICS 



27 



Tabic 23. 



Canada's Domestic Exports in Thousands of Dollars, and Indexes of the Cost 
of Living 



Classification 










1932 












1933 




Mar. 


April 


May 


June 


July 


Aug. 


Sept. 


Oct. 


Nov. 


Dec. 


Jan. 


Feb. 


Mar. 


Experts of Canadian Produce— 

Agricultural and Vegetable 
Products — 
Alcoholic beverages (chiefly 


816 
328 

6,779 
149 

6,134 

614 

135 

414 

1,469 

137 
119 
1,457 
981 
80 
270 
646 

2 
128 
15 
21 

8,521 

1,474 

269 

266 

225 

2,248 

220 
35 

200 
84 

351 
86 
60 

127 

1,878 
260 
355 
831 
507 

279 

132 

93 

110 

144 

377 
261 

138 
399 
212 

83-9 
660 
93-6 
99-3 
74-5 
96-8 

7-27 
3-08 
6-77 
17-16 


616 

77 

5,534 

267 

4,537 

414 
45 
171 

895 

146 
- 52 
649 
713 
36 
163 
357 

9 

72 
12 
10 

6.938 
825 
118 
152 
105 

1,258 

178 
41 

170 
86 

262 
49 
73 

106 

856 
149 
195 
542 
290 

170 
68 
77 
65 

81 
364 
293 

. 143 
381 
175 

83-7 
65-4 
92-8 
99-3 
74-5 
97-0 

7-22 
3-07 
6-77 
17-09 


1,195 

120 

11,852 

775 

9,627 

528 

323 

182 

1,648 

298 
167 
1,174 
404 
35 
195 
694 

148 

82 
10 
4 

7,507 

1,175 

231 

206 

121 

1,328 

195 
69 

120 
83 

491 
55 
63 

227 

1,339 
255 
256 
725 
406 

290 
102 
167 
109 

144 
643 
241 

143 

409 
300 

81-8 
62-9 
91-0 
93-9 
74-5 
971 

6-90 

3-04 

6-47 

16-45 


444 

58 

11,159 

470 

9,655 

539 

74 

80 

1,963 

348 
473 
1,911 
352 
16 
165 
571 

438 

107 
7 
16 

7,668 

2,170 

478 

245 

123 

1,295 

315 
34 

174 
98 

330 

101 
47 

169 

1,831 
302 
181 
521 
376 

232 

75 
299 
221 

98 
426 
277 

132 
338 
272 

81-0 
62-1 
90-9 
93-9 
71-9 
97-1 

6-79 
3-02 
6-35 
16-20 


580 
111 

13,464 

781 

11,210 

555 

139 

119 

1,443 

411 
1,591 
1,823 

758 
18 

152 

742 

187 
94 
16 
17 

6,515 
773 
718 
166 
214 

1,340 

653 

736 
143 
68 
464 
69 
58 

89 

1,017 
385 
270 
550 
420 

197 
148 
93 
178 

58 
115 
191 

167 
308 
344 

80-8 
61-4 
90-7 
93-9 
71-9 
96-8 

6-78 
3-06 
6-34 
16-21 


384 

72 

12,212 

678 
10,642 

684 

110 

280 

1,094 

332 

1,659 
1,807 
879 
21 
194 
739 

27 

101 

10 

42 

7,546 
971 
580 
224 
113 

1,487 

627 
125 
132 
65 
403 
61 
39 

1,025 

478 
441 
276 
252 
427 

223 

135 

46 

229 

87 
219 
184 

149 

265 
300 

81-5 
63-5 
91-9 
93-9 
71-9 
96-8 

7-01 
3-04 
6-33 
16-42 


469 
571 

16.176 

392 

4,166 

590 

75 

293 

1,290 

90 

1,468 

1,270 

507 

28 

167 

456 

45 
98 
17 

43 

5,633 

628 

739 

249 

30 

1,373 

666 
136 
76 
50 
270 
41 
40 

158 

716 
447 
284 
377 
504 

277 
95 
154 
143 

170 
182 
179 

172 
179 
434 

810 

63-0 
91-7 
93-9 
70-7 
96-6 

6-98 
3-01 
6-32 
16-34 


1,572 
2,095 

22,636 
277 

21,471 

692 

98 

403 

1,690 

74 

1,589 

1,423 

424 

32 

244 

487 

"i22 

19 
67 

7,037 

980 

558 

334 

76 

1,791 

979 
536 
76 
114 
230 
61 
63 

107 

1,065 
449 
459 
600 
525 

373 

84 

172 

200 

255 
155 

204 

185 
386 
348 

80-4 
63-6 
90-7 
90-0 
70-7 
96-6 

70-7 
2-98 
6-30 
16-40 


1,581 
1,565 

15,024 
314 

13,959 

547 
66 

268 
1,799 

74 

1,185 

1,261 

101 

50 

228 

327 

1 

99 
11 
22 

6,858 

837 

363 

239 

93 

1,814 

634 

273 
72 

72 
197 
102 

44 

1,186 

1,532 
285 
244 
754 
327 

298 

162 

36 

360 

169 
224 
299 

133 
169 
263 

80-4 
63-9 
90-4 
90-0 
70-7 
96-6 

7-09 
2-93 
6-04 
16-10 


1,698 
1.389 

15,074 
91 

14,505 

478 

52 

247 

1,535 

41 

432 

1,550 

1,592 

57 

78 

605 

78 
16 
35 

5,952 

1,592 

171 

137 

113 

1,365 

405 
71 
77 
61 

216 
86 
36 

537 

9,668 
444 
256 
473 
261 

353 
130 
30 
147 

210 
196 
150 

91 
109 
189 

80-4 
64-0 
89-6 
90-0 
70-7 
96-6 

7-04 
2-94 
5-99 
16-01 


397 
925 

7,109 
62 

6,912 

419 

69 

236 

1,162 

69 
47 
1,391 
2,210 
81 
274 
632 

68 
15 
18 

5,423 

683 

90 

156 

82 

1,457 

238 

130 
74 
71 
216 
102 
46 

69 

779 
192 
197 
796 
159 

272 
181 
52 

87 

236 
292 
228 

100 
129 
152 

79-7 
62-8 
89-3 
90-0 
69-2 
96-4 

6-94 
2-93 
5-98 
15-89 


669 

754 

5,577 

72 
5,241 

514 

28 

143 

1,009 

235 

39 

1,083 

1,670 

80 

231 

429 

1 

90 
19 
81 

4,472 

553 

85 

126 

99 

1,411 

171 
76 
69 
48 

268 
72 
56 

55 

578 
225 
274 
747 
263 

146 
95 
34 

70 

146 
169 
228 

116 
149 
116 

79-0 
60-6 
89-3 
90-0 
69-2 
96-2 

6-70 
2-91 
5-97 
15-61 


366 


Fruits 


940 


Grains (Total) 


7,879 
113 




Wheat 


7,540 
686 


Rubber (chiefly tires and 




145 




265 


Wheat flour 

Animals and Animal Pro- 
ducts — 
Cattle 


1,458 
258 




57 


Fish 


1 315 




1 147 




80 


Leather, unmanufactured 


338 
644 


Fibres, Textiles and Pro- 
ducts— 




Cotton 


84 


Rags 


13 




19 


Paper— 
Paper (chiefly newsprint) 


5,640 
920 




155 




165 




100 




1,813 




733 


Automobile parts 


90 




143 


Hardware and cutlery 


80 
593 




109 




48 


Non-Ferrous Metal Pro- 
ducts — 


137 


Copper, (chiefly ore and 


1,108 


Gold, raw 


223 




422 


Nickel 


1,126 


Silver 


459 


Non-Metallic Mineral Pro- 
ducts— 

Asbestos, (chiefly raw) 

Coal 


214 
107 


Petroleum and products 


168 
83 


Chemicals and Allied Pro- 
ducts — 


152 




345 




223 


Miscellaneous Commodities— 


127 




678 


Settlers' effects 


173 


Indexes of Retail Prices, Rents 

and Costs of Services- 
Total, 1926 = 100 


78-0 


Food 


60-4 


Fuel 


88-9 


Rent 


90-0 


Clothing 


69-2 


Sundries 


96-2 


Cost per Week of a Family 
Budget- 
All foods $ 

Fuel and light $ 

Totals S 


66-7 
29-2 
5-97 
15-59 



28 MONTHLY REVIEW OF BUSINESS STATISTICS 

Table 24. Summary of Canada's Imports, in Thousands of Dollars 



Classification 


1932 


1933 


Mar. 


April 


May 


June 


July 


Aug. 


Sept 


Oct. 


Nov. 


Dec. 


Jan. 


Feb. 


Mar. 


Imports of Principal Commodl- 
ties- 

Agricultural and Vegetable 
Products — 


3,505 
159 
554 

1,741 
177 
360 
539 
323 

2,143 

1,380 
866 

156 
589 
297 
233 
313 

453 

833 

335 

1,432 

757 
180 
128 
852 
299 
151 
428 
662 
274 
613 
592 

1,019 
838 

360 

274 

53 

96 

254 

2,175 

231 

981 

495 

226 

2,462 

39 

976 

499 

140 

89 

126 

154 

423 
287 
106 
108 
905 
141 
137 

583 
3,852 
525 
518 
2,145 
859 
222 

390 
396 

94 
101 

79 
291 


521 
53 
195 
1,071 
147 
163 
300 
173 
613 
199 
687 

70 
253 
109 
167 
158 

224 

493 

166 

856 

392 

57 

113 

405 

196 

75 

83 

140 

163 

304 

297 

555 
473 

204 
157 
24 
134 

147 
971 
131 

622 
92 

108 

1,758 

17 

690 

292 
96 
60 
77 
89 

283 
179 
63 
75 
561 
89 
80 

344 
2,035 
170 
402 
1,142 
554 
141 

217 
246 
144 
49 
58 
134 


831 
191 
463 

1,908 

97 

261 

315 

301 

2,017 
143 

1,057 

83 
323 
248 

198 
292 

211 
918 
222 
1,032 
573 

93 
175 
381 
219 

67 
203 
194 
221 
340 
392 

744 
707 

300 
210 
31 
67 

163 

1,112 

126 

697 

202 

195 

1,689 

61 

1,275 

403 

144 

91 

117 

69 

236 
236 
102 
106 
831 
105 
63 

578 
2,663 
' 157 

492 
3,436 

876 

254 

295 
311 
344 
72 
58 
246 


1,328 

95 

316 

2,216 
104 
210 
402 
121 

1,233 
170 
955 

90 
369 

83 
150 
288 

240 
234 
190 
1,108 
587 

64 
102 
314 
244 

54 
131 
146 
144 
340 
472 

786 
576 

309 

173 

19 

38 

74 

1,270 

156 

646 

152 

175 

1,544 

40 

1,216 

346 

134 

80 

99 

92 

176 
187 
114 
70 
626 
96 
83 

566 
2,249 

163 

488 
3,519 
1,022 

198 

2S2 

266 

132 

86 

71 

249 


890 

95 

315 

1,903 

103 

133 

288 

18 

1,816 
228 
330 

130 
223 

68 
177 

59 

193 

287 
178 
781 
451 

54 
320 
252 
133 

25 

70 
154 
194 

53 
600 

861 
481 

247 
113 
25 
25 

68 
778 
108 
468 
176 
159 
1,127 

31 
923 
272 
132 

67 
104 

76 

187 
185 
72 

49 

529 

89 

60 

481 
2,612 
213 
322 
3,557 
901 
185 

234 
335 

7 
49 
53 
178 


1,122 

60 

206 

1,746 

77 

108 

219 

19 

2,042 

261 

95 

98 
211 

95 
220 
109 

198 
472 
201 
812 
510 
122 
140 
460 
193 
90 
96 
174 
171 
284 
433 

828 
496 

247 
101 
26 
47 

63 

553 

102 

369 

286 

125 

949 

14 

784 

227 

107 

62 

58 

38 

144 
170 
70 
35 
493 
118 
31 

479 
2,744 
216 
273 
3,304 
953 
148 

157 

331 

240 

54 

166 

179 


1,053 

113 

175 

1,505 

97 

111 

435 

21 

1,562 

287 

81 

126 
246 
96 
197 
147 

199 
441 
232 

747 
425 
101 
159 
584 
225 
98 
83 
230 
143 
228 
441 

874 
517 

213 
93 
23 
10 

60 

632 

103 

306 

220 

129 

909 

11 

740 

247 

96 

45 

85 

43 

284 
140 
73 
49 
495 
68 
78 

393 
2,600 

176 

303 
2,674 
1,064 

191 

155 

292 
285 
51 
190 
254 


1,358 
135 
276 

1,651 

107 

274 

231 

28 

1,872 

502 

91 

174 
201 
233 
190 
117 

200 
656 
336 
758 
589 

50 
227 
548 
211 

92 
116 
255 
222 
154 
387 

907 
567 

215 

140 
39 
33 

38 

469 

157 

248 

96 

132 

1,086 

8 

784 

311 

90 

51 

82 

42 

287 
154 
93 
39 
572 
92 
76 

404 
3,134 
316 
312 
2,657 
738 
137 

244 
337 
229 
61 
117 
234 


1,537 
136 
352 

1,338 
110 
521 
266 
43 

1,479 
377 
200 

147 
180 

240 
156 
91 

165 

1,181 

140 

728 

603 

25 

221 

471 

97 

76 

157 

346 

221 

138 

347 

871 
536 

232 

147 

17 

43 

33 

557 

150 

342 

71 

197 

1,031 

23 

1,603 

294 

102 

48 

69 

74 

552 
157 
98 
47 
508 
129 
77 

445 
2,903 
214 
467 
2,122 
845 
245 

215 

369 
349 
64 
56 
278 


2,305 
147 
389 

1,567 
61 
183 
185 
109 
897 
339 
211 

116 
176 
118 
135 

77 

168 

1,122 

149 

552 

491 

13 

242 

327 

70 

57 

191 

296 

185 

138 

282 

744 
421 

201 
116 
11 
73 

14 

658 

80 

268 

135 

141 

1.086 

6 

417 

144 

82 

49 

47 

29 

123 
119 
98 
33 
399 
72 
40 

331 

2,318 
252 
216 

1,190 
457 
112 

171 
276 
161 
36 
25 
16C 


894 
85 
454 
786 
109 
160 
201 
95 
384 
366 
261 

71 
273 
123 
102 

49 

182 
706 
186 
725 
422 
32 
162 
415 
89 
60 
138 
374 
199 
188 
378 

618 

401 

173 

64 

9 

39 

104 

868 

97 

328 

100 

134 

983 

21 

232 

167 

59 

42 

37 

29 

98 
94 
42 
22 
350 
54 
49 

291 
1,836 
315 
262 
1,045 
164 
102 

175 

250 

14 

25 

16 

194 


798 
95 
296 
669 
88 
116 
216 
113 
397 
759 
231 

61 
281 
116 
127 

94 

216 

498 

143 

784 

396 

84 

87 

285 

84 

62 

105 

262 

146 

247 

450 

605 
493 

174 
64 
15 
34 

59 

747 

65 

365 

144 

136 

945 

55 

268 

153 

41 

53 

40 

41 

111 
89 
47 
32 

302 
32 

103 

285 
1,999 

197 

248 
1,084 

119 
91 

163 
233 
6 
24 
20 
125 


3,505 

103 

650 

998 

96 

215 

352 

135 

2,173 

1,090 

499 

101 
431 
80 
133 
169 

252 
508 
199 
1,007 
406 

86 
179 
342 
117 

97 
179 
287 
184 
272 
532 

776 
511 

184 
73 
11 
56 

91 

1,407 

110 

637 

531 

161 

901 

12 

423 

208 

80 

63 

77 

74 

140 
128 
46 
28 
381 
67 
83 

475 
1,898 

341 

284 
1,147 

291 
98 

266 
265 
33 
40 
41 
158 


Coeoa and chocolate 


Fruits 








Seeds 


Sugar, chiefly for refining 

Tea 




Animal Products — 
Fish .. 




Hides 


Leather, unmanufactured 


Textile Products— 














Silk — Paw 






Wool — Paw wool 








Wood and Paper— 
Books and printed matter 


Wood — Furniture and other 
manufactured wood 




Other unmanufactured wood. 
Iron and Steel — 
Automobiles 
















Other rolline mill products 

Stamped and coated products... 
Tools 


Wire 


Non-Ferrous Metals — 












Tin 


Non-Metallic Products— 


Coal 

Coke 










C*"*MICALS— 


D veins and tanning materials... 







































MONTHLY REVIEW OF BUSINESS STATISTICS 29 

Table 25. Banking and Currency, in Million Dollars Unless Otherwise Stated 



Classification 



1932 



Feb. I Mar. I Apr. I May I June I July I Aug. I Sept. | Oct. I Nov. I Dec. 



1933 



Jan. I Feb. 



Banking— 

Readilt Available Assets— 

Specie 

Dominion notes 

In Central gold reserves 

In United Kingdom banks. . . 

In foreign banks 

Foreign currency 

Government securities 

Call loans abroad 

Total quick assets 

Loans and Securities except 
Canadian Governments — 

Public securities 

Railway securities 

Canadian call loans 

Current loans 

Current loans abroad 

Provincial loans 

Municipal loans 

Total loans, etc 

Other Assets— 

Non-current loans 

Real estate 

Mortgages 

Premises 

Letters of credit 

Loans to companies 

Other assets 

Note circulation deposits 

Inter-bank balances, notes of 

other banks 

Cheques of other banks 
Balances due by other banks 

Grand total assets 

Liabilities to the Public— 

Note circulation 

Dominion Government 

Provincial Government 

Government advances 

Deposits by public — 

Savings deposits 

Demand deposits 

Total deposits 

Foreign deposits 

Due banks abroad, etc. — 

United Kingdom 

Foreign 

Bills payable 

Letters of credit 

Other liabilities 

Total public liabilities. . 

Due between banks 

Liabilities to Shareholders— 

Dividends $000 

Reserve 

Capital 

Grand total liabilities.. 
Surplus of notice deposits over 

current loans 

Percentage of current loans to 

notice denosits.. n c 

Gold included in C.G.R 

All notes in hands of public 1 

Index Numbers— 

(With sea*onal adjustment 
1926 = 100) 

Demand deposits 

Notice deposits 

Current loans 

Investment holdings 

Call loans, Canada 

Call loans elsewhere 

Total issue Pom . notes 

Gold held by Finance Dept 

against notes 

Notes in hands of public 

Currency- 
Net issues of Dominion notes 

per,— Chapter 4, 1915 

R.S. 1927, chap. 70 

RS. 1927, chap. 41 

Total 

Gold held against notes 



End of Month 



62-59 

123-81 

20 -OS 

7-89 

71-47 

13-21 

460-03 

98-95 

858 



142-74 

60-99 
129-77 

1.063 
190-65 

56-24 
139-29 

1,783 

10-86 

6-65 

6-26 

79-99 

49-73 

12-47 

1-66 

6-82 

12-71 

81-03 

3-07 

2,912 

134-29 
79-76 
20-06 
35-50 

1,390 
496-49 

1,886 
305-82 

4-79 
52-02 

2-57 
49-73 

2-77 
2,574 

9-84 

2,767 
162-00 
144-50 

2,893 

+327 

76-5 

10-7 

150-3 



91-5 

103-5 
115-8 
124-6 
92-5 

38-4 
860 

60-5 
84-4 



Mar 



26-0 
32-0 
99-4 
157-4 
63-8 



58-70 
116-93 
23-63 
10-40 
85-47 
14-38 
466-40 
83-13 
859 



144-77 

60-39 
130-71 

1.071 
188-76 

43-99 
149- 15 

1.788 

10-96 

6-78 

6-27 

79-83 

5116 

13 03 

1-49 

6 

11< 

82-56 
3-54 
2,926 

132-57 
86-11 
20-97 
32-00 

1.389 
500-48 

1 
308-12 

5-82 
56-60 

1-85 
51-16 

2 

2,587 
1013 

820 
162 00 
144-50 
2.905 

+312 

77-4 
10-7 
1490 



91-3 
103-1 
114-9 
126-5 
93-4 
33-8 
85-2 

60-4 
82-2 



26-0 
27-5 
99-4 
152-9 
63-9 



55-91 
111-86 
23-03 
10-95 
97-72 
15-33 
469-97 
73-15 
858 



138-52 

57-76 
122-36 

1,070 
184-58 

39-43 
154-01 

1,766 

11-21 

6-86 
6-27 
79-99 
51-94 
13-00 
1-80 
6-83 

11-91 

83-05 

3-37 

2,900 

137-35 
65-76 
24-05 
27-50 

1 

494-64 

1 

304-81 

5-11 

54-36 
1-61 

51-94 
2-43 

2,562 
9-48 

1.370 
162-00 
144-50 

2, 

+323 

76-8 

10-7 

154-1 



89-7 
103-5 
112-4 
124-8 
88-4 
30-0 
82-5 



59- 



Apr. May 



26-0 
29-6 
99-3 
154-9 
64-3 



55-49 

115-42 

22-58 

8-75 

99-44 

15-25 

465-48 

65-29 

848 



140-81 

5713 
113-83 

1.057 
187-08 

36-67 
153-52 

1,746 

11-94 

6-96 

6-19 

79-95 

48-90 

12-85 

1-64 

6-83 

11-87 

83-11 

3-44 

2,868 

131-07 
50-38 
19-31 
29-60 

1,387 
497-99 

1,885 
308-94 

4-94 
51-35 

1-25 
48 90 

2-22 
2,533 
10 

3,532 
162-00 
144-50 

2,854 

+330 

76-2 
11 
147-2 



91-2 
103-2 
111-7 
123-7 



June 



26-0 
40-5 
101-8 
168-3 
64-8 



54-97 

127-39 

22-88 

7-69 

95-42 

15-57 

462-31 

73-67 

860 



152-04 

54-98 
109-87 

1.037 
174 

34-34 
139-22 

1,703 

12-51 
7-19 
6-01 
79-90 
48-49 
13-01 
1-42 
6-95 

10-51 

96-87 

2-78 

2,848 

136-30 
36-42 
20-67 
40-50 

1,373 
488-94 

1,862 
308-22 

5-73 
51-36 

1-19 
48-49 

2-18 
2,513 
11-04 

817 
162-00 
144-50 
2,832 

+336 

75-6 

111 

154-9 



60-1 
86-5 



Jtly 



26-0 
38-5 
101-7 
166-2 
65-4 



54-85 

123-10 

24-78 

8-82 

96-75 
16-48 
166-93 
75-65 
867 



153-44 

53-69 
111-93 

1,028 
164-34 

20-19 
130-65 

1,663 

12-91 
7-26 
6-02 
79-95 
48-32 
12-92 
1-32 
6-59 

11-90 
69-44 
314 

2,790 

134-57 
15-54 
33-06 
38-50 

1,363 

462-09 

825 

299-38 

5-67 

51-78 
1-71 

48-32 
2-22 

2.456 
8-09 

1,194 
162-00 

144-50 
2.772 

+335 

75-5 

111 

152-1 



85-7 
101-6 
110-3 
125-5 
82-2 
30-8 
91-7 

60-4 
87-2 



Aug. 



26-0 
29-0 
99-2 
154-2 
66-2 



55 

115-28 

21-83 

8-81 

98-14 

16-56 

494-57 

96-39 

907 



155-15 

53-39 
114-07 

1,004 
159-04 

19-41 
123-67 

1,629 

13-15 
7-37 
6-01 
80-06 
48-44 
12-89 
1-40 
6-59 

10-42 

76-16 

3-36 

2,802 

127-77 
19-04 
32-31 
29-00 

1,367 
475 

1,842 
306-55 

4-50 
49-60 

1-47 
48-44 

2-14 
2,463 
10-85 

3, 

162-00 
144-50 
2,783 

+ 363 

73-5 

111 

145-5 



89-1 
101-8 
108-2 
131-7 
83-1 
38-6 
85-3 

61-2 
82-5 



Sept. 



26-0 
23-0 
10M 
153-1 
67-5 



55-48 
112 40 

23-08 
13-94 
87-13 
16-90 
494-20 
95-19 



152-17 
52-87 

114-95 
1,003 

158-98 
22-19 



116-62 109-21 
1,621 1,649 



13-46 
7-51 
6 

79-92 

48-27 

13-15 

1-48 

6-59 

9-52 
90-12 

3-57 
2,799 

132-24 
15-90 
31-87 
23-00 

1,359 

480-66 

,840 

307-14 

4-85 
48-91 

1-55 
48-27 

2-17 
2.457 
14-21 

720 
162-00 
144-50 
2,778 

+ 35<i 

73-8 

111 

152-5 



87-4 
101-7 
107-2 
131-1 



61-6 
83-7 



Oct. 



26-0 
27-5 
107-8 
161-3 
71-2 



55-03 
122-51 

21-38 

13-51 
100-60 

18-26 
515-54 

87-53 
934 



159-63 
51-76 

117-21 
1,018 

159-04 
34-25 



13-46 
7-61 

6-55 
79-59 
47-28 
13-04 

1-56 

6 

13. 

99-27 

3 

2,875 

133-03 
44 
40-70 
27-50 

1,371 
493-28 

1,864 
324-51 

4-54 

46-52 

1-22 

47-2<5 

2-13 

2,536 

11-29 

1.157 
162-00 
144-50 

2,855 

+353 

74 -3 

11-1 

148-4 



86-4 
102-7 
107-1 
135-4 
79-3 
26-5 
84-0 

63-5 

77-8 



Nov. 



26-0 
65-1 
107-7 
198-9 
73-0 



76-13 
163-50 

18-88 

8-44 

146-65 

18-75 
551-16 

99-37 

1,083 



159-60 
48-71 

107-61 
999 

153-56 
34-20 

107-04 
1,610 

13-36 
7-45 
6-39 
78-78 
47-54 
13-36 
1-54 
6-60 

8-71 
80-28 

3-35 
2,960 

125-05 
105-75 
31-33 
65-14 

1,379 
472-17 

1,851 
349-12 

4 51 

51 05 
•80 
47-54 
2-45 
2,634 
10-27 

2 

162-00 
144-50 
2,953 

+380 

72.5 
11-1 
139-5 



81-6 
102-8 
106-4 
145-0 
76-3 
37-6 
91-1 



53-26 
153 -U 

19-88 

7-79 

104 

17-94 
562-36 

91-49 

1,011 



166-96 
48-93 

103-20 
964 

151-66 
28-27 

111-57 
1,775 

13-31 
7-48 
6-39 

78-70 

42-63 

13-17 

1-49 



12-15 
80-41 
4-32 
2,852 

127-07 
53-11 
18-93 
56 

1,378 
466-21 

1,844 
328-73 

7-43 

41-37 

•63 

42-63 

2-61 
2,523 
12-32 

706 
162-00 
144-50 
2,843 

+ 413 

70-0 
11-1 
144-1 



81-6 
103-1 
1040 
147-8 
71-8 
35-9 
89-6 

61-6 
79-0 



54-26 
46-34 
18-88 
10-49 
83-29 
17-94 
568-20 
83-77 
983 



168-05 
47-97 

1C0-00 
946 

151-03 
23-04 

114-65 
1,550 

13-53 

7-58 

6-46 

79-23 

40-24 

13-06 

1-52 



9-23 
68-82 
3- 

2,784 

16-87 
37-51 
20-64 
46-74 

1,383 

445-99 

1,^29 

316-23 

4-90 

40-72 

•52 

40-24 

2-56 
2,456 

9-87 

1.157 
162-00 
144 -5" 

2,773 

+437 

68-4 
111 

134-0 



80-6 
103-0 
103-0 
147-7 
71-1 
33-4 
94-2 

66-5 
76-6 



60-37 
140-77 
19-08 
13-46 
83-58 
16-68 
5«l-28 
76-29 
992 



168-49 

47-68 

97-17 

924 

155-16 
24-60 

120-80 
1,538 

13-78 

7-62 

6-39 

79-25 

42-00 

12-97 

1-55 

6-61 

9-20 

69-10 
4-34 

2,782 

121-14 
26-27 
18-81 
41-94 

1,397 

445-86 

1,843 

309-74 

3-72 

40-56 

-58 

42-00 

2-57 
2,450 
10-88 

2,986 
162-00 
144-50 

2,770 

+ 473 



1L 
138-J 



82-3 
104-1 
100-7 
149-8 
69-2 
29-6 
93-1 

65-8 
78-0 



Dec. 


Jan. 


Feb. 


26-0 


26-0 


26-0 


57-5 


46-7 


41-9 


107-7 


107-7 


107-8 


191-2 


180-5 


175-7 


70-8 


70-9 


70-3 



Mar. 

26-0 
48-4 
106-5 
180-9 



1 Includes smaller Dominion Notes in hands of public together with Bank Notes in circulation, except those in the 
hands of banks other than the bank of issue. 



30 



MONTHLY REVIEW OF BUSINESS STATISTICS 



Valeurs du Commerce 

Millions de dollars — $ 000,000'a 



Trade Values 




Import 




miir 



ASIE - ASIA 
111 



fcrimTTTTrnMrn 



I * m ^v'm -. [^^TnTT fftfft 




rttm 




NOMBRE DE PAYS 


Represents... % 


IMCLUS 




at leur continent 


NUMBER OF COUNTRIES 


Representing % 


INCLUDEO 




of their continent 


EUROPE 


26 


9 9% 


AM. DU NORO 


2 


99% 


ASIE 


9 . 


76% 


AM. LATINE 


7 


6 3% 


AFRIOUE 


3 


55% 


OCEANIE 


2 


9 6% 


TOTAL 


49 


9 1% 



iiHiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiii 



-rrtrtftf- 




1929 



1930 



1931 



1932 1933 



1929 1930 1931 A 932 '933 



MONTHLY REVIEW OF BUSINESS STATISTICS 31 

Table 26. Index Numbers of Security Prices, Foreign Exchange, and other Financial Factors. 



Classification 


1932 


1933 


Mar. 


Apr. 


May 


June 


July 


Aug. 


Sept. 


Oct. 


Nov. 


Dec. 


Jan. 


Feb. 


Mar. 


Security Prices— 




























Common Stock Pkices — 




























Total (130) 


64 1 

71-5 
79-2 


540 

58-2 
62-5 


45-8 

51-4 
44-9 


43 2 

48-8 
40-5 


49-6 
56-6 
51-1 


590 

69-9 
63-5 


630 

73-8 
69-1 


54-8 

63-1 
55-9 


53-4 
62-5 
51-3 


51 3 

58-4 
45-5 


51 6 

59-6 
49-5 


47-6 

56-3 
44-4 


47-3 


Industrials, total (96) 


57-3 


Iron and Steel (19) 


44-8 




10-1 
65-5 
106-8 
38-3 


9-2 
63-7 
87-7 
32-5 


8-6 
63-1 
90-1 
29-1 


8-4 
62-6 
84-8 
28-3 


7-9 
38-3 
97-0 
28-9 


8-8 
47-4 
110-0 
38-5 


4-4 
53-0 
113-0 
42-3 


3-5 

49-8 
97-4 
38-0 


31 
48-3 
95-9 
38-7 


2-5 
43-3 
90-8 
37-6 


3-3 
41 1 
93-6 
36-8 


3-6 
39-7 
86-5 
33-6 


2-3 


Milling (5) 


37-8 


Oils (4) 


86-7 


Textiles and Clothing (9) 


32-2 


Food and Allied products (21) 


87-8 


83-2 


76-5 


73-0 


81-2 


89-7 


90-8 


86-5 


85-9 


83-0 


82-9 


80-2 


78-6 




40-3 
82-4 
59-8 
46-2 
81-1 


36-1 
62-2 
48-9 
34-4 
68-8 


26-3 
47-1 
36-9 
26-0 
63-8 


30-2 
43-3 
34-9 
24-7 
59-6 


35-6 
55-2 
41-8 
31-5 
59-9 


44-1 
78-2 
51-9 
42-7 
71-6 


44-1 
89-2 
56-9 
47-6 
76-3 


40-7 
73-9 
49-1 
39-0 
73-4 


43-3 
74-2 
46-6 
38-2 
70-8 


37-1 
70-1 
45-1 
37-4 
68-3 


340 
71-2 
44 6 
35 6 

70-5 


32-6 
69-7 
38-6 
26-8 
63-6 


36-0 




73-1 


Utilities total (18) 


38-2 




25-3 


Telephone and telegraph (2) . . 


64-0 


Power and traction (14) 


73-6 


63-7 


45-0 


42-7 


51-6 


60-4 


65-9 


57-7 


531 


50-8 


51-2 


48-3 


48-9 


Companies abroad total (8) . . . 


55-8 


47-4 


49-4 


46-5 


49-9 


52-7 


56-5 


47-4 


48-3 


48-9 


48-9 


46-6 


45-5 




67-0 

45-7 

86-0 

413-6 


59-1 

37-1 

85-8 

304-2 


66-3 

34-9 

65-7 

261-2 


59-6 

35-1 

60-5 

251-0 


65-6 

36-4 

67-1 

306-6 


72-8 

35-7 

73-9 

408-0 


77-6 

38-7 

76-1 

470-6 


64-3 
33-1 

74-4 
393-6 


67-9 
31-8 

69-6 
377-9 


69-1 

32-0 

67-5 

359-5 


69-7 

31-4 

67-5 

366-2 


67-8 

28-7 

65-5 

340-0 


66-5 


Utility (7) 


27-8 


Banks (8) 


62-3 




352-9 


Mining Stock Prices— 




Total (20) 


57-8 
57-6 
63-4 


52-4 
52-6 
56-5 


48-4 
50-2 
47-9 


48-3 
49-9 
47-8 


55-6 
57-2 
55-6 


59-7 
58-1 
69-7 


60-9 

56-4 
81-0 


57-5 

55-0 
71-0 


60-9 
58-1 
76-5 


63-1 

62-7 
70-9 


67-1 
66-8 

74-7 


75-3 

74-7 
84-7 


68-4 


Gold (11) 


66-6 


Copper (4) 


81-5 


Silver and miscellanoues (5). . 


21-4 


18-3 


15-5 


16-8 


21-0 


26-3 


28-4 


24-4 


23-6 


21-9 


26-5 


28-1 


26-5 


Financial Factors- 




























Preferred Stocks 


580 


55-4 


48-4 


45-2 


49-5 


52-9 


53-4 


52-9 


52-2 


50-2 


49-6 


49-6 


47-3 




110-6 


111-8 


113-2 


114-4 


110-6 


103-3 


101-9 


98-1 


102-3 


102-7 


99-2 


98-7 


100 


Yield on Ontario Government 




bonds p.c. 


5-30 


5-33 


5-42 


5-48 


5-30 


4-95 


4-88 


4-70 


4-90 


4-92 


4-75 


4-73 


4-79 


Shares traded. Montreal 


180. 


187, 


204, 


176, 


283, 


544, 


506, 


206, 


193, 


149, 


201, 


281, 


207, 




070 


313 


522 


041 


953 


528 


926 


902 


093 


733 


133 


197 


529 


New Issues of Bonds $000,000. 


35-72 


12-07 


25-68 


20-82 


27-32 


9-42 


73-19 


101-64 


1-09 


•14 


20-20 


•21 


•> -36 


Brokers' loans 1 $000,000 


22-76 


18-92 


15-14 


13-87 


13-02 


13-77 


14-12 


13-99 


13-82 


13-80 


13-61 


13-43 


12-86 


Foreign Exchange — 




























New York Funds in Montreal 




























High $ 


1131 


1-128 


1-154 


1-163 


1-161 


1-152 


1-118 


1110 


1-191 


1-183 


1-185 


1-209 


1-208 


Low $ 


1-106 


1-105 


1-116 


1-140 


1-135 


1-119 


1-101 


1-080 


1-104 


1-130 


1-124 


1-185 


1-185 


Average $ 


1-118 


1-112 


1-131 


1-153 


1-148 


1-142 


1-108 


1096 


1-148 


1-154 


1-143 


1-197 


1-199 


Close $ 


1-109 


1-120 


1-140 


1-146 


1-148 


1-119 


1-105 


1-106 


1-179 


1-130 


1-185 


1-197 


1-208 


London Sterling in Montreal- 




























High $ 


4-230 


4-215 


4-245 


4-280 


4-123 


4-045 


3-880 


3-815 


3-810 


3-845 


4-025 


4-145 


4-200 


Low $ 


3-915 


4-070 


4-095 


4-120 


4-028 


3-885 


3-805 


3-615 


3-648 


3-750 


3-760 


4-020 


4-090 


Average $ 


4-064 


4-173 


4-157 


4-205 


4-076 


3-975 


3-847 


3-723 


3-760 


3-787 


3-847 


4-099 


4-134 


Close $ 


4-230 


4-100 


4-203 


4-120 


4-028 3-885 


3-820 


3-635 


3-770 


3-760 


4-025 


4-095 


4-135 



>First Thursday of following month. 



Table 27 — Tonnage of Vessels Entered and Cleared from Six Canadian Ports. 


Year and 


Saint John 


Halifax 


Quebec 


Montreal Toronto 


Vancouver 


Month 


Enteredl Cleared 


Entered | Cleared 


Enteredl Cleared 


Enteredl Cleared! Enteredl Cleared 


Entered | Cleared 


000 Tons 



1927... 
1928. . . . 
1929. . . . 
1930... 
1931.... 
1932. . . . 

1932 

Jan 

Feb 

Mar.... 
April. . . 
May.... 

June 

July.... 

Aug 

Sept.... 

Oct 

Nov 

Dec 

1933 

Jan 

Feb 

Mar.... 



1,918 


1,930 


3,659 


3,603 


4,047 


3,205 


4,222 


4,017 


1,753 


1,739 


9,866 


1,757 


1,799 


3,716 


3,800 


4,278 


3,375 


4,993 


4,865 


1,738 


1,744 


10,306 


1,639 


1,592 


4,333 


4,429 


4,572 


3,792 


5,493 


5,460 


1,765 


1,750 


11,743 


1,772 


1,742 


4,848 


4,896 


4,273 


3,531 


4,638 


4,583 


1,993 


1,938 


11,971 


1,827 


1,865 


4,971 


4,918 


4,235 


3,474 


4,436 


4,417 


2,100 


2,017 


12,606 


2,013 


2,003 


4,503 


4,480 


5,003 


4,321 


7,840 


7,760 


2,554 


2,560 


12,137 


2,083 


2,040 


7,229 


7,124 


2,861 


2,868 


8,013 


7,993 


2,678 


2,683 


11,083 



9,870 
10,392 
11,729 
11,930 
12,588 
12,304 
11,172 



Tons 



212.902 
217,548 
225,255 
154,213 
134,036 
117,838 
167,357 
163,457 
133,519 
134,442 
122,838 
299,479 



274,181 
250,517 
237,473 



215.925 
210,751 
216,788 
179,015 
116,228 
127,282 
151,103 
168,431 
138,231 
129,907 
118.719 
267,733 



248.029 
265,391 
258,795 



817,890 
701,478 
745,359 
556,999 
480,041 
401,282 
611,795 
650,575 
580,821 
471,867 
411,317 
799,358 



759,453 
838,600 
964,530 



799,072 
697,095 
728.678 
546,060 
477,700 
389,421 
603,205 
652,078 
573,970 
463,161 
398,628 
795,357 



763,140 
838,266 
895,128 



341 
140,727 
327,682 
414.030 
422,444 
453,409 
410,428 
312,412 
311,553 
67,500 



341 



341 
133,203 
334,859 
378,322 
458,433 
468,762 
387,713 
314,965 
316,413 
74.495 



341 



330,035 
1,089. 
1,158,746 
1,107,539 
1,190,652 
1,093,061 
1,108,660 

891,773 
43,699 



237,399 
1,018, 
1,151,805 
1,176,390 
1,145,509 
1,141,267 
1,052,666 

975,932 
93.924 



73.238 
251.098 
397.299 
506,002 
492.502 
384,804 
236,730 
284,356 

52,102 



122,927 
244,621 
401,962 
517,252 
490,108 
382.034 
240,741 
266,217 
17,608 



942,575 
800,842 
898,393 
904,904 
938,589 
938,402 
,003,648 
999,488 
936,323 
951,217 
862.305 
905,946 



839,737 
794,827 
855,015 



933.039 
849,787 
904,000 
879,000 
930,000 
950,000 

1,002,000 
999.000 
916,327 

1,045,718 
856,233 
905,728 



856,514 
799,131 
870,210 



32 



MONTHLY REVIEW OF BUSINESS STATISTICS 
Table 28. — Canada's Equation of Exchange. 



Bank Deposits. Season- 
ally adjusted $000,000 

1919 

1920 

1921 

1922 

1923 

1924 

1925 

1926 

1927 

1928 

1929 

1930 

1931 

1932 

General Price Level, 1926 
=100— 

1919 

1920 

1921 

1922 

1923 

1924 

1925 

1926 

1927 

1928 

1929 

1930 

1931 

1932 

Total Payments (Million 
Dollars)— 

1919 

1920 

1921 

1922 

1923 

1924 

1925 

1926 

1927 

1928 

1929 

1930 

1931 

1932 

Turnover of Bank Deposits 
in Percentage Form— 

1919 

1920 

1921 

1922 

1923 

1924 

1925 

1926 

1927 

1928 

1929 

1930 

1931 

1932 

Product of Indexes of Phy- 
sical Volume of Busi- 
ness and General Price 
Level— 

1919 

1920 

1921 

1922 

1923 

1924 

1925 

1926 

1927 

1928 

1929 

1930 

1931 

1932 



Jan. 



1,636 

1,807 

1.1 

1,737 

1,714 

1,721 

1,771 

1,858 

1,962 

2,104 

2,225 

2,108 

1,981 

1,926 



95-2 
109-1 
103-6 
91-2 
90-6 
91-8 
91-9 
104-4 
106-8 
106-8 
107-5 
109-6 
100-7 
90-3 



2,670 
3,605 
3,245 
2,903 
2,878 
2,922 
2,973 
3,144 
3,420 
4,454 
5,277 
4,209 
3,470 
2.721 



123-5 
143-3 
140-5 
132 
130-9 
138-4 
135-2 
135-1 
130-1 
170-4 
170-1 
160-9 
133-0 
118-5 



68-9 
95-5 
71-4 
63-7 
76-9 
77-0 
81-8 
100-4 
112-2 
116-6 
150-3 
139-4 
99-3 
75-7 



Feb. 



1,616 
1,841 
1,911 
1,745 
1,735 
1,711 
1,769 
1,869 
1,956 
2,141 
2,201 
2,096 
1,988 
1,892 



100 
101 

oo- 
go- 

91- 



5 
() 
ti 
7 
7 
7 

103-6 
106-4 
106-4 
107-5 
109-2 
99-6 
87 



2,675 
3,571 
3,240 
2,825 
2,624 
3,307 
2,915 
3,228 
3,438 
4,656 
5,082 
4,206 
3,754 
2.958 



123-7 
146-6 
136- 1 
129-7 
125-9 
138-0 
132-6 
137-1 
134-6 
185-4 
176-5 
158-5 
140-5 
119-7 



67-4 
85-7 
70-5 
67-5 
74-0 
85-4 
82-4 
91-8 
111-7 
123-8 
137-4 
126-9 
100-6 
751 



Mar. 



1,628 
1,880 
1,903 
1,735 
1,728 
1,706 
1,776 
1,920 
1,970 
2,161 
2,187 
2,072 
2,030 



93-2 
111-5 
99-3 
90-5 
91-5 
91-1 
91-3 
102-4 
105-9 
106-3 
107-8 
108-4 
98-6 
87-2 



2,641 
3,669 
3,069 
3,023 
2,728 
2,808 
2,801 
3,183 
3,586 
4,439 
5,490 
4,248 
3,496 
2.778 



122-0 
147-2 
130-0 
132-2 
124-5 
136-1 
126-4 
129-5 
139-1 
164-2 
191-8 
160-6 
1400 
117-5 



58-8 
87-1 
60-2 
68-1 
82-5 
80-1 
79-2 
100-6 
111-6 
119-7 
137-4 
118-8 
100-8 
71-3 



April 



1,651 
1,873 
1,875 
1,728 
1,773 
1,725 
1,786 
1,886 
1,979 
2,202 
2,208 
2,080 
2,043 
1,882 



93-5 
113-3 
97-6 
900 
90-9 
89-9 
90-3 
101-7 
105-3 
106-3 
107-0 
107-3 
97-8 
86-9 



2,750 

3,562 

3,249 

2,678 

2,763 

2.787 

2,' 

3,527 

3,558 

4,400 

4,862 

4,116 

3,687 

2.780 



121-7 
147-0 
132-5 
128-9 
119-9 
132-4 
126-5 
137-6 
139-8 
160-6 
183-7 
158-9 
142-0 
119-1 



60-4 
83-2 
59-7 
62-0 
781 
76-9 
78-2 
99-6 
111-2 
1180 
140-6 
119-2 
95-0 
65-4 



May 



1,690 
1,891 
1,881 
1,704 
1, 765 
1,696 
1,744 
1,887 
1,989 
2,230 
2,166 
2,013 
2,038 
1,888 



94-5 
115-9 
99-6 
89-8 
90-5 
89-2 
90-4 
100-8 
105-3 
106- 1 
107-6 
106-9 
96-7 
86-6 



2,842 
3,304 
2,979 
2,887 
2,714 
2,779 
2,760 
2,920 
3,536 
4,940 
4,905 
4,079 
3.725 
2.577 



123-0 
142-8 
128-4 
1320 
125-2 
126- 1 
127- 1 
133-0 
140-3 
163-0 
184-4 
162-2 
142-0 
113-1 



62-6 

81-4 

61-0 

65-7 

77-3 

76-4 

760 

97-7 

1100 

126-6 

133-9 

121-9 

93-4 

69-2 



June 



1,742 
1,899 
1,867 
1,683 
1,741 
1,714 
1,696 
1,876 
1,972 
2,180 
2,132 
2,034 
2,050 
1,862 



950 
116-3 
92-9 
89-7 
90-1 
89-5 
90-3 
99-9 
105-6 
105-7 
106-5 
106-3 
95-4 
850 



2,933 

3,588 

3.141 

2,804 

2,: 

2.717 

2,833 

3,163 

3,747 

4,998 

4,671 

4,370 

3.463 

2.815 



124 
141-4 
130-7 
129-8 
129-6 
123-8 
1310 
133-0 
143-4 
173-7 
176-7 
162- 1 
140-3 
115-5 



62-9 

87-6 

580 

68-2 

78-1 

67-5 

77-6 

101-6 

1120 

122-8 

132-6 

114-8 

85-5 



July 



1,768 
1,902 
1,828 
1,677 
1,715 
1,686 
1,743 
1,877 
1,939 
2,174 
2,157 
2,025 
2,026 
1,835 



95-2 
116-7 
92-5 
90-1 



90-3 
98-8 
105-6 
105-6 
107-5 
105-4 
95-1 
84-5 



3,142 

3,775 

3,025 

2.797 

2,907 

3,115 

3,016 

3,249 

3,' 

4,649 

5,286 

4,118 

3,183 

2,884 



128-3 
143-9 
130-1 
132-3 
133-4 
131-6 
127-5 
128-8 
146-3 
176-8 
180-5 
162-8 
135 
118-9 



71-5 

88-1 
58-8 
69-6 
77-0 
73-5 
78-9 
99-5 
111-3 
126-2 
139-5 
115-7 



i-2 



Aug. 



1,780 
1,901 
1,806 
1,638 
1,707 
1,664 
1,755 
1,875 
1,959 
2,141 
2,126 
2,015 
2,048 
1,857 



97-2 
115-3 
93-5 
90-1 
90-8 
90-7 
91-0 
98-4 
105-7 
106-2 
109-3 
104-5 
95-0 



3,116 

3, 

3,035 

2,764 

3,058 

2,881 

3,018 

3,500 

3,736 

4,651 

5,262 

4,032 

3, 

2,995 



131-6 

148-6 

132-6 

133-1 

135-7 

134-8 

130- 

137-7 

147-4 

174-8 

187-3 

162-7 

126-4 

123-7 



71-5 
84-9 
66-8 
73-6 
78-5 
70-9 
80- 1 
94-8 
1150 
132-0 
139-7 
114-2 
85-8 
661 



Sept. 



1,881 
1,950 
1,801 
1,653 
1,704 
1,677 
1,861 
1,896 
1,994 
2,141 
2,234 
2,110 
2,066 
1,845 



98-1 
114-4 
93-6 
89-6 
91-1 
90-4 
90-6 
98-3 
105-3 
106-4 
109- 1 
103-6 
94-3 
850 



3,254 

3,680 

3.028 

2,842 

2,781 

3,058 

3,033 

3,259 

3 i 

4^235 

4,794 

4,037 

3,302 

2, 



129-1 
145-9 
131-0 
1321 
133-6 
139-1 
126-4 
137-4 
147-0 
164-4 
179-5 
151-1 
123-6 
124 



72 

84 

65 

75 

73 

74 

85 

97 

110-8 
130-1 



110-9 
87-6 
65-5 



Oct. 



1,937 
1,929 
1,793 
1,664 
1,667 
1,685 
1,851 
1,898 
2,026 
2,198 
2,220 
2,054 
2,020 
1,854 



98-2 
113-3 
92-3 
89-6 
91-0 
90-9 
90-7 
97-7 
105-7 
106-7 
109- 1 
103-2 
93-9 
84-5 



338 
226 

3,210 

3 

4,728 

5,217 

4,008 

2, 

2,632 



126-2 

145-3 
128-7 
129-9 
154-2 
141-4 
129-6 
135-9 
148-7 
161-2 
179-3 
153-7 
122- 1 
120-2 



2 
5 
5 

88-7 
103-5 
111-4 
133-3 
136-3 
105-7 
83-1 
63-6 



Nov. 



MONTHLY REVIEW OF BUSINESS STATISTICS 



33 



Table 29. Significant Statistics of the United Kingdom 



Classification 



Production— 

Iron 000 metric tons 

Steel 000 metric tons 

Coal 000 metric tons 

Electricity 

Generated mill, k.w.h. 

New orders received. .1920= 100 

Copper Available 000 tons 

Raw Cotton Delivered to 

Mill mill. lb. 

Production, Artificial Silk 

Yarn and Waste.... mill. lb. 
Natural Sh.kDeliveries000 lb. 
Crude Rubber 

Available 000 tons 

Building Plans 

Approved 1924 = 100 

Other 1924 = 100 

Employment— 
Insured Workers in 

Employment mill. 

Number Unemployed 000 

Percentage Unemployed 

Coal mining 

Iron and steel 

General engineering 

Electrical engineering 

Shipbuilding and marine en- 
gineering 

Base metal working 

Cotton 

Woollen 

Building 

Public works contracting 

Trade— 
Imports, Total £ mn. 

Food, drink and tobacco£ mn. 

Raw materials £ mn. 

Manufactured £ mn. 

Total, net imports £ mn. 

Exports, Total £ mn. 

Food, drink and tobacco £ mn. 

Raw materials £ mn. 

Manufactured £ mn. 

Bank Clearings, Country 
and Provincial Daily 
Average £ mn. 

Provincial £ mn. 

Postal Receipts, Daily.. £000 
Transportation— 
Shipping — 

Entrances mill, net tons 

Clearances mill, net tons 

Index of shipping 

freights 1924 = 100 

Railways — 

Average weekly 
railway receipts £ 000 

Freight traffic, total.mil 1. tons 

Merchandise mill, tons 

Coal mill, tons 

Minerals and other 
merchandise.... mill, tons 
Prices— 
Wholesale Prices 1913 = 100— 

Board of trade 

Economist 

Statist 

Times 

Retail Foods 

Cost of living 

Banking— 
Bank of England — 

Private deposits £ mn. 

Bank and currency notes £ mn. 

Gold reserve £ mn. 

Nine Clearing Banks— 

Deposits £ mn. 

Discounts £ mn. 

Advances £ mn. 

Investments £ mn. 

Treasury Bills £ mill. 

Money— 

Day to Day Rate p.c. 

Three Months Rate p.c. 

Security Values— 

Fixed Interest 1921 = 100 

Variable Dividend. .1921 = 100 

Total 1921 = 100 

Exchange, New York $ to £. 



1932 



Mar. April May June 



341 

470 

19,091 

1,090 
57 
7-4 

118 

6-32 
267 

4-14 

121-8 

93-3 



9-55 

2,595 
20-8 
18-8 
67-7 
27-2 
16-6 

56-7 
24-8 
23-4 
14-7 
28-8 
37-5 

611 
30-9 
16-5 
130 
55-7 
31-2 
2-7 
3-5 
24-2 



13-2 
102 

128 



2,790 

20-8 

3-7 

13-8 

3-3 



104- 



98-9 
97-4 



146 



105 

354 

124-6 

1,639 
215 
888 
266 
576 

2-48 
2-64 

111-6 

92-7 
105-5 
3-634 



322 

440 

18,663 

987 
59 
8-2 

120 

6-45 

290 



125-8 
93 



56-5 
25-6 
24-9 
170 
26-8 
37-4 

53-5 
27-5 
13-4 
11-8 

48-8 
34-8 

2 

4-0 



130 

95 

130 



4-35 
4 

68-5 



!,660 
20-1 
3-6 
13-2 

3-3 



102-4 

86-3 

97-0 

96-7 

126 

144 



108 

358 

124-6 

1,643 
238 
866 
272 
612 

1-98 
2-36 

110-6 

84-5 

102-1 

3-752 



424 
17,275 

895 

62 

9-7 

103 



309 



132-2 
108-5 



9-40 
2,754 
221 
20-6 
500 
28-6 
16-4 

57-5 
26-3 
33-4 
24-0 
26-2 
37-2 

55-7 
29-9 



12 

94 
128 



4-77 
4-25 



65-6 



5,670 
18-6 
3-4 
121 

3-2 



100-7 

83-3 

94-4 

93-9 

125 

143 



111 

358 

132-4 

1,661 
245 
858 
284 
617 

1 
1-57 

111-4 
82-0 
101 
3-676 



316 

467 

17,028 



58 
10-8 

101 

6-23 
318 



159-5 
880 



9-39 
2,770 
22-3 
210 
46-9 
27-8 
16 3 

57-3 
270 
30-4 
24-8 
25-8 
38-8 

57-5 
31-4 
13-5 
11-8 

53-3 
29-7 



120 

90-0 

126 



513 



57-7 



J.730 
18-9 
3-4 
12-2 

3-2 



981 
80-9 
90-6 
90-3 
123 
142 



122 

357 

140-0 

1,727 
276 
838 
324 
628 



1-06 

1110 
78 

100-6 
3-i 



July 



297 

437 

15.275 



52 



5-71 
333 



7-58 



1150 
108 



9-32 
2,839 
22 
21-5 
47-8 
28-8 
IS 4 

57-5 
28-5 
311 
251 
27-3 
42-8 

51-9 

29-3 

10 

11 

48-6 

29 
2-3 
3-5 

22-4 



13-3 

:08-0 

129 



503 
4 

56-3 



3,030 
17-5 
3-4 
11-0 

31 



97-7 
82-7 
92-8 
93-2 
125 
143 



117 

366 
141-5 

1,765 
316 
822 
333 
750 

•67 
'98 

115-6 

84-5 

105-5 

3-552 



Aug. 



367 
15,542 

815 

54 

14-8 

79 

4-62 
274 

8-90 

780 
500 



9-28 
2,866 
23 

22-6 
48-6 
28-8 
16-3 

57-7 
26-2 
33-5 
25-4 
271 
43-4 

53-3 

28-2 

11-7 

13 

49 

28-6 
2-6 
3-4 

21-7 



11-9 

920 
121 



513 
4-50 



590 



2,990 
16-5 



10-7 
2-7 



99 

85-2 

94-9 

960 

123 

141 



123 
36 
139- 

1.813 
373 
803 
348 
791 

•71 
•72 

1161 

92-5 

108-4 

3-476 



Sept. Oct 



265 

437 

16,360 

922 

56 

10-7 



5-70 

298 



123-9 
93-9 



9-15 
2,849 
22-8 
22-9 
46-8 
30-8 
160 

62-1 
27-3 
34-8 
20-3 
28-5 
42-1 

54-3 
30-6 
11-2 
121 
51-4 
26-2 
2-5 
3-2 



11-4 

880 
131 



4-91 
4-77 



64-3 



17-2 
3-3 
110 

2-8 



102 1 

88-1 

94-6 

97-7 

123 

141 



123 

362 

140-3 



•65 



118-4 

96-8 

111-4 

3-471 



280 

445 

17,829 



55 
101 



101 



6-32 
304 



7-30 



155-8 
94-5 



9-40 
2,737 
21-9 
22-9 
47-7 
30-2 
160 

61-9 
26-6 
25-7 
16-5 
29-5 
42-8 

60-8 
35-1 
11-9 

13-5 
571 
30-4 



12-8 

105-9 

134 



4 
4-35 



62- 



2,690 
18-8 
3-6 
12 4 

2-8 



101-1 

85-3 

91-5 

96-5 

125 

143 



119 

361 

140-4 

1,853 
387 
780 
396 
872 

•71 
•84 

120-3 

96-3 

112-5 

3-399 



Nov. Dec. 



272 

480 

18,594 

1,228 

53 

120 

103 

6-59 
321 

9-12 

155-5 
85-2 



9-37 
2,774 
22-2 
231 
46-8 
301 
16 2 

61-4 
25-6 
24-3 
16-7 
30-7 
43-8 

61-6 
34-4 
15-3 

28-7 
57-5 
31-1 
3-4 
4-1 
22-9 



125 

102-5 
135 



4-35 
4-41 



64-5 



2,605 
19-9 
3-7 
13-0 

3-1 



101-1 

85-7 

91-6 

95-3 

125 

143 



116 

359 

139-4 

1,859 
389 
770 
409 



115-9 



109-6 
3-277 



437 
19,157 



60 
11-0 



112 



5-52 
254 



7-16 



134-9 
136-9 



2,700 
21-7 
22 

45-0 
29-2 
16 



32 

15-6 

12-7 

56-5 

32-4 



13-1 

103-0 

174 



4-55 
4-29 



2.824 
20-9 
3-7 
13 

3-3 



101-0 

84-1 

91-4 

94-3 

125 

143 



136 

371 

119-8 

1,944 
406 
758 
456 
897 

•75 
1-25 

116-1 
95-8 
109-4 

3-270 



1933 



Jan. 



1,336 

60 

11-4 

117 

5-93 
326 

6-81 

136-2 
108-3 



9-29 
2,877 
23-1 
22-4 
44-8 
301 
18-6 

51 

25> 

23- 
20- 
37-5 
46-2 

54-1 
27-2 
151 
11-5 

49-9 

29-2 

2-5 

3-8 

22-1 



13-7 

108-8 
129 



4-40 
4 40 



63-6 



2,322 



100 

84-2 

91-5 

94-7 

123 

142 



147 
359 
119 

1,943 
429 
750 
455 
926 

•75 
1-81 

116-9 

96-4 

110-2 

3-365 



Feb. Mar 



276 

490 

18,552 

1,151 
59 
6-7 

107 

5-43 
293 

5 81 

129-0 
135-0 



9-34 
2,836 
22-8 
21-8 
43-8 
29-6 
19-3 

61-6 
23-8 
24-4 
191 
34-2 
45-2 

49-1 
25-2 
13-2 
10-5 
44-6 
27-9 
2-3 
3-4 
21-4 



131 

101-3 

127 



4-03 



62-6 



2,491 



98 

82-7 

90-6 

92 
122 
141 



133 

356 
142-2 

1,917 
384 
751 
480 
790 

•81 
•91 

118-4 

96-1 

1111 

3-422 



2,776 



56- 



52-4 
32-6 



119 
139 



140 
364 
56-4 



3-415 



34 



MONTHLY REVIEW OF BUSINESS STATISTICS 



Table 30. Significant Statistics of the United States. 



1932 I 1933 


Classification 






Mar. 


Apri! 


May 


June 


July 


Aug. 


Sept. 


Oct. 


Nov. 


Dec. 


Jan. 


Feb. 


Mar. 


United States Statistics- 




























Wheat, Visiblb Supply. Mil. bush 


. 202 


172 


! 167 


18-8 


194 


19C 


177 


161 


15! 


148 




Receipts, principal 




























markets 000 bush 

Shipments, principal 
markets 000 bush 


. 13,412 


! 13,198 15,34^ 


I 13,471 


41,00( 


40,732 


38.4K 


27,235 


17,584 


13,851 


12,814 


9,869 





9,562 


13,221 


15,942 


11,50' 


' 17,294 


19,646 


21.31C 


17,541 


23,464 


13,604 


8,375 


7,481 




Exports, including 




























wheat flour 000 bush 


8,43! 


11,77; 


8,76' 


8,00 


4,772 


5,768 


4,221 


4,422 


5,995 


3.54S 


3,313 


2,176 




Wheat Flour Produc- 




























tion 000 bbls 


8,482 


8,19f 


7,731 


7.82C 


7,82? 


9,005 


9,394 


9,382 


8.71S 


8.323 


8,072 






Sugar Meltings, 8 






Ports 000 long tons 


336 


29$ 


327 


381 


365 


35< 


40C 


281 


23c 


21c 


21c 


240 




Tobacco Consumption, 




























Cigars Millions 


355 


35C 


36£ 


40C 


36! 


401 


405 


437 


41< 


254 


297 


287 




Cigarettes Millions 


8,447 


7,562 


8,685 


10.56C 


9,534 


9,559 


9,31] 


8,351 


7,614 


7,315 


8,622 


7,854 




Cattle Receipts, Primary 




























Markets 00C 


1,377 


1,376 


1,397 


1,338 


1,29] 


1,606 


1,689 


1,896 


1,54c 


1,161 


1,811 


1,136 




Hoa Receipts, Primary 




























Markets 00C 


2,931 


2,96( 


3,05( 


2,545 


2,15* 


2,405 


2,505 


2,691 


2,775 


3,12] 


3,381 


2,699 




Cotton Consumption... 000 bales 


481 


367 


332 


32] 


27$ 


402 


492 


502 


504 


44( 


47J 


442 




Newsprint Produc- 




























tion 000 s. tons 


100 •( 


91-2 


88-1 


854 


74-5 


79-5 


70-6 


76-7 


81-7 


80-1 


74-4 


67-1 




Newsprint Consump- 




























tion 000 s. tons 


156-2 


148-4 


152-3 


138-2 


157-1 


123 £ 


127-4 


145-0 


145-9 


132-8 


127-4 


116-3 




Pig Iron Production.. 000 1. tons 


967 


852 


784 


626 


572 


531 


593 


645 


631 


546 


661 


554 


542 


Steel Ingot Produc- 




























tion 000 1. tons 


1,411 


1,240 


1,107 


897 


793 


832 


975 


1,069 


1,015 


845 


1,006 


1,065 


886 


Unitlled Orders U.S. 




Steel Co 000 1. tons 


2,472 


2,327 


2,177 


2,035 


1,966 


1,970 


1,985 


1,997 


1,968 


1,968 


1,899 


1,854 




Automobile Produc- 




tion 000 cars and trucks 


119-0 


148-3 


184-3 


183-1 


111-1 


90-3 


84-1 


48-7 


59-6 


107-4 


130-1 


106-8 






22,448 
129,477 


20,575 
132,020 


18,605 
132,575 


16.423 
134,027 


14,716 
135,902 


13.611 
133,153 


13.260 
125,775 


15,217 
121,840 


16,078 
121,948 


18,653 
124,856 


19,828 
129,644 


20,076 
134,440 




Stocks s. tons 




Lead Production s. tons 


30,345 


23,236 


25,902 


26,068 


15,819 


17,118 


20,498 


21,092 


24,465 


21,638 


24,615 


20,333 




Petroleum Produc- 






























67,189 


67,717 


68,523 


64,835 


66,310 


66,220 


65,036 


65,219 


63,384 


58,044 


63,998 






Consumption (to 






stills) 000 bbls. 


68,502 


71,131 


74,669 


72,327 


71,455 


67,271 


63,913 


66,698 


65.504 


65,998 


66,093 






Gasoline Production.. 000 bbls. 


31,789 


33,093 


34,599 


33,312 


33,705 


32,883 


30,908 


33,212 


32,072 


31,254 


30,508 








29,451 
112-2 


30,488 
121-7 


31,574 
146-2 


38,766 
113-1 


31,317 
128-8 


35,207 
134-0 


33,645 
127-5 


32,255 
107-5 


30,294 
105-3 


27,191 
81-2 


26,442 
83-4 






Contracts Awarded $000,000 


52-7 




Caijloadings 000 cars 


2,287 


2,773 


2,088 


1,966 


2,422 


2,345 


2,245 


3,158 


2,195 


2,487 


1,910 


1,958 


1,841 


Electric Power Pro- 




























duction mill. k.h. 


7,321 


6,781 


6,635 


6,548 


6,525 


6,743 


6,735 


7,053 


6,937 


7,127 


6,909 






Index Factory Employ- 




























ment 1923-5=100 


66-4 


64-3 


62-1 


60-0 


58-3 


58-8 


60-3 


611 


61-2 


60-6 


59-4 


59-4 




Mail Order Sales, 2 cos $000 


33,959 


39,745 


38,718 


39,889 


32,073 


33,777 


39,156 


45,423 


41,281 


51,700 


26,958 


26, 732 




Ten Cent Sales, 4 Chains. . .$000 


40,512 


39,359 


38,869 


36,864 


34,361 


34,538 


36.632 


41,605 


38,040 


66,307 


30,001 


30.534 




Imports $000,000 


131-3 


126-7 


112-0 


111-4 


79-4 


91-1 


98-4 


106-4 


104-5 


97-0 


96-0 


83-8 




Exports $000,000 


155-3 


135-2 


132-0 


114-3 


106-8 


109-2 


132-0 


153-5 


139-4 


131-2 


120-6 


101-5 




Manufacturing Pro- 




duction 1923-5 = 100 


65-0 


61-0 


590 


58-0 


570 


59-0 


65-0 


65-0 


63 


64-0 


64-0 


62-0 




Mineral Production.. 1923-5=100 


84-0 


79-0 


67-0 


63-0 


64-0 


65-0 


700 


74-0 


750 


76-0 


73-0 


77-0 




Industrial Produc- 




























tion 1923-5«100 


68-0 


64-0 


60-0 


59-0 


58-0 


60-0 


66-0 


66-0 


65-0 


66-0 


65-0 


64-0 








counted Mil. Dolls. 


639 


556 


490 


440 


538 


433 


332 


326 


309 


235 


274 


582 


42-6 


Reserve Ratio p.c. 


70-7 


67-1 


62-1 


57-6 


56-5 


58-9 


611 


62-1 


62-6 


62-9 


65-5 


53-5 


59-3 


Member Banks Loans 




























Net Demand 
Deposits Mil. Dolls. 


12,211 


11,880 


11,631 


11,263 


10,996 


10,796 


10,706 


10,441 


10,413 


10,297 


10,166 


9,627 




10,941 


11,144 


11,102 


10,925 


10,751 


10,982 


11,229 


11,401 


11,745 


11,758 


11,899 


10,593 




Interest Rates, Time Loans.. p.c. 


3-13 


2-30 


1-75 


1-50 


1-38 


1-38 


1-38 


•88 


•51 


•50 


•50 


•88 


2-80 


Call loans renewal p.c. 


2-50 


2-50 


2-50 


2-50 


2-08 


2-08 


2-00 


1-35 


1-04 


1-00 


1-00 


1-00 


3-22 


Prime commercial paper, 






























3-75 


3-50 


3-13 


2-75 


2-50 


2-68 


2-13 


2-00 


1-74 


1-50 


1-38 


1-38 


3-30 


Bond Prices High Gr^ade 




























Rails (10) 


79-28 
58-25 


73-23 
49-42 


69-69 
43-08 


68-78 
41-39 


70-97 
42-98 


79-32 
53-35 


82-07 
55-01 


80-76 
49-86 


78-19 
47-51 


77-88 
44-05 


82-49 
46-94 


81-92 
45-22 




Forty bonds 




Prices Common Stocks 




(404) 1926=100 


56-8 


43-9 


39-8 


34-0 


35-9 


53-3 


52-2 


49-9 


47-5 


47-4 


49-1 


44-9 




(Copyright Standard Statistics Co.) 




























Industrials (338) 


53-8 
32-1 
93-4 
54-5 
23-9 


41-7 
22-2 
73-3 
34-3 
18-7 


38-1 
17-4 
67-8 
30-1 
17-9 


33-5 
14-1 
55-0 
25-5 
15-1 


44-4 
21-2 
55-4 
35-2 
20-6 


51-5 
29-2 
84-2 
44-5 
28-5 


55-8 
34-5 
91-4 
54-2 
32-9 


47-7 
27-5 
80-6 
42-8 
23-9 


45-4 
25-5 

77-6 
39-5 
22-6 


44-8 
25-7 
79-6 
40-4 
23-5 


46-2 
27-6 
81-8 
41-9 
24-2 


42-5 
26-7 
73 1 
37-7 
20- 




Railways (33) 




Utilities (34) 








Tires and rubber goods (17) 






57-9 
29-6 
45-0 
30-4 
32-3 
30-7 
16-8 
104-6 
33-1 


49-2 
21-8 
38-0 
21-9 
23-1 
25-6 
11-0 
89-5 
31-4 


41-7 
20-4 
38-6 
19-7 
19-9 
23-4 
9-1 
82-9 
23-2 


34-8 
22-0 
36-5 
17-3 
16-3 
20-0 
6-5 
70-3 
23-0 


43-6 
29-6 
50-1 
26-4 
24-9 
27-2 
11-4 
93-0 
23-1 


49-3 
37-7 
54-6 
29-8 
33-0 
33-1 
15-8 
98-0 
82-6 


52-8 
47-0 
53-9 
31-8 
42-1 
38-7 
17-3 
101-4 
67-4 


48-2 
34-4 
47-4 
26-4 
32-5 
32-5 
12-9 
90-5 
29-2 


47-1 
32-1 
47-1 
24-8 
27-7 
29-9 
11-1 
82-9 
23-0 


46-6 
26-1 
46-1 
24-2 
24-8 
27-6 
9-2 
81-4 
23-2 


46-3 

29-4 
46-4 
25-2 
27-2 
26-7 
8-6 
85-7 
18-7 


42-7 
28-1 
42-0 
25-2 
26-7 
25-2 
60 
78-8 
19-3 









Oil (16) 








Steel and iron (9) 




Textile (31) 








Tobacco (10) 




Stock Sales, N.Y Mil Shares 


20-1 


Bond Sales, N.Y Mil. Dolls. 


252-7 


252-4 


258-4 


257-2 


240-7 


333-1 


250-3 


178-6 


158-9 


241-9 


260-0 


231-5 






533 


379 


300 


244 


242 


332 


380 


325 


338 


347 


359 


360 




Bank Debits, N.Y... Mil. Dolls. 


16,160 


15,558 


12,912 


4,202 


12,728 


13,458 


14,163 


12,944 


9,815 


13,967 


12,413 


12,036 




Outside, 140 centres. Mil. Dolls. 


13,729 


14,366 


12,498 


12,908 


12,572 12,188111,767 


12.354U0.935 


12,820 12,053 


10,079 



REVUE MENSUELLE DE LA SITUATION ECONOMIQUE 

Vol. VIII OTTAWA, AVRIL, 1933 N° 4 

Statisticten du Dominion: R. H. Coats, B.A., F.S.S. (Hon.), F.R.S.C. 

Chef de la Section de la Statistiqtje Generale: S. A. Cudmore, M.A., F.S.S. 

Adjoint (Statistiques Economiques): S. B. Smith, M.A. 

STATISTIQUE COURANTE DES AFFAIRES AU CANADA 

La situation economique du Canada s'est pleinement maintenue en mars, la hausse des 
prix de gros etant le point lumineux a l'horizon. L'indice a monte de 63-6 en fevrier a 64-4 
et une plus grande avance des denrees les plus speculatives en avril a completement change les 
perspectives immediates. L'indice canadien des produits de la ferme a monte de 43-0 a 44-7 
et les metaux non ferreux ont continue leur avance du mois precedent. L'opinion se repand 
que les prix de gros vont grandement profiter d'evenements politiques et economiques qui facili- 
teraient la reprise prochaine des activites commerciales. 

Les obligations du gouvernement, vu les conditions financieres agitees aux Etats-Unis, ont 
ete moderement plus bas que le mois precedent. Le rendement moyen des obligations de l'On- 
tario etait de 4-79 p.c. comparativement a 4-73, et les obligations du Dominion ont aussi flechi. 

Le cours moyen des actions ordinaires a 6te le meme qu'en fevrier, Findice etant a 47-3 
comparativement a 47-6. Les industriels ont avance et les utilites ont recule moderement. 
La moyenne des fonds de New- York a $1-199 a Montreal se compare a $1-197 en fevrier. 

Operations commerciales 

Le volume des affaires s'est bien maintenu en mars malgre la crise bancaire des Etats-Unis. 
La production minerale, mesuree par neuf facteurs significatifs, montre de l'amelioration. Les 
expeditions d'or, a 274,925 onces, se comparent a 225,492 onces en fevrier et le mouvement de 
l'argent donne 1,692,469 onces comparativement a 997,579. Les exportations de nickel donnent 
5,073,000 livres comparativement a 3,469,000, un gain modere apres rajustement. La produc- 
tion de charbon, a 812,393 tonnes, se compare a 1,036,400 tonnes en fevrier, la plus grande partie 
de ce declin etant contraire aux tendances saisonnieres. 

L'indice de la production alimentaire base sur dix facteurs marque 74-1 en mars com- 
parativement a 63-0 en fevrier. La farine de ble et le gruau d'avoine donnent des augmen- 
tations, apres rajustements, et l'avoine roulee donne une diminution. La production de sucre 
des quatre semaines terminees le 25 mars est de 55,432,000 livres comparativement a 20,347,000 
livres la periode precedente. Les abatages de pores et de moutons montrent des gains tandis 
que le gain des bovins est inferieur a la normale saisonniere. Les exportations de fromage et 
de saumon en conserve ont ete plus grosses en mars. 

Les dedouanements de tabac en feuille et de cigares ont ete considerablement plus lourds, 
mais le gain en cigarettes a ete moins que normal pour la saison. La manufacture d'enveloppes 
de pneumatiques montre un faible gain pour le dernier mois dont les statistiques sont etablies. 
L'activite dans l'industrie de la chaussure a ete plus grande, selon les derniers rapports. 

La production de papier a journal est de 137,078 tonnes comparativement a 125,610, un 
gain plus que normal pour mars. Les exportations de pulpe de bois, planches et madriers ont 
ete plus fortes et celles de bardeaux ont decline, apres rajustement. L'indice de la production 
forest iere a 60-6 se compare a 59-8 en fevrier. 

La production d'acier en lingots est de 11,212 tonnes comparativement a 12,374 tonnes en 
fevrier et comme tous les hauts fourneaux sont inactifs, il n'a pas ete produit de fonte. La pro- 
duction d'automobiles est de 6,632 comparativement a 3,298, le gain etant de pres de 67 p.c. 
apres rajustement. 

Les gains des contrats de construction et des permis de batir sont legers, en contraste avec 
l'augmentation normale de la saison. Les operations de construction indiquent un tres bas 
niveau. 

La production d'energie electrique a ete sur une moyenne quotidienne de 44,227,000 k.w.h. 
en mars comparativement a 46,413,000 en fevrier, le declin etant un peu plus que normal pour 
la saison. 

Les chargements de wagons, a 157,416, se comparent a 133,147 le mois precedent, le gain 
etant de pres de 3 p.c. apres rajustement. 

Les exportations, a $36,579,000 se comparent a $26,398,000, soit un gain modere apres rajus- 
tement, tandis que le gain dans les importations est inferieur a la normale. 



36 REVUE MENSUELLE DE LA SITUATION ECONOMIQUE 

Les debits des banques de mars se chiffrent a $1,887,000,000 comparativement a $1,830,- 
000,000, le declin, apres rajustement, etant de 5-1 p.c. 

L'indice du marche agricole marque 129 comparativement a 76-5, le gain provenant des 
expeditions de grain a la tete des lacs et sur la cote du Pacifique. L'indice du grain vendu donne 
140-2 comparativement 79-4. L'indice des denrees dans les entrepots frigorifiques le ler avril 
est a 112-7 comparativement a 135-8 le ler mars. 

Changements economiques 

Les trois facteurs representatifs choisis comme refletant le mieux la position economique 
jourante n'ont montre aucune amelioration dans le premier trimestre de 1933. Le cours des 
actions ordinaires a ete plutot a la baisse depuis septembre dernier jusqu'a mars, l'indice montrant 
17-3 comparativement a, 63-0, moyenne de septembre. Le point le plus bas de la depression 
ictuelle a ete touche en juin 1932, alors que l'indice marquait 43-2. Apres l'elimination de la 
jourse a long terme telle que determined pour la periode de Janvier 1919 a juin 1932, l'indice 
est un peu plus bas en mars 1933 qu'en juin 1932. II est 2-90 fois la deviation standardised 
au-dessous de la tendance a long terme comparativement a 2-89 en juin. 

Le facteur le moins favorable a ce sujet est le fort declin du volume physique des affaires, 
declin qui a ete continu depuis quatre ans. L'indice a baisse de plus de deux fois la deviation 
standardised au-dessus de la course a long terme dans les commencements de 1932 a pres que 
de quatre fois au-dessous les derniers mois sur lesquels les statistiques sont compilees. 

Le rendement des obligations est en meilleure position dans le premier trimestre de 1933 
que dans la periode correspondante de l'annee precedente. Le rendement des obligations etait 
faible dans les premiers mois de 1928, indiquant le credit facile. Le changement fut rapide 
les douze mois suivants. Alors que le declin de l'argent a long terme montrait qu'il y avait 
amelioration au cours des quinze mois precedant septembre 1931, la dislocation financiere 
exterieure conduisit a une vive avance qui eut sa cime en Janvier 1933. La situation du credit 
s'ameliora dans la derniere partie de 1932 et n'a guere change dans le premier trimestre de 1933, 
bien que les rendements soient un peu plus forts en mars. 

Le graphique de la page 4 montre les correlations des trois facteurs apres rajustements suivant 
les methodes statistiques reconnues. 

Relation entre les prix et le volume des affaires 

Le graphique de la page 10 montre la relation des indices du volume des affaires avec ceux 
des prix de gros depuis 1919 jusqu'a date. Ces facteurs sont les plus significatifs dans l'orien- 
tation des conditions economiques. L'operation profitable des entreprises productives depend 
de la stabilite et du mouvement ascendant des prix. Dans les periodes de declin, le commerce 
subit un grand desavantage. Les principaux declins dans le volume des affaires d'apres-guerre 
sont en 1920-21 et de 1929 jusqu'a nos jours, coi'neidant avec une baisse tres prononcee des prix 
de gros. De Janvier 1922 a decembre 1929, il y a une periode de stabilite relative des prix. Ce 
facteur a contribue a l'expansion industrielle de 1922 a 1929. 

Un gain simultane des deux facteurs comme en 1919 constitue l'essence d'une amelioration 
dans les conditions economiques. Le gain d'un facteur et la stabilite de l'autre, comme dans 
la periode de 1922 a 1929, reflete des conditions relativement prosperes. Un declin simultane 
des deux facteurs sur une periode assez prolongee comme 1920-21 ou 1929-33 est la preuve d'une 
depression majeure. 

Le premier trimestre de 1933, le declin des operations commerciales s'est continue au taux 
plus ou moins caracteristique des quatre annees precedentes. Le declin des prix de gros a ete 
rapide en 1930, mais le recul a ete moins rapide les 27 derniers mois. L'indice a monte" de 
huit-dixiemes de point en mars, contrebalancant le declin des trois mois precedents. 

Si l'on prend separement ou les prix ou le volume physique, il est possible d'en tirer certaines 
conclusions sur l'orientation des affaires. Par l'etude de la marche des prix, en etablissant 
une ligne normale de l'abondance de l'argent et du credit et en allouant une marge pour la produc- 
tion et les stocks de denrees, il est possible d'etablir que les prix sont relativement hauts ou bas. 

L'equation de l'echange 

Le graphique de la page 15 montre un nombre de facteurs entrant dans l'equation des 
echanges canadiens. L'interet de cette equation provient de la lumiere qu'elle projette sur les 
fluctuations des prix generaux. Les changements dans le niveau general des prix sont d'un interet 
tres etendu, principalement pour les speculateurs et pour les administrateurs ayant a tracer un 
programme d'activites. 






REVUE MENSUELLE DE LA SITUATION ECONOM1QUE 37 

L'equation des echanges est developpce sur la theorie quantitative de Pargent. L'essence 
de la theorie, c'est que Pun des effets normaux d'une variation dans la quantite d'argent en circu- 
lation provoque directement des changements de prix. En d'autres mots, quand pour une cause 
quelconque les media de circulation entre les mains du public augmentent en quantite, le niveau 
general a une tendance a se mouvoir dans la merae direction, et vice versa. 

La reconstruction de la theorie quantitative de Pargent, a la suite des recherches de Kem- 
merer et Fisher, a resulte en une equation des echanges. II 6tait pr6tendu, par exemple, qu'au- 
cuhe difference ne provenait du fait que les fonds fussent actuellement entre les mains du public ou 
deposes dans les banques, les depots sujets a retrait par cheque depassant en 1932 dix fois le chiffre 
du numeraire en circulation, y compris les billets et Pargent monnaye entre les mains du public. 

Le chiffre des billets de banque entre les mains du public est obtenu en deduisant " les 
billets detenus par les autres banques " de la circulation globale des billets de banque. Les 
billets du Dominion en possession des banques et a la reserve centrale d'or sont deduits des 
emissions globales. Le montant de la monnaie subsidiaire est base sur les chiffres soumis par 
la Monnaie. La somme de la monnaie, des billets du Dominion et des banques, apres ces deduc- 
tions, donne tout Pargent actuellement entre les mains du public. 

L'efficience de Pargent, toutefois, depend de la frequence avec laquelle elle sert a faire des 
paiements. Une grande quantite d'argent se deplacant a faible velocite ne donne pas plus de 
service qu'une petite quantite se deplacant a grande vitesse. 

Les statistiques des debits des banques, etablies en cooperation avec PAssociation des Ban- 
quiers Canadiens depuis 1922, sont d'une grande valeur dans cette etude. En divisant le total 
des depots des banques par les debits on obtient la velocite approximative de la circulation de 
mois en mois depuis la guerre, dont les resultats paraissent dans la premiere section du graphique. 
Les debits de 1919 a, 1923 ont ete calcules sur les rapports des compensations. 

En presumant que la velocite de Pargent est d'environ 125 p.c. du deplacement des depots, 
la velocite mensuelle est obtenue par interpolation suivant la velocite des depots. En prenant 
le produit de Pargent actuellement en circulation et sa velocite, on a construit une serie men- 
suelle comparative du total des paiements au comptant de la periode d'apres-guerre. En ajou- 
tant cette serie aux debits des banques augmentes de 14-5 p.c. pour couvrir les cheques payes 
en dehors des 32 centres ou se trouvent des chambres de compensations, on a le total de tous les 
paiements par cheque ou en argent. 

Nous avons la un cote de l'equation des echanges, qui est peut-e'tre le medium rassernblant 
le mieux tous les facteurs influencant la marche des prix. L'equation montre que le montant 
global des paiements en especes ou en cheques est egal au produit du prix et de la quantite totale 
de marchandises echangees et de services rendus au cours de la periode. 

Le but reel est d' analyser les relations entre differents facteurs de l'equation, obtenant ainsi 
un apercu des conditions determinant les fluctuations du niveau des prix. L'equation prend 
la forme de MV — MiVi=PT, M reprcsentant Pargent entre les mains du public, Mi les depots 
des banques sujets a, retrait par cheque, et V et Vi la velocite de Pargent et des depots tandis 
que P est Pcquivalant du niveau general des prix et T Pcquivalent de commerce, ce qui repre- 
sente la somme des denrees et des services echanges. 

La fluctuation cyclique des depots est d'un caractere plus modere que celle des debits, le 
roulement des depots etant beaucoup plus gros dans les periodes de prosperite. Le volume 
des debits comparativement aux depots a touche au nouveau bas de la pcriode d'apres-guerre 
dans le premier trimestre de 193,3. Le niveau actuel des depots est suffisant pour une expan- 
sion considerable des affaires et de la speculation. Dans une periode de depression, les bas prix 
et la lenteur des operations expliquent la faible velocite des debits des banques. 

Pourvu que les autres facteurs de l'equitation restent inchanges, l'effet de la contraction 
industrielle des quatre annees dernieres aurait ete d'elever les prix. Quels sont done alors les 
facteurs montrant assez de fluctuation pour contrebalancer Peffet constructif des prix exerce 
par la baisse des affaires en ces dernieres annees? On en trouve une influence mineure dans la 
diminution de la monnaie en circulation, mais le facteur majeur se trouve dans le declin pro- 
nonce de velocite des depots en disponibilite. 

Commerce mondial 

La valeur des importations et exportations des principaux pays, par regions continentales, 
de Janvier 1929 a, decembre 1932 parait dans la graphique de la page 30. On constate en 1932 
une plus grande resistance aux tendances rcactionnaires decoulant du fort declin caracteristique 
des deux annees precedentes. Le niveau de 1932 a ete plus bas qu'en 1930 et 1931, mais la 
marche d'un mois a Pautre indiquait une plus grande stabilite. 



38 REVUE MENSUELLE DE LA SITUATION ECONOMIQUE 

En L930 la forte chute du coura des matieres premieres a frappe les pays agricoles, parti- 
culidremenl en dehors de l'Europe. Quelques-uns ont etc capables d'augmenter le volume 
de leurs exportations, mais merae en ce cas la baisse des prix en a diminue la valeur totale. 
Comme le commerce entre pays europeens n'a pas ete aussi rudement affecte en 1930, le com- 
merce des pays d'Europe n'a commence a baisser serieusement qu'en 1931. Dans les plus 
recents stages de la depression, cependant, I'abaissement du pouvoir d'achat de tous les pays 
agricoles a cause une baisse dans les exportations des pays industriels, de sorte que le declin est 
devenu general. II est evident qu'en 1932 la depression avait desorganisc les marches mondiaux 
a un degre extraordinaire. 

D'apres le Releve Economique Mondial de J. B. Condliffe, public par la Socicte des Nations, 
la contraction du commerce mondial signifie rappauvrissement. II a son contrecoup dans le 
ehomage, un abaissement du standard de la vie et la disorganisation de l'industrie et du 
commerce. 

La SITUATION AUX ETATS-UNIS 

Malgre la crise bancaire de mars, l'activite industrielle des Etats-Unis a fait montre d'une 
reprise substantielle la derniere partie du mois et les statistiques hebdomadaires accusent des 
gains dans plusieurs lignes importantes au commencement d'avril. Apres le 25 mars, les opera- 
tions des acieries ont pris de l'expansion montrant que la production d'avril depasserait celle 
de mars. La production estimative d'automobiles a ete de 31,629 la semaine terminee le 8 avril 
comparativement a 10,633 la semaine du 18 mars, le gain ayant ete graduel au cours de l'inter 
valle. La production d'energie electrique, apres avoir baisse avec violence pendant le conge 
bancaire, s'est mise a avancer et a la fin du mois elle etait a, peu pres au meme niveau qu'a la fin 
de fevrier. 

Le developpement economique le plus saillant a ete l'adoption, le 20 avril, de la loi de secours 
a l'agriculture, donnant au president le droit de prendre les mesures nccessaires au relevement 
des prix aux Etats-Unis. Ce plan comprend un arrangement avec le Federal Reserve System 
pour l'achat sur le marche public de $3,000,000,000 d'obligations du gouvernement. Si cela 
ne suffit pas a faire face aux besoins de la situation, il y a trois alternatives: (1) des bons du 
Tresor peuvent etre emis jusqu'a concurrence de $3,000,000,000 pour rencontrer les obligations 
federates a leurs echeances et pour l'achat de bons des Etats-Unis; (2) la reduction du titre or du 
dollar americain, mais ne devant pas aller au-dela de 50 p.c. du titre actuel; (3) l'acceptation 
de $100,000,000 en paiement des dettes de guerre en argent a 50 cents l'once. 

Les discussions des questions economiques avec les representants des autres pays en prepa- 
ration de la conference monetaire et economique mondiale ont commence le 20 avril avec l'arrivee 
du premier ministre du Royaume-Uni. 

LA SITUATION EN GRANDE-BRETAGNE 

Les comptes publics de 1' an nee fiscalc terminee le 31 mars 1933 montrent un etat de chose] 
assez satisfaisant, si Ton ticnt compte des conditions mondiales generates. Le revenu ordinaire, 
sans compter celui des services pourvoyant a leurs revenus, comme les Postes, sont de £744,791,000 
et toutes les depenses sur la meme base sont de £777,070,000. Ce dernier chiffre, cependant, 
comprend £17,239,000 verse au nouveau fonds d'amortissement pour require le principal de la 
dette, et £28,956,000 paye aux Etats-Unis, de sorte que, apres elimination du fonds d'amortisse- 
ment, il reste un deficit comparativement modere de £15,400,000 et qui aurait 6te transform6 
en un surplus substantiel s'il n'y avait pas eu de paiement aux Etats-Unis, bien que le Royaume- 
Uni n'ait recu aucun paiement de la France et des autres pays crediteurs. 

Les prix de gros ont continue de baisser, le nombre-indice de mars etant a 81-7 p.c. de 
base de 1930 comparativement a, 82-8 p.c. et 83-0 p.c. en fevrier et Janvier respectivement. 

Le commerce en produits britanniques le premier trimestre de 1933, avec chiffres correspon- 
dants de 1932 entre parentheses a <He comme suit: importations £159,241,000 (£193,441,000); 
exportations de produits du Royaume-Uni £89,706,000 (£93,331,000); reexportations £12,621,000 
(£16,115,000); execdent des importations £56,914,000 (£84,995,000). La reduction de 
balance commerciale dcfavorable pendant le trimestre est de £28,000,000, ou au taux de 
£100,000,000 par annee, ce qui est le trait saillant. 

Le chomage montre de la diminution, le nombre de chomeurs etant de 2,776,184 le 20 mars, 
soit une reduction de 80,454 en un mois. 

Ottawa, Bureau federal de la Statistique, 24 avril 1933. 



PUBLICATIONS ISSUED BY THE DOMINION BUREAU OF STATISTICS 



1. ANNUAL OR SPECIAL REPOBTS ISSUED DURING THE MONTH ENDED 

APRIL 16, 1933 

Population. — Seventh census of Canada, 1931, Bulletin No. 1, Mental Institutions. Vital statistics, 1930, 
10th annual report. 

Production. — Agricultural Products. — Commercial tobacco production in Canada, 1932. Annual 
statistics of fruit and floriculture, 1932. Animal Products. — Animal products, 1930, by counties, 
Nova Scotia, final bulletin No. 2; New Brunswick, final bulletin No. 3; Manitoba, final bulletin 
No. 4. Report on the production of processed cheese in Canada, 1932. Statistics of dairy factories, 
1931. Harness and saddlery and miscellaneous leather goods in Canada, 1931. Advance report on 
the fur farms of Canada, 1931. Forest Products. — Preliminary report on the sash, door and planing- 
mill industry in Canada, 1931. Report on the furniture industry in Canada, 1931. 

Manufactures. — Vegetable Products. — Report on the bread and other bakery products industry in 
Canada, 1931. Report on the coffee, tea and spice industry in Canada, 1931. Iron and Steel and 
Their Products. — The hardware and tools industry in Canada, 1931. The agricultural implements 
industry in Canada, 1931. Electrical Apparatus and Supplies. — The radio industry in Canada 
1932. 

External Trade. — Review of Canada's foreign trade, calendar year 1932. Trade of Canada (imports for 
consumption and exports) calendar year 1932. 

Internal Trade. — Retail trade in Alberta, 1930. Retail trade in Alberta, 1930, by census divisions, cities 
and towns. Retail trade in British Columbia, 1930. Retail trade in British Columbia, 1930, by 
census divisions, cities and towns. Retail trade in Canada, 1930 (preliminary summary). Press sum- 
mary of same. 

Education. — Survey of libraries in Canada, 1931 (bilingual). Apercue annuel sur l'education au Canada, 
1931. 



2. PUBLICATIONS REGULARLY ISSUED BY THE WEEK, MONTH OR QUARTER 

Weekly Bulletins. — Canadian Grain Statistics, Carloadings of Revenue Freight. Investors' and Traders' 
Indexes of Security Prices. Index Number of 20 Mining Stocks. 

Monthly Bulletins. — Agricultural Statistics. The Wheat Situation- Review; statistical supplement. 
Cold Storage Holdings. Production of— (a) Flour, (b) Sugar, (c) Boots and Shoes, (d) Auto- 
mobiles, (e) Iron and Steel, (f) Coal and Coke, (g) Leading Mineral Products, (h) Asbestos. 
(i) Asphalt Roofing, (j) Cement, (k) Clay Products. (1) Copper, (m) Feldspar, (n) Gold, 
(o) Gypsum, (p) Lead, (q) Lime, (r) Natural Gas. (s) Nickel, (t) Petroleum, (u) Salt. 
(v) Silver, (w) Zinc, (x) Concentrated Milk Products, (y) Creamery Butter. Building Permits. 
Summary of the Trades of Canada current month and 12 months. Summary of Canada's domestic 
exports. Summary of Canada's Imports. Asbestos trade. Farm implements and machinery. 
Footwear trade. Exports: Grain and flour; Lumber; Meats, lard and sausage casings; Milk, milk 
products and eggs; Non-ferrous ores and smelter products; Paints and varnishes; Petroleum and its 
products; Pulpwood, wood pulp and paper; Rubber and insulated wire and cable; Vehicles (of iron). 
Imports: Coffee and tea; Lumber; Meats, lard and sausage casings; Milk and its products and eggs; 
Non-ferrous ores and smelter products; Paints and varnishes; Petroleum and its products; Rubber; 
Stoves, sheet metal products; Refrigerators; Vehicles (of iron). 
Railway Operating Statistics. Traffic of Canadian Railways. Canal Statistics. 
Prices and Price Indexes. Automobile Financing. Changes in the value of retail sales. 
The Employment Situation as reported by Employers. Commercial Failures. Bank Debits. 
Review of Business Statistics. — Price $1.00 per year. 
Vital Statistics, Births, Marriages and Deaths, by provinces. 



Quarterly Reports.— Trade of Canada— Price $2.00 per year. 



For the publications listed above application should be made to the Dominion Statistician, Dominion 
Bureau of Statistics, Ottawa. 



Volume VIII 




Numero 4 



CANADA 

BUREAU FEDERAL DE LA STATISTIQUE 
SECTION DE LA STATISTIQUE G&N&RALE 



REVUE DE LA SITUATION ECONOMIQUE 



AVRIL 1933 



Publie par ordre de l'Hon. H. H. Stevens, M.P. 
Ministre du Commerce 



OTTAWA 

J. O. PATF.NAUDE: IMPRIMEUR DU ROl SUPPLEANT 

1933 



Prix: Un dollar par an. 






*ov.»ou-^, THL LI BR ARIA.. 

G*>r>. J <P3 uril VERS I TY OF TORONTO 

y > $[^ D.l. TORONTO 5. ONI 




Volume VIII ««■? Number 5 



CANADA 

-BOMTNTON BUREAU OF STATISTICS 
GENERAL STATISTICS BRANCH 







MONTHLY REVIEW OF BUSINESS STATISTICS 



MAY, 1933 






Published by Authority of the Honourable H. H. Stevens, M.P. 
Minister of Trade and Commerce 






OTTAWA 

J. O. PATENAUDE, ACTING KING'S PRINTER 

1933 



Price: One Dollar per year. 



MONTHLY REVIEW OF BUSINESS STATISTICS 



SUMMARY OF CONTENTS 



Page 

Chart of Three Representative Factors 4 

General Review 3-7 

Table 1. Weighted Indices of the Physical Vol- 
ume of Business 8 

Table 2. Trend of Business Movements. 

Imports of raw materials. Exports of lumber. 
Production of basic industries. Exports of certain 
commodities. Operations of railways. Canal 
traffic. Strikes and lockouts. Reports of the em- 
ployment offices. Immigration. Bank clearings. 
Failure 

Chart of Business Revenues and Common 
Stocks 10 

Table 3. Receipts and Visible Supply of Canadian 
Grain 11 

Table 4. Exports and Cash Price of Canadian 
Grain 11 

Table 5. Consumption of Grain and Production 
by the Milling Industry 12 

Table 6. Receipts, Manufactures and Stocks of 
Sugar 12 

Table 7. Tobacco, Cigars and Cigarettes Entered 
for Consumption. 

Tobacco, cut. Tobacco, plug— Cigarettes. Cigar- 
ettes, ov«r-weight. Cigars. Foreign Raw Leaf 
Tobacco 13 

T able 8. Prod uctlon of Boots an d Shoes 13 

Table 9. Cold Storage Holdings, Sales and 
Slaughterings of Live Stock and Retail Food 
Prices 14 

Chart of Weekly Factors 15 

Table 10. Output of Central Electric Stations In 
Canada 16 

Table 11. Railway Freight Loaded at Stations. . 17 

Table 12. Index Numbers of Employment by 
Industries 18 

Electrical Energy Available for Consumption 18 

Table 13. Seasonally Adjusted Indexes of Em- 
ployment, Indexes of Retail Sales and Auto- 
mobile Financing 19 

Table 14. Trend of Business in the Five Economic 
Areas. 

Canada, Maritime Provinces, Quebec, Ontario, 
Prairie Provinces, British Columbia — Construction 
Contracts Awarded. Building Permits. Index of 
Employment. Bank Debits. Sales of Insurance. 
Commercial Failures 20 

Table 15. Mineral Production by Months. 

Metals— Gold, Silver, Nickel, Copper, Lead, 
Zinc, Fuels — Coal, Petroleum, Natural Gas, Non- 
Metals — Asbestos, Gypsum, Feldspar, Salt, Struc- 
tural Materials— Cement, Clay Products, Lime. . . 20 



Pag: 



Table 16. Weekly Factors of Economic Activity in 
Canada. 

Grain Receipts and Prices, Live Stock Sales and 
Prices, Carloadings, Security Prices, Mining Stock 
Prices 

Table 17. Bank Debits to Individual Accounts 
in the Clearing House Centres of Canada 

Table 18. Indexes of Employment by Cities 



Table 19. Building Permits Issued in Sixty-one 
Cities * 

Table 20. Index Numbers of Wholesale Prices. . . . 

Table 21. Prices of Representative Commodities 
and Wholesale Prices in Other Countries. 

United States, United Kingdom, France, Ger- 
many, Belgium, Netherlands, Norway, Sweden, 
Italy, Finland, India, Japan, Australia, New 
Zealand, Egypt 

Table 22. Total Value of Imports and Exports, 
by Groups, in Thousands of Dollars 



Table 24. Summary of Canada's Imports by 
Principal Commodities 

Table 25. Banking and Currency 



Chart of Indexes of Physical Volume 

Table 26. Index Numbers of Security Prices. 

(a) 1. Common Stocks— Industrials, Total, Iron 
and Steel, Pulp and Paper, Milling, Oils, Textiles 
and Clothing, Food and Allied Products, Beverages, 
Miscellaneous. Utilities, Total, Transportation, 
Telephone and Telegraph, Power and Traction. 

(b) Common Stocks, continued — Companies 
abroad, Total, Industrial, Utilities, Banks, General 
Index Number, Traders' Index, Preferred Stocks, 
Interest Rates, Yields on Bonds, Shares Traded, 
Montreal. Mining Stocks — Gold, Copper, Silver 
and Miscellaneous, Total Index 

Table 27. Tonnage of Vessels Entered and Cleared 
from Canadian Ports 



Table 28. Annual Indexes 

Table 29. Significant Statistics of the United 
Kingdom 



Table 30. 
States.. 



Significant Statistics of the United 



List of Current Publications of the Dominion 
Bureau of Statistics 



24 



25 



26 



Table 23. Canada'sDomestic Exports by Principal 
Commodities 27 



Indexes of Cost of Living and Cost per Week of a 
Family Budget 



34 



39 



General Review (in French) 35-38 






MONTHLY REVIEW OF BUSINESS STATISTICS 

Vol. VIII OTTAWA, MAY, 1933 No. 5 

Dominion Statistician: R. H. Coats, B.A., F.S.S. (Hon.), F.R.S.C. 

Chief, Branch op General Statistics: S. A. Cudmore, M.A., F.S.S. 

Assistant on Business Statistics: Sydney B. Smith, M.A. 

THE BUSINESS SITUATION IN CANADA 

Economic conditions in Canada recorded improvement during April over the level of the 
first quarter, the more optimistic tone being reflected in marked advances on stock and com- 
modity exchanges while business operations showed a gain over the preceding month. The index 
of wholesale prices was 65-4 compared with 64-4 in March, the gains being pronounced in farm 
products and non-ferrous metals. The index of common stocks reflected a sharp advance on 
the Canadian exchanges. The standing in April was 51-9 compared with 47-3 and the weekly 
index shows that the advance was continued in the early weeks of May. Ten groups out of the 
14 in the classification averaged higher in April, the exceptions being banks, textiles, telephone 
and power. Money and credit factors showed moderate change in the period under review. 
Dominion bonds strengthened during the month, the average price being only slightly higher 
in April than in the preceding month. The price of Ontario government bonds, on the other 
hand, was lower in April than in March, yields being computed at 4-85 p.c. compared with 
4-79 p. c. 

After adjustment for seasonal tendencies, bank deposits at the beginning of April were not 
greatly altered, the decline in notice deposits being counterbalanced by the gain in demand 
deposits. The gain in current loans was less than normal for the season. Call loans in Canada 
showed a decline, while call loans elsewhere were moderately greater. Investment holdings 
were $792,800,000 compared with $797,500,000, the greatest total in the history of Canadian 
banking. 

Bank and Dominion notes in the hands of the public were $151,700,000 compared with 
$138,880,000, the gain being considerably greater than normal for the season. 

Business Operations 

Business operations were at a higher level in April than in the preceding month, the gains 
in industrial production being well diversified. Conditions in mineral production were mixed, 
gains and declines being about evenly divided. Shipments of the precious metals were in lesser 
volume than in March. Receipts of gold at the Mint were 206,582 ounces compared with 264,159 
in the preceding month, and silver shipments were 652,421 ounces compared with 1,692,469. 
Nickel exports were 2,746,000 pounds compared with 5,073,000, the decline being less than 
normal for the season. Zinc shipments to other countries also showed a gain after seasonal 
adjustment, the total in April being 14,057,800 pounds. Asbestos exports of the better grades 
were 4,995 tons compared with 3,641 and the imports of bauxite for the manufacture of aluminium 
showed a gain after seasonal adjustment. 

The milling industry was more active in the last month for which statistics are available, 
a marked increase being shown in the output of wheat flour, oatmeal and rolled oats. The out- 
put of manufactured sugar was 46,455,000 pounds compared with 55,432,000 in March. Declines 
were shown in inspected slaughterings of live stock, the index being 109-0 compared with 119-2. 
The composite for the ten factors indicating the trend of the production of foodstuffs, was 82-7 
compared with 74-1. 

Crude rubber imports were 1,245,000 pounds compared with 2,496,000 in March, a consider- 
able decline being shown after seasonal adjustment. Imports of raw cotton and wool were at 
a low level in April, a decline being shown from March even after the usual adjustment. 

The output of newsprint was 147,759 tons compared with 137,078, the gain after seasonal 
adjustment being more than 8 p.c. Wood pulp and shingles were exported in greater volume, 
while a decline was shown in the exports of planks and boards. The forestry index reflecting 
mainly the greater output of newsprint was 63-7 compared with 60-7 in March. Output of steel 

64112-1* 



MONTHLY REVIEW OF BUSINESS STATISTICS 




MONTHLY REVIEW OF BUSINESS STATISTICS 5 

ingots at 11,384 tons showed a slight gain over March, the production of pig iron being suspended 
during the month. Output of automobiles was 8,255 units compared with 6,632 in March, the 
gain being greater than normal for the season. The decline in the imports of petroleum was 
less than normal for the season. 

Construction contract awards were valued at $8,609,000 compared with $3,192,000, the 
gain after usual adjustments being 31 p.c. Building permits at $1,552,000 showed moderate 
gain. Carloadings at 161,531 compared with 157,416 in March, showed a gain, whereas a decline 
would have been expected from seasonal causes. The gain in trade employment was less than 
normal for the season. Imports and exports were at lower levels in April, imports showing the 
greater decline after seasonal adjustment. 

Bank debits at clearing centres were $1,877,000,000, a slight percentage decline from the 
preceding month, which would be somewhat greater after seasonal adjustment. 

Receipts of grain at Lakehead and Pacific coast ports were at a lower level in April, declines 
being shown by wheat and barley while a greater movement occurred in oats, flax and rye. The 
index of grain marketings was 109-7 in April compared with 140-2 in March. Sales of cattle 
on stock 3'ards at 38,156 head were less than in March, while gains were recorded in calves, hogs 
and sheep. The net result was an index of 79-2 compared with 77-8 in March. 

The index of agricultural marketings was 104-1 compared with 129-0 in the preceding 
month. 

The gain in cold storage holdings of eggs was less than normal for the season and cheese, 
mutton and poultry were held in lesser volume after seasonal adjustment. Gains were recorded 
after the usual adjustment in butter, beef, pork, lard and veal. The index of storage holdings 
declined to 100-4 on March 1 compared with 112-7 on April 1. 

Economic Changes 

The index of the physical volume of business declined in the first quarter of 1933 to a new 
point on the present movement. The smoothed version of the index was in March nearly 4 times 
the standard deviation below the line of the long-term trend determined from the period from 
January, 1919, to June, 1932. The reading for April, received too late for insertion in the chart 
of three representative factors, was 3-93 times the standard deviation below computed normal. 
The very fact that the decline has been so protracted and severe suggests that the next important 
movement should be in an upward direction. 

The appreciation in speculative values during April marked a definite change in fundamental 
conditions. The index of common stocks was 2 • 78 times the standard deviation below the line 
of long-term trend compared with 2-90 times in the preceding month. The average price of 
Ontario government bonds declined in April, resulting in a gain in yields to 1 • 42 times the standard 
deviation above the line of long-term trend. 

Business Revenues and Speculative Values 

The chart on page 10 shows the relationship of common stock prices to the trend of business 
revenues for different periods. The curves are shown by years from 1903, by months from 1921 
and by weeks from the first of 1932. The index of business revenues was obtained by multiply- 
ing the index of the volume of business by the index of wholesale prices. While in the post-war 
period the index of common stocks fluctuated to a greater extent, a significant degree of cor- 
relation was shown between the two indexes. In the preparation of the annual indexes shown 
in the first section of the chart, official indexes were used as far as available. From 1903 to 1913 
a special compilation was made to extend the index of common stocks. The statistics of imports 
on a calendar year basis were used to indicate the trend of the volume of business from 1903 to 
1918. The heavy demand for munition and war supplies as well as inflated prices accounted 
for the high level of the business revenues index from 1916 to 1920. From 1921 to 1929, the 
index and business revenues recorded repeated gains but the advance in common stock prices 
was relatively much greater. While both indexes declined from 1929 to 1932, the greater reaction 
in common stocks resulted in the close proximity of the two indexes in 1932. The index of busi- 
ness revenues computed in this way was lower than in any year since 1915, while common stocks 
averaged lower than in any year since 1909. The monthly trends of the two indexes since 
January, 1921, are shown in the second section of the chart Except for the greater altitude 
for common stocks culminating in 1929, the correlation between the two indexes was very close. 

64112—2 



6 MONTHLY REVIEW OF BUSINESS STATISTICS 

Barring temporary reactions, the advance from the latter part of 1921 to 1929 was continuous 
in both indexes, while the decline of the last four years has brought the two indexes in close 
alignment. 

In the weekly section, the index of revenues is based on indexes of business volume and 
wholesale prices, reflecting conditions in the United States. The same close relationship is shown 
as in the annual and monthly comparisons. 

Weekly Factors 

In a period of rapid economic changes such as occurred in April, weekly statistics are 
specially valuable for current interpretation. In the chart appearing on page 15, nine important 
factors on a weekly basis are shown by weeks from the beginning of 1932 to the present time. 
While the seasonally adjusted index of carloadings is still at a considerably lower level than in 
the corresponding week of 1932, four consecutive gains were reported in the current period result- 
ing for the week ended May 6 in a new high point since last October. The wheat situation of 
the last 18 months was characterized by heavy deliveries at country elevators in September 
and October, a declining but heavy visible supply since last November and a rising price during 
the first four months of the present year. 

Total hog marketings at yards, plants and direct on export amounted to 3,200,000 head in 
1932 as compared with 2,643,000 head in the preceding year, and represented the highest pro- 
duction during the last five years. The market during the year to date has shown improvement 
with expectations that the British quota system will improve Canadian opportunities in com- 
petition with foreign countries. Sales of commercial cattle at the nine public stock yards during 
1932 showed a decrease of about 77,000 head from 1931, and constituted the smallest movement 
in 12 years. The volume of cattle on grain East and West during the past winter was consider- 
ably above domestic needs, and to maintain cattle prices in Canada a very substantial number 
will have to be moved to the overseas market during the spring and early summer. Fortunately 
the Birkenhead and Glasgow markets have been on an import basis from the beginning of the 
present year, and the movement from Canada got off to an early and liberal start. 

The weekly index of common stock prices has shown four well-defined movements since 
January, 1932. From March to June of last year the reaction was severe, leading in the latter 
month to the lowest point of the present depression. A short-lived rally occurred from June 
to the early part of September. The decline culminating in early April, reduced the index to 
41-2 compared with 62-2 for the week ended September 10. The rally since the week of April 6 
has been one of the most rapid resulting in an index of 57-2 in the week ended May 11. 

Influenced by the advance of the gold group, the index of 20 mining stocks showed an upward 
trend from June of last year to the present. The index for the week ended May 11 was 86-6 
compared with a low point of 46-8 reached in the second week of June, 1932. 

Business Indexes 

Seven of the principal indexes of business operations are shown by months from January, 
1931, to the present in the chart on page 30. While a downward trend was general for each of 
the indexes, mineral production and the operations of the central electric stations showed greater 
resistance to the depression than the other lines. The index of the physical volume of business 
reached a low point for the present depression in February when the standing was about 67 p.c. 
of the monthly average for 1926 regarded as the base. The production of electric energy was the 
only factor of the seven considered here to show a definitely larger volume than in the base year. 

The index of April being 20-6, relative to the 1926 average, the construction industry showed 
a greater decline than any of the other factors considered here. The index of construction 
operations based on contracts awarded and building permits was 16*1 in March and 20-6 in 
April. 

Wholesale Prices 

The outstanding feature of the month affecting fundamental economic conditions was the 
substantial gain in commodity prices. The April rise in wheat prices of between nine and ten 
cents per bushel was the greatest made on the Winnipeg market since October, 1931, while other 
grains advanced quite sharply. Raw sugar prices moved steadily forward for the first three weeks 



MONTHLY REVIEW OF BUSINESS STATISTICS 7 

in April and futures reached the highest levels touched in the last two years, Cuban raws selling 
without restriction of any kind. Early dullness in raw rubber gave way to unusual activity, 
the interest being largely speculative as factories did not purchase actuals in any quantities 
until near the end of April. Cattle quotations moved upward during the latter part of the month, 
while hog prices despite liberal supplies rose steadily at most points. Despite adequate stocks, 
copper, from an opening price of 5 cents per pound, Connecticut Valley basis, advanced to 6 
to 6 j cents per pound at the close of the month. Heavy speculative buying was cited as the main 
cause of the market advance in silver prices. A notable exception to the prevailing trend was 
the reduction in the price of newsprint. The price of paper rolls was reduced from $1.89 to 
$1.64 per 100 pounds, car lots, net f.o.b mill. 

The price advance was mainly in farm products and non-ferrous metals, the index of 
Canadian field products moving up from 38-0 in March to 41-1 in April. 

Output of Newsprint 

The production of newsprint was greater in April than in any month since last November. 
The output was 147,759 tons compared with 137,078 in the preceding month. Production in 
April is normally less than in March, but in this case the gain even after seasonal adjustment 
was no less than 8-6 p. c. A better indication of the demand for newsprint is supplied by the 
shipments during the month under review, which were up 13,500 tons over production, at 161,266 
tons. Shipments for March were 140,694 tons, so that there was a gain in shipments for April 
of 20,572 tons. Shipments of 161,266 tons as against a production of 147,759 indicate a reduction 
in stocks on hand at the mills during April of 13,507 tons, a substantial decline. 

CONDITIONS IN THE UNITED STATES 

Business operations in the United States showed a marked gain in April from the low levels 
of the preceding month. The improvement is clearly reflected in weekly indexes of industrial 
activity. The rapidity of the rise from the middle of March to the present time has been marked. 
The weekly output of electric power increased further in April after adjustment for seasonal 
tendencies continuing the recovery commenced in the latter part of March. From the low rate 
of activity of about 14 p.c. of capacity in the week ended March 25, steel mill operations expanded 
to nearly 30 p.c. of capacity in the week ended May 6, a doubling of the rate of activity within 
a period of six weeks. Steel ingot production was at the highest level since February, 1932, 
orders being received from automobile manufacturers, tin plate producers and miscellaneous 
classes of consumers. A brisk demand developed for non-ferrous metals and prices advanced 
sharply. The Phelps Dodge Co. reduced its copper production from 20 p.c. to 10 p.c. of rated 
capacity. Further reductions are expected by other large producers and a complete shut down 
of all major companies during the summer is a possibility. With demands for new cars generally 
better throughout the country, estimates of output in April indicate a better than seasonal 
increase. Carloadings of miscellaneous freight after adjustment for seasonal tendencies increased 
about 12 p.c. in April, more than repairing the loss which occurred in March. The production 
of crude petroleum in the week ended April 29 was the largest for any week since December 19, 
1931. The increase in output as compared with that of earlier weeks this year occurred chiefly 
in the East Texas field. Prices quoted by certain purchasing companies in this field were reduced 
from 50 cents per barrel to 10 cents. 

Average wholesale commodity prices advanced during March and April under the stimulus 
of the proposed measures paving the way for possible currency and credit inflation. The net 
gain in average stock prices was no less than 42 p.c, the largest percentage gain in a single month 
since the beginning of 1926. 

Dominion Bureau of Statistics, Ottawa, May 21, 1933. 



64112— 2* 



8 MONTHLY REVIEW OF BUSINESS STATISTICS 

Table 1. Weighted Indexes of the Physical Volume of Business and Agricultural Factors in 
Canada, Based on the Monthly average for 1926 and Corrected where Necessary for Seasonal 
Variation. 



1932 



Physical Volume of Business. . 

INDUSTRIAL PRODUC- 
TION 

Mineral Production 

Copper exports 

Nickel exports 

Lead production 

Zinc exports 

Gold shipments 

Silver shipments 

Asbestos exports 

Bauxite imports 

Coal production 

Manufacturing 

Foodstuffs 

Flour production 

Oatmeal production 

Sugar manufactured 

Cheese exports 

Salmon exports 

Tobacco 

Cigars 

Cigarettes 

Rubber imports 

Boots and shoes production. 
Textiles 

Raw cotton imports . . . 

Cotton yarn imports. . 

Wool, raw and yarn.... 
Forestry 

Newsprint 

Wood pulp exports 

Planks and boards exports 

Shingles exported 

Iron and steel 

Steel production . 

Pig iron production 

Iron and steel imports. . . 

Automobile production. . 

Coke production 

Crude petroleum imports . . 

Construction i 

Contracts awarded 

Building permits 

Cost of construction 



Electric Power.. 



DISTRIBUTION 

Trade employment. 

Carloadings 

Imports 

Exports 



Agricultural Factors— 
AGRICULTURAL MARKET 

INGS 

Grain Marketings 

Wheat 

Oats 

Barley 

Flax 

Rye 

Live Stock Marketings... 

Cattle 

Calves 

Hogs 

Sheep 

ANIMAL PRODUCTS- 
INSPECTED Slaughterings— 

Cattle 

Sheep 

Hogs 

Cold Storage Holdings... 

Eggs 

Butter 

Cheese 

Beef 

pork :; 

Mutton 



April May June July Aug. Sept. Oct. I Nov. Dec 



Poultry. 
Lard.... 
Veal.... 



75 3 



105-0 
600 
92-2 
88-2 
157-8 
213-2 
73-2 
25-0 
85-6 
64-6 

66-5 
68-3 
54-0 
99-8 
45-6 
39-3 
74-2 

101-1 
88-9 

106-0 
97-1 
90-7 
61-3 
66-5 
83-0 
25-1 
74-1 

111-6 
49-0 
34-5 
56-0 
33 

52-3 
27-5 
36-0 
29-0 
89-1 

129-0 

27-9 
28-5 
26-5 



139 

95-0 
117 
77-2 
61-6 
61 



102-3 

105-7 
113-5 
67-2 
47-4 
23-3 
138-8 
87-2 
61-4 
79-6 
120-8 
188-8 



107-9 

91-2 

237-4 

108-2 

144-1 

313-5 

143-7 

64-9 

73-3 

103-1 

174-9 

343-1 

71-5 

121-2 



79 9 

74-6 

94-4 
56-6 
68-2 
86-9 
143-9 
182-7 
87-0 
28-7 
49-3 
59-4 

77-4 

77 

68-1 

50 

61 

44 

65 
102 

70 
113 

79-9 

96-5 
120-9 
129-6 

96-5 

83-3 

71 
107-9 

46-3 

33 

40 

34-1 

40 

19 

360 

34 

78 
230-1 

31 

32 
30 
89-1 

131 

94 
117 
71-2 
72 
58-4 



84-4 
82-8 
89-9 
230 
36-4 
28-6 
106-3 
91-5 
67-8 
78-4 
125-1 
172-3 



1100 

87-1 

175-8 

121-7 

120-9 

134-0 

178-0 

54-4 

77-1 

101-9 

210-6 

297-8 

73-1 

94-3 



81 4 

76-9 
92-3 

67-e 

361 
92-8 
51-6 
211-3 
82-0 
17-7 
23-5 
61-2 

82-1 
94-0 
85-9 
62-4 
70-1 
55-5 
223-6 
120-0 
78-9 
134-4 
169-9 
93-3 
53-9 
50-4 
79-5 
63-2 
74-5 
102-6 
35-C 
51-8 
50-1 
32-9 
25-6 
12-7 
38-1 
36-7 
75-3 
176-8 

28-1 
28-3 
27-6 
88-5 

130-5 

93-7 
117-4 
70-3 
69-7 
59-3 



221 4 

250 

279-9 
29-2 
48-2 
77-4 

218-4 
89-4 
66 8 
92- 

116-5 

186-4 



119 

91-9 
233-4 
128-8 
116-9 
113-0 
167-8 

62-0 

81-2 
107- 
205-4 
245 

74-2 
104-2 



78-3 



74-2 

83-4 
103-2 
32-4 
89-3 
74-3 
163-0 
74-5 
20-6 
19-3 
54-5 

76-9 

93-3 

96-6 

46 

84-0 

68-9 

155-4 
96-7 
72- 

105-5 



84 
42 
41 
87 
28 
55 
89 
39 
17-6 
37-2 
41 

45-7 
11-7 
31-1 
47-0 
83-2 
192 

39-4 
42-6 
31-4 
88-0 

129-0 

89-6 
115-9 
60-5 
63-2 
62-9 



135-9 
147-9 
118-5 
112-5 
66-5 
32-7 
170-7 
821 
64-9 
87-1 
105-5 
131-3 



1111 

85-7 

178-5 

122-8 

112-2 

103-6 

143-1 

73-5 

82-4 

103-8 

292-9 

199-9 

80-3 

100-0 



78-1 

73-6 

84-8 
7-6 
160 
98-2 
64-0 
186-5 
73-9 
24-3 
16-4 
56-8 

75-5 

97-6 
103-7 

70-1 

93-2 

77-0 

99-4 
102-7 

71-4 
114-3 

61-2 

93-0 

73-2 

73- 

93- 

63- 

59- 

91- 

38- 

25- 

46- 

27- 

43- 
9-3 

26 

26-4 

72 
172 

37-1 
40-1 

28 
87 

137-1 

90-4 
115 
64 
63 
63-0 



196-6 

222-6 

242-8 

531 

121-0 

66-2 

177-8 

79-9 

59-4 

83-9 

111-8 

112-2 



108-0 

88-7 

143-6 

119-4 

106-4 

98-6 

114 8 

62-7 

94-5 

114-5 

337-6 

170-9 

64-4 

103 1 



771 



71-9 

89-5 
17-2 
23-3 
88-7 
90-8 
185-0 
88-9 
30-8 
67-6 
68-5 

74-3 
94-5 
85-6 
60-4 
98-7 
54-1 
35-8 

102-7 
69-0 

114-8 

201-5 
95-0 
67-4 
66-0 

116-8 
60-1 
60-5 
99 
33 
18-0 
53-6 
20 
41-0 
9- 
27- 
15- 
82- 

136- 

31- 
36- 
20-0 
88-3 

128 

91-3 
114 
68-1 
64-7 
64-6 



189-0 

213-9 

239-1 

140-9 

34-2 

12-1 

21-3 

77-1 

55-9 

92-8 

110-4 

94-2 



93-1 

79-3 

115-4 

100-5 

104-9 

103-7 

112-8 

59-3 

92-5 

1151 

351-9 

123-0 

62-9 

111-4 



75 3 



70-4 

99-3 
38-5 
401 
84-2 
135-2 
185-1 
101-2 
41-6 
92-8 
75 5 

70-6 
88-9 
78-0 
55-1 

131-1 
56-0 
34 
78-7 
68 
82 

74-0 
83-3 
71-7 
68-3 

141-2 
63-9 
64-7 
97-3 
50-2 
25 
61-2 
22 
27 
10-9 
30 
21-2 
81-3 

140 

30-7 
32-6 
26 



127-8 

88 
113 
59-8 
67 
66-4 



87-4 
97-0 
70-9 
9-7 
110 
13-4 
67-4 
47-4 
84-1 
95-3 
108-2 



81-7 
66-4 
107-4 
89-9 
96-7 
108-4 
1191 
58-4 
82-9 
102-7 
207-9 
73-9 
36-9 
102-1 



75-8 



71-8 

86-4 
21-3 
46-4 

119-1 
58-3 

164-1 
69-6 
28-7 

202-3 
75-3 

72-3 
86-7 
93-5 
48 

125-4 
57-7 
27-1 

126-5 
70-3 

148-1 
96-5 
81 

104-1 

110-9 
65 
81 
65-8 

101 
51-6 
23-3 
50 

2S-3 
57-6 
24-5 
39-7 
18-9 
90-2 

102-0 

39-4 
44-7 
26-0 



134-4 

86-9 
111-6 
60-1 
70-6 
47-3 



59-5 
65-1 
55-3 
10-5 
21- 
4' 
74 
41 

101 

123 



120-3 



88-3 
67-8 
115-0 
99-9 
98 

121-2 
126-4 
62-7 
64-6 
5 



72-6 

67-7 

90-5 
45 
38-2 
82-8 
91-7 
198-1 
61-4 
43-3 
25-9 
73-8 

70-2 

94-4 

61 

23 
127 

39 

56-1 
106-2 

60-0 
124-1 

59-3 

63 

96 

94-8 

66 
115-3 

60 

92 

40-6 

23 

42 

29 

51 

48 

29 

21 

931 

71 

19 

20-5 
17-1 
88-1 

131-3 

86-1 
113-4 
58-4 
59 
47-5 



1933 



Jan. Feb. Mar. Mar 



59 
56 
61 
49 
27 
18 
5 

70-3 
55 
81-4 
93-8 
76-2 



93-8 
73-6 

118-3 

105-3 
98-3 

130-5 

139 
52-8 
54-7 

101-3 



114-61 111-2 



•5 
81-9 
81-2 



47-0 
64-9 
67-5 



68 1 

62-2 

80-5 
153 

67-1 
90-8 
73-0 
161-6 
39-4 
57-3 
16-3 
66-5 

62-2 

67-9 

52-0 

15 

51-5 

11-3 

49-8 

125-7 
44-5 

155-3 
70-2 
65 
60-0 
57-5 
76-3 
67-4 
63-4 
90-9 
45-3 
32-3 
64-2 
31-9 
65 

51-0 
21-0 
23-4 
90-6 
86-0 

25- 

29-0 

24 

87 

131-6 

84 
111 
56-1 
52-4 
56-6 



56-1 
52-5 
58-4 
22-2 
12-7 
17-8 



71-9 
63-5 

107-2 
74-5 

118-4 



101-8 
110-1 
186-0 
92-6 
112-0 
163-2 
148-9 
57-2 
50-5 
112-3 
108-1 
131-7 
82-1 
51-7 



670 



94 

50-0 
99 5 
83-8 
103-6 
164-1 
62-3 
24-1 
26-7 
78-5 

58-7 

63-0 

57-8 

23-1 

28 

14-3 

40-3 

113-1 
49-6 

136-4 
73-3 
77-0 
56-1 
53-8 
63- 
65- 

sp- 
47- 
29- 
49- 
19-6 
19 
10 

27-4 
19-0 
68-8 
117-6 

20-3 
22-7 
14-3 
87-3 

136- 1 



110-9 
57-9 
50-8 
49-6 



76-5 
75-9 
85-0 
29-6 
18-7 
8-6 
11-8 
79-4 
71-3 

113-3 
79-9 

149-0 



112-6 

116-3 

221-2 

100-9 

127-6 

256-4 

148-9 

65-9 

61-3 

96-4 

90-0 

235 

75-9 

47-4 



68 4 

62-5 

91-4 

29-0 

101-6 

75-6 

121-7 

177-9 

104-8 

30-7 

21-5 

61-8 

62-7 
74-1 
86-5 
34-6 
62-2 
22-4 
47-6 

110-0 
55-6 

129-1 
43-4 
84-5 
55-3 
47-9 
77-8 
85 
60 
85-9 
481 
32-7 



25- 
31- 
82- 
106-6 

16-1 
18-9 
9 
87 

134-4 



110-5 
61-8 
50-0 
51-1 



129-0 
140-2 
155-7 
71-5 
36-3 
16-6 
57-1 
77-8 
71-3 
66-6 
77-2 
183-1 



119-2 

109-4 

258-5 

114-2 

135-8 

315-4 

146-6 

72-9 

65-0 

93-7 

78-2 

213-0 

71-7 

46-5 



1 Due to receipt of later information regarding wage rates indexes of construction were revised for 1932. 



MONTHLY REVIEW OF BUSINESS STATISTICS 
Table 2. Trend of Business Movements 



Items 



Trend of Business Movements— 

Rubber, Crude Imports. 000 lbs. 

Cotton, Raw Imports 000 lbs . 

Wool, Raw Imports 000 lbs. 

Planks and Boards 
Exports Mil. bd. ft. 

Timber Scaled in B.C. Mil. bd. ft. 

Newsprint Production.. 000 tons 

Shipments 000 tons 

Stocks 000 tons 

Pig Iron Production. .000 1. tons 

Ferro-alloys Production. . .tons 

Steel Ingots and 
Castings 0001. tons 

Passenger Automobile Pro- 
duction No. 

Truck Production No. 

Total Cars and Trucks No. 

Exports— Auto Complete or 
Chassis No. 

Exports— Automobiles and 
Parts $000 

Petroleum, Crude Imports 

000,000 sal. 

Condensed Milk Output 000 lbs. 

Evaporated Milk Output 000 lbs . 

Fish Exports 000 lbs 

Fish Exports $000 

Canned Salmon Exports 

000 cases 

Railways— 
Canadian National — 

Operating Revenues $000 

Operating Expenses $000 

Operating Income $000 

Freight carried one mile 

000,000 tons 
Passengers carried one mile 
000,000 pass. 
Canadian Pacific — 

Operating Revenues $000 

Operating Expenses $000 

Operating Income $000 

Freieht carried one 

mile 000,000 tons 

Passengers carried 

one mile 000,000 pass. 

All Railwavp— 

Operating Revenues $000 

Operating Expenses $000 

Operating Income $000 

Freight carried 

one mile 000,000 tons 

Passengers carried 

one mile 000,000 pas?. 

Carloadings 000 cars 

Canal Cargo Traffic — 

Sault Ste. Marie 000 s. tons 

Welland 000 s. tons 

St. Lawrence 000 s. tons 

Coal A variable 000 s . tons 

Coke Production 000 tons 

Strikes and Lockouts — 

Disputes in existence No . 

Number of employees No. 

Time loss in working days 

Percentage of unemploy- 
ment in Trade Unions.. P. C. 
Employment Office Reports— 

Applications No. 

Vacancies No. 

Placements No. 

Immigration— Total No 

From IT. Kingdom No. 

From U. States No. 

From other Countries No. 

Returned Canadians No . 

Bank Clearings $000,000 

Failures No 

Liabilities $000 



1932 



April May June July Aug. Sept. Oct. Nov. Dec 



3,585 

6,230 

347 

42-52 
165-5 
176-66 
186-44 
53-90 
16-90 
2,185 

36-03 

5,660 
1,150 
6,810 

321 



38-57 
1,102 

4,872 
10,575 



32-51 



11,658 

10,935 

457 

822 



9,511 

8,237 

918 

663 

50 

23,851 

21,052 

1,932 

1,653 

113 
180-18 

369 

465 

279 

1,264 

143 

11 

1,413 

34,556 

23-0 

57,580 

34,961 

33,744 

2,059 

386 

1,274 

399 

1,538 

1,073 

190 

3,171 



3,171 
12,463 
1,096 

62-95 
184-3 
175-89 
172-95 
57-01 
13-34 
1,132 

29-24 

7,269 

952 

8,221 

333 

264 

109-52 
913 

6,271 
15,313 

1,214 

34-30 



11,410 

10,932 

185 

815 

49 

9,537 

8,425 

737 

673 

50 

23,400 

21,245 

1,191 

1,632 

110 
182-73 

1, 

1,037 
884 

1,694 
129 

13 

1,521 

31,905 

22-1 

54,745 

32,209 

31,039 

2,718 

510 

1,834 

374 

2,194 

1,037 

204 

3,148 



6,349 

4,486 

816 

110-69 
178-5 
161-37 
164-31 
50-03 



18-12 



804 
7,112 

768 

349 

113-95 
979 

6,947 
17,228 

1,933 

86-89 



12,026 

11,273 

533 



963 



10,484 
8,558 
1,579 

933 

63 



3,425 

3,590 

344 

37-85 
129-0 
142-49 
145-43 
47-02 
7-31 
892 

27-51 

6,773 

699 

7,472 

740 

1,089 

104-21 
1,495 
5,307 

16,123 
1,831 

69-33 



11,219 

10,876 

51 



778 



),685 
J, 460 



670 
71 



24,813 22,970 



21,654 
2,328 

2,257 

129 
185-15 

1,988 
1,065 

905 
1,694 

119 

17 
3,011 
38,147 

21-9 

50.547 

29,404 

28,532 

2,562 

387 

1,794 

381 

1,944 

1,081 

176 

3,794 



21,053 
1,027 

1,790 

147 
157-37 

2,638 
1,030 

822 
1,679 

127 

26 
6,121 
50,397 

21-8 

46,692 

25,917 

25,191 

1,974 

298 

1,299 

377 

1,807 

1,105 

175 

2,987 



2,173 

5,995 

670 

53-61 
121-1 
157-92 
154-88 
50-03 
5-99 
871 

26-71 

3,166 

901 

4,067 

1,523 

752 

89-78 
1,666 
5,173 
23,167 
1,859 

66-20 



10, 

11.215 

644 

766 

62 

10,172 

9,119 

697 

690 

65 

23,099 

21,922 

268 

1,813 



6,204 

4,553 

535 

35-46 
97-2 
150-69 
152-62 
48-06 
5-71 
732 

23-14 

1,741 

601 

2,342 

1,654 

802 

76-91 
1,419 
3,959 
23,813 
1,390 

48-13 



13,601 
11,350 
1,985 

1,493 

53 

13,256 
9,271 
3,723 

1,416 

55 

2^,988 
22,254 
5, 

3,043 



138 122 
175-62:215-65 



3,095 
1,162 

938 
1,894 

121 

16 
4,972 
62,492 

21-4 

48,815 

28,397 

27,355 

1,944 

270 

1,338 

336 

1,611 

1,058 

188 

2,825 



3,807 
1,292 
1,061 
2,092 
127 

16 
4,251 
10,995 

20-4 

53,437 

32,111 

29,944 

1,871 

357 

1,279 

235 

1,378 

1,087 

192 

3,926 



2,704 

7,029 

857 

55-26 
110-1 
157-51 
157-57 

48-41 
6-73 

1,599 

17-10 

2,361 

562 

2,923 

2,416 

1,515 

83-45 
1.351 

2,990 

27.166 

1,477 

57-72 



13,641 
11,109 
2,194 



12.290 
8,005 
3,924 

1,193 

42 

28,190 
20,839 
6,385 

2,607 



211-53 

3,924 
1,252 
1,014 
2,543 
131 

15 
2,225 
14,470 

22-0 

23,222 

56,877 

22,205 

1,723 

300 
1,145 

278 
1,236 
1,176 

199 
3,439 



3,568 
15,376 
1,070 

46-37 
99-8 
161-33 
164-33 
45-46 
14-15 
1,544 

37-09 



535 
2,204 

1,438 

906 

51-71 
134-8 
2,619 
38,583 
1,304 

42-39 



11,463 
10,686 



1,025 



10,726 
7,053 
3,324 

1.023 

40 

24,276 
19, 
4,057 

2,181 

90 
192-58 

2,877 
1,087 

751 
2,738 

143 

12 
1,130 
3,653 

22- 

65.165 

28,683 

27,383 

1,258 

188 

817 

253 

1,026 

1,130 

229 

4,343 



2,109 
13,819 
1,283 

37-54 
80-5 

138-68 
140-77 
42-34 
27-03 



30-76 

1,561 

578 

2,139 

1,090 

476 

32-81 
1,385 
2,872 
27,189 
1,581 

69-53 



10,301 

10,589 

528 « 



852 



9.483 
7,091 
2,311 

753 

54 

21,902 
19,434 
1, 

1,740 

130 
152-56 

215 

147 

51 

2,023 

150 

12 

2,375 
10,378 

25-5 

49,736 

30,885 

29.192 

938 

110 

617 

211 

2,632 

1,063 

196 

7,836 



1933 



Jan. 



2,663 

8,765 

919 

39-18 
49-1 
140-54 
133-06 
49-84 
29-21 
1,217 

40-77 

2,921 

437 

3,358 

475 

368 

35-09 

852 

2,025 

26,740 

1,439 

51-26 



8,003 
10.00? 
2,323 



629 



7,659 

7,005 

323 

627 

40 

17,643 
18,528 
1,813 



95 
134-43 



Feb. Mar. April 



2,632 

6,026 

819 

37-71 

37-4 
125-61 
120-92 

54-52 
6-14 

1,076 

12-37 

3,025 

273 

3,298 

256 

247 

37-56 

976 

1,845 

24.032 

1,120 

35-05 



7,834 
9,754 
2,238 

593 

40 

7,117 

6,637 

97 

787 

39 

16,788 
17,881 
2,073 

1,302 



133-15 



1,471 
150 



622 



25-5 

56,873 

28,602 

27,304 

700 

96 

513 

91 

807 

978 

216 

4,050 



128 

5 

4,450 
58,500 

24-3 

45,919 

23,714 

22,733 

939 

96 

554 

259 

668 

882 

214 

3,947 



2,496 
6.374 
1,617 

60-46 
67-8 
137-08 
140-69 
50-87 

"927 

11-21 

5,927 
705 



1,601 

824 

49-34 

960 

2,704 

20,692 

1,343 

47-48 



9,834 

10,091 

553 1 

820 

44 

8,777 
7,563 
87-7 

761 

44 



157-42 



1,288 
139 

10 
1,840 
12,945 

25-1 

46,534 

22,613 

21,604 

1,126 

99 

732 

295 

784 

946 



1,245 

4,050 

954 

33-74 

147-76 
161-27 
37-23 

9i8 

11-38 

6,957 
1,298 
8,255 

1,256 

552 

3619 

784 
4,797 
7,466 

488 

6-81 



,505 



7,922 



161-53 



588 
352 



5 

690 

4,435 



47,566 
24,652 
23,415 



950 



J Deficit. 



10 



MONTHLY REVIEW OF BUSINESS STATISTICS 



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MONTHLY REVIEW OF BUSINESS STATISTICS 



11 







Table 3. 


Receipts and Visible Supply of Canadian Grain 






Year 


Receipts at Country Elevators and Platform Loadings 


Visible Supply of Canac 


ian Grain 




and 
Month 


Wheat 


| Oats 


| Barley 


1 Flax 


Rye 


Wheat 


Oats 


Barley 


Flax 


Rye 


Thousand Bushels 


1930 

October 

November. . . 
December.... 

1931 

January 

February.... 

March 

April 

May 


53.800 
52,445 
17,32o 

9.258 

9,843 

9.589 

8,418 

6,145 

8.205 

5,437 

11,862 

47,443 

74,088 

43,056 

19,613 

10,851 

12,245 

12.746 

5.982 

8.197 

15,050 

3.780 

17,633 

120,538 

79.564 

36.457 

18,486 

11,300 
11.543 
20,850 
10.312 


3.967 
3,992 
2,055 

1,681 
2,304 
3,733 
2,097 
1,334 
2,049 
1,970 
2,784 
2,893 
5.270 
6.495 
3,350 

1,909 
4,013 
4.788 
1.834 
2.353 
2,094 
1,091 
1,184 
3.441 
4,082 
3,031 
1,612 

1,095 
1,753 
4,988 
1,680 


2,440 

1,123 

639 

616 

404 

614 

688 

803 

1.412 

892 

1,047 

4,569 

1,023 

1,586 

1,380 

801 

943 

1.194 

543 

454 

514 

402 

929 

2,599 

1,125 

1,338 

1,219 

474 
479 
944 
360 


1,223 

1,271 

182 

65 
48 
74 
60 
42 
79 
60 
49 
167 
900 
399 
99 

26 
36 
68 
70 
24 
44 
48 
53 
282 
693 
179 
88 

57 
35 
67 
80 


1.291 
839 
233 

153 

97 
362 
266 
287 
418 
247 
252 
349 
315 
522 
209 

128 

130 
245 
153 
67 
57 
67 
448 
540 
270 
131 
98 

74 
71 
160 
100 


188.673 
207.386 
217,643 

202.283 
190,202 
180,540 
162.041 
132.593 
115,872 
110,731 
101,733 
126,462 
163,133 
185,811 
192,305 

195,510 
186, 120 
183.956 
164.562 
149.251 
138.572 
121,474 
113,036 
198.240 
239,435 
237,194 
237,391 

229,186 
223.535 
225,529 
219,807 


11,206 
13,847 
15,022 

14,207 
13.802 
14,887 
13,242 
10.840 
9,624 
8,886 
8,847 
9,568 
10,864 
13.609 
15,614 

4,626 
14,279 
14.801 
11.055 
6.443 
5,659 
6.204 
5,857 
7,273 
8.316 
9,115 
9,233 

9.345 

9,767 
12,152 
10,700 


31,879 
31,608 
31,339 

30,436 
29,527 
27,551 
24,081 
15.447 
11,944 
10.260 
8,471 
11,338 
11,274 
10,282 
11,494 

11,402 
11.183 
11,100 
9.220 
6,706 
4,401 
3,627 
3.056 
5.813 
5,874 
6.024 
6.772 

6,806 
6,679 
6,802 
6,505 


1,904 
2,406 
2,074 

2,080 

2,104 

2,059 

1.856 

1,254 

1.127 

742 

758 

883 

1,588 

1,549 

11.473 

1,396 
1.363 
1,383 
1.267 
1,424 
1,347 
1,283 
1,208 
1,400 
1,497 
1.582 
1,436 

1,480 
1,461 

1,286 
1,384 


12.224 
12,124 
13.158 

13,458 
13,391 
13,275 
13,448 
12,970 




12,549 


July 


12,600 


August 

September . . 

October 

November... 
December... 

1933 

January 

February.... 
March 


12,163 
12,358 
12,309 
13,024 
12,572 

12,355 
12,864 
12.323 
11,122 


May 


10,242 




7.563 


July 


5,541 


August 

September... 

October 

November... 
December. . . 

1933 

January 

February 

March 

April 


5,129 
5,359 
5,258 
4,770 
4,990 

5,020 
5,122 
5,131 
5.169 



Table 4. Exports and Cash Price of Canadian Grain 



Year 

and 

Month 



1930 
October. . . . 
November. 
December. . 

1931 

January. . . . 
February. . 

March 

April , 

May 

June , 

July , 

August 
September , 
October 
November. 
December. 

1933 

January 

February.. 

March 

April 

May 

June , 

July 

August 
September. 

October 

November. 
December. 

1933 

January 

February.. 

March 

April 



Exports of Grain 



Wheat 



Oats 



Barley 



Flax 



Rye 



Bushels 



29.784,275 
11.217,6?4 
22,230,397 



f, 608. 852 
10,296,603 
12.995,567 

4,680,769 
29.521.699 
20.783.219 
12.004,817 
11,909,108 
14.335.637 
18,925,303 
27,452,063 
22,355,975 



9,472,346 
9,898.363 
9,920 634 
7,513.289 
15.543.013 
15.857,427 
19,620.224 
18.289.832 
26,874.237 
40,192,415 
27.3ni.976 
27.735,999 



14,706.801 
10,922,337 
14,815,705 
4,460,214 



345,661 
381.088 
666.166 



260,342 

127,170 

308.087 

158.382 

1,646,844 

2.291,951 

1.257,248 

753,105 

694,908 

1.082,074 

1,364,700 

1,232,261 



1.184,647 
1.139.568 
1.035.612 
1.748,438 
1.622.815 
1.239.599 
513,384 
800,804 
1,050,470 
2,139,232 
1.629 ',634 
1,433,805 



354,614 

824,704 
567,884 
147,738 



524,849 
,129.144 
734,683 



244,953 
120,034 
458.125 
755,247 
281.088 
199,012 
655,725 
287,465 
757,930 
220.752 
129,468 
205,976 



231,707 

323,221 

346,107 

613.805 

1,711,716 

1,021,578 

1,688,500 

1,547,340 

769.088 

718,213 

748.801 

272,667 



191,524 

223,139 

356,683 

23,271 



102.496 
421,428 
502,899 



150 

2,700 

168 



483,290 
49,049 

263,500 
61,500 



184,263 



1.200 
3,672 



362.578 



1,400 

2,458 

5,002 

20 



425.398 
24,226 
623,814 



20.000 
49,340 
10.642 



109,036 
669.380 
122.094 
145,273 
483.039 
71.978 
742,391 
1,249,981 



218.504 

302,337 

245,800 

299.906 

1,691,542 

1,115,445 

2.480,942 

1.104,386 

425,911 

403,802 

504,710 

17,143 



17,143 
43,314 

17,082 



Average Cash Price 
(Ba*ris in store Fort William and Port Arthur* 



Wheat 
No.l 
Nor. 



Oats 
No. 2 
C.W. 



Barley 
No. 3 
C.W. 



Flax 
No. 1 
N.W.C. 



Rye 
No. 1 
C.W. 



Dollars per Bushel 



•725 
•643 
•553 



•539 
•592 
•567 
•591 
•606 
•607 
•572 
•551 
•536 
•598 
•672 
•606 



•442 
•457 
•491 

•536 



•328 


•282 


1-292 


•282 


•233 


1-052 


•287 


•250 


•978 


•261 


•221 


•950 


•276 


•221 


•968 


•277 


•251 


1033 


•281 


•282 


1-040 


•291 


•310 


1-061 


•296 


•328 


1-070 


•293 


•322 


1-182 


•282 


•317 


1-037 


•273 


•306 


•973 


•312 


•331 


•945 


•336 


•425 


1-056 


•300 


•383 


•990 


•293 


•377 


•985 


•295 


•383 


1-015 


•300 


•398 


1-016 


•323 


•410 


•985 


•355 


•402 


•137 


•338 


•377 


•717 


•351 


•365 


•682 


•300 


• 344 


•715 


•261 


•288 


•785 


•235 


•257 


•708 


• 240 


•302 


•696 


• 210 


• 277 


•701 


•225 


•276 


•770 


•233 


•275 


•777 


•248 


•288 


•792 


•247 


•313 


•841 



•373 
•306 
•300 



•371 

•286 
•312 
•318 
•341 
•365 
•327 
•293 
• 325 
•370 
•487 
•427 



•426 
•441 

•478 
•457 
•412 
•337 
•331 
•334 
•318 
•292 
•295 
•297 



•310 
•318 
•338 
•377 



12 MONTHLY REVIEW OF BUSINESS STATISTICS 

Table 5. Consumption of Grain and Production by the Milling Industry 



Year 

and 

month 



1930 
December.... 

1931 

January 

February 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September. . . . 

October 

November. . . . 
December. . . . 

1932 

January 

February 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September 

October 

November. . . . 
December 

1933 

January 

February 

March 



Mill grindings 



Wheat 



Bushels 
5,225,805 

4,833,535 
4,607,154 
5,158,112 
4,718,805 
5,304,076 
5,033,072 
5,932,146 
5,992,090 
8,772,319 
7,565,330 
S, 101,645 
5,275,097 

3,798,168 
3,751,268 
4,685.646 
4,446,506 
4,643,15? 
5,173,525 
5.379,486 
5,716.002 
6,151,877 
7,670,545 
8,638,600 
4,493,143 

815,453 
3,744,957 
4,451,773 



Oats 



Bushels 
1,125,885 

997,080 

940,355 

843.761 

822,047 

785.196 

769,942 

937,695 

836,410 

1,166,178 

1,506,473 

1,761,877 

1,151,246 

902,969 

789,941 

882.368 

666,203 

616,418 

650,403 

695,557 

939,418 

1,081,749 

1,346,592 

1,453,153 



791,596 
698,8*1 
799,911 



Corn 



Bushels 
148,866 

160,976 
170,167 
141,271 
176.096 
157.539 
167,195 
175,921 
149.814 
170,265 
172,015 
209,089 
158,509 

145,738 
153,989 
175.321 
178,754 
129,879 
135,783 
183,623 
187,020 
147,992 
129,236 
209,499 
151,518 

113,039 
125,805 
174,940 



Barley 



Bushels 
136,065 

125,357 
129,777 
134,297 
116.171 
84.809 
73,578 
81,527 
107,612 
126,363 
126,710 
129,541 
106,230 

89,204 
68,471 
85.835 
73,738 
53,386 
44,464 
40,894 
74,088 
72,056 
77,779 
102,769 
60.0S2 

55,257 
55,880 
60, 804 



Mixed 
grain 



Bushels 
1,886.930 



915,710 
657.462 
660,573 
565.891 
189,023 
962,081 
938,413 
029,935 
272,527 
705,240 
791,642 
123,600 

788,297 
701,800 
818.416 
416,128 
045,021 
873,889 
716,067 
895,616 
174,201 
447,920 
941, 34« 
829,953 



1,643,156 
1,275,855 
1,545.154 



Mill production 



Wheat flour 



Percent- 
age of 
operation 



36-6 
37-3 
38-9 
36-3 
411 
43-7 
47-1 
47-8 
56-7 
60-5 
70-0 
40-9 

31*3 
31-3 

87-2 
35-9 
38-6 
43-0 
41-3 
42-7 
50-9 
62-4 
70 5 
351 

30-9 
321 
341 



Quan- 
tity 



Barrels 
1,170,025 



086,272 
035,383 
168,408 
058.311 
183.280 
121,115 
319,008 
333,287 
515,613 
693,925 
812,457 
175,152 



851 
842 
1.053 
993 
1,040 
1,151 
1,201 
1,272 
1,384 
1,721 
1,942 
1,009 



,965 
.009 
,500 
,598 
, S44 
,799 



859,107 

844,899 

1,004,787 



Oatmeal 



Pounds 
3,636,850 



,449,163 
,461,180 
,568,252 
,925,422 
,865.362 
,569,155 
690,259 
408.475 
,439,682 
,589,165 
,520,322 
,659,093 

,799,728 
,788,903 
.653,557 
,551.310 
888,497 
880,560 
402,937 
658 480 
777,966 
,387.585 
.193.036 
499,733 

401,299 
527,676 
559,858 



Rolled 
oats 



Pounds 
10,723,499 



10,870, 
10.434, 
8,674, 
6.945, 
7,659, 
9.528, 
12,272, 
9,530 
14,520, 
17,498, 
20,901, 
11,513, 

9,534, 
8,218, 
9.454, 
6.594 
6.315 
8,027 
8,940, 
12.301 
14,124 
16.683 
17,871 
10,532 



9,015,044 
7,613,656 

8,588,777 



Corn 

flour and 

meal 



Pounds 
1,070,225 



155,518 
894,492 
158,556 
612.040 
130,887 
072.918 
612,240 
277.749 
039.254 
288,754 
588,950 
714,434 

802,005 
309,16^ 
233,622 
591,116 
908,770 
099,028 
628,909 
738.376 
226.154 
776,832 
466,753 
£98,580 



1,363,972 
1,951,278 
2,916,344 



Wheat 

flour 

exported 



Barrels 
601,894 

392,256 
414,773 

560,553 
326.117 
481,265 
490,294 
466,967 
522,178 
556,565 
558,459 
476,487 
451,310 

331,806 
357,513 
414.779 
255,390 
461,867 
570,861 
446,379 
330.382 
385,113 
528.794 
576,864 
492,033 

397,304 
333,114 
490,270 



Table 6. Receipts. Manufactures and Stocks of Sugar in Thousand Pounds 



Year and 
4-week period 



1930 
November 29.. 
December 31.. 

1931 
January 31.. 
February 28.. 
March 28.. 

April 25.. 

May 23.. 

June 20.. 

July 18.. 

August 15.. 
September 12.. 
October 10.. 
November 7.. 
December 5.. 
December 31.. 

1932 

January 30.. 

February 27. . 

March 26 . 

April 23 . 

May 21.. 

June 18. . 

July 16.. 

August 13.. 

September 10.. 

October 8.. 

November 5.. 

December 3.. 

December 31.. 

1933 

January 28 

February 25 ... . 

March 25 

April 22 



Raw Sugar 



Stock 
on hand 
at be- 
ginning 
ofperod 



60,779 
104,507 



103,269 
115.726 
91.476 
71,255 
74.881 
117,363 
123,541 
110,325 
76,658 
96,149 
66,512 
91,033 
96,785 



98.423 
102.650 
83,834 
67,702 
60,295 
122,205 
122,425 
110,656 
38,489 
77,116 
60,036 
106,861 
109,097 



109,232 
101,898 
112,182 
81,130 



Re- 
ceipts 



115,341 
49,803 



34,506 
18.680 
34,275 
49,907 

123.518 
79.112 
77,162 
66,006 

107.722 
54,318 

110,354 
90.S28 
50,737 



32,199 

8,639 

36,780 

27.237 

126,477 
75,224 
85,435 
35,112 

120.743 
75.160 

123.367 
80,943 
37,886 



11,432 
29,326 
26,839 
32,989 



Melt- 
ings 
and 
ship- 
ments 



71,613 
46,040 



27,050 
42.930 
54,497 
46.282 
81.036 
72,933 
90.37P 
99.674 
88.231 
83,955 
85,833 
85,076 
49,099 



27,973 
27,454 
52.912 
34,644 

64,507 
75,005 
97,204 
107,288 
82,116 
92,239 
76,543 
78,707 
37.750 



18,767 
19,041 
57.891 
43,698 



Refined Sugar 



Stock 
on hand 

at be- 
ginning 
of period 



102,122 
131,418 



136,260 
111.178 
98,886 
96.086 
71.354 
79.818 
77,289 
74,075 
76,046 
82,326 
88,407 
130,392 
162,469 



174,985 
155,110 
131,044 
129,590 
109,901 
111.503 
123,942 
108.248 
124,079 
174.995 
174,985 
155,411 
188,834 



194,558 

173,161 

143,345 

69,492 



Manu- 
factured 
granu- 
lated 



97.293 
57,875 



23,643 
35380 
47,504 
37,025 
66.180 
63,254 
78,414 
84,879 
82,700 
86,397 
109,523 
110,785 
51,744 



24.211 
22.640 
44,332 
30.275 
53.212 
63.996 
84,990 
91,620 
73,687 
97,775 
108,298 
109,777 
54.028 



24,239 
16,803 
48,749 
40,587 



Manu- 
factured 
yellow 

and 
brown 



11,265 
9.202 



3,540 
5.029 
8.085 
5,331 
10.476 
6,106 
6,881 
6.993 
6,706 
9.789 
12,267 
13,635 
9,868 



3.6^0 
3,041 
7,544 
5.605 
5.540 
9.725 
7.503 

10.080 
8,230 
8,238 
7,576 

12,679 
7,317 



3,064 
3,544 
6,683 
5.868 



Total 
manu- 
factured 



108.558 
67,077 



27,184 
40.408 
55.589 
42,356 
76.655 
69.360 
85.295 
91,871 
89,406 
96,185 
121,791 
124,420 
61,613 



27.891 
25,681 
51.876 
35,879 
58,751 
73,722 
92,583 
101,700 
81,917 
106,613 
115,874 
122.457 
61.345 



27,303 
20,347 
55,432 
46.455 



Total 
domes- 
tic 
ship- 
ments 



77,119 
52,812 



51,595 
52,161 
57,641 

66,091 
66. 933 
70,882 
87,386 
88,342 
82,097 
87,601 
77,662 
90,849 
48,712 



47,270 
49.221 
52.838 
55.229 
56.256 
60,354 

107,377 
84,478 
79.741 

101.052 
84,813 
R7.675 
55,183 



48,263 
49,749 
128,586 
22,005 



Ship- 
ments 
granu- 
lated 



67.650 
46,364 



46,867 
46.216 
51,188 
60,250 
60.766 
65,395 
81.810 
84.192 
75,001 
80.321 
69,411 
76,969 
42,927 



42.439 
43,691 
47,136 
47.723 
51,129 
55,403 
100,986 
79,862 
74.845 
95,456 
76.537 
77,1*5 
49,016 



43.449 

43,715 

117,650 

19.544 



Ship- 
ments 
yellow 

and 
brown 



11,612 
7,494 



5,399 
6.485 
7,200 
6,839 
7.425 
6,494 
6,699 
5,708 
8,125 
9,783 
10,395 
15.374 
8,170 



5,327 
6,055 
6,195 
7.846 
6,020 
5,880 
7,291 
6,007 
7.262 
9,451 
9,521 
11,848 
6,604 



5,251 
6,448 
11,635 
3,380 



Total 
ship- 
ments 



79,262 
53,858 



52,266 
52.700 
58,388 
67,088 
68.191 
71.889 
88,510 
89,900 
83,126 
90,104 
79.808 
92,342 
49,097 



47,766 
49,747 
53,330 
55.569 
57,149 
61.983 

108.277 
85,869 
82.107 

104,008 
86,058 
89,033 
55,621 



48,700 
50,163 
129.149 
22,924 



MONTHLY REVIEW OF BUSINESS STATISTICS 



13 



Table 7. Tobacco, C 


igars and Cigarettes Entered for Consumption. 




Year and Month 


Tobacco, 
cut 


Tobacco, 
plug 


Cigarettes 


Cigarettes, 
over- 
weight 


Cigars 


Foreign 
raw leaf 
tobacco 


1930 
September 


Pound 

1,406,258 
1,381,943 
1,224,840 
1,312,936 

1,057,507 
1,163,399 
1.372.596 
1,250.655 
1,487,028 
1.480.478 
1,468,877 
1,449,103 
1,457,618 
1,452,865 
1,451,340 
1,366,936 

1.144.298 
1,272,469 
1,414,941 
1,659,842 
1,436,417 
1,493,496 
1,488,431 
1,559,663 
1,662,365 
1,551,042 
1,427,688 
1,209,812 

1,065,534 
1,429,012 
1,537,535 
1,261,563 


Pound 

476,020 
452,670 
455,503 
471,292 

366,785 
430,463 
459.155 
439,364 
514,005 
503.867 
453.989 
469.793 
417,050 
439.268 
410,253 
428,968 

3^2,000 
343,887 
389.797 
425.577 
421.248 
425.899 
391,668 
419.483 
368,601 
379,960 
358,572 
340,791 

300.491 
304,290 
374,473 

324.732 


Number 

483.960,240 
438,497,550 
401,175,589 
326,147,670 

319,555,340 
327,255,230 
349,681,715 
382,303,130 
382,951,155 
430.179.170 
474,415,620 
425,138,580 
371,311,090 
344,956,140 
355,716,768 
369,235,870 

278,416,630 
281,496,910 
304,243,772 
269,309,750 
312,790.432 
376.779.975 
338,874,828 
329,466,364 
313,709,922 
214,301,678 
388,625,140 
304,613,955 

310,144,850 
264,524,935 
305,107,720 
267,148,135 


Number 

167,700 
17,900 
38.200 

144,300 

78,300 

68,500 

117.800 

600 

31,820 
164,250 
227,450 
200,400 

76,600 
135,450 
115,200 
148,210 

57,200 
56.700 
50,150 
49,050 
37,350 
66,300 
40,300 
43,700 
39,400 
57,100 
148,400 
39,260 

28,420 
17,890 
15,370 
33,600 


Number 

19,333,469 
22,515,666 
17.418.328 
11,408,452 

7,259,572 
7,650,784 
9.984 215 
11,116,740 
14,734,327 
14,380,513 
14,091,692 
12,860,616 
15,270,873 
17,316,957 
15,753,873 
11,329,243 

7,595,920 

8,154,663 

9.657,775 

10 208,636 

10,552,455 

12,754,263 

11,492,868 

12,298,501 

12,799,348 

14,424,229 

14,071,178 

9,014,869 

3,965,735 
4,675,418 
6.407.352 
6,996,151 


Pound 

1.514,283 
1,505,683 




1,139,124 




1.064,933 


1931 


1,288,600 


February 


1,072,285 
1.115,135 




1,284,691 


May 


1,434,154 




1,382,348 


July 


1,328,631 


August 


1,233,479 




1,076.864 




1,177,265 




1,144,401 




994,476 




1,063,412 




889,417 




942,969 




1.120.066 




1,108,312 




1,320,001 


July 


1.149,197 


August 


1,083,602 
1,042,140 




938,889 




1,027,873 




744,579 


1933 


832,534 




742,408 




852,367 


April 


801,092 



Table 8. — Production of Boots and Shoes. 



1930 

August 

September . 

October 

November. 
December.. 

1931 

January 

February... 

March 

April., 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September. 
October. . . . 
November. 
December. 

1932 

January 

February.. 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September. 
October. 
November. 
December . 

1S33 

January 

February... 
March 



Boots and shoes with leather or fabric uppers 



Welts 



306,544 
310,184 
290.812 
204.928 
193.340 

231.498 
278,200 
•326,112 
332,306 
293.408 
252,037 
281,175 
274,641 
275,15* 
235.904 
181,474 
171,294 

212,534 
272,581 
281,244 
243,435 
241,653 
235,079 
247,387 
273,591 
267,515 
213,345 
196,801 
167,762 

185,162 
207,516 
250.519 



McKays 

and 

all 

imitation 

welts 



722,749 
740,557 
663,65) 
422,543 
406,884 

426,112 
600, 694 
880,851 
810.653 
892,177 
782,256 
6^3,700 
816,379 
824,8^7 
723,099 
404.143 
433,536 

532,297 
774,827 
907,035 
781,111 
821.112 
746.474 
610,920 
828,070 
807,126 
679,722 
450,418 
306,383 

398,195 
614,061 
804,562 



Nailed 
pegged, 

screw 
or wire 
fastened 



144,308 
160,270 
161,697 
113.951 
113,786 

111,106 
123.809 
152,328 
134,025 
146.830 
119,495 
121.R77 
164,848 
195,496 
182,548 
150, S54 
132,822 

123.365 

158. 46i 
150,132 
120,920 
125.907 
118,518 
129.595 
180,350 
185,458 
189,725 
166,934 
114,304 

88,256 
112,162 
140,267 



Stich- 
downs 



129,710 
125,639 
123.372 
114.824 
128,353 

126,310 
138,121 
177,142 
207.343 
233.114 
234,244 
174,632 
148,542 
124,722 
139,528 
138,910 
148,777 

132,897 
171,322 
212,237 
216,884 
264.754 
243,324 
169.801 
148,365 
136,672 
151,968 
135.217 
124,894 

114,919 
149,983 
195,450 



Total 



1.368,683 

1,406,149 

1,305.315 

900,345 

877,041 



921,878 
184,316 
,596,409 
546.111 
622,637 
,442,330 
,316,349 
,467,600 
482.835 
337,126 
013,879 
919,847 

029,556 
414.816 
607,280 
413,214 
507.574 
400,508 
202,968 
484,042 
,470,476 
301,011 
017,153 
753,573 

808,671 
1,126,000 
1,440,056 



Total footwear 



Mens* 



465,095 
483,554 
494,271 
350,806 
339.476 

296,301 
368.102 
472.669 
443,797 
445.979 
403,207 
421,682 
434,443 
451,133 
431,115 
363,011 
348,868 

300,352 
420.882 
411,320 
370,801 
422.104 
436.647 
409,588 
469,002 
471,961 
449,281 
403.661 
311,351 

267,310 
302,984 
393,335 



Boys' 

and 

youths' 



81,408 
100,482 
97,210 
77,582 
85,163 

72,959 
68.363 
97,515 

92,829 
85,643 
79,458 
74,836 
85,615 
1C4.041 
119.592 
107,503 
104,437 

79.681 
91.177 
87.098 
68,822 
75.047 
65,144 
54,778 
91,741 
109,625 
108.139 
110,661 
67,645 

45,171 
60,423 
82,193 



Women's 



719,083 
754,204 
670.404 
430.139 
384.526 



554,616 
790,849 
756.981 
817,519 
766,049 
674,325 
804,318 
839.989 
711.900 
513.3S4 
418,306 

491,281 
731.280 
807,022 
742,845 
803,803 
746,658 
665,684 
863,149 
858,238 
748,048 
568,263 
404,451 

426,723 
596,200 
774,888 



Misses' 

and 

childrens 



182,347 
176.812 
183.661 
175.803 
159.008 

144.793 
188.776 
244,120 
252,635 
260,635 
210,498 
187,098 
198,594 
184,536 
197,983 
178,872 
174,731 

163,531 
214.295 
284,903 
232,427 
248,460 
214,127 
160,666 
183,565 
187,436 
202,130 
187,757 
134,308 

129,475 
161,377 
202,713 



Babies 

and 
infants' 



94,753 
100,807 
106,846 
90.468 
96,019 

84,703 
97,108 
124,777 
123,675 
131,016 
117,239 
98,881 
106,036 
89,738 
93,554 
91,926 
87,192 

77,337 

100. 779 

119,865 

108,597 

106, 674 

98,616 

88,768 

100,902 

95,942 

91,592 

90,992 

60,309 

53,219 
79,292 
86,358 



Total 



1,542,686 
1,615,859 
1,552.392 
1,124.798 
1,064.192 

984,924 
276,965 
729,930 
669.917 
740.792 
576,449 
456.822 
627.006 
672,437 
554,144 
254,696 
133,534 

112,192 
558,413 
720,208 
523,492 
656.088 
559,192 
379,484 
708,359 
723,202 
599,190 
361.334 
978,064 

921,898 
1,200,276 
1,539,487 



64112—3 



14 



MONTHLY REVIEW OF BUSINESS STATISTICS 



Table 9. — Sales and Slaughterings of Live Stock, Retail Food Prices, and Cold Storage Holdings. 



Classification 



Saieson Stock Yds: 

(Current month 
prelim.) 

Cattle 

Calves 

Hogs 

Sheep 

Inspected Slaugh- 
terings: 

Cattle 

Calves 

Sheep 

Lambs 

Swine 

A?. Retail Prices, In 
cents, of Food in 
Canada: 

Beef chuck lb. 

Veal roast " 

Mutton roast. . . " 
Pork fresh.... " 
Bacon break- 
fast " 

Lard pure " 

Eggs fresh doz. 

Milk qt 

Butter cream- 
ery lb. 

Cheese " 

Bread " 

Flour ■ 

Rolled oats... " 

Rice " 

Beans ■ 

Apples evapor- 
ated " 

Prunes ** 

Sugar granul- 
ated " 

Tea " 

Coffee " 

Potatoes peck 



1932 



1933 



April May June 



38,244 
35,424 
112,178 
11,388 



43,302 

46,612 

28,448 

1,426 

229,124 



13-4 
14-6 
22-2 
15-3 

17-8 
11-5 
24-8 
10-1 

31-2 
21-2 
6-2 
30 
4-7 
8-5 
4-3 

15-8 
11-0 

CO 
50-3 
43-7 
15-3 



44,226 
38,482 
119,341 
11,867 



44,156 

51,240 

16,685 

6,519 

254,836 



13 

13-6 
22 
15-2 



4-3 

15-9 
10-8 

60 
45-2 
42-6 
15-2 



38,833 
30,026 
104,127 
30,434 



41,818 
43,171 
12,726 
37,472 
247,722 



13-3 
13-5 
22-7 
15-0 

16-8 
11-3 
19-2 



22-6 
20-7 
6-2 
3-0 
4-7 
8-5 
4-3 

15-5 
11-0 



5-9 
45-5 
42-4 
14-7 



July 



44,941 
25,356 
81,557 
38,457 



41.228 
32.252 
11.369 
52.640 
191,577 



13-4 
13-4 
21-8 
15-0 

16-8 
11-3 
21-5 
9-6 

21-6 
20-1 
5-7 
2-9 
4-8 
8-6 
4-3 

15-7 
10-9 

5-9 
45-0 
421 
14-9 



Aug. Sept 



64,884 
26,638 
S3, 187 



47,184 
31,598 
11,983 
73,856 
189,253 



13-1 
13-2 
21-4 
15-6 

17-6 

11-4 

24- 1 

9-6 

22-1 
20-2 
5-6 
2-9 
4-8 
8-5 
4-2 

15-9 
11-0 

5-8 
44-6 
41-6 
26-4 



56,647 
24,305 
62,737 
60,044 



52,174 
29,450 
11,286 
89,869 
166,352 



12-7 
13-1 
20-4 
15-9 

18-8 

121 

25-6 

9-6 

25-0 
19-8 
5-6 
2-9 
4-8 
8-5 
4-3 

161 
11-2 

5-9 
45-2 
42-4 
18-4 



Oct. 


Nov. 


58,195 


66,598 


25,299 


26,072 


76,081 


126,986 


103,224 


75,412 


50,408 


56,03* 


27,248 


23,722 


8,216 


8,982 


137,368 


109,900 


189,222 


249,858 


12-4 


11-9 


13-2 


12-7 


19-3 


17-9 


15-7 


14-5 


19-6 


19-2 


12-6 


13-3 


30-3 


38-6 


9-5 


9-6 


26-9 


26-4 


20-0 


19-9 


5-6 


5-6 


2-9 


2-8 


4-8 


4-7 


8-4 


8-3 


4-3 


4-2 


15-7 


15-8 


10-8 


10-7 


5-8 


5-8 


44-5 


43-* 


41-3 


41-2 


17-3 


17-3 



Jan. 



31,800 
11,460 
101,857 
20,329 



45,075 

14,919 

5,369 

44,019 



10 

12-2 
16 
12-9 

18-6 

12-9 

45-2 

9-8 

25-9 
19-8 
5-8 
2-7 
4-6 
8-2 
4-0 

15-5 
10 6 

5-8 
43-7 
41-0 
18-1 



48,018 
16,405 
104,202 
24,396 



50,521 
20,255 
5,054 
43,522 
247,081 



110 
12-0 
16-7 
12-7 

181 

12-3 

39-1 

9-7 

26-1 
19-6 

5-7 
2-6 
4-6 
8-2 
3-9 

15-4 
10-8 

5-8 

43-2 
40-9 
19-0 



Feb 



37,336 
16,349 
82,708 
14,066 



42,412 
22,247 
3,614 
32,416 
220,419 



10-9 
12-2 
17-5 
12-2 

17-4 
11-7 

28-8 
9-7 

25-7 



14-9 
10-6 

5-7 
42-2 
40-1 
19-2 



Mar. April. 



40,355 
24,082 
90.770 
14,902 



50,959 

38,379 

3,351 

38,307 
250,468 



17-7 

11-5 

27-8 

9-7 



26-9 
19-2 
5-6 
2-6 
4-5 
80 
3-8 



2 
4 
19-2 



38,156 
32,569 
90,448 
12,074 



42,352 

54,760 

28,385 

1,663 

231,627 



11-3 

12-3 
19-4 
14-4 

18-8 

12-3 

23-0 

9-3 



19-5 
5-2 
2-6 
4-5 
7-9 
3-7 

14-8 

10-9 

7-4 
41-9 
39-9 
191 



Cold Storage 
Holdings 



Cold Storage Holdings as at 
First of Month: 

(000 lbs. or doz.) 
Butter— 

Creamery 

Dairy 

Totals 

Cheese 

Eggs— 

Cold Storage 

Fresh 

Frozen 

Pork— 

Fresh frozen 

Fresh not frozen 

Cured dry salted. . .' 

Cured sweet pickled 

In process of cure 

Totals 

Lard 

Beef— 

Fresh frozen 

Fresh not frozen 

Cured 

In process of cure 

Totals 

Veal— 

Fresh frozen 

Fresh not frozen 

Totals 

Mutton and Lamb— 

Frozen 

Not frozen 

Totals 

PotTLTRT 

Fen- 
Fresh frozen 

Fresh not frozen 

Smoked, etc 

Fresh frozea during preceding 
month 



1932 



May June July Aug. Sept. Oct. Nov. Dec 



2,1 

32 
2,848 
5,934 

3,416 

534 

3,458 

22.455 

2,840 

702 

7.695 

7,784 

41,476 
3,286 

3,416 

4,299 

233 

198 

8,146 

484 
447 
930 

3,946 

161 
4,107 
7,701 

8,569 

48 

4,544 

1,014 



,292 
93 

.3.S5 
,535 

,870 
584 
,312 

,503 
,080 
,048 
,991 
580 
203 
,743 

975 
,992 
458 
175 
600 



, 024 



16,472 

334 

16,806 

16,022 

10,879 

829 

5,i 

18,458 
3,122 
S82 
5,848 
8,999 

37,409 
4,257 

2,329 

3,583 

127 

162 

6,401 

716 
453 



1,506 

214 

1,747 

5,257 

10,173 

51 

5,218 

2,451 



25,283 

259 

25,542 

19,355 

11,211 

820 

5,158 

13,862 
2,695 
394 
6,422 
11,180 
34,553 
3,566 

2,668 

4,094 

J02 

224 

7,288 



414 
1,215 

1,001 

277 

1,277 

4,414 

14,086 

56 

5,522 

6,073 



30,943 

338 

31, -281 

22,119 

11,896 

995 

5,023 

10,255 
3,118 
710 
6.083 
9,788 

29.954 
2,707 

2,792 

4,596 

287 

177 

7,852 

893 

323 

1,216 

872 

366 

1,239 

3.374 

16,734 

83 

6,228 



33,318 

257 

33,575 

21,764 

11,056 
1,205 
4,848 

6,466 
2,463 
369 
5,051 
8,053 
22.4^2 
1,183 

2,813 

4.980 

239 

72 

8,113 

889 

471 

1,360 

1,020 

449 

1.469 

2,404 

19,512 

46 

6,825 

3,912 



31,181 

136 

31,316 

20,423 



519 
4,506 

5.236 
2.573 
267 
4,451 
9,624 
22,152 
1,913 

3,294 

5,002 

110 



958 

416 

1,374 

3,070 

383 

3.453 

2.057 

21,706 

52 

7,177 

4,107 



26,361 

109 

26,470 

13,229 

4,123 

271 

3,988 

6,049 
3.830 
40 
4,912 
7.767 
23.56 
1.539 

4,642 

4,850 

79 

93 

9,665 



359 
1,253 

4,856 
439 

5.295 
3,540 

19,953 

89 

7,173 

2 740 



1933 



Jan. Feb. Mar. April May 



20,328 

69 

20.397 

12,944 

1,254 

273 

3,773 

11.765 
4,281 
461 
6,219 
6,827 

29.552 
2,327 

5,113 

3,421 

222 

184 

8,940 

702 



5.043 

274 

5,291 

8.341 

17,121 

40 

6,734 

1,680 



15,476 

45 

15,521 

11,511 

433 

650 

3,524 

14,148 
3,770 
514 
5,032 
7,874 

31.338 
2,653 

4,639 

4,655 

229 

113 

9,636 

335 

247 

S82 

3,733 

276 

4,009 

7,230 

14,046 
113 

5,960 

84C 



9,605 

19 

9,624 

10,567 



267 
3,270 

15,688 
3,707 
661 
5,134 
9,164 

34,354 
2,831 

3,88 ? 

4,275 
303 
189 

8,655 

178 
258 
437 

2,556 

288 

2,845 

6,463 

10,600 

99 

4,792 

760 



3,386 

9 

3.395 

8,439 

278 
455 

2,920 

14,320 
3,277 
872 
5,792 
10,633 
34,894 
2,527 

3,679 

4,674 

156 

173 

8,683 

173 
444 
617 

1,988 

184 

2,172 

5,272 

7,324 

64 

3,784 

1,149 



1,943 

7 

1,950 

7,543 

4,041 

632 
2,701 

17,952 
3,903 
905 
6,713 
9,536 

39,009 
4,159 

3,441 

3,905 

62 

225 

7,632 



530 



920 

140 

1,060 

3,383 

5,940 

43 

4,119 

1,364 



MONTHLY REVIEW OF BUSINESS STATISTICS 



15 



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7° 



16 



MONTHLY REVIEW OF BUSINESS STATISTICS 



Table 10. Output of Central Electric Stations in Canada. (A) Monthly Output. 

(Thousandn of Kilowatt Hours) 



Month 



1930- May 

June 

July 

August 

September. 

October 

November. 
December . 

1931-January 

February... 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September. 

October 

November. 
December . 

1932- January 

February. . . 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September. 
October — 
November. 
December . 

1933-January 

February . . . 

March 

April 



Totals for Canada 



Water 



1,523,521 
1,414,236 
1.404,009 
1,391.054 
1.419.051 
1,549.846 
1.488,175 
1.513.152 

1.456,326 
1.311,136 
1.391.982 
1,388,034 
1,342.940 
1,267,869 
1,230,622 
1.234,266 
1,263,412 
1,400,704 
1,385,378 
1,397,876 

1,382,794 
1,297,892 
1,363,912 
1,306,753 
1.249.226 
1.176.673 
1,133,555 
1,206.682 
1.254,644 
1.362.670 
1,417.074 
1,400,793 

1,366.336 
1,273,113 
1 . 346 849 
1,275,313 



Fuel 



21.106 

20,375 

21, 

20.806 

23,910 

24,714 

27,228 

29,156 

32,395 
27,851 
25.576 
23,056 
22.846 
21,959 
20,700 
21,883 
25,001 
27,638 
29,642 
34,306 

31,124 
27,241 
24,784 
22,736 
21,789 
21.559 
22,026 
23,538 
24.496 
27.474 
31.153 
32.398 

30,303 
26,453 
24.198 
19,768 



Total 



1,544,627 
1,434,611 
1,425,690 
1,411,860 
1,442,961 
1,574,560 
1,515,40 
1,542.30 



488,721 
338,987 
417,558 
411,090 
365.786 
289,828 
251,322 
256,149 
288,413 
428,342 
415,020 
432,182 



1,413,918 

1,325,133 

1,388. 

1,329,489 

1.271,015 

1,198,232 

1,155.581 

1,230.220 

1,279,140 

1,390,144 

1,448,227 

1,433,191 

1,396.639 
1,299.566 
1.371.047 
1,295,081 



Generated by Water-Power 



Mari- 
time 
Pro- 
vinces 



44,139 
42.632 
40, 667 
41,788 
38.662 
39,480 
41,264 
44.295 

44,394 
31.097 
34,338 
52,154 
53,433 
52.675 
50,712 
44,924 
46,251 
55,743 
56,725 
55,214 

4^,584 
46,998 
44.292 
50,445 
53,897 
47.894 
38.583 
44,786 
48,069 
50,98° 
53.110 
52,587 

44.535 
33.143 
40.464 
43,968 



Quebec 



761.327 
709.245 
722.335 
710.842 
704.123 
781,996 
764,490 
764,612 

735,385 
674,560 
703,708 
717,900 
693,853 
638,719 
620,634 
644,446 
662,400 
736,381 
731,014 
722,508 

721.P2 

682,589 

713,227 

700.575 

661.74° 

633.614 

606.872 

663.9H 

687.536 

763,577 

823.035 

801,939 

7*5,142 

718,527 
747.878 
703,886 



Ontario 



524,679 
485,791 
460,611 
457,424 
485.151 
521.991 
480,131 
480,442 

469,438 
422.213 
451,912 
415,482 
394,243 
379.568 
369.294 
352,877 
355,122 
384,065 
373,084 
385,407 

374,534 
355,865 
394,206 
363,099 
344,635 
325,476 
317,815 
326.021 
337.472 
348,530 
333,565 
326,173 

318,039 

323,816 
350.959 
338,279 



Prairie 
Pro- 
vinces 



100.116 
87.683 
89,169 
84,925 
92,060 
D5.005 
92.292 

111,443 

104,099 
88.481 
95,991 
101,539 
102,640 
101,337 
100,480 
98,119 
102,835 
123.087 
125,867 
130.407 

199,95' 
115,399 
110.943 
99,544 
95,863 
83,542 
81.519 
82.12P 
90,082 
104.78° 
111.404 
116,933 

116,099 
104,085 
108 015 
97,162 



British 

Colum 

bia 



93,260 
88,885 
91,227 
96.075 
99.055 
111,374 
109.998 
112,360 

103.010 
94.785 

106.033 

100, 959 
98,771 
95,570 
89,502 
93,900 
96.804 

101,428 
98,688 

104,340 

107,899 
97.041 

101.244 
93.090 
93,091 
86,147 
88,766 
89,835 
91.485 
94,794 
95,960 

103,161 

102,521 
93,542 
99.533 
92,018 



Generated by Fuel 



Prairie 
Pro- 



16.466 
15.801 
16,522 
14,898 
14.882 
16.874 
19,506 
19.748 

20.187 
17,298 
15.992 
13.360 
12,781 
12.139 
12.297 
12,905 
13,436 
15,332 
18,819 
20.908 

20,382 
18,125 
15.410 
12,413 
12,294 
11,996 
11,986 
13,530 
13.976 
16,072 
18,393 
19,679 

18,230 
16,217 
15 388 
12,122 



Other 
Pro- 
vinces 



4,640 
4,574 
5.159 
5.908 
9.028 
7,840 
7,722 
9,408 

12,208 
10.553 
9,584 
9,696 
10.065 
9,820 
8.403 
8,978 
11,565 
12,306 
10,823 
13,398 

10,742 
9,116 
9,374 
10,323 
9,495 
9,563 
10,040 
10,008 
10,520 
11,402 
12,760 
12,719 

12,073 
10,236 
8 810 

7, 



Total 
Exports 





(B) 


Average Daily Output 


681 


49,827 


1,424 


24,559 


16.925 


3.230 


67J 


47.82C 


1,422 


23,642 


16.193 


2.9?2 


699 


4=1.990 


1.312 


23.301 


14.858 


2,877 


671 


45,544 


1.348 


22.930 


14,756 


2.740 


797 


48,09? 


1.288 


23.47C 


16,172 


3.069 


797 


50,792 


1,273 


25,226 


16,838 


3,065 


908 


50.514 


1,375 


25.483 


16.004 


3.077 


940 


49.751 


1,429 


24,665 


15,498 


3.595 


1,045 


48,023 


1,432 


23,722 


15.143 


3.358 


995 


47.S21 


1,111 


24,091 


15,079 


3.160 


825 


45,72 s ; 


1.108 


22.700 


14,578 


3,098 


76« 


47,036 


1,738 


23.930 


13,849 


3.385 


737 


44.057 


1.723 


22.382 


12.718 


3,311 


732 


42,994 


1.755 


21.291 


12,652 


3,378 


667 


40.365 


1.636 


20.020 


11,913 


3.242 


706 


40,521 


1.449 


20.789 


11.383 


3.165 


833 


42,947 


1,542 


22,080 


11.837 


3.42« 


891 


45,980 


1,798 


23.754 


12.38'' 


3,971 


9SR 


47,167 


1,891 


24,367 


12,436 


4,195 


1.108 


46,199 


1.781 


23,307 


12,436 


4.207 


1.004 


45,610 


1,567 


23.285 


12,081 


4,192 


939 


45,693 


1.621 


23,537 


12,271 


3.979 


799 


44,796 


1,429 


23.007 


12,716 


3.579 


758 


44,316 


1.681 


23,353 


12,103 


3,318 


702 


41,000 


1.739 


21,346 


11.117 


3.092 


719 


39,941 


1,597 


21.120 


10.849 


2,785 


711 


37,277 


1.244 


19.577 


10.252 


2.630 


759 


39,684 


1.445 


21.416 


10,517 


2.649 


817 


42.638 


1,602 


22.918 


11,249 


3.0°3 


886 


44,843 


1,642 


24,632 


11,243 


3.380 


1,038 


48,274 


1,770 


27,435 


11,119 


3.713 


1,045 


46,231 


1.696 


25,868 


10,522 


3,772 


978 


45,053 


1.437 


25.327 


10,259 


3,745 


945 


46,413 


1,184 


25,662 


11,564 


3,717 


780 


44 227 


1.305 


24.125 


11 321 


3.485 


659 


43,169 


1,465 


23,463 


11,276 


3,239 



1930-May 

June 

July 

August. ... 
September 
October. . . 
November 
December. 

1931 -January . . . 
February.. 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August . . . 
September 
October.. . 
November 
December 

1932-January. . . 
February.. 

March 

April , 

May 

June , 

July 

August 

September. 

October 

November. 
December . 

1933-January 

February. . 

March 

April 



49.146 
47.141 
45.291 
44.873 
47.301 
49,995 
49,606 
48.811 

46.978 
46.826 
44,903 
48.268 
43,320 
42.262 
39.698 
39.815 
42,114 
45.194 
46.170 
45,093 

44,606 
44,754 
43,997 
43,558 
40,298 
39,222 
36.566 
38.925 
41.821 
43,957 
47,236 
45,186 

44.075 
45,468 
43.447 
42,510 



3.008 
2,982 
2,943 
3.099 
3.302 
3.593 
3.667 
3,824 

3.323 
3.385 
3.421 
3.366 

3.186 
3,185 
2.887 
3.029 
3,227 
3,272 
3.290 



3.481 
3.346 
3 266 
3.103 
3,003 
2.872 
2.863 
2,898 
3.049 
3,058 
3.199 
3.328 

3,307 
3.341 
3.211 
3,067 



531 


150 


527 


152 


53.1 


IflK 


481 


190 


496 


301 


514 


253 


650 


258 


637 


303 


651 


394 


618 


377 


516 


309 


445 


323 


412 


325 


405 


32" 


396 


271 


416 


290 


44c 


3*5 


4<)4 


397 


627 


361 


674 


432 


657 


347 


625 


314 


407 


302 


414 


344 


396 


306 


400 


319 


387 


324 


436 


323 


46R 


351 


518 


368 


613 


425 


635 


410 


580 


389 


570 


366 


496 


284 


401 


255 



MONTHLY REVIEW OF BUSINESS STATISTICS 



17 



Table 11 — Railway Revenue Freight Loaded at Stations in Canada in Tons. 



Commodities 



Hallway Freight Loaded— 
Agricultural Products— 

Wheat 

Corn 

Oats 

Barley 

Rye 

Flaxseed 

Other grain 

Flour 

Other mill products 

Hay and straw 

Cotton , 

Apples (fresh) 

Other fruit (fresh) 

Potatoes 

Other fresh vegetables 

Other agricultural products. . . 
Animal Products— 

Horses 

Cattle and calves 

Sheep 

Hogs 

Dressed meats (fresh) 

Dressed meats (cured, salted 
canned) 

Other packing house products 
(edible) 

Poultry 

Eggs 

Butter and cheese 

Wool 

Hides and leather 

Other animal products (non- 
edible) 

Mine Products— 

Anthracite coal 

Bituminous coal 

Lignite coal 

Coke 

Iron ores 

Other ores and concentrates... 

Base bullion and matte 

Clay, gravel, sand, stone 
(crushed) 

Slate — Dimensions or block 
stone 

Crude petroleum 

Asphalt 

Salt 

Other mine products 

Forest Products— 

Logs, posts, poles, cordwood. . 

Ties 

Pulpwood 

Lumber— Timber— Box shooks 
— Staves heading 

Other forest products 

Manufactures and Miscellan- 
eous— 

Refined Petroleum and its pro- 
ducts 

Sugar 

Iron, pig and bloom 

Rails and fastenings 

Bar and sheet iron— Structural 
iron and iron pipe 

Castings, machinery & boilers 

Cement 

Brick and artificial stone 

Lime and plaster 

Sewer pipe and drain tile 

Agricultural implements and 
vehicles other than autos 

Automobiles and auto trucks. . 

Household goods 

Furniture 

Liquor beverages 

Fertilizers, all kinds 

Paper, printed matter, books . 

Wood-pulp 

Fish (fresh, frozen cured, etc.) 

Canned goods (all canned food 
products) 

Other manufactures and mis- 
cellaneous 

Merchandise 



1932 



Feb. 



May June July Aug Sept 



2,688 

24,479 

596 

19,908 

6,588 

4,335 

4,366 
148 

3,280 

3,670 
331 

2,028 



13,942 



429,206 
51,665 
19,168 
1,010 
51,428 
23,193 

252,232 

11,618 

1,879 

8,126 

15,326 

62,587 

127,518 

5,154 

93,734 

187,905 
11,047 



174,806 
11,097 
4,835 
2,055 

26,511 
6.573 
60,179 
11,181 
18,267 
2,485 

2,567 
10,835 

5,114 

1,409 
10,887 
88,803 
133.501 
40,254 

2,363 

8.177 

168,976 
149,078 



1,170, 

7,922 
41,235 
21,337 
12,947 

5,548 

1,718 

103,031 

84.255 

12,353 

187 

183 

1.429 
16.127 

2.1 

9,276 



526 588,611 

6,229 

73,725 

30,709 

10 

7,163 

2,963 

105,914 

83.363 

7,353 

479 

257 

3,554 

5,233 

3 

8,168 



2.871 
25.889 

1,480 
20. 934 

5,700 

4,499 

5,139 
42 
1,765 
7,153 
460 
2,332 

2.613 



429,465 
33,191 
19,111 
942 
45,778 
25.924 

292.715 

10,342 
708 
18,936 
15,615 
68,111 

98,556 

6.120 

58,434 

99,350 
22. 644 



157,460 
15,712 
3.713 
2,924 

25.117 
5.372 
60,099 
11.889 
16,260 
2,254 

3,345 
10.697 

4,109 

1.194 
10,580 
20,485 
115,217 
35,061 

2,657 

8,836 

169,566 
138,492 



3,01 
31,219 

1,902 
14,944 

5,882 

3,643 

5,873 
159 
1,241 
8,347 
1,937 
2,054 

2,093 



1,558 
409,383 
33,841 
22,265 
818 
45,649 
23,909 

177,172 



17,396 
14,577 
72,116 

69,996 
3,159 
63,977 

135,208 
15,993 



177,601 

23,058 

4,514 

9,156 

20,059 
5,601 
57,693 
11,739 
16,888 
1,936 

4,934 
8,941 
3,592 
1,620 
10,913 
9.7C9 
106,001 
33,399 
2,872 

9,054 

187,213 
121,859 



811,77 

2.144 

21,543 

25,896 

10,456 

2,780 

2,819 

103,018 

79,984 

9,499 

626 

4,521 

7,513 

1,417 

8,959 

8,575 

2,471 
34,139 

2,610 
13,106 

7,048 

3,249 

4,747 
167 

1,328 

6,415 
485 

2,031 

2,416 

1,667 

414,123 

83,943 

23,853 

1,032 
21,354 
23,185 

292,224 

9,050 

1,106 

16,311 

13,481 

55,814 

70,067 

2,694 

47,763 

125,939 
13,093 



208,541 
17,138 
6,905 
1,376 

17,789 
5,659 

57,194 
9,393 

15,639 
3,277 

7,214 

5,242 

2,603 

1,374 

11,435 

13,373 

102,453 

37,939 

3,559 

9,877 

60,890 
133,121 



2,318,995 

1.686 

43.973 

64,765 

9,814 

1,495 

2,121 

109,753 

76,883 

10,868 

488 

34,4 

17,704 

9,405 

20,002 

40,362 

1,973 
41,505 

4,170 
12,325 

6,459 

2,943 

5,133 
191 
772 

4,895 
743 

2,612 

2.997 

2,725 

443,921 
199,236 
35,818 
542 
25,848 
28,949 

215,154 

6,587 

1,752 

12,221 

12,729 

66,725 

110,374 

1,537 

63,795 

128,157 
11,378 



185,461 

19,816 

4,193 

926 

20,232 
5,630 
53,426 
12,466 
14,281 
1,694 

3,639 

3,047 

2,644 

1.611 

10,132 

18,216 

102,204 

37,895 

3,712 

10,462 

144,933 
130,766 



Oct. 



,670,793 

3,041 

59,399 

32,749 

10,955 

7,037 

7,047 

144,778 

91,206 

15,999 

455 

67,081 

9,193 

30,366 

18,830 

107,973 

2,369 
38,232 
11,203 
14,516 

7,496 

2,373 

4,526 
242 
505 

4,332 
439 

2,782 

3,064 

4,505 

426,425 

430,350 

57,711 

360 

31,238 

28,123 

209,773 

6,: 

1,630 

9,187 

13,977 

77.499 

182,086 

702 

71,378 

136,595 
14,113 



147,274 

17,707 

8,839 

1,084 

13,098 
4,401 

40,414 
8,603 

15,421 
1,922 

1,752 
3,634 
4,842 
2,031 
10,591 
18,744 
112,913 
47,546 
5,654 

12,708 

154,431 



Nov. 



1,160,863 

5.792 

72.368 

30,338 

2,942 

8 434 

7.153 

155.185 

104.479 

16,957 

303 

42.905 

1,634 

29.963 

12.546 

96,375 

3,031 
34,925 

6.612 
19,803 

7,967 

2,393 

3,772 

763 
613 

2,471 
569 

2,347 

2,693 

7,392 

458,900 

406,823 

71,593 

90 

30.844 

22,579 

127,553 

3.896 

1,757 

3,621 

14,616 



185.190 

1,545 

79.356 

120,448 
18,053 



112,366 

23 405 

8,222 

1,033 

13.389 
4,174 

12.618 
4,631 

12,566 
1.143 

1,739 

4.099 

3,802 

1,471 

9,619 

25,063 

117.770 

54.326 

5, 753 

12,239 

151,470 



128 ',511 1 131,085 



Dec 



752,536 

5,786 

39,533 

31,011 

7,228 

5,339 

6,082 

87,733 

59,411 

17,637 

1 

14,965 

900 

19,304 

8,104 

50,345 

2,011 
21,526 

2,266 
18,194 

7,783 

2,971 

4,113 
5,475 

646 
1,816 

348 
2,329 

2,450 

3,201 

417,916 

333,358 

80,918 

74 

22,267 

17,541 

29,174 

2,281 
1,453 
1,552 
8,631 
34,600 

193,999 

553 

63,458 

87,468 
24,464 



85,508 

16,820 

4,139 

684 



,094 
,376 
,624 
,695 
,164 
571 



1,280 

3,084 

2,067 

1,248 

11,099 

21,048 

100,299 

34,307 

6,712 

8,259 

113,722 
95,668 



1933 



Jan. 


Feb. 


468,915 


402,034 


9, 772 


2,678 


24,374 


28,094 


8,410 


9,776 


1,287 


1,322 


1,300 


768 


3,646 


3,128 


75,521 


79,282 


52,739 


54,519 


18,506 


21,769 


390 


262 


22,701 


17,669 


841 


728 


20,445 


23,831 


7,482 


6,976 


11.146 


12,800 


1,106 


1,389 


25,526 


19,382 


1,954 


1,294 


20,713 


18,202 


8,127 


6,666 


2,395 


3,284 


4,105 


3,292 


319 


126 


466 


372 


1,661 


1,906 


330 


372 


3,681 


3,157 


2,950 


2,918 


441 


16,246 


334,268 


434,037 


316,281 


203,244 


70,091 


97,983 


26,214 


28,181 


21,353 


27,380 


21,183 


16,515 


1,251 


608 


933 


1,134 


630 


675 


9,417 


8,572 


25. 772 


22,764 


150, 795 


161,896 


323 


1,402 


82,416 


126,750 


75, 607 


92,869 


12,035 


10,637 


76,793 


66,385 


14,735 


14,342 


3,835 


3,741 


816 


670 


7,588 


8,597 


3.722 


3,170 


4,669 


3,061 


3,584 


1,792 


9,257 


8,907 


714 


488 


1,203 


1,539 


5,069 


4,743 


1,575 


1,701 


1,890 


1,081 


6,767 


6,504 


19.586 


19,810 


117,166 


107,927 


32,519 


34,646 


6,993 


6,212 


6,972 


9,107 


109,298 


114,241 


86,760 


102,094 



18 



MONTHLY REVIEW OF BUSINESS STATISTICS 



Table 12. Indexes of Employment by Industries, Year 1926 = 100 



Industries— First of Month 



Indexes of Employment Un- 
adjusted- 
All Industries 

Manufacturing 

Animal products — edible 

Fur and products 

Leather and products 

Lumber and products 

Rough and dressed lumber. 

Furniture 

Other lumber products 

Musical instruments 

Plant products — edible 

Pulp and paper products 

Pulp and paper 

Paper products 

Printing and publishing 

Rubber products 

Textile products 

Thread, yam and cloth 

Hosiery and knit goods 

Garments and personal fur- 
nishings 

Other textile products 

Plant products (n.e.s.) 

Tobacco 

Distilled and malt liquors.. 
Wood distillates and extracts . 
Chemicals and allied products 
Clay, glass and stone products 

Electrio current 

Electrical apparatus 

Iron and steel products 

Crude, rolled and forged 

products 

Machinery (other than ve- 
hicles) 

Agricultural implements.. . 

Land vehicles 

Automobiles and parts... 
Steel shipbuilding and re- 
pairing 

Heating appliances 

Iron and steel fabrication 

(n.e.s.) 

Foundry and machine shop 

products 

Other iron and steel pro- 
ducts 

Non-ferrous metal products.. 

Mineral products , 

Miscellaneous , 

LOGGING 

Mining 

Coal 

Metallic ores 

Non-metallic minerals (ex 

cept coal) , 

Communications 

Telegraphs , 

Telephones 

Transportation 

Street railways and cartage.. 

Steam railways 

Shipping and stevedoring 

Construction and Maintenance 

Building 

Highway 

Railway 

Services 

Hotels and restaurants 

Professional , 

Personal (chiefly laundries).. 

Trade 

Retail 

Whol*>»)e 



1932 



May June July Aug. Sept. Oct. Nov. Dec. Jan. Feb. Mar. April May 



87-5 
85-8 
971 
75-9 
91 4 
60-1 
45-5 
77-1 
91-6 
33-7 
93-4 
87-3 
72-4 
96-2 
104-2 
85-9 
100-7 
108-5 
111-2 



120-6 
120-3 
120-3 

91-5 
113-6 

77-0 
1141 
116-5 

70-5 

65-2 

81-7 
27-3 
73-7 
81-7 

65-9 
73-2 

71-2 

74-9 

760 
83-2 
119-4 
102-8 
32-5 
97-9 
89-4 
131-1 

73 1 

94-1 
96-6 
93-5 
84-3 
112-3 
77-7 
820 



58-5 
130-7 

65-8 
H4-7 
107-4 
130-3 
121-4 
/16-2 
123-0 
101-0 



89-1 
860 

106-3 
860 
90-5 
64-2 
51 3 
77-4 
93-3 
31-3 
96-9 
88-3 
72-8 
991 

105-3 
86-4 
98-9 

107-0 

108-6 

91-9 

81-0 
112-4 
107-1 
119-7 

78-8 
1141 

83-1 
117-4 
109-9 

69-4 

58-8 

78-6 
27-4 
73-8 
86-3 

65*4 
76-5 

660 

74-3 

75-3 
78-4 

123-3 
97-5 
37-9 
96-8 
86-5 

133-0 

74-4 

94-1 

98-0 

931 

85-5 

1131 

77-1 

91-4 

92-9 

F2-9 

147-7 

74-0 

116-8 

111-1 

129-4 

121-9 

116-1 

122 1 

102-4 



1933 



83-2 
80-3 
95 
81-0 
86-7 
50-6 
36-2 
73-9 
76-2 
43-9 

102-9 
86-1 
70-2 
99-3 

102-9 
86-1 
96-3 

105-4 

1151 

85 
73-5 

121-7 
125-4 
115-6 
105-2 
106-9 

53-9 
110-6 
101-5 

60-5 



63-7 

67-7 
24-2 
62-1 
50-9 

54-5 
72-0 

46-2 

62-8 

65-3 
79-8 
118-2 

98-4 
56-2 
99 

93-4 
134-0 

65 3 
89 3 
84-6 
90-5 
83 

116-6 
72-9 
94-2 
67-6 
37-4 

115-4 
56-3 

103-7 
94-8 

125-3 

111-8 

117-8 

124 

101 



45 



102 



61 
34 

69 
76 

55 
58 

43 

1 60 



Electrical Energy Consumed, Million Kw. hr. 1 



Economic 










1932 












1933 






Area 


April 


May 


June 


July 


Aug. 


Sept. 


Oct. 


Nov. 


Dec. 


Jan. 

55-2 
604-9 
451-5 
101-6 


Feb. 


Mar. 


April 


Maritime Provinces 


59-7 
576-7 
433-1 

92-7 


62-2 
522-6 
433-6 

92-6 


56-3 
492-9 
402-4 

85-1 


47-4 
467-7 
399-1 

87-9 


53-5 
509-9 
412-5 

89-1 


57-3 
527-2 

427-6 
90-5 


61-0 
600-2 
462-5 

94-0 


64-5 
654-6 
468-0 

95 


63-9 
632-0 
455-8 
102-1 


42-4 
549-4 
447-4 

92-6 


48-1 
575-3 
479-3 

98-5 


50-5 
557-8 


Ontario 

British Columbia 


450-2 
91-0 



1 Production plus provincial imports less provincial exports. 



MONTHLY REVIEW OF BUSINESS STATISTICS 



19 



Table 13. Indexes of Employment with Seasonal Adjustment, Indexes of Retail Sales 

Automobile Financing. 



Classification 



Seasonally Adjusted Indexes of 
Employment— All Industries. 

Manufacturing 

Leather and products 

Rough and dressed lumber 

Furniture 

Musical Instruments 

Pulp and paper 

Paper products 

Printing and publishing 

Rubber products 

Textile products 

Thread, yarn and cloth 

Hosiery and knit goods 

Clay, glass and stone products. . 

Electric current 

Electric apparatus 

Iron and steel products 

Crude, rolled and forged pro- 
ducts 

Machinery other than vehicles. . 

Agricultural implements 

Automobiles and parts 

Logging 

Mining 

Metallic ores 

Non metallic minerals except 
coal 

Telephones 

Transportation 

Street railways and cartage — 

Steam railways 

Shipping and stevedoring 

Construction and Maintenance. 

Building 

Highway 

Railway 

Hotels and Restaurants 

Trade 

Retail 

Wholesale 

Economic areas and cities — 

Maritime Provinces 

Quebec 

Ontario 

Prairie Provinces 

British Columbia 

Montreal 

Quebec 

Toronto 

Ottawa 

Hamilton 

Windsor 

Winnipeg 

Vancouver 



Indexes of Retail Sales, January, 

1929 = 100 — 

Boots and shoes (6) 

Candy (6) 

Clothing (9) 

Drugs (7) 

Dyers and cleaners (4) 

Furniture (4) 

General and departmental, 25 

stores and 4 chains , 

Groceries and meats (23) 

Hardware (5) 

Music and radio (4) , 

Restaurants (11) 

General index 

Automobile Financing— 

Total new and used cars — 

Number 

Percentage change, 1932 to 1931 

Financing in dollars S000 

Percentage change, 1932 to 1931 



1932 



1933 



May I June I July I Aug. I Sept. I Oct. I Nov. Dec. Ja». | Feb. I Mar. I Apr. I May 



First of Month 



89 6 


86-8 


84-9 


82-3 


82-4 


83-4 


820 


82- 4 


841 


81-3 


80-8 


89-5 


85- 1 


83-4 


83-0 


80-1 


81-0 


81-8 


80-9 


81-4 


81-0 


77-8 


77-2 


77-0 


92-3 


92-9 


88-3 


90-9 


92-5 


90-1 


87-9 


84-5 


79-5 


80-7 


81-6 


84-2 


47-6 


43-4 


42-9 


39-8 


39-8 


38-9 


39-7 


43-6 


43-2 


42-9 


41-9 


40-1 


75-5 


76-8 


71-2 


63-2 


69-2 


72-2 


74-0 


71-7 


70-4 


64-0 


63-2 


60-5 


34-6 


32-9 


30-9 


36-9 


51-2 


46-4 


43-7 


39-9 


22-8 


22-7 


20-7 


23-3 


72-8 


70-1 


71-3 


69-9 


72-8 


71-7 


73-2 


71-6 


71-2 


70-7 


70-9 


68-6 


95-9 


98-9 


97-6 


95-5 


98-2 


96-9 


98-6 


95-4 


95-7 


95-6 


97-4 


94-8 


104-8 


105-6 


104-3 


102-6 


104-0 


102-6 


102-2 


102-4 


98-4 


98-8 


100-1 


99-3 


84-2 


84-3 


85-0 


80-7 


82-8 


83-2 


83-6 


85-6 


81-6 


70-5 


74-2 


73-4 


98-4 


98-8 


97-7 


94-1 


96-0 


98-3 


97-4 


95-6 


92-4 


88-5 


89-2 


89-3 


107-5 


107-0 


105-3 


102-7 


105-1 


105-1 


105 1 


103-8 


100-7 


99-0 


960 


96-3 


110-0 


108-6 


109-2 


106-2 


106-9 


109-7 


111-3 


110-3 


109-3 


102-2 


101-9 


101-4 


77-7 


78-8 


72-7 


65-0 


64-8 


66-6 


58-5 


53-2 


56-4 


55-2 


54-4 


51-8 


117-7 


115-9 


1131 


110-5 


110-9 


109-4 


108-7 


110-7 


112-7 


112-9 


113-3 


112-9 


1170 


110-8 


110-3 


110-1 


102-0 


103-6 


104-7 


98-4 


96-7 


90-4 


87-7 


88-9 


68-7 


66-7 


67-3 


63-9 


62-6 


61-7 


58-2 


60-6 


61-4 


59-4 


57-5 


59-2 


61-5 


55-5 


61-2 


53-8 


62-0 


60-1 


62-1 


64-9 


51-9 


49-2 


38-6 


42-6 


79-8 


79-2 


77-2 


71-4 


70-8 


68-4 


62-8 


68-2 


66-3 


62-5 


63-2 


61-1 


26-0 


26-2 


27-0 


23-4 


24-8 


23-9 


22-7 


241 


24-1 


29-7 


31-3 


31-8 


66-1 


72-4 


83-4 


82-6 


59-1 


47-8 


52-5 


60-3 


82-7 


67-2 


61-1 


65-3 


42-9 


46-3 


51-5 


49-4 


38-5 


33-6 


32-8 


38-9 


53-1 


450 


41-5 


45-8 


100-5 


98-8 


96-1 


95-7 


96-5 


96-6 


98-3 


97-4 


94-9 


92-8 


95-7 


94-1 


133-8 


132-1 


130-2 


128-3 


126-6 


128-6 


131-2 


132-7 


133-4 


136-3 


139-2 


136-1 


74-7 


70-9 


69-9 


67-1 


66-2 


67-1 


66-4 


64-6 


66-4 


66-2 


64-0 


61-9 


93-9 


92-9 


91-6 


90-7 


90-1 


89-5 


89-3 


90-2 


89-3 


89-1 


88-2 


87-1 


87-5 


84-7 


83-8 


82-7 


83-3 


82-8 


80-2 


80-8 


81 1 


79-4 


79-3 


78-7 


114-4 


1120 


111-9 


110-5 


114-6 


115-1 


114-4 


115-1 


117-9 


116-8 


118-4 


118-3 


811 


78-0 


76-5 


74-9 


74-9 


74-8 


71-6 


71-2 


72-0 


70-5 


70-7 


70-8 


89-5 


78-5 


79-6 


80-1 


80-0 


78-5 


76-1 


83-2 


82-3 


78-0 


76-6 


73-1 


99-9 


87-1 


73-6 


65-9 


63-3 


66-2 


66-1 


69-9 


82-6 


83-3 


85-5 


81-6 


66-0 


62-2 


53-1 


46-9 


42-4 


40-1 


36-1 


36-0 


37-0 


37-4 


34-4 


32-1 


269-4 


163-2 


97-5 


81-8 


77-5 


87-2 


100-7 


120-9 


161-0 


215-3 


291-3 


258-8 


70-3 


60-8 


58-1 


54-6 


59-6 


64-4 


60-6 


66-8 


73-2 


70-8 


69-9 


74-0 


117-6 


109-0 


103-5 


97-2 


102-3 


97-3 


102-9 


102-8 


104-4 


98-9 


105 -.5 


104-5 


117-8 


117-4 


115-9 


115-3 


114-0 


114-3 


113-7 


111-6 


113-4 


111-5 


110-9 


110-5 


124-8 


124-1 


123-7 


120-7 


120-6 


120-9 


120-2 


115-2 


117-8 


116-0 


116-1 


114-5 


102-8 


103-5 


100-9 


101-2 


100-9 


100-4 


99-6 


99-2 


99-6 


98-5 


98-9 


100-2 


89-6 


95-3 


91-1 


85-3 


83-7 


81-8 


87-0 


86-1 


83-2 


80-3 


79-9 


81-7 


8S 9 


85-2 


83-9 


80-1 


81-4 


81-3 


79-6 


81-3 


84-9 


80-7 


78-0 


77-9 


911 


88-4 


83-9 


84-6 


82-5 


82-7 


80-3 


82-6 


84-3 


81-5 


82-3 


81-7 


92-8 


88-9 


86-2 


84-6 


87-0 


90-4 


86-0 


83-3 


88-1 


85-1 


86-3 


86-6 


82-9 


81-7 


80-2 


761 


77-4 


77-7 


75-2 


74-2 


77-4 


74-2 


72-3 


72-0 


92-3 


88-9 


85-4 


82-1 


82-7 


83-9 


81-1 


82-5 


82-9 


82-9 


81-6 


80-0 


107-4 


109-8 


102-4 


97-2 


101-4 


94-2 


92-7 


93-4 


94-8 


94-2 


99-5 


96-3 


97-9 


96-7 


94-3 


91-8 


90-0 


90-8 


89-7 


87-8 


87-6 


88-4 


88-2 


87-1 


103-1 


95-9 


92-9 


91-5 


92-6 


88-2 


91-9 


94-4 


91-7 


93-9 


93-9 


92-2 


86-6 


83-9 


82-9 


78-9 


75-8 


75-9 


76-1 


75-3 


73-0 


73-9 


73-4 


72-3 


80-3 


81-7 


87-8 


78-0 


69-3 


59-3 


66-0 


65-5 


85-5 


65-9 


65-5 


82-8 


89-2 


86-8 


87-0 


85-1 


82-5 


82-2 


81-0 


78-5 


79-6 


81-1 


81-8 


82-0 


87-3 


89-7 


87-3 


84-2 


84-8 


85-1 


86-2 


84-5 


86-1 


87-1 


84-5 


80-7 



79 4 
76-2 
88-7 
390 
61-6 
23-2 
68-2 
93-1 
97-9 
74-0 
89-4 
94-5 
98-9 
50-7 
111-8 
84-5 
59-3 

40-7 
59-9 
31-9 
63-6 
46-4 
92-3 
136-4 



84-9 

81-9 

116-1 

70-5 

96-1 

73-0 

32-0 

200-8 

64-6 

102-0 

110-1 

116-3 

96-6 



81-9 
78-0 
81-0 
84-0 
72-3 

80-5 
96-8 
85-9 
87-7 
69-1 
73-3 
79-8 
79-0 













1932 










1933 


Mar. 


April 


May 


June 


July 


Aug. 


Sept. 


Oct. 


Nov. 


Dec. 


Jan. 


Feb. 


62-5 


87-3 


88-2 


107-5 


83-1 


57-3 


71-6 


76-5 


77-3 


95-9 


50-8 


43-7 


103-0 


72-3 


75-3 


63-7 


70-9 


69-2 


62-7 


68-3 


57-0 


127-9 


53-2 


59-1 


85-8 


98-4 


91-7 


110-8 


68-7 


51-6 


80-7 


87-2 


85-6 


120-4 


52-0 


41-1 


90-8 


87-4 


79-3 


84-4 


79-0 


79-3 


76-8 


81-2 


79-3 


92-9 


74-4 


70-2 


88-3 


127-8 


119-6 


119-2 


93-2 


92-2 


123-5 


108-8 


92-2 


77-4 


66-8 


68-0 


49-5 


53-6 


52-9 


43-7 


32-7 


44-9 


54-9 


58-4 


55-6 


59-3 


27-4 


31-1 


89-3 


103-1 


103-9 


102-3 


88-0 


81-6 


94-0 


109-9 


97-7 


161-7 


66-8 


66-8 


88-2 


84-5 


82-9 


80-7 


78-8 


75-0 


78-9 


80-0 


78-0 


85-6 


70-0 


67-4 


65 -fi 


93-9 


120- 1 


109-5 


89-2 


94-0 


104-5 


102-7 


79-4 


99-3 


43-2 


44-5 


31-9 


28-6 


26-6 


20-9 


15-9 


22-1 


38-8 


39-0 


40-7 


41-6 


20-7 


17-1 


67-3 


68-0 


64-5 


62-6 


63-9 


65-6 


64-7 


61-5 


56-1 


62-4 


54-0 


51-1 


85-3 


92-1 


91-0 


91-8 


79-6 


73-7 


84-0 


91-6 


85-0 


119-7 


63-9 


61-6 


4,950 


7,345 


9,615 


9,151 


6,632 


6,065 


5,018 


4,361 


4,286 


3,641 


3,013 


3,271 


-38-2 


-49-5 


-33-9 


-20-7 


-35-8 


-10-9 


-15-8 


-32-2 


-17-0 


-26-2 


-25-6 


-21-6 


2,025 


3,000 


3,788 


3,472 


2,475 


2,185 


1,897 


1,583 


1,334 


1,132 


1,001 


1,174 


-43-0 


-52-5 


-40-1 


-29-4 


-41-0 


-24-8 


-27-4 


-40-5 


-37-8 


-38-4 


-30-8 


-23-2 



Mars 

49-2 
53-4 
72-4 
75-8 
73-4 
42-5 

75-2 
79-0 
58-3 
20-1 
56-9 
72-8 



5,214 
+ 5-3 

1,764 
-12-9 



20 



MONTHLY REVIEW OF BUSINESS STATISTICS 
Table 14. Trend of Business in the Five Economic Areas 1 



Areas and Items 










1932 












19^3 




April 


May 


June 


July 


Aug. 


Sept. 


Oct. 


Nov. 


Dec. 


Jan. 


Feb. 


Mar. 


April 


Business In Five Economic 
Areas— 

Canada— 

Contracts awarded $000 

Building Permits $000 

Employment.Average 1.928- 100 
Bank Debits $000,000 


10.113 
4.237 
87 5 
2,074 
33,425 
190 

585 

473 

87 8 

42-5 

1,781 

13 

2,948 

830 

86 

596 

9,845 

75 

4,018 

1.820 

89-5 

925 

14,851 

79 

1.724 

825 

87-6 

379 

4,702 

17 

838 

288 

82-7 

1311 

2,246 

6 


14.186 
5,290 
891 
2.175 
30,779 
204 

338 

147 

96-4 

49-2 

1,939 

14 

7.390 

1,467 

87-8 

676 

8,913 

?0 

4,168 

1.511 

89-9 

967 

13.660 

79 

1,417 

1,904 

89-3 

358 

4,289 

20 

874 

262 

83-7 

124-9 

1,978 

11 


12,155 
4,388 
88-7 
2,203 
40,744 
176 

1.333 

131 

96-4 

43-6 

2,242 

18 

4.16S 

1,535 

86-6 

693 

13,116 

61 

4,321 

2,064 

89-2 

944 

17,258 
70 

1,852 

470 

90-5 

397 

5,750 

17 

474 

188 

83-7 

124-1 

2.378 

10 


12,540 

4.227 

86-3 

2,176 

34,226 

175 

630 

207 

90-1 

46-2 

2,381 

8 

3,444 

2,120 

84-4 

647 

9,924 

72 

6.793 

1.115 

86-9 

975 

14.587 

65 

1,023 

480 

90-1 

388 

6.323 

21 

651 

304 

81-4 

118-3 

2,011 

9 


12,689 
3,331 
86-0 
2,116 
28,124 
188 

961 

118 

87-8 

41-8 

1,797 

9 

6,858 
1,145 
85-3 
641 
8,533 
86 

3,360 

977 

851 

895 

11,608 

72 

830 
367 
91-6 

406 

4,370 

15 

679 

724 

82-8 

131-8 

1,816 

6 


9.G47 
2,204 
86-7 
2,098 
25,023 
192 

344 
71 

84-9 

43-3 

1,532 

9 

3,475 

455 

85-8 

623 

7,757 
89 

4,691 

901 

86-1 

917 

10,433 

64 

644 

337 

94-6 

402 

3.633 

21 

493 

439 

82-1 

112-1 

1,668 

9 


8.876 
3,056 
84-7 
2,367 
29,657 
199 

508 

139 

86-8 

43-2 

1,749 

15 

4,859 

1.289 

83-6 

692 

8,928 

80 

2,722 

1,154 

84-2 

927 

12,498 

73 

628 

222 

91-6 

580 

4,680 

26 

159 

253 

77-8 

124-6 

1,802 
5 


10,170 

2,505 

83-2 

2,466 

33,739 

229 

348 

134 

83-8 

40-6 

2,068 

15 

4,938 

609 

82-9 

710 

9,895 

89 

2,861 
1,522 
84-1 
1,158 
14,461 
80 

828 

104 

86-7 

435 

5,291 

35 

1,196 

136 

73-8 

122-2 

2,024 

10 


4,190 

1,481 

78-5 

2,085 

33,249 

196 

542 

72 

801 

39-4 

2,042 

10 

1,248 

261 

77-8 

606 

9,793 

80 

1,476 

939 

78-8 

904 

14,290 

69 

48 
137 
84-4 
410 
5,083 
31 

875 

72 

69-7 

125-3 

2,041 

6 


3,362 

1,164 

77-0 

1,969 

29,171 

216 

124 

43 

76-5 

38-2 

1,914 

11 

1,523 

328 

75-7 

607 

8,879 

90 

950 
316 
78-9 
853 
12,013 
79 

101 

308 

80-4 

354 

4,377 

27 

665 

168 

68-0 

117-4 

1,988 

9 


3,149 

907 

76-9 

1,830 

26,089 

214 

193 
44 

76-8 

34-5 

1,600 

14 

1,210 

215 

74-1 

562 

8,315 

85 

966 
349 
79 -S 
863 
11,148 
80 

191 
52 

80-0 

267 

3,409 

29 

590 

247 

67-7 

103-8 

1,617 

6 


3,192 

935 

76-0 

1,887 

29,601 


8,6f9 
1,552 
77-6 
1,877 


Sales of Insurance $000 

Commercial Failures... Number 


29,624 


Maritime Provinces— 

Contracts Awarded $000 

Building Permits $000 

Employment. Average 1926-100 
Bank Debits $000,000 


156 

102 

78-3 

33-3 

2,087 


287 

112 

80-3 

33-6 


Sales of Insurance $000 


1,849 


O TTFBEC 

Contracts Awarded $000 

Building Permits $000 

Emolovment.Average 1926-100 
Bank Debits $000,000 


973 
221 
73-1 
534 
9,222 


3,366 
426 
75-4 
520 


Sales of Insurance $000 


9,002 


Ontario— 

Contracts Awarded $000 

Building Permits $000 

Employment. Average 1926— 10C 

Bank Debits $000,000 

Sales of Insurance $000 


1,325 

386 

78-3 

786 

12,461 


2,045 

671 

79-5 

821 

13,318 


Prairie Provinces— 

Contracts Awarded $000 

Building Permits $00( 

Employment. Average 1926 — 100 
Bank Debits $000,000 


220 

87 

78-3 

430 

3,766 


545 

194 

79-2 

397 


Sales of Insurance $000 

Commercial Failures... Number 
British Columbia — 
Contracts Awarded $000 


3,655 


518 

138 

68-8 

104-5 

2,065 


2,365 


Building Permits $00( 

Employment. Average 1926-100 
Bank Debits $000,000 


149 
72-2 
105-2 


Sales of Insurance $000 

Commercial Failures.. . Number 


1,800 







'Employment indexes apply to first of following month. 







Table 15. 


Mineral Production by Months 












Minerals 


1932 


1933 


Mar. 


Apr. 


May 


June 


July 


Aug. 


Sept. 


Oct. 


Nov. 


Dec 


Jan. 


Feb. 


Mar. 


Mineral Productlon- 






























Metals— 

Gold 

Silver 


000 oa. 
000 ob. 

tons 
tons 

tons 
tons 


255-7 
1,460 
1.877 
11,831 
10.666 
7,583 


246-4 
1,645 
1,692 
11,039 
10.812 
7.325 


268-5 

1,418 

1,736 

10,678 

10,075 
7,624 


270-5 
1,311 
1,581 
10,335 
11,228 
7,333 


247-9 
1,825 
1,480 
9.045 
10.027 
7.603 


262-6 
1,447 
420 
8.802 
10,899 
6,866 


260-5 
1,172 
339 
9,406 
9,947 
6,651 


253-1 
1,511 
1,071 
11,293 
9,930 
6,852 


252-5 
1,515 
614 
8,858 
13,180 
6,653 


266-7 
1,299 
684 
11,105 
9,972 
6,984 


233-4 
1,384 
890 
11,475 
10,391 
6,946 


228-2 
1,307 
995 
8,583 
9,313 
6,325 


256-3 


Nickel 

Copper 

Lead 

Zinc 


1,640 
10,854 

9,612 
.6,903 


Fuels— 

Coal 

Petroleum 

Natural Gas 


000 tons 

000 bbls. 

000 M cu. ft 


1,049 
97 5 

3,010 


739 

95-6 

2,354 


697 
95-2 
1,760 


752 

89-5 
1,131 


653 

86-9 
982 


720 

85-2 

912 


929 
79-8 
1,158 


1,229 
78-8 
1.712 


1.263 
77-1 

2,182 


1,160 
80-8 
2,699 


1,023 

82-8 

2,945 


812 

73-1 

2,827 


' 87 -2 
2,498 


Non-metals— 

Asbestos 

Gypsum 

Feldspar 

Salt 


tons 

000 tons 

tons 

tons 


8.937 

5-86 

1.160 

13,093 


8.830 

15-55 

415 

15,326 


9,942 

32-24 

423 

15,406 


7.977 

70-71 

479 

15,409 


7,164 

80-14 

635 

13,869 


9.918 

69-46 

360 

14,331 


11.001 

52 «3 

375 

15,218 


13.232 

52-34 

482 

16,683 


11.616 

27-60 

433 

18,640 


14,478 

19-61 

493 

9,833 


5,950 
2-73 


5.482 
2-43 


5,455 


9,884 


9,223 


i2,670 


Structural Materials— 

Cement 000 bbls. 

Clay products. ... $ 000 
Lime. tons 


276 

311 

29,108 


427 

362 

26.744 


531 

404 

30,014 


567 

428 

27,290 


457 

375 

27,185 


510 

386 

27,733 


500 

356 

28,550 


411 
323 

34,822 


193 

249 

29,211 


83 

133 

18,295 


65 
111 

18,224 


45 

75 

17, 750 


95 



MONTHLY REVIEW OF BUSINESS STATISTICS 



21 



Table 16. Weekly Indicators of Economic Activity in Canada, 1933 






Items 


March 


April 


May 


4 


11 


18 


25 


1 


8 


15 


22 


29 


6 


13 


Statistics of Grain Trade— 

Receipts Country Elevators — 
Wheat 000 bushels 


3,774 

806 

185 

13 

32 

224-0 
9,513 
6,729 
1,459 
5,110 

•491 

•240 
•275 
•777 
•320 

9,098 
3,920 
20,002 
3,937 

3-27 
6-72 
4-05 
6-07 

5,900 

1,132 

3,151 

834 

759 

1,068 

1,289 

1,743 

807 

11,167 

6,361 

34,211 

18,049 

75-16 
58-23 
53-75 
177-83 
23-21 
21-99 
50-04 
43-18 
54-27 
71-99 
54-62 
57-46 
53-64 
65-16 

49-0 
38-9 
1-4 
33-1 
79-9 
26-0 
70-8 
32-3 
59-2 

32-8 
20-8 
55-0 
41-7 

40-4 
58-8 
24-8 
41-3 

69-6 
80-9 
26-2 
70-5 


3, £83 

758 

167 

12 

26 

223-4 
9,858 
6,674 
1,438 
5,10f 

•501 
•248 
•285 
•794 
•337 

8,462 
4,691 
19,689 
3,209 

3-59 
7-21 
4-55 
6-26 

5,290 
1,136 
3,676 
850 
6'-l 
1.C65 
1,369 
1,654 

11.495 

6,418 

34,371 

15,769 

70-51 
55-28 
68- T8 
209-8^ 
20-46 
24-30 
53-04 
42-27 
49-83 
71-87 
55-19 
58-40 
54-73 
65-81 

50-2 
39-2 
1-1 
32-3 
81-5 
27-2 
69-9 
33-2 
61-8 

34-1 
22-4 
56-6 
42-6 

40-3 
57-7 
25-7 
42-3 

66-2 
77-8 
26-3 
67-2 


5,169 

1,217 

241 

14 

38 

224-6 
10,784 
6,795 
1,445 
5,130 

•506 
•252 
•297 
•801 
•351 

9,718 
5.461 

21,445 
3,942 

3 88 
702 
5-04 
6-35 

6,285 

1,479 

3,335 

972 

715 

907 

1.439 

1,642 

636 

11.594 

6,882 

35.886 

16,581 

81-79 
71-07 
62-92 
251-17 
19-92 
20-30 
56-08 
42-47 
43-44 
72-16 
56-01 
60-06 
54-37 
71-93 

53-0 
42-7 
•9 
35-1 
82-4 
26-0 
72-4 
36-8 
68-8 

34-9 

22-6 
58-3 
44-0 

41-6 
59-7 
26-4 
44-0 

67-4 
83-9 
26-8 
69-5 


4,784 

1,459 

224 

18 

49 

225-2 
11,629 
6,732 
1,358 
5,138 

•486 
•242 
•291 
•793 
•33S 

9,933 

6-630 

21,567 

3,994 

4-04 
6-42 
5-29 
6-42 

6,740 

1,437 

2,955 

764 

774 

1,050 

1,280 

1,565 

664 

11,776 

6,527 

35,532 

16,418 

93-78 
65-26 
60-94 
215-82 
21-20 
24-68 
51-65 
41-92 
45-02 
70-68 
50-25 
59-28 
53-13 
72-41 

52-0 
41-5 
•8 
35-7 
79-7 
25-0 
72-9 
36-8 
68-6 

34-0 
21-1 
57-8 
43-6 

40-7 
58-6 
25-7 
43-1 

66-5 
83-2 
26-6 
68-7 


3,708 

1,151 

219 

17 

30 

226-7 
11,864 
6,790 
1,359 
5,178 

•489 
•241 
•293 
•791 

•344 

9,469 
6,502 
22,094 
2,760 

4-02 
5-84 
6-07 
6-87 

5,362 

1,545 

2,593 

692 

873 

1,220 

1,219 

1,568 

73.3 

11,891 

6,888 

34,584 

18,016 

81-51 
66-91 
55-78 
190-11 
23-89 
32-17 
49-37 
45-12 
49-93 
70-20 
53-97 
59-11 
55-09 
67-64 

50-7 

39-5 

•8 

35-2 

78-7 
24-9 
72-8 
36-1 
65-8 

32-8 
20-0 
55-7 
42-3 

39-8 
57-5 
24-9 
41-9 

66-5 
81-1 
26-5 
68-2 


2,384 

594 

103 

15 

22 

225-9 
12,238 
6,742 
1,320 
5,141 

•507 
•240 
•299 
•800 
•362 

10,333 
6,661 

23,476 
2,531 

4-19 
611 

5-85 
7-43 

4,201 

1,482 

2,554 

517 

786 

869 

1,474 

1,098 

770 

12,317 

6,302 

32,370 

17,885 

68-21 

65-87 
58-98 
136-05 
21-82 
28-21 
59-99 
34-04 
51-64 
71-59 
49-38 
56-55 
54-39 
60-98 

50-6 
38-7 
3 
36-3 
78-4 
24-9 
71-2 
34-8 
66-5 

31-3 
18-7 
53-3 
40-7 

39-6 
57-5 
24-6 
41-2 

68-4 
78-9 
25-8 
69-0 


1,961 

331 

50 

15 

15 

224-3 
11,926 
6,573 
1,302 
5,130 

•541 
•242 
•306 
•826 
•372 

6,941 
7,300 
17,062 
3,792 

4-15 
6-61 
5-37 

7-95 

4,252 

1,109 

2,485 

363 

882 

930 

1,336 

1,002 

616 

10,813 

6,348 

30,136 

17,382 

74-50 
56-5'j 
61-97 
123-47 
25-16 
35-89 
51-56 
33-92 
42-87 
70-19 
51-83 
57-34 
54-71 
62-76 

52-1 
38-3 
•8 
36-9 
78-4 
23-6 
74-1 
34-9 
72-0 

31-6 
20-1 
52-9 
400 

420 
61-6 
25-6 
42-4 

72-6 
841 
26-5 
73 '2 


2,533 

418 

83 

24 

29 

220-6 
11,763 
6,472 
1,323 
5,151 

•571 

•248 
■320 
•855 

•3S4 

8,884 
7,644 
17,808 
2,844 

4-66 
5-75 
513 
8-00 

4,788 

1,203 

3,319 

295 

1,066 

884 

1,380 

1,255 

765 

12,256 

6,945 

34,156 

17,086 

73-25 
56-77 

72-56 
94-25 
28-49 
35-93 
57-31 
42-67 
49-74 
70-69 
51-64 
59-44 
53-40 
61-53 

58-9 

41-2 
•8 
37-4 
88-4 
23-8 
76-4 
35-9 
85-3 

33-6 
22-7 
53-3 
41-6 

46-9 
67-8 
29-6 
46-9 

73-4 
89-6 
28-6 
75-1 


2,550 
296 
1G9 

23 
30 

219-8 
11,023 
6,576 
1,394 
5,199 

•578 
•256 
•329 
•888 
•390 

9,836 

9,554 

26,994 

2,440 

4-37 
5-53 
5-74 
8-00 

5,563 

1,642 

3,038 

345 

1,182 

698 

1,266 

1,348 

794 

12,409 

7,764 

36,049 

18,192 

80-16 
82-64 
73-03 
104-86 
30-96 
37-01 
52-88 
45-87 
50-35 
70-34 
55-86 
62-59 
60-79 
66 -2(i 

64-9 
45-2 
•9 
39-9 
100-3 
25-6 
80-4 
37-8 
92-4 

35-9 

25-7 
55-3 
43-1 

50 
74-5 
29-6 
50-9 

77-3 
101-9 
31-3 

80-8 


1,889 

245 

93 

13 

23 

217-0 
10,812 
6,615 
1,413 
5,117 

•625 

•280 

•348 

1-009 

• 422 

11,653 

7,560 

27,049 

2,668 

4-59 
5-50 
5-55 
8-50 

6,601 

1,372 

3,261 

241 

1,303 

642 

1,287 

1,474 

806 

12,345 

8,177 

37,409 

17,930 

91-94 
70-18 
71-22 
72-37 
33-52 
40-61 
54-63 
48-41 
50-92 
69-88 
55 17 
63-59 
60-81 
69-42 

68-8 
49-2 
1-0 
45-2 
104-0 
27-9 
83-7 
44-5 
98-4 

39-0 
29-9 
55-9 
45-3 

52-7 
77-1 
32-6 
54-3 

77-9 
105-4 
31-8 
82-1 




Oats 000 bushels 




Barley 000 bushels 

Flax 000 bushels 

Rye 000 bushels 

Visible Supply— 

Wheat 000,000 bushels 

Oats 000 bushels 


212-4 
10,478 


Barley 000 bushels 

Flax 000 bushels 


6,536 
1,261 


Rye 000 bushels 

Aver. Cash Price Ft. W 7 illiam and Pt. 
Arthur — 

Wheat No. 1 Nor S per bush. 

Oats No. 2C.W " 


4,983 

•639 
•289 


Barley No. 3 C.W 


•358 


Flax No. 1 N.W.C 

Rye No. 1 C.W " 


1-046 
•450 


Sales on Stock Yards — 


11,156 
8 334 


Hogs " 

Sheep " 

Prices at Toronto — 

Steers, 1,000-1,200 lbs per cwt. $ 

Calves, good veal " $ 


22,858 
2,588 

4-53 
5-80 
575 


Lambs, good handy weight " $ 

Carloadings, Totals- 


8-50 
5 983 




1 334 




3 043 


Coke 


187 




1,438 
657 




Other forest products 


1,365 

1,480 

818 


Mdse L.C.L 

Miscellaneous 


12,163 

7,985 

36 453 


Total cars received from connections 

Indexes of Carloadings. 1926 = 100 — 


18,110 
76-04 




69-84 


Coal 


61-66 


Coke 


54-36 


Lumber 


37-34 




44-27 


Pulp and paper 


55-60 




49-83 


Ore 


50-21 




69-45 




52-70 


Total for Canada 


60-63 




58-14 




65-90 


Indexes of Common Stock Prices— 

Industrials — 
Total (96) 


72-5 


Iron and steel (19) 


55-9 


Pulp and paper (9) 


11 


Milling (5) 


491 


Oils (4) 


107-4 


Textiles and clothing (9) 


32-6 


Food and allied products (21) 


91-5 


Beverages (8) 


49-6 


Miscellaneous (21) 


102-6 


Utilities — 
Total (18) 


41-1 


Transportation (2) 


311 


Telephone and telegraph (2) 


590 


Power and traction (14) 


48-3 


Companies Abroad— 
Total (8) 


551 


Industrial (1) 


78-1 


Utility (7) 


36-6 


Grand total (122) 


57-2 


Mining Stocks— 
Gold (11) 


82-1 


Copper (4) 


1111 


Silver and miscellaneous (5) 


350 


Total Index (20) 


86-6 























22 



MONTHLY REVIEW OF BUSINESS STATISTICS 



Table 17. Bank Debits to Individual Accounts in the Clearing House Centres of Canada in 
Millions of Dollars, with Annual Totals for Leading Cities and Economic Areas 



Year 


Canada 


Halifax 


Saint 
John 


Montreal 


Toronto 


Winnipeg 


Vancou- 
ver 


Maritime 
Provinces 


Quebec 


Ontario 


Prairie 
Provinces 


British 
Columbia 


1924 


27,157 


249 


262 


7,502 


7,659 


3,793 


1,410 


585 


8,133 


11,209 


5,505 


1,725 


1925 


28,126 


292 


208 


7,766 


7,588 


4,183 


1,475 


672 


8,475 


11,236 


6,000 


1,842 


1926 


30,358 


310 


215 


9,133 


8,210 


3,877 


1,553 


605 


9,909 


11,998 


5,886 


1,960 


1927 


36,094 


325 


219 


11,780 


10,537 


4,005 


1,596 


628 


12,744 


14.642 


6,127 


2,053 


1928 


43,477 


405 


249 


13,962 


12,673 


5,188 


1.982 


745 


14,913 


17,312 


8,005 


2,499 


1929 


46,670 


425 


273 


15,558 


13,714 


4.789 


2,366 


798 


16,488 


18,543 


7,923 


2,923 


1930 


37,491 


362 


248 


12,271 


10,655 


3,712 


1,813 


708 


13.137 


15,044 


6,279 


2,322 


1931 


31,536 


330 


235 


9,757 


9,512 


3,280 


1,416 


653 


10,550 


13,377 


5,201 


1,806 


1932 


25,844 


258 


214 


7,136 


8,066 


3,138 


1,190 


519 


7,766 


11,259 


4,797 


1,503 



Clearing House 
Centres 


1932 


1933 


April 


May 


June 


July 


Aug. 


Sept. 


Oct. 


Nov 


Dec 


Jan. 


Feb. 


Mar. 


April. 


Bank Debits 

Maritime Provinces 
Halifax 


21-1 

6-3 
15-2 


$ 

26-3 
6-0 
16-9 


S 

21-4 
6-4 
15-7 


$ 

24-1 
6-2 
15-9 


1 

20-3 
5-6 
15-9 


1 

22-6 
5-6 
15-1 


$ 

21-7 
5-7 
15-8 


$ 

21-1 
6-0 
13.5 


S 

19-9 
6-2 
13-3 


$ 

19-4 
6-5 
12-4 


16-9 
5-1 
12-6 


16-8 
4-9 
11-6 


$ 
17-7 




4-8 


Saint John 


11-1 


Totals 


42-5 


49-2 


43-6 


46-2 


41-8 


43-3 


43-2 


40-6 


39-4 


38-2 


34-5 


33-3 


33-6 






Quebec — 


548-9 

41-0 

6-0 


612-0 

58-2 

6-0 


639-7 

47-4 

6-3 


587-6 
54-3 
5-5 


592-6 

43-1 

5-8 


576-6 

40-9 

5-8 


631-1 
55-4 

5-7 


654-1 

49-9 

5-7 


556-8 

43-5 

5-8 


546-4 
55-4 
5-1 


520-8 
36-5 
4-7 


493-4 
36-4 

4-G 


480-3 




35-1 


Sherbrooke 


4-7 


Totals 


595-9 


676-2 


693-4 


647-4 


641-4 


623-3 


692-2 


709-7 


606-1 


607-0 


562-0 


534-4 


520-2 






Ontario — 


7-4 

5-6 

4-4 

46-8 

4-5 

8-2 

25-6 

141-2 

4-7 

6 9 

3-7 

648-2 

20-3 


6-9 
60 
4-6 

481 
4-8 
7-9 

28-0 

174-6 

4-4 

8-5 

3-4 

650-8 

18-9 


7-7 
5-2 
51 

45-4 
5-0 
8-8 

32-1 

159-0 

4-7 

8-8 

4-3 

639-7 

18-5 


8-5 
4-3 
5-4 

40-1 
5-4 
8-1 

28-8 
132-6 
4-8 
8-8 
3-1 
708-8 

17-0 


6-2 
4-8 
4-6 

43-2 
4-2 
6-9 

23-3 

124-4 

3-9 

6-8 

2-9 

644-6 

18-4 


6-6 
110 

4-4 
45-4 

5-3 

7-6 
22-7 
83-8 

4-4 
11-8 

3-2 

692-7 

18-1 


7-5 
4-4 
4-2 

41-5 
4-8 
8-2 

26-3 

89-5 

4-0 

9-2 

3-2 

707-2 

17-3 


6-9 
6-8 
5-6 

43-4 
4-3 
8-6 

24-9 

203-1 

4-3 

6-6 

3-3 

823-4 

17-3 


7-7 
7-7 
5-4 

39-0 
4-7 
8-0 

26-6 

99-2 

5-4 

8-1 

3-1 

672-1 

16-7 


6-4 
5-3 
3-6 

32-5 
3-9 
7-7 

24-5 

86-8 

3-9 

6-7 

2-6 

655-3 

13-3 


5-1 
3-8 
4-6 

29-2 
3-6 
6-6 

21-9 

80-6 

2-9 

4-2 

2-5 

683-6 

14-3 


5-5 
4-0 
2-9 

31-7 
3-7 
6-5 

22-8 

81-3 

3-6 

6-4 

3-0 

594-6 

19-5 


5-8 




3-5 


Fort William 


4-3 
34-9 




3-1 




6-0 




20-5 




85-3 


Peterborough 

Sarnia 


3-4 

50 




2-9 


Toronto 


631-9 




14-0 






Totals 


925-3 


966-9 


944-2 


975-9 


894-2 


917-0 


927-4 


1,158-5 


903-8 


852-5 


863-0 


785-5 


820-6 






Prairie Provinces- 
Brandon 


2-5 

40-5 

35-7 

2-9 

1-7 

4 4 

20 

45-3 

9-9 

234-1 


3-0 

420 

31-2 

2-9 

1-5 

50 

1-8 

39-3 

9-8 

221-4 


2-8 

48-9 

32-3 

31 

1-6 

5-2 

1-8 

34-2 

9-3 

258-3 


2-7 
34-6 
28-9 

3-n 

1-7 
5-6 
1-7 
35-9 
8-8 
264-7 


2-7 

37-3 

30-6 

3-3 

1-5 

4-4 

1-6 

36-7 

9-7 

278-8 


3-1 

43-4 

28-2 

3-6 

1-7 

51 

1-6 

41-0 

10-0 

264-6 


3-5 

51-0 

34-0 

3-7 

2-4 

6-1 

1-8 

61-6 

11-5 

404-2 


2-8 

48-6 

26-8 

3-5 

2-0 

5-2 

1-8 

34-1 

9-8 

300-8 


2-6 

43-9 

30-4 

3-3 

1-8 

5-3 

1-9 

29-8 

9-2 

281-7 


2-2 

43-9 

37-6 

2-6 

1-5 

4-5 

1-4 

27-2 

7-7 

225-2 


1-7 

31-6 

22-0 

1-9 

1-3 

2-9 

1-0 

21-9 

6-0 

176-7 


2-0 

38-9 

30-0 

2-5 

1-5 

3-0 

1-5 

32-6 

7-1 

310-6 


2-1 


Calgary 

Edmonton 

Lethbridse 

Medicine Hat 

Moose Jaw 

Prince Albert 


38-2 
28-5 
2-5 
1-5 
3-3 
1-3 
32-8 


8askatoon 


7-3 




279-8 






Totals 


379-1 


357-9 


397-5 


387-8 


406-5 


402-2 


579-7 


435-3 


410-0 


353-8 


266-9 


429-6 


397-3 






British Columbia— 
New Westminster. 
Vancouver 


4-6 

105-6 
21-C 


4-4 
97-9 
22-5 


4-2 
961 
23-8 


4-6 
91-7 
22-0 


4-2 

105-1 
22-5 


4-2 
89-1 
18-9 


4-2 
102-1 
18-4 


3-6 
97-9 
20-6 


4-1 
98-1 
23-0 


3-5 
91-3 
22-5 


3-1 

82-8 
18-0 


3-5 
84-7 
16-3 


3-6 
81-9 
19-7 






Totals 


131-1 


124-9 


124-1 


118-3 


131-8 


112-1 


124-6 


122-2 


125-3 


117-4 


103-8 


104-5 


105-2 






Totals Canada. 


2,073-9 


2,175-2 


2,202-8 


2.175-6 


2,115-7 


2,097- 


2,367-2 


2,466-3 


2,084-6 


1,968-9 


1.830-3 


1,887-3 


1,876-8 



Table 18. Indexes of Employment by Cities, 1926—100 



1st of Month 


1932 


1933 


Feb. 


Mar. 


Apr. 


May 


June 


July 


Aug. 


Sept. 


Oct. 


Nov. 


Dec. 


Jan. 


Feb. 


Mar. 


April. 


May. 


Employ- 
ment- 
Montreal 

Quebec 

Toronto 

Ottawa 

Hamilton — 

Windsor 

Winnipeg 

Vancouver... 


87-4 
100-9 
97-8 
104-5 
90-2 
81-4 
89-6 
90-1 


89-8 
101-9 
97-8 
96-6 
90-4 
80-4 
88-5 
87-8 


91-2 

102-0 
97-8 

101-7 
87-4 
89-8 
88-8 
87-8 


911 
104-0 
97-5 
102-5 
86-9 
88-3 
86-1 
87-6- 


91-7 
105-6 
96-8 
100-9 
84-9 
91-0 
85-2 
89-4 


88-6 
104-8 
94-6 
99-3 
84-4 
89-6 
87-0 
88-7 


85-5 
101-0 
92-3 
97-6 
80-6 
80-0 
86-0 
87-9 


86-3 
105-8 
91-6 
98-0 
77-1 
71-8 
85-1 
89-0 


88-0 
100-2 
93-5 
94-4 
77-6 
58-7 
85-6 
88-5 


84-8 
98-5 
92-5 
94-1 
77-8 
62-5 
84-3 
87-9 


85-1 
95-9 
91-2 
92-6 
76-6 
63-7 
82-2 
85-8 


77-5 
92-6 
86-5 
85-8 
70-7 
63-9 
80-8 
82-5 


76-1 

88-9 
84-7 
85-7 
70-4 
67-2 
77-8 
81-2 


75-8 
92-3 
84-4 
85-5 
70-8 
70-5 
78-0 
80-51 


76-4 
92-7 
85-0 
85-3 
70-9 
79-0 
78-0 
79-0 


79-5 
93-7 
85-6 
87-2 
69-4 
80-6 
77-0 
79-2 



MONTHLY REVIEW OF BUSINESS STATISTICS 23 

Table 19. Building Permits Issued by Sixty-one Cities in Canada in Thousands of Dollars 













1932 










1933 


City 


April 


May 


June 


July 


Aug. 


Sept. 


Oct. 


Nov. 


Dec. 


Jan. 


Feb. 


Mar. 


April 


Building Permits— 

Nova Scotia 


213 


106 


92 


120 


67 


51 


102 


109 


49 


37 


30 


75 


64 


Halifax 


108 

26 
79 


95 
2 
9 


89 
1 
3 


105 
14 


67 


40 


92 
2 
8 


108 


49 


37 


28 
2 


75 


63 


New Glasgow 

Sydney 


1 




10 








1 














New Brunswick . . . 


260 


40 


39 


88 


51 


49 


36 


25 


23 


6 


15 


27 


48 


Fredericton 


3 

32 
225 


4 
12 
24 


3 

6 

31 


5 

58 
24 


1 
23 
27 


29 

20 


2 
5 

29 










5 
6 
17 


7 


6 
19 








2 


Saint John 


22 


6 


15 


40 




830 


1,467 


1,536 


2,116 


1,151 


530 


1.290 


609 


261 


328 


215 


221 


426 






Montreal and Mai- 
sonneuve 


661 

70 
7 
18 
32 
42 


1,311 
115 

2 

20 
13 

5 


1,420 

52 

4 

28 
8 
23 


1,810 
241 

"'46 
8 
12 


973 
99 

6 
32 

8 
33 


338 
61 
77 
11 

43 


1,149 

68 
1 

12 
1 

59 


248 

320 

4 

4 

33 


216 
12 


308 
12 


194 
14 
1 
2 
1 
3 


184 
16 

2 
2 
18 


343 

31 


Shawinigan 

Sherbrooke 

Three Rivers 

Westmount 


j 


2 
1 

30 


4 
4 


12 

2 
36 




1,820 


1,512 


2,067 


1.116 


977 


901 


1,175 


1,522 


939 


316 


349 


386 


671 








17 
35 

9 
41 
13 
11 
98 
89 
138 
87 
36 

9 
145 

5 
11 
18 

4 

12 
14 

5 

9 
817 

157 
21 
11 


19 
8 
9 

63 

12 

17 

111 

108 

19 

63 

10 

6 

132 

2 

16 

156 

7 

14 

4 

15 

13 

514 

171 

4 
3 
1 


14 
7 

10 
23 
10 
38 

149 
28 
37 
49 

106 
6 

261 

14 

12 
7 

18 

1 

8 

34 

376 

126 

8 

699 

2 


6 
13 

2 
28 

8 

8 
187 

8 

2 
35 

2 

115 

6 

8 

31 

4 

50 
2 
4 

13 
394 

115 
3 
66 


.... 

2 
12 
14 
13 

72 

30 

25 

27 

1 

1 

76 

1 

100 

5 

6 

22 
1 
4 

29 
381 

119 

9 

13 

1 


8 
9 
6 

76 
3 

14 
105 

22 

13 

35 
2 
5 

68 
1 
1 

14 
3 
9 

14 
5 

11 
317 

129 

1 
8 
8 


29 

5 

6 

8 

3 

15 

348 

19 

33 

31 

2 

4 

91 

3 

8 

12 

12 

8 

1 

3 

9 

383 

111 
11 

6 


2 

22 

3 

10 

45 

7 

37 

38 

2 

7 

38 

1 

6 

25 
2 

18 

4 

5 

1 

1,197 

46 
1 
2 


3 
2 
3 


i 






5 




1 
2 

17 
3 

10 
6 
3 
4 

35 

2 

43 
1 

i9 

3 
1 


3 
9 

33 
2 
2 

29 
3 
6 

44 
2 
1 

35 
7 
5 
8 

3 


9 




1 


Fort William 

Gait 


16 


2 

12 

8 

8 

22 


3 

1 
39 

1 

1 
30 

4 


3 


Guelph 


3 




40 




19 




14 




19 


Niagara Falls 


1 
4 




48 

3 
2 
2 

i 

2 
805 

S 
2 
2 


11 

2 
2 

1 

1 

10 
3 

*134 

53 
6 
11 


105 


Owen Sound 

Peterborough 

Port Arthur 

Stratford 


8 
85 

9 
9 


St. Catharines 


9 
1 




2 

5 

153 

34 
5 
3 


3 
1 

168 

16 



3 


3 


Sault Ste. Marie.. 


4 
213 


York and East 

Townships 

Welland 


63 
16 





























6 


1 
3 
11 








1 
1 
11 














Walkerville 


1 
17 


1 
4 


3 
12 


1 

10 














Woodstock 


3 


3 


2 


1 


1 


1 


6 


Manitoba 


199 


1,108 


135 


202 


171 


132 


79 


30 


115 


17 


9 


32 


76 




5 
54 
139 


7 

28 
1,073 


2 

4 
128 


6 

3 

192 


1 

10 

161 


7 

6 

118 


1 

6 

72 


30 


2 

100 
13 








18 


St. Boniface 


1 
16 


1 
8 


"'3i 


1 

57 






Saskatchewan 


179 


486 


155 


207 


163 


137 


90 


39 


73 


257 


8 


17 


25 


Moose Jaw 


61 
18 
100 


52 
26 

409 


24 
22 
108 


112 

7 

88 


15 

19 

129 


6 

18 
113 


5 

9 
76 


12 

26 


1 

1 

71 


"256 
2 


2 

6 


1 
10 

6 


1 
9 




15 








431 


431 


249 


191 


159 


154 


118 


51 


20 


34 


36 


39 


93 






Calgary 


250 

160 

13 

8 


74 

347 

9 

1 


74 

171 

2 

1 


68 

112 

9 

1 


55 

76 

22 

5 


71 

74 

8 

1 


61 

48 

8 

1 


16 
13 

"*2i 


13 

6 

1 


15 
6 
13 


26 
9 
1 


24 
12 
2 


26 


Edmonton 

Lethbridge 


58 
4 
5 














British Columbia.. 


298 


272 


198 


314 


734 


449 


253 


136 


72 


168 


247 


138 


149 




4 

8 

1 

212 

5 

66 


11 

i5 

4 

203 

2 

36 


8 
4 

10 

5 

127 

44 


1 

3 

17 

10 

233 

5 

45 


3 

4 

16 

2 

634 

37 

39 


9 

5 
14 

2 
384 

4 
31 


8 
19 

9 

2 
176 

4 
35 


2 
3 

9 

'"112 
'"io 


1 




9 
1 
6 
2 
196 


10 
1 
5 
3 

98 
2 

20 


6 


Nanaimo 


10 


New Westminster. 

Prince Rupert 

Vancouver 

North Vancouver. 


3 

2 

54 

12 


2 
""i45 


11 

1 

101 

5 


Victoria 


20 


34 


16 






Total 61 cities. . . 


4,371 


5,483 


4,749 


4,410 


3,523 


9 ,450 


3,171 


2,553 


1,569 


1,164 


907 


935 


1,552 



24 



MONTHLY REVIEW OF BUSINESS STATISTICS 
Table 20. Index Numbers of Wholesale Prices: 1926 = 100 



Classification 



Totals 

Component Material- 
Vegetable products 

Animal products 

Textiles 

Wood and paper 

Iron and its products 

Non-ferrous metals 

Non-metallic minerals 

Chemicals 

Purpose — Consumers goods. ... 
Foods, beverages and tobacco 

Producers' goods 

Producers' equipment 

Producers' materials 

Building and construction ma- 
terials 

Manufacturers' materials 

Origin— Raw and partly manu- 
factured 

Fully and chiefly manufact'd 
Field origin — raw 

Manuiactured 

Totals 

Animal origin— Raw 

Manufactured 

Totals 

Canadian farm PRODccrs-Field 

Animal 

Totals 

Marine origin— Raw. 

Manufactured 

Totals 

Forest origin— Raw 

Manufactured 

Totals 

Mineral origin— Raw 

Manufactured 

Totals 

Commodity Groups- 
Fruits 

Grains 

Flour and milled products 

Rubber and its products 

Sugar and its products 

Tobacco 

Fishery products 

Furs 

Hides and skins 

Leather, unmanufactured 

Boots and shoes 

Live stock 

Meats and poultry 

Milk and its products 

Eggs 

Cotton, raw 

Cotton yarn and thread 

Knit goods 

Silk, raw 

Artificial silk and its products. . 

Wool, raw 

Wool yarns 

Newsprint 

Lumber and timber 

Pulp 

Pig iron and steel billets 

Rolling mill products 

Scrap 

Aluminium 

Brass, copper and products 

Lead and its products 

Metallic nickel 

Silver 

Zinc and its products 

Bricks 

Coal 

Coke 

Petroleum and products 

Lime 

Cement 

Asbestos 

Fertilizers 



1932 



April May June July Aug Sept. Oct. Nov. Dec 



68 4 



71-2 
71-4 



67 7 



71 
70-5 



66 6 



82 



63 



71-2 
720 



66 6 



71-2 
72-0 



100 

75 

91 
105 

71-2 

72-4 



71-2 

72-0 



43 
92 
50 

40 

97 

48 

41 
100 

89 
100 

75 

91 
105 

71-2 

72 



64 8 

52-2 
57-5 
68-6 
64-6 
86-0 
58-2 
85-7 
83-6 

71-0 
60-1 
59-9 
86-0 

57-0 

77-1 
52-5 

52-3 

68-7 

37-7 

66-1 

53-0 

56 

60-5 

58-7 

36-6 

56 

44-2 

54-2 

62-4 

60 

67-6 

65 

66-3 

76-3 

84-7 

80 9 



33 

51 

52-5 

73-5 

50-3 

60-2 

49-7 

33-4 

731 



47-7 
48-0 
58-7 
69-5 
40-6 
80-5 
800 
30-2 



31 
67-7 

60-4 
68-2 
66-3 
86-9 
90-2 
44-3 
97-2 
49-1 



42- 
97- 
49- 
43- 

100- 
89- 
94- 
75- 
91- 

105- 



71-2 

72-3 



U (! 



29 



71 

72-3 



1933 



Jan 



71-2 
72-3 



Feb. Mar. April 



63 6 

50 
55 

67 
63 
85 
58 
85 



71-2 
72-3 



MONTHLY REVIEW OF BUSINESS STATISTICS 25 

Table 21. Prices o r Representative Commodities, and Wholesale Prices in Other Countries. 



Description 1 



Wholesale Prices of Important 

Commodities- 
Oats, No. 2 C.W bush 

Wheat, No. 1 Man Northern " 
Flour, First Patont 2-98's 

iute 

Buear, raw 96° Centrifugal 

NY cwt. 

Suear, granulated, Montreal " 
Rubber, ribbed, smoked 

sheets.N.Y lb. 

Bobber, Para, upriver, fine, 

N.Y 

Cattle, steers, good 1,000- 

1,200 lb* cwt. 

Hoes, bacon, Toronto " 

Beef bides, packer hides, 

native steers lb. 

Pole leather, m'r's. green 
hide crons " 

Box sides B mill ft. 

Butter, creamery, finest. 
Montreal . . lb. 

Cheese, Canadian, old large, 
Montreal " 

Fcgs. fresh extras, Montreal doz 

Cotton, raw 1-1 1/16', Ham- 
ilton lb. 

Cotton yarns, 10's white 
single . . " 

Saxonv. 4*50 yds to lb " 

G'neham. dress, 6-50-7-75 
yds to lb u 

Si'k. raw, grand double 
extra, N.Y. " 

Wool, eastern brieht } blood " 

Wool, western range, semi- 
bri^ht.iblood " 

Pulp, eroundwood No. 1 ton 

Pis iron, basic mill " 

8teel merchant bars, mill 100 lb 
Copper, electrolytic domes- 
tic cwt. 

Lead, domestic, Montreal. . " 
Tin ingots, Straits, Toronto lb. 
Bnelter, domestic. Montreal cwt. 
Coal, anthracite, Toronto. . ton 
Coal, bituminous, N.S. run- 

of-mine ** 

Gasoline, Toronto eal. 

Sulphuric a"id.66*Benume. net ton 
Indexes of Wholesale Prices In 
Other Countries— » 
United States- 
Fisher, 200: 1926 

Burenv of Labour. 550- 1926 

Annalist, 72: 1913 

United Kingdom— 
Board of Trade. 150: 1913 . 

Economist. 58: 1927 

France, Statistique General. 45: 

1914 

Germany. Federal Statistical 

Office. 400; 1913 

Belgium, Ministry of Labour, 

130: 1914 

Netherlands, Central Bureau 

Statistics. 48: 1913 

Norway, Official, 95: 1913 

Sweden, Commerce Dept., 160: 

1913 

rtalv.Bachi, 100:1913 

Finland. Official. 139: 1926 

India, Dept. of Statistics, 75: 

1914 

Japan, Bank o' Japan, 5*'. 1913 
Australia, Commonwealth Sta- 
tistician, 92: 1911 

New Zealand, Official. 180: 1913 

Eirvnt, Dept. of Statistics, 

Cairo, 23: 1913-1914 



1932 



Apr. May June July Aug. Sept 



-323 
■620 



•725 
4-370 



•034 
•058 



5-880 
4-540 



•050- 
•C60 



■320 



•231 

•180 
•214 

•082 

•203 
•495 

•923 

-784 
•110 

085- 

•090 

22-429 

18-0C0 

2-250 

7-467 
3-609 
•255 
3-634 
12-342 

6-OCO 

•175 

18-OCO 



62-2 
65-5 
90-7 

102-4 

62-7 

425 

98-4 

539 

80 
120 

109 
311 

89 

92 
116-5 

131-5 

131-6 



5-100 



•653 
4-275 



5-840 
4-510 



33- 
•043 



•310 
•200 



■197 



■076 



■923 



•100 

•081- 

•085 

22-160 

18-000 

2-250 

6-968 
3-320 
•280 
3-564 
12 510 

6-000 

•185 

16 COO 



61-0 
64-4 
88-8 

100-7 
60-5 

421 

97 2 

526 

79 
120 

109 
305 



113-6 



129-4 
131-3 



•338 
•551 



4-275 
•031 



6- 160 
4-580 



•030- 
•040 



■191 



•072 



■923 



1-678 
•090 



21-690 

18-000 
2-250 

6-791 
3 145 

•270 
3-480 
12-510 

6-000 

•185 

16-000 



59 6 
63-9 
88-6 



58-8 
408 

96-2 
514 



120 

108 
297 
87 

86 
110-6 

127-8 
130-8 

81 



1-304 
4-370 



-033 

•064 



6-140 
5-030 



•038- 
•048 



106 



•245 

•079 

•100 
•495 

•923 

1-638 
•090 

•085 

21-145 
18-0"0 
2-250 

6-851 
3-083 
•285 
3-355 
12-510 

6-001 

•180 

16-001 



60-4 
64-5 
92-1 

97-7 
60-1 

404 

95-9 

512 



122 

108 

296 

89 

87 
111-6 

128 4 
130-8 

78 



1-323 
4-370 

•042 

•068 

6-050 
5-210 

•055- 
•065 

•280 
•180 

•212 

•160 
•281 

•096 

•210 
•495 

•923 

2-059 
•095 

•100 

20-968 
18-000 
2-250 

7-030 
3-217 
•300 
3-561 
12-757 

6-000 

•180 

16-000 



61-8 
65-2 

94-2 

99-5 



394 
95-4 
524 



91 
117-7 



130-1 
130-8 



77 



4-600 



1-197 
4-370 



•043 



5-360 
5-110 

•075- 
•085 

•280 
•190 

•245 

•1P0 
•330 

•092 

•225 
•506 

•923 

2-107 
•095 

•105 

20-472 
18-000 
2-250 

7-616 
3-482 
•318 
3-802 
12-981 

6-000 

•180 

16-000 



62-7 
65-3 
95-2 

102-1 
64-0 

397 

95-1 

533 

76 
123 

110 

300 

90 

91 
126-5 

132-4 
131-1 

78 



Oct. 



•235 

•482 



4-500 



1-277 
4-370 



4-700 
4-500 



•070- 



•280 
•190 

•240 

•180 
•394 

•082 

•225 
•484 

•923 

2-024 
•095 

•105 

19-573 
18-000 
2-250 

7-310 
3-264 
•315 
3-667 
13-328 

5-250 

•180 

16-000 



611 
64-4 
91-0 

101-1 
62-0 

392 

94-3 



77 
123 



110 

298 



127- 



129-0 
130-4 



Nov. 



•240 
•467 



•500 



1-254 
4-370 

•040 

•085 

4-220 
3-920 

•055- 
•065 

•270 
•190 

•235 

•180 
•490 

•086 

•225 

•484 

•959 

2-006 
•095 

•105 

19-795 
18-000 
2-250 

7-305 
3-373 
•315 
3-834 
13-328 

5-250 

•180 

16-000 



60-3 
63-9 
88-4 

101-1 
62-3 

391 

93-9 

525 

77 
124 

109 

298 
91 

90 
134-4 

127-0 
128-6 

79 



Dec. 
S 



4-400 



•943 
4-180 



1933 



Jan. 



4-100 
3-970 



•043- 
•053 



■23' 



•210 
•484 

•95k 

1-967 
•09( 

•10? 

19-763 
18-000 
2-250 

7-021 
3-386 
•305 
3-971 
13-328 

5-250 

•180 

16-000 



58-5 
62-6 
85-7 

101-1 
61-1 

390 

92-4 

522 

76 
123 

108 

296 

90 

88 
139-5 

125-6 
127-3 

76 



4-500 



•795 
4-180 



•036 
•070 



4110 
3-760 



•055- 
•065 



•235 



•180 
•318 



•210 
•484 

•959 

1-623 
•090 

•105 

19-190 
18-000 
2-250 

6-905 
3-262 
•300 
3-924 
13-328 

5-250 

•180 

16-000 



56-4 
61-0 
82-4 

100-3 
61-2 

390 

91-0 

521 

75 
122 

106 



87 
135-J 



123-5 
126-6 



73 



Feb. 



•458 
4-500 

•835 

4 -085 

•035 

•072 

4-000 
3-810 

•045- 
•055 

•250 
•180 

•239 

•180 
•250 

•C83 

•210 
•484 

•959 

1-538 
•090 

•105 

19-450 
18-000 
2-250 

7-050 
3-400 
•320 
3-983 
13-339 

5-250 

•165 

16 000 



55-3 
59-8 
80-5 

98-9 
60-1 

390 

91-2 

512 

74 
121 

106 
296 
89 



135- 



131-5 

72 



Mar. 
$ 



•245 
•491 



4-600 



1-193 
4-085 



•036 
•072 



4-360 
5-110 



•050- 



•250 
•180 

•271 

•180 
•235 

•094 

•210 

•484 

•959 

1-598 
•090 

•103 

18-930 
18-000 
2-250 

7-180 
3-459 
•335 
4-152 
13-339 

5-250 

•165 

16-000 



561 
60-2 
82-0 

97-6 
59-8 

385 

91-1 

504 

72 
121 

105 

293 

89 



134-1 



April 

$ 

•247 
•536 

4-700 

1-255 

6-180 

•042 

•072 

4-800 
5-550 

•055 
•065 

•260 
•180 

•273 

•180 
•205 

•094 

•210 
•450 

•959 

1-685 
•090 

•105 

18-615 
18-000 
2-250 

7-618 
3-416 
•343 
4-139 
11-949 

5-250 

•165 

16-000 



57-2 



*For full description see the report on Prices and Price Indexes published by the Dominion Bureau of Statistics 
Application for this publication should be made to the Dominion Statistician. 

'The description inoludes the authority, the number of commodities and the base year. 



26 MONTHLY REVIEW OF BUSINESS STATISTICS 

Table 22. Total Value of Imports and Exports, by Groups, in Thousands of Dollars 



Month 



1930 

October 

November. . 

December. . 

1931 

January 

February. . . 

Maroh 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September. . 

October 

November.. 
December. . 

1933 

January 

February. . . 

March 

April 

May......... 

June 

July 

August 

September.. 

October 

November.. 
December. . 

1933 

January 

February 

Mar<"h 

April 



Imports of Merchandise for Consumption in Canada 



Total 
Imports 



$000 

78,358 
76,325 



50.414 
50,694 
75.348 
51,189 
73,457 
52.508 
48,379 
47,308 
45,379 
45,933 
46,911 
40,290 

34,115 
35,586 
57,437 
29,794 
44,361 
40,743 
35,711 
36,527 
34,504 
37,095 
37,769 
28,961 

24,441 
23,514 
32,851 
20,457 I 



Vege- 
table 
Products 



$000 

15,231 
15,146 
13,535 

9.181 
9,014 
15,739 
11,367 
17,839 
9,966 
10,411 
9,371 
8,870 
9.927 
12,074 
10,676 

6,094 
7,538 
14,489 
5.283 
9,416 
8,702 
7,462 
7,098 
6.814 
8,225 



5,148 
4,919 
8,685 
3,944 



Animal 
Pro- 
ducts 



S000 

3,867 
3,324 
2,451 

2.665 
2,540 
4,187 
2,240 
3,344 
2,362 
2,287 
2,206 
2,150 
1,796 
1,544 
1,309 

1,482 
1,640 
2.204 
1 096 
1.756 
1,611 
1,330 
1,251 
1,265 
1.425 
1,427 
977 

942 

980 

1,379 

842 



Textiles 



$000 

10,756 
12,738 
9,036 

8,025 
8,711 
11,825 
6,987 
8.717 
7.251 
7,152 
7,372 
6.530 
6.344 
5.985 
5,254 

6,285 
6.602 
9,401 
4.601 
6,074. 
5.310 
4.552 
5.587 
4,935 
5.428 
5,450 
4,725 

4,739 
4,390 
5,424 
3,311 



Wood 
and 
Paper 



$000 

4,198 
3,693 
3.059 

2.808 
2,815 
3,951 
2,798 
3,530 
3.146 
2,790 
2,743 
2,696 
2,862 
2.505 
2,279 

1,968 
2,032 
2,660 
1.553 
2,078 
1.922 
1,778 
1,745 
1,754 
1,907 
1,859 
1.566 

1,304 

1,409 
1,614 
1,084 



Iron and 
its Pro- 
ducts 



$000 

13,563 
12,839 
10,837 

10,051 
11,353 
17,282 
11,925 
14,807 
9,989 
8,108 
7,377 
6,883 
6,285 
6,479 
5,881 

5,085 
6,009 
9,983 
5.820 
7,169 
6,710 
5,130 
4,394 
4.233 
4,288 
5,262 
3,624 

3,655 
3,643 
5,408 
3,647 



Non- 
Ferrous 
Metals 



$000 

5,452 
5,914 
4,394 

3.202 
3,363 
4.620 
3,018 
3,953 
3,157 
2.984 
2,958 
2,958 
3,055 
2,849 
2,335 

2,256 
2,091 
2.688 
1.688 
2,085 
1,733 
1,513 
1,402 
1,496 
1.655 
1,908 
1,129 

914 

971 

1,192 

912 



Non- 
Metallic 
Minerals 


Chemic- 


als and 

Allied 

Products 


$000 


$000 


15,871 


3,151 


13,304 


3,384 


10,127 


2,549 


8,246 


1,935 


7,834 


2,094 


9,691 


3,372 


6,969 


2,375 


12,152 


3,898 


9.838 


2,530 


8,382 


2,290 


8,139 


2,666 


8,614 


2,537 


9,432 


2,422 


9,626 


2,721 


7,209 


2,497 


6,656 


1,950 


5,438 


1,874 


9.691 


2.971 


5.567 


1.998 


9,476 


2,942 


9,229 


2,556 


9,367 


2,081 


9,143 


2,217 


8.501 


2.336 


8,626 


2,770 


8,138 


2,577 


5.509 


1.588 


4,504 


1,292 


4,405 


1,196 


5,193 


1,901 


4,022 


1,229 



Miscel- 
laneous 
Com- 
modities 



$000 



6,269 
5,374 
4.349 

4,300 
3,271 
4,681 
3,512 
6,217 
4,270 
3,975 
4,477 
4,142 
3,809 
3,127 
2,851 

2,338 

2,362 
3,351 
2,188 
3,366 
2,989 
2,499 
3,691 
3.169 
2.771 
2,509 
2,012 

1,943 
1,601 
2,054 
1,464 





Exports of Merchandise from Canada 




Total 
Exports 

of 
Mdse. 


Domestic Produce 


Month 


Total 
Exports 
of Can- 
adian 
Produce 


Vege- 
table 
Pro- 
ducts 


Animal 
Pro- 
ducts 


Tex- 
tiles 


Wood 
and 
Paper 


Iron 
and 
its 
Pro- 
ducts 


Non- 
Ferrous 
Metals 


Non- 
Metallic 
Miner- 
als 


Chemi- 
cal and 
Allied 
Pro- 
ducts 


Miscel- 
laneous 
Com- 
modi- 
ties 


1930 

October 

November 

December.. 

1931 


$000 

84,298 
74,592 
68.053 

45.634 
44,914 
56.206 
34,674 
60,84.5 
56,320 
50.671 
40,804 
49,909 
56,534 
58.430 
54,21? 

30,063 
37,010 
41,019 
27 455 
41,402 
41,701 
43,032 
41.855 
42.665 
57,160 
46.621 
43,109 

32.000 

26,814 
37,161 
20,312 


$000 

82.781 
73.060 
66,820 

44,683 
43,873 
55.048 
33,935 
59,833 
54.348 
49,675 
48,764 
48.901 
55,538 
57,4^7 
53.255 

38,367 
36,431 
39,749 
26 976 
40,594 
40,945 
42,321 
41,314 
42,187 
56,626 
45,945 
42,616 

31.562 
26,398 
36.579 
20,012 


$000 

37,358 
34,542 
24,647 

11,638 
13,541 
15.982 
7,625 
26,502 
21.394 
14,496 
14,611 
13,058 
19,337 
27.825 
22.945 

11,070 
12,363 
12,291 
8 722 
16,920 
15,042 
17,3"2 
15,664 
20,382 
30.638 
21.978 
21 676 

12,042 
9,571 
13,434 

4,666 


$000 

8,320 
7,765 
6,322 

6,211 
5.059 

5.783 
3,851 
3.778 
5,194 
7,008 
6,604 
7,842 
8,336 
5,820 
5,453 

5,693 
4,989 
4,231 
2.434 
3,412 
4,232 
6,212 
6,252 
4.645 
4.888 
3.773 
4,797 

5,191 
4,075 
4,392 

2.479 


$000 

501 
369 
343 

240 
233 
383 
258 
757 
670 
642 
590 
357 
419 
517 
328 

234 

304 
436 
218 
462 
781 
506 
384 
422 
471 
328 
269 

230 
339 
321 
146 


$000 

20,964 
17.584 
19.724 

14,281 
14.274 
19.120 
13,409 
16,424 
17.105 
15,365 
15,851 
15,102 
15,705 
14.?13 
13,956 

12,910 
11,165 
13,835 

9,675 
11,210 
12.678 
10,333 
11,521 

9,392 
11,399 
10.685 

9,167 

8,234 

7,284 
9,309 
7,139 


$000 

3.372 
2,483 
3.322 

2,459 
1.786 
2,297 
1.608 
1,947 
1.674 
1.559 
1,253 
1,422 
1,297 
877 
907 

867 
879 
1,173 
958 
1,253 
1,203 
2,016 
1,611 
1,505 
2.230 
1,557 
1,065 

1,021 

842 

2,007 

1,033 


$000 

7.737 

5,882 
8.458 

6,996 
5,615 
7.215 
4,192 
6,251 
4.726 
6.922 
6.546 
7,29« 
6,976 
4.250 
6. 846 

5,446 
4.631 
4.980 
2.687 
4.004 
3,970 
3.450 
3.422 
3,286 
3,890 
4,770 
3 585 

2,634 
2,651 
4,284 
2,926 


$000 

1,840 
1.823 
1,804 

1,118 
1.212 
1.449 
855 
1.456 
1,281 
1,319 
1,292 
1.084 
1,360 
1.320 
1,220 

807 
629 
823 
464 
778 
P40 
730 
785 
788 
1,064 
1,074 
768 

698 
437 
682 
409 


$000 

1,072 

1,096 

845 

664 
889 

1.400 
097 

1,175 
958 
859 
800 
673 
872 
805 
666 

736 
836 

1,067 
971 

1,472 

1,184 
711 
749 
816 
915 

1,078 
761 

1,014 
701 
987 
792 


$000 

1,616 
1.617 
1,355 

1,076 


February 

M;irch 


1,265 
1.418 


April 


1,140 


May 


1,543 
1.347 


July 


1,506 




1,217 


September 

October 


1,164 
1,236 


November 

December 


1,150 
934 


1932 

January 


586 


February 


635 


March 


911 


April 


847 


May ... 

June 


1,054 
917 


July 


1,043 


August 


925 


September 


951 


October 


1.122 




701 


December 


528 


1933 

January 


499 


February 

March 

April 


494 
1,162 

422 



MONTHLY REVIEW OF BUSINESS STATISTICS 



27 



Table 23. 



Canada's Domestic Exports in Thousands of Dollars, and Indexes of the Cost 

of Living 



Classification 



1932 



April May June July Aug. Sept. Oct. Nov. Dec 



1933 



Jan. Feb. Mar. April 



Experts of Canadian Produce— 
Agricultural and Vegetable 
Products — 

Alcoholic beverages (chiefly 
whiskey) 

Fruits 

Grains (Total) 

Barley 

Wheat 

Rubber (chiefly tires and 
footwear) 

Sugar 

Vegetables 

Wheat flour 

Animals and Animal Pro- 
ducts— 

Cattle 

Cheese 

Fish 

Furs, (chiefly raw) 

Hides, raw , 

Leather, unmanufactured. 

Meats 

Fibres, Textiles and Pro- 
ducts — 

Binder twine 

Cotton 

Rags 

Raw wool 

Wood, Wood Products and 
Paper— 

Paper (chiefly newsprint) 

Planks and boards 

Pulp-wood 

Shingles 

Timber, square 

Wood-pulp 

Iron and Its Products— 

Automobiles 

Automobile parts 

Farm implements 

Hardware and cutlery 

Machinery 

Pigs and ingots 

Tubes and pipes 

Non-Ferrous Metal Pro- 
ducts— 

Aluminium 

Copner, (chiefly ore and 
blister) 

Gol d , raw 

Lead 

Nickel 

Silver 

Non- Metallic Mineral Pro- 
ducts— 

Asbestos, (chiefly raw).... 

Coal 

Petroleum and products. . . 

Stone and products 

Chemicals and Allied Pro- 
ducts — 

Acids 

Fertilizers 

Soda and compounds 

Miscellaneous Commodities— 

Electrical energy 

Film* 

Settlers' effects 



Indexes of Retail Prices, Rents 
and Costs of Services- 
Total, 1926 = 100 

Food 

Fuel 

Rent 

Clothing 

Sundries , 



Cost per Week of a Family 
Budget- 
All foods $ 

Fuel and light % 

Rent % 

Totals % 



616 

77 

5,534 

267 
4,537 

414 
45 
171 



146 
52 
649 
713 
36 
163 
357 



6,938 
825 
118 
152 
105 

1,258 

178 
41 

170 
86 

262 
49 
73 



106 

856 
149 
195 
542 

290 



170 



83-7 
65-4 
92 8 
99-3 
74-5 
97-0 



1,195 

120 

11,852 

775 

9,627 

528 

323 

182 

1,648 



167 
1,174 

404 

35 

195 

694 



148 



7,507 

1,175 

231 

206 

121 



195 
69 

120 
83 

491 
55 



227 

1,339 
255 

256 
725 
406 



290 
102 
167 
109 



144 
643 
241 

143 

409 
300 



81-8 
62-9 
91-0 
93-9 
74-5 
971 



444 

58 

11,159 

470 

9,655 

539 

74 

80 

1,963 



348 
473 
,911 
352 
16 
165 
571 



438 

107 

7 

16 



7,668 

2,170 

478 

245 

123 

1,295 

315 
34 

174 
98 

330 

101 
47 



169 



HI 

13,464 

781 

11,210 

655 

139 

119 

1,443 



411 
1,591 

1,823 

758 

18 

152 

742 



6,515 
773 
718 
166 
214 

1,340 

653 
736 
143 
68 
464 



58 



7-22 


6-90 


3-07 


3-04 


6-77 


6-47 


17-09 


16-45 



1,831 


1,017 


302 


385 


181 


270 


521 


550 


376 


420 


232 


197 


75 


148 


299 


93 


221 


178 


98 


58 


426 


115 


277 


191 


132 


167 


338 


308 


272 


344 


81-0 


80-8 


62-1 


61-4 


90-9 


90-7 


93 9 


93-9 


71-9 


71-9 


97-1 


96-8 


6-79 


6-78 


3-02 


3-06 


6-35 


6-34 


16-20 


16-21 



384 

72 

12,212 

678 
10,642 

684 

110 

280 

1,094 



332 
1,659 
1,807 

879 
21 

194 

739 



7,546 
971 
580 
224 
113 

1,487 

627 
125 
132 
65 
403 
61 
39 



89 1,025 



478 
441 

276 
252 
427 



87 
219 
184 

149 
265 
300 



81-5 
63-5 
91-9 
93-9 
71-9 



7-01 
3-04 
6-33 
16-42 



571 
16,176 

392 
4, 

590 

75 

293 

1,290 



90 
,468 
,270 
507 
28 
167 
456 



5,633 
628 
739 
249 
30 

1,373 



136 
76 
50 

270 
41 
40 



158 

716 
447 
284 
377 
504 



170 
182 
179 

172 
179 
434 



810 
63-0 
91-7 
93-9 

70-7 



6-98 
3-01 
6-32 
16-34 



1,572 
2,095 

22,636 
277 
21,471 

692 

98 

403 



74 

1,589 

1,423 

424 

32 

244 

487 



1,581 
1,565 

15,024 
314 

13,959 

647 

66 

268 

1,799 



74 
:,185 



7,037 

980 

558 

334 

76 

1,791 



101 
50 

228 
327 



6,858 
837 
363 
239 
93 

1,814 



979 


634 


536 


273 


76 


72 


114 


72 


230 


197 


61 


102 


63 


44 


107 


1,186 


1.065 


1,532 


449 


285 


459 


244 


600 


754 


525 


327 


373 


298 


84 


162 


172 


36 


200 


360 


255 


169 


155 


224 


204 


299 


185 


133 


386 


169 


348 


263 


80-4 


80-4 


63-6 


63-9 


90-7 


90-4 


90-0 


90-0 


70-7 


70-7 


96-6 


96-6 


70-7 


7-09 


2-98 


2-93 


6-30 


6-04 


16-40 


16-10 



1, 

15,074 

91 

14,505 

478 

52 

247 

1,535 



41 

432 

1,550 

1,592 

67 

78 

605 



5,952 

1,592 

171 

137 

113 

1,365 

405 
71 
77 
61 

216 



537 

9.668 
444 
256 
473 
261 



210 
196 
150 

91 
109 

189 



80-4 
64-0 
89-6 
90-0 
70-7 
96-6 



7-04 
2-94 
5-99 
1601 



397 
925 

7,109 
62 

6,912 

419 

69 

236 

1,162 



69 

47 

1,391 

2,210 

81 

274 

632 



5,423 

583 

90 

156 

82 

1,457 

238 
130 
74 
71 
216 
102 
46 



79-7 
62-8 
89-3 
90-0 
69-2 
96-4 



6-94 
2-93 
5-98 
15-89 



669 
754 

5.577 
72 

5,241 

514 

28 

143 

1,009 



235 

39 

1,083 

1.670 



4,472 

553 

85 

126 

99 

1,411 

171 
76 
69 
48 

268 
72 



55 

578 
225 
274 
747 
263 



79-0 
60-6 

89-3 
90-0 
69-2 
96-2 



6-70 
2-91 
5-97 
15-61 



366 

940 

7,879 

113 

7,540 



258 

57 

1,315 

1,147 



5,640 
920 
155 
165 
100 

1,813 



137 



223 

422 

1,126 

459 



78-4 
60-4 
88-9 
90-0 
66-5 
96 



6-67 
2-92 
5-97 
15-59 



159 
258 

2,374 
10 

2,315 

362 
53 
99 

717 



167 

34 

479 



43 
219 

462 



4,698 

537 

90 

97 

46 

1.282 

512 
39 
80 
32 
160 
100 
38 



672 
81 
345 
723 
185 



176 



346 
220 

108 
129 
125 



78-6 
61-3 
88-8 
90-0 
66-5 
96-0 



6-83 
2-90 
5-97 
15-74 



23 MONTHLY REVIEW OF BUSINESS STATISTICS 

Table 24. Summary of Canada's Imports, in Thousands of Dollars 



Classification 










1932 










1933 


April 


May 


June 


July 


Aug. 


Sep 


Oct.' 


Nov. 


Dec. 


Jan. 


Feb. 


Mar. 


"April 


Imports of Principal Commodi- 
ties - 

Agricultural and Vegetable 
Products— 


521 
53 
195 
1,071 
147 
163 
30) 
173 
613 
199 
687 

70 
253 
109 
167 
158 

224 
493 
166 
856 
392 
57 
113 
405 
196 
75 
83 
139 
163 
304 
298 

555 
473 

204 
157 
24 
134 

147 
971 
131 

622 
92 

108 

1.758 

17 

690 

292 
96 
60 
77 
89 

283 
179 
63 
75 
561 
89 
80 

344 
2,035 
170 
402 
1.142 
5.54 
141 

217 
246 
144 
49 
58 
134 


831 

191 
463 

1,908 

97 

261 

315 

301 

2,017 
143 

1,057 

83 

323 
248 
198 
292 

211 
918 
222 
1,032 
573 

93 
175 
381 
219 

67 
203 
194 
221 
340 
392 

744 
707 

300 

210 

31 

67 

163 

1.112 

126 

697 

202 

195 

1,689 

61 

1,275 

403 

144 

91 

117 

69 

236 
236 
102 
106 
831 
105 
63 

578 
2.663 
157 
492 
3,436 
876 
254 

295 
311 
344 
72 
58 
246 


1,328 

95 

316 

2,216 
104 
210 
402 
121 

1,233 
170 
955 

90 
369 

83 
150 
288 

240 
234 
190 
1,108 
587 

64 
102 
314 
244 

54 
131 
146 
144 
340 
472 

786 
576 

309 

173 

19 

38 

74 

1,270 

156 

646 

152 

175 

1,544 

40 

1,216 

346 

134 

80 

99 

92 

176 

187 
114 

70 

626 

96 

83 

566 

2,249 

163 

488 
3,519 
1,022 

198 

2«2 

266 

132 

86 

71 

249 


890 

95 

315 

1,903 

103 

133 

288 

18 

1,816 
228 
330 

130 
223 

68 
177 

59 

193 
287 
178 
781 
451 

54 
320 
252 
133 

25 

70 
154 
194 

53 
600 

861 
481 

247 
113 
25 
25 

68 
778 
108 
468 
176 
159 
1,127 

31 
923 
272 
132 

67 
104 

76 

187 
185 
72 
49 
529 
89 
60 

481 
2,612 
213 
322 
3.557 
901 
185 

234 

335 

7 

49 

53 

178 


1,122 

60 

206 

1,746 

77 

108 

219 

19 

2,042 

261 

95 

98 
211 

95 
220 
109 

198 
472 
201 
812 
510 
122 
140 
460 
193 
90 
96 
174 
171 
284 
433 

828 
496 

247 
101 
26 
47 

63 

553 

102 

369 

286 

125 

949 

14 

784 

227 

107 

62 

58 

38 

144 
170 
70 
35 
493 
118 
31 

479 
2.744 
216 
273 
3,304 
953 
148 

157 
331 
240 
54 
166 
179 


1,053 

113 

175 

1,505 

97 

111 

435 

21 

1,562 

287 

81 

126 
246 
96 
197 
147 

199 
441 
232 
747 
425 
101 
159 
584 
225 
98 
83 
230 
143 
229 
441 

874 
517 

213 
93 
23 
10 

60 

632 

103 

306 

220 

129 

909 

11 

740 

247 

96 

45 

85 

43 

284 

140 
73 
49 

49H 
68 
78 

393 
2,6^0 

176 

303 
2,674 
1,064 

191 

155 
292 
285 
51 
190 
254 


1,358 
135 
276 

1,651 

107 

274 

231 

28 

1,872 

502 

91 

174 

201 
233 
190 
117 

200 
656 
336 
75? 
589 

50 
227 
548 
211 

92 
116 
255 
222 
154 
387 

907 
567 

215 
140 
39 
33 

38 

469 

157 

248 

96 

132 

1,086 

8 

784 

311 

90 

51 

82 

42 

287 
151 
93 
39 
572 
92 
76 

404 
3,134 
316 
312 
2.657 
738 
137 

244 
337 
229 
61 
117 
234 


1,537 
136 
352 

1,338 
110 
521 
266 
43 

1,479 
377 
200 

147 

180 

240 

156 

91 

165 

1,181 

140 

728 

603 

25 

221 

471 

97 

76 

157 

346 

221 

138 

347 

871 
536 

232 
147 
17 
43 

33 

557 

150 

342 

71 

197 

1,031 

23 

1,603 

294 

102 

48 

69 

74 

552 
157 

98 

47 
508 
129 

77 

445 
2,903 
214 
467 
2,122 
845 
245 

215 
369 
349 
64 
56 
278 


2,305 
147 
389 

1,567 
61 
183 
185 
109 
897 
339 
211 

116 
176 
118 
135 

77 

168 

1,122 

149 

552 

491 

13 

242 

327 

70 

57 

191 

296 

185 

138 

282 

744 
421 

201 
116 

11 
73 

14 

658 

80 

268 

135 

141 

1.086 

6 

417 

144 

82 

49 

47 

29 

123 
119 
98 
33 
399 
72 
40 

331 

2,318 
252 
216 

1,190 
457 
112 

171 

276 
161 
36 
25 
16C 


894 
85 
454 
786 
109 
160 
201 
95 
384 
366 
261 

71 
273 
123 
102 

49 

182 
706 
186 
725 
422 
32 
162 
415 
89 
60 
138 
374 
199 
188 
378 

618 
401 

173 

64 

9 

39 

104 

868 

97 

328 

100 

134 

983 

21 

232 

167 

59 

42 

37 

29 

98 
94 
42 
22 
350 
54 
49 

291 
1,836 
315 
262 
1,045 
164 
102 

175 

250 

14 

25 

16 

194 


798 
95 

296 
669 
88 
116 
216 
113 
397 
759 
231 

61 
281 
116 
127 

94 

216 

498 

143 

784 

396 

84 

87 

285 

84 

62 

105 

262 

146 

247 

450 

605 
493 

174 
64 
15 
34 

59 

747 

65 

365 

144 

136 

945 

55 

268 

153 

41 

53 

40 

41 

111 
89 
47 
32 

302 
32 
103 

285 
1,999 

197 

248 
1,084 

119 
91 

163 
233 
6 
24 
20 
125 


3,505 

103 

650 

998 

96 

215 

352 

135 

2,173 

1,090 

499 

101 

431 
80 
133 
169 

252 
508 
199 
1,007 
406 

86 
179 
342 
117 

97 
179 
287 
184 
272 
532 

776 
511 

184 
73 
11 
56 

91 

1,407 

110 

637 

531 

161 

901 

12 

423 

208 

80 

63 

77 

74 

140 
128 
46 
28 
381 
67 
83 

475 
1,898 

341 

284 
1,147 

291 
98 

266 
265 
33 
40 
41 
158 


750 




62 




248 


Fruits 


845 




90 


Nuts (edible) 


105 




168 




75 


Sugar, chiefly for refining 

Tea 


262 
117 




424 


Animal Products— 
Fish 


48 




161 


Hides 


64 


Leather, unmanufactured 


99 
121 


Textile Products— 


131 




354 




96 


other 


653 
323 




62 




82 


Silk— Raw 


234 




90 




48 




118 




138 




108 




123 




272 


Wood and Paper— 


531 
316 


Wood— Furniture and other 
manufactured wood 


112 
65 




5 


Other unmanufactured wood. 
Iron and Steel — 


33 
133 




884 




59 




351 




146 


Hardware and cutlery 


114 
584 




13 




640 


Other rolling mill products 

Stamped and coated products.. 
Tools 


154 
65 
53 


Tubes and pipes 

Wire 


45 
44 


Non-Ferrous Metals — 


67 




77 




37 




27 


Electric apparatus 


306 


Precious metals 


61 


Tin 


45 


Non-Metallic Products — 


293 


Coal 


1,475 


Coke 


112 




236 




1,095 




266 


Stone and products 


79 


Chemicals — 


149 


Dyeing and tanning materials... 


212 
45 




27 




57 




128 







MONTHLY REVIEW OF BUSINESS STATISTICS 29 

Table 25. Banking and Currency, in Million Dollars Unless Otherwise Stated 



Classification 



1932 



Mar. I Apr. I May I June | July I Aug. I Sept. I Oct. I Nov.! Dec. 



1933 



Jan. I Feb. I Mar 



1 Feb - 1 



Banking— 

Readily Available Assets— 

Specie 

Dominion notes 

Tn Central cold reserves 

In United Kingdom banks. 

In foreign banks 

Foreign currency 

Government securities 

Call loans abroad 

Total quick assets... 
Loans and Securities except 
Canadian Governments- 

Public securities 

Railway securities 

Canadian call loans 

Current loans 

Current loans abroad 

Provincial loans 

Municipal loans 

Total loans, etc 

Other Assets— 

Non-current loans 

Real estate 

Morteaees 

Premises 

Letters of credit 

Loans to companies 

Other assets 

Note circulation deposits. . . 
Inter-hank